• Blenheim Palace  Italian Garden with topiary maize - England
  • Blenheim Palace  Italian Garden with topiary maize - England
  • Blenheim Palace  Italian Garden with topiary maize - England
  • Blenheim Palace  Italian Garden with topiary maize - England
  • Blenheim Palace  Italian Garden with topiary maize - England
  • Blenheim Palace  Italian Garden with topiary maize - England
  • Blenheim Palace  Italian Garden with topiary maize - England
  • Blenheim Palace  Italian Garden with topiary maize - England
  • Blenheim Palace  Italian Garden with topiary maize - England
  • Blenheim Palace  Italian Garden with topiary maize - England
  • Blenheim Palace  Italian Garden with topiary maize - England
  • Blenheim Palace  Italian Garden and Fountain - England
  • Blenheim Palace  Italian Garden and Fountain - England
  • Blenheim Palace  Italian Garden and Fountain - England
  • Blenheim Palace  Italian Garden and Fountain - England
  • Blenheim Palace  Italian Garden and Fountain - England
  • Blenheim Palace  Italian Garden and Fountain - England
  • Blenheim Palace  Italian Garden and Fountain - England
  • Blenheim Palace  Italian Garden and Fountain - England
  • Blenheim Palace  Italian Garden and Fountain - England
  • Blenheim Palace - Italian Garden fountain
  • Blenheim Palace - Italian Garden fountain
  • Blenheim Palace - Italian Garden fountain
  • Blenheim Palace - Italian Garden fountain
  • Blenheim Palace - Italian Garden fountain
  • Blenheim Palace - Italian Garden fountain
  • Blenheim Palace - Italian Garden  and Palace
  • Blenheim Palace - Italian Garden  and Palace
  • Blenheim Palace - Italian Garden  and Palace
  • Blenheim Palace - Italian Garden  and Palace
  • Blenheim Palace - Italian Garden  and Palace
  • Blenheim Palace - Italian Garden fountain
  • Blenheim Palace - Italian Garden fountain
  • Blenheim Palace - Italian Garden fountain
  • Blenheim Palace - Italian Garden fountain
  • Blenheim Palace - Italian Garden fountain
  • Zsolnay architectural features on the old Zoltan Csukas furniture shop Pecs ( Pécs ) - European Cultural City of The Year 2010 , Hungary
  • Zsolnay architectural features on the old Zoltan Csukas furniture shop Pecs ( Pécs ) - European Cultural City of The Year 2010 , Hungary
  • Zsolnay architectural features on Pecs ( Pécs ) - European Cultural City of The Year 2010 , Hungary
  • Zsolnay architectural features on Pecs ( Pécs ) - European Cultural City of The Year 2010 , Hungary
  • Zsolnay architectural features on Pecs ( Pécs ) - European Cultural City of The Year 2010 , Hungary
  • Zsolnay architectural features on the old Zoltan Csukas furniture shop Pecs ( Pécs ) - European Cultural City of The Year 2010 , Hungary
  • Zsolnay architectural features on the old Zoltan Csukas furniture shop Pecs ( Pécs ) - European Cultural City of The Year 2010 , Hungary
  • Zsolnay architectural features on Pecs ( Pécs ) - European Cultural City of The Year 2010 , Hungary
  • Zsolnay architectural features on Pecs ( Pécs ) - European Cultural City of The Year 2010 , Hungary
  • Zsolnay architectural features on Pecs ( Pécs ) - European Cultural City of The Year 2010 , Hungary
  • Zsolnay architectural features on Pecs ( Pécs ) - European Cultural City of The Year 2010 , Hungary
  • Zsolnay architectural features on Pecs ( Pécs ) - European Cultural City of The Year 2010 , Hungary
  • The fountain of Aphrodite of Ephesus, Villa d'Este gardens, Tivoli
  • The fountain of Aphrodite of Ephesus, Villa d'Este gardens, Tivoli
  • waterfall of The oval fountain, 1567, Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • waterfall of The oval fountain, 1567, Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • Room of The Nobility (Stanza della Nobilta). The Renaissance paintings by Federico Zuccari can be dated to 1566-67. Decorated with Trompe-l'?il Ionian Pillars & busts the figures in the panels depict "Virtue" and "Thee Liberal Arts". Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • Room of Noah ( Sala di Noe ). The room was decorated with frescoes by Durante Alberti between 1570 and 1571 from drawings by Girolamo Muziano. The scenes depict Noah and the floods.  Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • First Tribune Room ( Prima stanza tribune). The room was probably decorated by Cesare Nebbia in 1569, and the depictions depict the first legendary accounts of Tivoli. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • Salon of the Fountain( Sala della Fontana ), the banquet hall of Cardinal Ipollito d"Este. The trompe-l'?il frescoes were carried out by 6 assistants of Girolamo Muziano (1532-1592) were inspired by the "Solomonic" winding columns of the Vatican Basilica to create a loggia decorated by festoons of fruit, flowers & vegetables with a landscape beyond. The rustic fountain at the end of the salon was built by fountain maker Curzio Maccarone and was completed in 1568. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • View of the Renaissance gardens of Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • View of the water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • Room of The Nobility (Stanza della Nobilta). The Renaissance paintings by Federico Zuccari can be dated to 1566-67. Decorated with Trompe-l'?il Ionian Pillars & busts the figures in the panels depict "Virtue" and "Thee Liberal Arts". Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Room of The Nobility (Stanza della Nobilta). The Renaissance paintings by Federico Zuccari can be dated to 1566-67. Decorated with Trompe-l'?il Ionian Pillars & busts the figures in the panels depict "Virtue" and "Thee Liberal Arts". Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Room of Hercules ( Sala di Ercole ) Celebrating the deeds of Hercules, the hero of Tivoli, the renaissance frecoes were carried out by 6 assistants of Girolamo Muziano (1532-1592). The central ceiling panel frescoes depict the epilogue of the myth, the Apotheosis of Hercules : the hero is welcomed by the 12 major divinities of Olympus in thanks for his labours. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The fountain of Aphrodite of Ephesus, Villa d'Este gardens, Tivoli
  • The fountain of Aphrodite of Ephesus, Villa d'Este gardens, Tivoli
  • waterfall of The oval fountain, 1567, Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • Room of The Nobility (Stanza della Nobilta). The Renaissance paintings by Federico Zuccari can be dated to 1566-67. Decorated with Trompe-l'?il Ionian Pillars & busts the figures in the panels depict "Virtue" and "Thee Liberal Arts". Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Hundred Fountains, 1569, Villa d'Este gardens, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The Hundred Fountains, 1569, Villa d'Este gardens, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The fountain of Aphrodite of Ephesus, Villa d'Este gardens, Tivoli
  • The fountain of Aphrodite of Ephesus, Villa d'Este gardens, Tivoli
  • waterfall of The oval fountain, 1567, Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • waterfall of The oval fountain, 1567, Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • waterfall of The oval fountain, 1567, Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • waterfall of The oval fountain, 1567, Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The Hundred Fountains, 1569, Villa d'Este gardens, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The fountain of Aphrodite of Ephesus, Villa d'Este gardens, Tivoli
  • waterfall of The oval fountain, 1567, Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • waterfall of The oval fountain, 1567, Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • waterfall of The oval fountain, 1567, Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • Room of Noah ( Sala di Noe ). The room was decorated with frescoes by Durante Alberti between 1570 and 1571 from drawings by Girolamo Muziano. The scenes depict Noah and the floods.  Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • Room of Noah ( Sala di Noe ). The room was decorated with frescoes by Durante Alberti between 1570 and 1571 from drawings by Girolamo Muziano. The scenes depict Noah and the floods.  Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • . internal frescoes & decorations by Livio Agresti from Forlì (1550 to 1572)
  • Room of Noah ( Sala di Noe ). The room was decorated with frescoes by Durante Alberti between 1570 and 1571 from drawings by Girolamo Muziano. The scenes depict Noah and the floods.  Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • . internal frescoes & decorations by Livio Agresti from Forlì (1550 to 1572)
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • First Tribune Room ( Prima stanza tribune). The room was probably decorated by Cesare Nebbia in 1569, and the depictions depict the first legendary accounts of Tivoli. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • Salon of the Fountain( Sala della Fontana ), the banquet hall of Cardinal Ipollito d"Este. The trompe-l'?il frescoes were carried out by 6 assistants of Girolamo Muziano (1532-1592) were inspired by the "Solomonic" winding columns of the Vatican Basilica to create a loggia decorated by festoons of fruit, flowers & vegetables with a landscape beyond. The rustic fountain at the end of the salon was built by fountain maker Curzio Maccarone and was completed in 1568. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • Room of Glory (Stanza della Gloria ). The Renaissance paintings by Federico Zuccari can be dated to 1566-68. The frescoes in the vaulted ceiling depict the virtues which consent the fulfilment of "Glory" with allegorical panels depicting Magnanimity, Fortune, Time and Religion. Trompe-l'?il alcoves reveal the Cardinals hat of Ippolito d'Este  . Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • Room of Glory (Stanza della Gloria ). The Renaissance paintings by Federico Zuccari can be dated to 1566-68. The frescoes in the vaulted ceiling depict the virtues which consent the fulfilment of "Glory" with allegorical panels depicting Magnanimity, Fortune, Time and Religion. Trompe-l'?il alcoves reveal the Cardinals hat of Ippolito d'Este  . Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Room of Glory (Stanza della Gloria ). The Renaissance paintings by Federico Zuccari can be dated to 1566-68. . Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • Room of The Nobility (Stanza della Nobilta). The Renaissance paintings by Federico Zuccari can be dated to 1566-67. Decorated with Trompe-l'?il Ionian Pillars & busts the figures in the panels depict "Virtue" and "Thee Liberal Arts". Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Room of Glory (Stanza della Gloria ). The Renaissance paintings by Federico Zuccari can be dated to 1566-68. The frescoes in the vaulted ceiling depict the virtues which consent the fulfilment of "Glory" with allegorical panels depicting Magnanimity, Fortune, Time and Religion. Trompe-l'?il alcoves reveal the Cardinals hat of Ippolito d'Este  . Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Room of The Nobility (Stanza della Nobilta). The Renaissance paintings by Federico Zuccari can be dated to 1566-67. Decorated with Trompe-l'?il Ionian Pillars & busts the figures in the panels depict "Virtue" and "Thee Liberal Arts". Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Hundred Fountains, 1569, Villa d'Este gardens, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • Corridor with Renaissance painting of hunting scenes in the Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The fountain of Aphrodite of Ephesus, Villa d'Este gardens, Tivoli
  • The fountain of Aphrodite of Ephesus, Villa d'Este gardens, Tivoli
  • The fountain of Aphrodite of Ephesus, Villa d'Este gardens, Tivoli
  • waterfall of The oval fountain, 1567, Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • waterfall of The oval fountain, 1567, Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • View of the water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • View of the Renaissance gardens of Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy
  • The water jets of the Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a white background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a white background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Early Anglo Saxon sulptures of the Apostles now part of the south porch of Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. The apostles, apart from Peter who holds a crude key, have no distinguishing feature to allow identification. Some are holding books, none have halos and some hold their heads at awkward angles. These three styles are typical of Anglo Saxon art. The two panels are 10 ft long and 4ft 6" high are date from the original Ango Saxon church of 705. They were probablbly built into the proch during the Norman rebuilding. The style of these sculptures is of the Roman Byzantine style and were probably sculpted by masions from Gaul.  Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England
  • Early Anglo Saxon sulptures of Christ and the  Apostles now part of the south porch of Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. The apostles, apart from Peter who holds a crude key, have no distinguishing feature to allow identification. Some are holding books, none have halos and some hold their heads at awkward angles. These three styles are typical of Anglo Saxon art. The two panels are 10 ft long and 4ft 6" high are date from the original Ango Saxon church of 705. They were probablbly built into the proch during the Norman rebuilding. The style of these sculptures is of the Roman Byzantine style and were probably sculpted by masions from Gaul.  Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England
  • Early Anglo Saxon sulptures of Christ and the  Apostles now part of the south porch of Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. The apostles, apart from Peter who holds a crude key, have no distinguishing feature to allow identification. Some are holding books, none have halos and some hold their heads at awkward angles. These three styles are typical of Anglo Saxon art. The two panels are 10 ft long and 4ft 6" high are date from the original Ango Saxon church of 705. They were probablbly built into the proch during the Norman rebuilding. The style of these sculptures is of the Roman Byzantine style and were probably sculpted by masions from Gaul.  Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England
  • Early Anglo Saxon sulptures of an Apostle holding a book now part of the south porch of Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. The apostles, apart from Peter who holds a crude key, have no distinguishing feature to allow identification. Some are holding books, none have halos and some hold their heads at awkward angles. These three styles are typical of Anglo Saxon art. The two panels are 10 ft long and 4ft 6" high are date from the original Ango Saxon church of 705. They were probablbly built into the proch during the Norman rebuilding. The style of these sculptures is of the Roman Byzantine style and were probably sculpted by masions from Gaul.  Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England
  • Early Anglo Saxon sulptures of an Apostle holding a book now part of the south porch of Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. The apostles, apart from Peter who holds a crude key, have no distinguishing feature to allow identification. Some are holding books, none have halos and some hold their heads at awkward angles. These three styles are typical of Anglo Saxon art. The two panels are 10 ft long and 4ft 6" high are date from the original Ango Saxon church of 705. They were probablbly built into the proch during the Norman rebuilding. The style of these sculptures is of the Roman Byzantine style and were probably sculpted by masions from Gaul.  Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England
  • Early Anglo Saxon sulptures of an Apostle holding a book now part of the south porch of Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. The apostles, apart from Peter who holds a crude key, have no distinguishing feature to allow identification. Some are holding books, none have halos and some hold their heads at awkward angles. These three styles are typical of Anglo Saxon art. The two panels are 10 ft long and 4ft 6" high are date from the original Ango Saxon church of 705. They were probablbly built into the proch during the Norman rebuilding. The style of these sculptures is of the Roman Byzantine style and were probably sculpted by masions from Gaul.  Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England
  • Early Anglo Saxon sulptures of the Apostles now part of the south porch of Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. The apostles, apart from Peter who holds a crude key, have no distinguishing feature to allow identification. Some are holding books, none have halos and some hold their heads at awkward angles. These three styles are typical of Anglo Saxon art. The two panels are 10 ft long and 4ft 6" high are date from the original Ango Saxon church of 705. They were probablbly built into the proch during the Norman rebuilding. The style of these sculptures is of the Roman Byzantine style and were probably sculpted by masions from Gaul.  Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England
  • Early Anglo Saxon sulptures of the Apostles now part of the south porch of Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. The apostles, apart from Peter who holds a crude key, have no distinguishing feature to allow identification. Some are holding books, none have halos and some hold their heads at awkward angles. These three styles are typical of Anglo Saxon art. The two panels are 10 ft long and 4ft 6" high are date from the original Ango Saxon church of 705. They were probablbly built into the proch during the Norman rebuilding. The style of these sculptures is of the Roman Byzantine style and were probably sculpted by masions from Gaul.  Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England
  • Early Anglo Saxon sulptures of the Apostles now part of the south porch of Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. The apostles, apart from Peter who holds a crude key, have no distinguishing feature to allow identification. Some are holding books, none have halos and some hold their heads at awkward angles. These three styles are typical of Anglo Saxon art. The two panels are 10 ft long and 4ft 6" high are date from the original Ango Saxon church of 705. They were probablbly built into the proch during the Norman rebuilding. The style of these sculptures is of the Roman Byzantine style and were probably sculpted by masions from Gaul.  Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Wood Church of  the orthodox  Cuvioasa Paraschiva , Poienile Izei, Maramures, Northern Transylvania, Romania. Romania. UNESCO World Heritage Site.  The Church of the Holy Parasceve (Poienile Izei) is one of the oldest of the wooden churches of Maramure? (1604), and reveals two phases in the development of such buildings. The first can be seen in the lower part of the walls with a sanctuary based on a square plan, a typical feature of the oldest wooden buildings. In the 18th century, the walls were raised, the naos was covered by a semi-circular vault, and the interior was decorated with paintings. The portico was added during the first half of the 19th century.
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from 110 AD. In this portrait, the hairstyle and facial features are typical of the Trajan era of portraiture. The hairstyle is characterised by a slight central parting on the forehead . Inv 287, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from 110 AD. In this portrait, the hairstyle and facial features are typical of the Trajan era of portraiture. The hairstyle is characterised by a slight central parting on the forehead . Inv 287, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from 110 AD. In this portrait, the hairstyle and facial features are typical of the Trajan era of portraiture. The hairstyle is characterised by a slight central parting on the forehead . Inv 287, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from 110 AD. In this portrait, the hairstyle and facial features are typical of the Trajan era of portraiture. The hairstyle is characterised by a slight central parting on the forehead . Inv 287, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • The Ares Borghese is a Roman marble statue of the imperial era, 1st or 2nd century AD. This statue possibly preserves some features of an original work in bronze, now lost, of the 5th century BC by Alcamenes, an Athenian sculptor, or the statue may not be a copy of Alcamenes's, but instead a Roman creation according to a classicising or Neo-Attic type. Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The Ares Borghese is a Roman marble statue of the imperial era, 1st or 2nd century AD. This statue possibly preserves some features of an original work in bronze, now lost, of the 5th century BC by Alcamenes, an Athenian sculptor, or the statue may not be a copy of Alcamenes's, but instead a Roman creation according to a classicising or Neo-Attic type. Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The Ares Borghese is a Roman marble statue of the imperial era, 1st or 2nd century AD. This statue possibly preserves some features of an original work in bronze, now lost, of the 5th century BC by Alcamenes, an Athenian sculptor, or the statue may not be a copy of Alcamenes's, but instead a Roman creation according to a classicising or Neo-Attic type. Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The Ares Borghese is a Roman marble statue of the imperial era, 1st or 2nd century AD. This statue possibly preserves some features of an original work in bronze, now lost, of the 5th century BC by Alcamenes, an Athenian sculptor, or the statue may not be a copy of Alcamenes's, but instead a Roman creation according to a classicising or Neo-Attic type. Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from 110 AD. In this portrait, the hairstyle and facial features are typical of the Trajan era of portraiture. The hairstyle is characterised by a slight central parting on the forehead . Inv 287, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from 110 AD. In this portrait, the hairstyle and facial features are typical of the Trajan era of portraiture. The hairstyle is characterised by a slight central parting on the forehead . Inv 287, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from 110 AD. In this portrait, the hairstyle and facial features are typical of the Trajan era of portraiture. The hairstyle is characterised by a slight central parting on the forehead . Inv 287, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from the reign of Nero, 54-68 AD. This portrait can be dated to the reign of Nero due to the facial features and hair style, with short locks and long fringe over the forehead. The young man is wearing a tunic, stopped with a small fibula (clasp) on the left shoulder. Inv 281, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from the reign of Nero, 54-68 AD. This portrait can be dated to the reign of Nero due to the facial features and hair style, with short locks and long fringe over the forehead. The young man is wearing a tunic, stopped with a small fibula (clasp) on the left shoulder. Inv 281, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from the reign of Nero, 54-68 AD. This portrait can be dated to the reign of Nero due to the facial features and hair style, with short locks and long fringe over the forehead. The young man is wearing a tunic, stopped with a small fibula (clasp) on the left shoulder. Inv 281, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from the reign of Nero, 54-68 AD. This portrait can be dated to the reign of Nero due to the facial features and hair style, with short locks and long fringe over the forehead. The young man is wearing a tunic, stopped with a small fibula (clasp) on the left shoulder. Inv 281, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from the reign of Nero, 54-68 AD. This portrait can be dated to the reign of Nero due to the facial features and hair style, with short locks and long fringe over the forehead. The young man is wearing a tunic, stopped with a small fibula (clasp) on the left shoulder. Inv 281, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from the reign of Nero, 54-68 AD. This portrait can be dated to the reign of Nero due to the facial features and hair style, with short locks and long fringe over the forehead. The young man is wearing a tunic, stopped with a small fibula (clasp) on the left shoulder. Inv 281, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young charioteer from the age of Domitian, 81-96AD. This statue of a young charioteer, with Oriental eastern Mediterranean features, is wearing a tunic stopped on the right shoulder by a flattened circular fibula (clasp). The hairstyle, with its ’S’ shaped curls, was made artificially with an iron (calamistrum). This style was inspired by official portrayts of a young Domitian, who emulated Neronian style during the last years of his reign. The bust was rounded to be inserted onto a modern pillar. . Inv 276, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • The Ares Borghese is a Roman marble statue of the imperial era, 1st or 2nd century AD. This statue possibly preserves some features of an original work in bronze, now lost, of the 5th century BC by Alcamenes, an Athenian sculptor, or the statue may not be a copy of Alcamenes's, but instead a Roman creation according to a classicising or Neo-Attic type. Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from 110 AD. In this portrait, the hairstyle and facial features are typical of the Trajan era of portraiture. The hairstyle is characterised by a slight central parting on the forehead . Inv 287, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from 110 AD. In this portrait, the hairstyle and facial features are typical of the Trajan era of portraiture. The hairstyle is characterised by a slight central parting on the forehead . Inv 287, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from 110 AD. In this portrait, the hairstyle and facial features are typical of the Trajan era of portraiture. The hairstyle is characterised by a slight central parting on the forehead . Inv 287, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from 110 AD. In this portrait, the hairstyle and facial features are typical of the Trajan era of portraiture. The hairstyle is characterised by a slight central parting on the forehead . Inv 287, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from the reign of Nero, 54-68 AD. This portrait can be dated to the reign of Nero due to the facial features and hair style, with short locks and long fringe over the forehead. The young man is wearing a tunic, stopped with a small fibula (clasp) on the left shoulder. Inv 281, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from the reign of Nero, 54-68 AD. This portrait can be dated to the reign of Nero due to the facial features and hair style, with short locks and long fringe over the forehead. The young man is wearing a tunic, stopped with a small fibula (clasp) on the left shoulder. Inv 281, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy

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