• Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman relief panel showing a Barbarian, circa 98-117 AD from the Palace of Montecitorio, Rome. This  relief panel is part of a larger work. It represents a battle and the figure can be identified as a barbarian by his eastern style tunic and thick beard. Judging by the quality of the execution, the relief must have belonged to an important public monument situated in the area of the Campus Martius .  Inv 39163, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman relief panel showing a Barbarian, circa 98-117 AD from the Palace of Montecitorio, Rome. This  relief panel is part of a larger work. It represents a battle and the figure can be identified as a barbarian by his eastern style tunic and thick beard. Judging by the quality of the execution, the relief must have belonged to an important public monument situated in the area of the Campus Martius .  Inv 39163, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman relief panel showing a Barbarian, circa 98-117 AD from the Palace of Montecitorio, Rome. This  relief panel is part of a larger work. It represents a battle and the figure can be identified as a barbarian by his eastern style tunic and thick beard. Judging by the quality of the execution, the relief must have belonged to an important public monument situated in the area of the Campus Martius .  Inv 39163, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman relief panel showing a Barbarian, circa 98-117 AD from the Palace of Montecitorio, Rome. This  relief panel is part of a larger work. It represents a battle and the figure can be identified as a barbarian by his eastern style tunic and thick beard. Judging by the quality of the execution, the relief must have belonged to an important public monument situated in the area of the Campus Martius .  Inv 39163, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman relief panel showing a Barbarian, circa 98-117 AD from the Palace of Montecitorio, Rome. This  relief panel is part of a larger work. It represents a battle and the figure can be identified as a barbarian by his eastern style tunic and thick beard. Judging by the quality of the execution, the relief must have belonged to an important public monument situated in the area of the Campus Martius .  Inv 39163, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman relief panel showing a Barbarian, circa 98-117 AD from the Palace of Montecitorio, Rome. This  relief panel is part of a larger work. It represents a battle and the figure can be identified as a barbarian by his eastern style tunic and thick beard. Judging by the quality of the execution, the relief must have belonged to an important public monument situated in the area of the Campus Martius .  Inv 39163, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman relief panel showing a Barbarian, circa 98-117 AD from the Palace of Montecitorio, Rome. This  relief panel is part of a larger work. It represents a battle and the figure can be identified as a barbarian by his eastern style tunic and thick beard. Judging by the quality of the execution, the relief must have belonged to an important public monument situated in the area of the Campus Martius .  Inv 39163, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman relief panel showing a Barbarian, circa 98-117 AD from the Palace of Montecitorio, Rome. This  relief panel is part of a larger work. It represents a battle and the figure can be identified as a barbarian by his eastern style tunic and thick beard. Judging by the quality of the execution, the relief must have belonged to an important public monument situated in the area of the Campus Martius .  Inv 39163, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman relief panel showing a Barbarian, circa 98-117 AD from the Palace of Montecitorio, Rome. This  relief panel is part of a larger work. It represents a battle and the figure can be identified as a barbarian by his eastern style tunic and thick beard. Judging by the quality of the execution, the relief must have belonged to an important public monument situated in the area of the Campus Martius .  Inv 39163, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman relief panel showing a Barbarian, circa 98-117 AD from the Palace of Montecitorio, Rome. This  relief panel is part of a larger work. It represents a battle and the figure can be identified as a barbarian by his eastern style tunic and thick beard. Judging by the quality of the execution, the relief must have belonged to an important public monument situated in the area of the Campus Martius .  Inv 39163, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Romanesque painted Canopy of Tavèrnoles.<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century  from the ancient monastery of St. Sernin Tavèrnoles valleys Valira Alt Urgell, Spain<br />
<br />
Acquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1906. Ref: 24060 MNAC.<br />
<br />
Romanesque canopy-type panel with its cut supporting beams still visible. The panel is decorated with a painted image of Christ in Majesty or Christ Pantocrator in a mandorla which is supported by four angelic figures that evoke the theme of the Ascension. The canopy was discovered in the early twentieth century in the monastery of St. Sernin Tavernoles, half hidden by a Gothic altarpiece.
  • Heyl Statue of Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love. 2nd century terracotta from the Heyl collection. This statuette is one of the most beautiful examples of ancient terracotta statues in existence. The close fitting robe or the goddess of love has slipped from her shoulders, her raised left leg perhaps stood on a pillar. The front of the figure, which was shaped in a mould, was carved using a modelling scraper and finally painted. Altes Museum Berlin
  • Heyl Statue of Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love. 2nd century terracotta from the Heyl collection. This statuette is one of the most beautiful examples of ancient terracotta statues in existence. The close fitting robe or the goddess of love has slipped from her shoulders, her raised left leg perhaps stood on a pillar. The front of the figure, which was shaped in a mould, was carved using a modelling scraper and finally painted. Altes Museum Berlin
  • Heyl Statue of Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love. 2nd century terracotta from the Heyl collection. This statuette is one of the most beautiful examples of ancient terracotta statues in existence. The close fitting robe or the goddess of love has slipped from her shoulders, her raised left leg perhaps stood on a pillar. The front of the figure, which was shaped in a mould, was carved using a modelling scraper and finally painted. Altes Museum Berlin
  • Heyl Statue of Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love. 2nd century terracotta from the Heyl collection. This statuette is one of the most beautiful examples of ancient terracotta statues in existence. The close fitting robe or the goddess of love has slipped from her shoulders, her raised left leg perhaps stood on a pillar. The front of the figure, which was shaped in a mould, was carved using a modelling scraper and finally painted. Altes Museum Berlin
  • Heyl Statue of Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love. 2nd century terracotta from the Heyl collection. This statuette is one of the most beautiful examples of ancient terracotta statues in existence. The close fitting robe or the goddess of love has slipped from her shoulders, her raised left leg perhaps stood on a pillar. The front of the figure, which was shaped in a mould, was carved using a modelling scraper and finally painted. Altes Museum Berlin
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Romanesque painted Canopy of Tavèrnoles.<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century  from the ancient monastery of St. Sernin Tavèrnoles valleys Valira Alt Urgell, Spain<br />
<br />
Acquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1906. Ref: 24060 MNAC.<br />
<br />
Romanesque canopy-type panel with its cut supporting beams still visible. The panel is decorated with a painted image of Christ in Majesty or Christ Pantocrator in a mandorla which is supported by four angelic figures that evoke the theme of the Ascension. The canopy was discovered in the early twentieth century in the monastery of St. Sernin Tavernoles, half hidden by a Gothic altarpiece.
  • Romanesque painted Canopy of Tavèrnoles.<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century  from the ancient monastery of St. Sernin Tavèrnoles valleys Valira Alt Urgell, Spain<br />
<br />
Acquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1906. Ref: 24060 MNAC.<br />
<br />
Romanesque canopy-type panel with its cut supporting beams still visible. The panel is decorated with a painted image of Christ in Majesty or Christ Pantocrator in a mandorla which is supported by four angelic figures that evoke the theme of the Ascension. The canopy was discovered in the early twentieth century in the monastery of St. Sernin Tavernoles, half hidden by a Gothic altarpiece.
  • Romanesque painted Canopy of Tavèrnoles.<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century  from the ancient monastery of St. Sernin Tavèrnoles valleys Valira Alt Urgell, Spain<br />
<br />
Acquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1906. Ref: 24060 MNAC.<br />
<br />
Romanesque canopy-type panel with its cut supporting beams still visible. The panel is decorated with a painted image of Christ in Majesty or Christ Pantocrator in a mandorla which is supported by four angelic figures that evoke the theme of the Ascension. The canopy was discovered in the early twentieth century in the monastery of St. Sernin Tavernoles, half hidden by a Gothic altarpiece.
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053,Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053,Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Romanesque painted Canopy of Tavèrnoles.<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century  from the ancient monastery of St. Sernin Tavèrnoles valleys Valira Alt Urgell, Spain<br />
<br />
Acquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1906. Ref: 24060 MNAC.<br />
<br />
Romanesque canopy-type panel with its cut supporting beams still visible. The panel is decorated with a painted image of Christ in Majesty or Christ Pantocrator in a mandorla which is supported by four angelic figures that evoke the theme of the Ascension. The canopy was discovered in the early twentieth century in the monastery of St. Sernin Tavernoles, half hidden by a Gothic altarpiece.
  • Romanesque painted Canopy of Tavèrnoles.<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century  from the ancient monastery of St. Sernin Tavèrnoles valleys Valira Alt Urgell, Spain<br />
<br />
Acquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1906. Ref: 24060 MNAC.<br />
<br />
Romanesque canopy-type panel with its cut supporting beams still visible. The panel is decorated with a painted image of Christ in Majesty or Christ Pantocrator in a mandorla which is supported by four angelic figures that evoke the theme of the Ascension. The canopy was discovered in the early twentieth century in the monastery of St. Sernin Tavernoles, half hidden by a Gothic altarpiece.
  • Romanesque painted Canopy of Tavèrnoles.<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century  from the ancient monastery of St. Sernin Tavèrnoles valleys Valira Alt Urgell, Spain<br />
<br />
Acquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1906. Ref: 24060 MNAC.<br />
<br />
Romanesque canopy-type panel with its cut supporting beams still visible. The panel is decorated with a painted image of Christ in Majesty or Christ Pantocrator in a mandorla which is supported by four angelic figures that evoke the theme of the Ascension. The canopy was discovered in the early twentieth century in the monastery of St. Sernin Tavernoles, half hidden by a Gothic altarpiece.
  • Romanesque painted Canopy of Tavèrnoles.<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century  from the ancient monastery of St. Sernin Tavèrnoles valleys Valira Alt Urgell, Spain<br />
<br />
Acquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1906. Ref: 24060 MNAC.<br />
<br />
Romanesque canopy-type panel with its cut supporting beams still visible. The panel is decorated with a painted image of Christ in Majesty or Christ Pantocrator in a mandorla which is supported by four angelic figures that evoke the theme of the Ascension. The canopy was discovered in the early twentieth century in the monastery of St. Sernin Tavernoles, half hidden by a Gothic altarpiece.
  • Romanesque painted Canopy of Tavèrnoles.<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century  from the ancient monastery of St. Sernin Tavèrnoles valleys Valira Alt Urgell, Spain<br />
<br />
Acquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1906. Ref: 24060 MNAC.<br />
<br />
Romanesque canopy-type panel with its cut supporting beams still visible. The panel is decorated with a painted image of Christ in Majesty or Christ Pantocrator in a mandorla which is supported by four angelic figures that evoke the theme of the Ascension. The canopy was discovered in the early twentieth century in the monastery of St. Sernin Tavernoles, half hidden by a Gothic altarpiece.
  • The Venus of Arles (  Greek Goddess Aphrodite) is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) marble sculpture of Venus probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The style of the Venus of Arles, like the Venus de Milo, is not a fully nude figure both having draped clothes from the waist down. The first known example of a totally nude Venus is the 4th century BC  Aphrodite of Cnidus by.Praxiteles  The Venus of Arles was probably an earlier statue by Praxiteles known as the Aphrodite of Thespiae . <br />
The venus of Arles was found in 1651 by workmen digging a well in Arles. In 1681 it was given to Louis XIV to decorate the Galerie des Glaces of Versailles. The statue was moved to the Musée du Louvre after the French Revolution.
  • The Venus of Arles (  Greek Goddess Aphrodite) is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) marble sculpture of Venus probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The style of the Venus of Arles, like the Venus de Milo, is not a fully nude figure both having draped clothes from the waist down. The first known example of a totally nude Venus is the 4th century BC  Aphrodite of Cnidus by.Praxiteles  The Venus of Arles was probably an earlier statue by Praxiteles known as the Aphrodite of Thespiae . <br />
The venus of Arles was found in 1651 by workmen digging a well in Arles. In 1681 it was given to Louis XIV to decorate the Galerie des Glaces of Versailles. The statue was moved to the Musée du Louvre after the French Revolution.
  • The Venus of Arles (  Greek Goddess Aphrodite) is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) marble sculpture of Venus probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The style of the Venus of Arles, like the Venus de Milo, is not a fully nude figure both having draped clothes from the waist down. The first known example of a totally nude Venus is the 4th century BC  Aphrodite of Cnidus by.Praxiteles  The Venus of Arles was probably an earlier statue by Praxiteles known as the Aphrodite of Thespiae . <br />
The venus of Arles was found in 1651 by workmen digging a well in Arles. In 1681 it was given to Louis XIV to decorate the Galerie des Glaces of Versailles. The statue was moved to the Musée du Louvre after the French Revolution.
  • The Venus of Arles (  Greek Goddess Aphrodite) is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) marble sculpture of Venus probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The style of the Venus of Arles, like the Venus de Milo, is not a fully nude figure both having draped clothes from the waist down. The first known example of a totally nude Venus is the 4th century BC  Aphrodite of Cnidus by.Praxiteles  The Venus of Arles was probably an earlier statue by Praxiteles known as the Aphrodite of Thespiae . <br />
The venus of Arles was found in 1651 by workmen digging a well in Arles. In 1681 it was given to Louis XIV to decorate the Galerie des Glaces of Versailles. The statue was moved to the Musée du Louvre after the French Revolution.
  • Heyl Statue of Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love. 2nd century terracotta from the Heyl collection. This statuette is one of the most beautiful examples of ancient terracotta statues in existence. The close fitting robe or the goddess of love has slipped from her shoulders, her raised left leg perhaps stood on a pillar. The front of the figure, which was shaped in a mould, was carved using a modelling scraper and finally painted. Altes Museum Berlin
  • Heyl Statue of Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love. 2nd century terracotta from the Heyl collection. This statuette is one of the most beautiful examples of ancient terracotta statues in existence. The close fitting robe or the goddess of love has slipped from her shoulders, her raised left leg perhaps stood on a pillar. The front of the figure, which was shaped in a mould, was carved using a modelling scraper and finally painted. Altes Museum Berlin
  • Heyl Statue of Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love. 2nd century terracotta from the Heyl collection. This statuette is one of the most beautiful examples of ancient terracotta statues in existence. The close fitting robe or the goddess of love has slipped from her shoulders, her raised left leg perhaps stood on a pillar. The front of the figure, which was shaped in a mould, was carved using a modelling scraper and finally painted. Altes Museum Berlin
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of a male figure restored as Augustus 2nd century AD, inv no 6053, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • The Venus of Arles (  Greek Goddess Aphrodite) is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) marble sculpture of Venus probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The style of the Venus of Arles, like the Venus de Milo, is not a fully nude figure both having draped clothes from the waist down. The first known example of a totally nude Venus is the 4th century BC  Aphrodite of Cnidus by.Praxiteles  The Venus of Arles was probably an earlier statue by Praxiteles known as the Aphrodite of Thespiae . <br />
The venus of Arles was found in 1651 by workmen digging a well in Arles. In 1681 it was given to Louis XIV to decorate the Galerie des Glaces of Versailles. The statue was moved to the Musée du Louvre after the French Revolution.
  • The Venus of Arles (  Greek Goddess Aphrodite) is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) marble sculpture of Venus probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The style of the Venus of Arles, like the Venus de Milo, is not a fully nude figure both having draped clothes from the waist down. The first known example of a totally nude Venus is the 4th century BC  Aphrodite of Cnidus by.Praxiteles  The Venus of Arles was probably an earlier statue by Praxiteles known as the Aphrodite of Thespiae . <br />
The venus of Arles was found in 1651 by workmen digging a well in Arles. In 1681 it was given to Louis XIV to decorate the Galerie des Glaces of Versailles. The statue was moved to the Musée du Louvre after the French Revolution.
  • The Venus of Arles (  Greek Goddess Aphrodite) is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) marble sculpture of Venus probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The style of the Venus of Arles, like the Venus de Milo, is not a fully nude figure both having draped clothes from the waist down. The first known example of a totally nude Venus is the 4th century BC  Aphrodite of Cnidus by.Praxiteles  The Venus of Arles was probably an earlier statue by Praxiteles known as the Aphrodite of Thespiae . <br />
The venus of Arles was found in 1651 by workmen digging a well in Arles. In 1681 it was given to Louis XIV to decorate the Galerie des Glaces of Versailles. The statue was moved to the Musée du Louvre after the French Revolution.
  • Romanesque painted Canopy of Tavèrnoles.<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century  from the ancient monastery of St. Sernin Tavèrnoles valleys Valira Alt Urgell, Spain<br />
<br />
Acquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1906. Ref: 24060 MNAC.<br />
<br />
Romanesque canopy-type panel with its cut supporting beams still visible. The panel is decorated with a painted image of Christ in Majesty or Christ Pantocrator in a mandorla which is supported by four angelic figures that evoke the theme of the Ascension. The canopy was discovered in the early twentieth century in the monastery of St. Sernin Tavernoles, half hidden by a Gothic altarpiece.
  • Romanesque painted Canopy of Tavèrnoles.<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century  from the ancient monastery of St. Sernin Tavèrnoles valleys Valira Alt Urgell, Spain<br />
<br />
Acquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1906. Ref: 24060 MNAC.<br />
<br />
Romanesque canopy-type panel with its cut supporting beams still visible. The panel is decorated with a painted image of Christ in Majesty or Christ Pantocrator in a mandorla which is supported by four angelic figures that evoke the theme of the Ascension. The canopy was discovered in the early twentieth century in the monastery of St. Sernin Tavernoles, half hidden by a Gothic altarpiece.
  • Romanesque painted Canopy of Tavèrnoles.<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century  from the ancient monastery of St. Sernin Tavèrnoles valleys Valira Alt Urgell, Spain<br />
<br />
Acquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1906. Ref: 24060 MNAC.<br />
<br />
Romanesque canopy-type panel with its cut supporting beams still visible. The panel is decorated with a painted image of Christ in Majesty or Christ Pantocrator in a mandorla which is supported by four angelic figures that evoke the theme of the Ascension. The canopy was discovered in the early twentieth century in the monastery of St. Sernin Tavernoles, half hidden by a Gothic altarpiece.
  • Romanesque painted Canopy of Tavèrnoles.<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century  from the ancient monastery of St. Sernin Tavèrnoles valleys Valira Alt Urgell, Spain<br />
<br />
Acquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1906. Ref: 24060 MNAC.<br />
<br />
Romanesque canopy-type panel with its cut supporting beams still visible. The panel is decorated with a painted image of Christ in Majesty or Christ Pantocrator in a mandorla which is supported by four angelic figures that evoke the theme of the Ascension. The canopy was discovered in the early twentieth century in the monastery of St. Sernin Tavernoles, half hidden by a Gothic altarpiece.
  • Romanesque painted Canopy of Tavèrnoles.<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century  from the ancient monastery of St. Sernin Tavèrnoles valleys Valira Alt Urgell, Spain<br />
<br />
Acquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1906. Ref: 24060 MNAC.<br />
<br />
Romanesque canopy-type panel with its cut supporting beams still visible. The panel is decorated with a painted image of Christ in Majesty or Christ Pantocrator in a mandorla which is supported by four angelic figures that evoke the theme of the Ascension. The canopy was discovered in the early twentieth century in the monastery of St. Sernin Tavernoles, half hidden by a Gothic altarpiece.
  • Romanesque painted Canopy of Tavèrnoles.<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century  from the ancient monastery of St. Sernin Tavèrnoles valleys Valira Alt Urgell, Spain<br />
<br />
Acquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1906. Ref: 24060 MNAC.<br />
<br />
Romanesque canopy-type panel with its cut supporting beams still visible. The panel is decorated with a painted image of Christ in Majesty or Christ Pantocrator in a mandorla which is supported by four angelic figures that evoke the theme of the Ascension. The canopy was discovered in the early twentieth century in the monastery of St. Sernin Tavernoles, half hidden by a Gothic altarpiece.
  • Romanesque painted Canopy of Tavèrnoles.<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century  from the ancient monastery of St. Sernin Tavèrnoles valleys Valira Alt Urgell, Spain<br />
<br />
Acquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1906. Ref: 24060 MNAC.<br />
<br />
Romanesque canopy-type panel with its cut supporting beams still visible. The panel is decorated with a painted image of Christ in Majesty or Christ Pantocrator in a mandorla which is supported by four angelic figures that evoke the theme of the Ascension. The canopy was discovered in the early twentieth century in the monastery of St. Sernin Tavernoles, half hidden by a Gothic altarpiece.
  • Romanesque painted Canopy of Tavèrnoles.<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century  from the ancient monastery of St. Sernin Tavèrnoles valleys Valira Alt Urgell, Spain<br />
<br />
Acquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1906. Ref: 24060 MNAC.<br />
<br />
Romanesque canopy-type panel with its cut supporting beams still visible. The panel is decorated with a painted image of Christ in Majesty or Christ Pantocrator in a mandorla which is supported by four angelic figures that evoke the theme of the Ascension. The canopy was discovered in the early twentieth century in the monastery of St. Sernin Tavernoles, half hidden by a Gothic altarpiece.
  • Romanesque painted Canopy of Tavèrnoles.<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the thirteenth century  from the ancient monastery of St. Sernin Tavèrnoles valleys Valira Alt Urgell, Spain<br />
<br />
Acquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1906. Ref: 24060 MNAC.<br />
<br />
Romanesque canopy-type panel with its cut supporting beams still visible. The panel is decorated with a painted image of Christ in Majesty or Christ Pantocrator in a mandorla which is supported by four angelic figures that evoke the theme of the Ascension. The canopy was discovered in the early twentieth century in the monastery of St. Sernin Tavernoles, half hidden by a Gothic altarpiece.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Septime Severe, excavated  from Choud El Battan sculpted circa 193-211AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.73.  Against a white background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Septime Severe, excavated  from Choud El Battan sculpted circa 193-211AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.73.   Against a grey background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Septime Severe, excavated  from Choud El Battan sculpted circa 193-211AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.73
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius, excavated  from Carthage made circa 161-180 AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.965.  Against a white background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius, excavated  from Carthage made circa 161-180 AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.965.  Against a black background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius, excavated  from Carthage made circa 161-180 AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.965
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius, excavated  from Carthage made circa 161-180 AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.965. Against a grey art background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Vitellius, excavated  from Althiburos sculpted circa 20 April 69-20 Dec 69AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.1784.  Against a white background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Vitellius, excavated  from Althiburos sculpted circa 20 April 69-20 Dec 69AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.1784.  Against a black background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Vitellius, excavated  from Althiburos sculpted circa 20 April 69-20 Dec 69AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.1784.   Against a grey background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Vitellius, excavated  from Althiburos sculpted circa 20 April 69-20 Dec 69AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.1784. Against a grey art background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Vespesien, excavated  from Althiburos sculpted circa  69-79AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.1025.  Against a white background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Vespesien, excavated  from Althiburos sculpted circa  69-79AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.1025.   Against a grey background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Vespesien, excavated  from Althiburos sculpted circa  69-79AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.1025
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Vespesien, excavated  from Althiburos sculpted circa  69-79AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C.1025. Against a grey art background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius, excavated from Bulla Regia Theatre, sculpted circa late second century. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis.  Against a white background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius, excavated from Bulla Regia Theatre, sculpted circa late second century. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis.  Against a black background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius, excavated from Bulla Regia Theatre, sculpted circa late second century. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis.   Against a grey background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius, excavated from Bulla Regia Theatre, sculpted circa late second century. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius, excavated from Bulla Regia Theatre, sculpted circa late second century. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis. Against a grey art background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Lucius Verus, excavated from Bulla Regia Theatre, sculpted circa 161-169 AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis.  Against a black background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Lucius Verus, excavated from Bulla Regia Theatre, sculpted circa 161-169 AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis.   Against a grey background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Lucius Verus, excavated from Bulla Regia Theatre, sculpted circa 161-169 AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis. Against a grey art background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Gordian 1st, excavated from Carthage ( ruled 3 months in 238AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 3212. v
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Gordian 1st, excavated from Carthage ( ruled 3 months in 238AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 3212.  Against a black background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Gordian 1st, excavated from Carthage ( ruled 3 months in 238AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 3212.   Against a grey background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Gordian 1st, excavated from Carthage ( ruled 3 months in 238AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 3212
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Gordian 1st, excavated from Carthage ( ruled 3 months in 238AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 3212. Against a grey art background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Caracalla, excavated from Thuburbo-Majus, sculpted circa 211-217AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 1347.  Against a white background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Caracalla, excavated from Thuburbo-Majus, sculpted circa 211-217AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 1347.  Against a black background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Caracalla, excavated from Thuburbo-Majus, sculpted circa 211-217AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 1347.   Against a grey background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Caracalla, excavated from Thuburbo-Majus, sculpted circa 211-217AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 1347
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Caracalla, excavated from Thuburbo-Majus, sculpted circa 211-217AD. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 1347. Against a grey art background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Augustus, excavated from El-Jem, sculpted circa 27BC-14AD The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 72.  Against a white background.
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Augustus, excavated from El-Jem, sculpted circa 27BC-14AD The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 72
  • Roman sculpture of the Emperor Augustus, excavated from El-Jem, sculpted circa 27BC-14AD The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Inv No: C. 72
  • Detail of a second Century Roman statue of Apollo excavated from the Theatre of Carthage. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Inv No C939. Against a black background.
  • Detail of a second Century Roman statue of Apollo excavated from the Theatre of Carthage. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Inv No C939. v
  • Second Century Roman statue of Apollo excavated from the Theatre of Carthage. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Inv No C939.  Against a white background.
  • Second Century Roman statue of Apollo excavated from the Theatre of Carthage. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Inv No C939.  Against a black background.
  • Second Century Roman statue of Apollo excavated from the Theatre of Carthage. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Inv No C939.   Against a grey background.
  • Second Century Roman statue of Apollo excavated from the Theatre of Carthage. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Inv No C939
  • Second Century Roman statue of Apollo excavated from the Theatre of Carthage. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Inv No C939. Against a grey art background.
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Gigantic Roman bronze statue hand possibly from a sculpture of Emperor Constantine, from Rome. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Gigantic Roman bronze statue hand from Rome. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Gigantic Roman bronze statue hand from Rome. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD found in the Horti Tauriani, Rome.  The bust portrays an elderly Hadrian with a well worn expression from around 130AD. An enthusiastic builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors.  MC inv 890, Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD found in the Horti Tauriani, Rome.  The bust portrays an elderly Hadrian with a well worn expression from around 130AD. An enthusiastic builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors.  MC inv 890, Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Matidia circa119 AD from Via Giolitti, Rome. Matidia was Sabina’s mother and Hadrian’s wife. The high level of idealisation of the portrait suggests that it was made after her death. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Matidia circa119 AD from Via Giolitti, Rome. Matidia was Sabina’s mother and Hadrian’s wife. The high level of idealisation of the portrait suggests that it was made after her death. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Matidia circa119 AD from Via Giolitti, Rome. Matidia was Sabina’s mother and Hadrian’s wife. The high level of idealisation of the portrait suggests that it was made after her death. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. . MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. . MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. . MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman gilded bronze head of Emperor Constantine dating from about 330-337 AD.. Inv 5.13, The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman gilded bronze head of Emperor Constantine dating from about 330-337 AD.. Inv 5.13, The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman gilded bronze head of Emperor Constantine dating from about 330-337 AD.. Inv 5.13, The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman gilded bronze head of Emperor Constantine dating from about 330-337 AD.. Inv 5.13, The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman gilded bronze head of Emperor Constantine dating from about 330-337 AD.. Inv 5.13, The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman gilded bronze head of Emperor Constantine dating from about 330-337 AD.. Inv 5.13, The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman gilded bronze head of Emperor Constantine dating from about 330-337 AD.. Inv 5.13, The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman sculpted head of Dionysus inspired by a Hellenistic original. Found in the Horti Lamiani near the Piazza Vittorio Emanuele, Rome. M.C. Inv 1129, The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman sculpted head of Dionysus inspired by a Hellenistic original. Found in the Horti Lamiani near the Piazza Vittorio Emanuele, Rome. M.C. Inv 1129, The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman sculpted head of Dionysus inspired by a Hellenistic original. Found in the Horti Lamiani near the Piazza Vittorio Emanuele, Rome. M.C. Inv 1129, The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman bust of Socrates, 1st cent AD from the construction site of the monument to Vitorio Emanuel II,  Rome, Italy. This portrait of Socrates is similar to the Herm of Socrates from the Naples National Museum. In xenophon’s Symposium socrates is described as ‘Short body with wide shoulders, prominent belly, aquiline nose, thick wide mouth and head almost completely bold. In 399 BC the famous Athenian philosopher was condemned to death for impiety and corruption. Inv 1236, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman bust of Socrates, 1st cent AD from the construction site of the monument to Vitorio Emanuel II,  Rome, Italy. This portrait of Socrates is similar to the Herm of Socrates from the Naples National Museum. In xenophon’s Symposium socrates is described as ‘Short body with wide shoulders, prominent belly, aquiline nose, thick wide mouth and head almost completely bold. In 399 BC the famous Athenian philosopher was condemned to death for impiety and corruption. Inv 1236, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman bust of Socrates, 1st cent AD from the construction site of the monument to Vitorio Emanuel II,  Rome, Italy. This portrait of Socrates is similar to the Herm of Socrates from the Naples National Museum. In xenophon’s Symposium socrates is described as ‘Short body with wide shoulders, prominent belly, aquiline nose, thick wide mouth and head almost completely bold. In 399 BC the famous Athenian philosopher was condemned to death for impiety and corruption. Inv 1236, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman bust of Socrates, 1st cent AD from the construction site of the monument to Vitorio Emanuel II,  Rome, Italy. This portrait of Socrates is similar to the Herm of Socrates from the Naples National Museum. In xenophon’s Symposium socrates is described as ‘Short body with wide shoulders, prominent belly, aquiline nose, thick wide mouth and head almost completely bold. In 399 BC the famous Athenian philosopher was condemned to death for impiety and corruption. Inv 1236, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman bust of Socrates, 1st cent AD from the construction site of the monument to Vitorio Emanuel II,  Rome, Italy. This portrait of Socrates is similar to the Herm of Socrates from the Naples National Museum. In xenophon’s Symposium socrates is described as ‘Short body with wide shoulders, prominent belly, aquiline nose, thick wide mouth and head almost completely bold. In 399 BC the famous Athenian philosopher was condemned to death for impiety and corruption. Inv 1236, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman relief sculpture on the Christian sarcophagus side od Marcus Claudianus depicting scenes from  the new testament , circa 330 - 335 AD from the via della Lungara near S.Giacomo in Settimiana, Rome, Italy. National Roman Musuem, Rome.
  • Roman relief sculpture on the Christian sarcophagus side od Marcus Claudianus depicting scenes from  the new testament , circa 330 - 335 AD from the via della Lungara near S.Giacomo in Settimiana, Rome, Italy. National Roman Musuem, Rome.
  • Roman relief sculpture on the Christian sarcophagus side od Marcus Claudianus depicting scenes from  the new testament , circa 330 - 335 AD from the via della Lungara near S.Giacomo in Settimiana, Rome, Italy. National Roman Musuem, Rome.
  • Roman relief sculpture on the Christian sarcophagus side od Marcus Claudianus depicting scenes from  the new testament , circa 330 - 335 AD from the via della Lungara near S.Giacomo in Settimiana, Rome, Italy. National Roman Musuem, Rome.
  • Roman relief sculpture on the Christian sarcophagus side od Marcus Claudianus depicting scenes from  the new testament , circa 330 - 335 AD from the via della Lungara near S.Giacomo in Settimiana, Rome, Italy. National Roman Musuem, Rome.
  • Roman relief sculpture on a sarcophagus side showing a married couple with pagan deities, circa 270 - 280 AD from the via Latina, Rome, Italy. National Roman Musuem, Rome.
  • Roman relief sculpture on a sarcophagus side showing a married couple with pagan deities, circa 270 - 280 AD from the via Latina, Rome, Italy. National Roman Musuem, Rome.
  • Roman relief sculpture on a sarcophagus side showing a married couple with pagan deities, circa 270 - 280 AD from the via Latina, Rome, Italy. National Roman Musuem, Rome.
  • Roman relief sculpture on a sarcophagus side depiction the Muses, circa 280 - 290 AD from the Villa Celimontana. National Roman Musuem, Rome.
  • Roman relief sculpture on a sarcophagus side depiction the Muses, circa 280 - 290 AD from the Villa Celimontana. National Roman Musuem, Rome.
  • Roman relief sculpture on a sarcophagus side depiction the Muses, circa 280 - 290 AD from the Villa Celimontana. National Roman Musuem, Rome.
  • Roman relief sculpture on a sarcophagus side depiction the Muses, circa 280 - 290 AD from the Villa Celimontana. National Roman Musuem, Rome.
  • Roman relief sculpture on a sarcophagus side depiction the Muses, circa 280 - 290 AD from the Villa Celimontana. National Roman Musuem, Rome.
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of an Emperor with a breastplate (loricata) from the 2nd cent AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. The statue depicts a man in military dress, with a breastplate (lorca) decorated within griffins and a cluster of acanthus, and edged by a series of pendants (pteryges) with a head of ferocious animals and a cloak (paludamentum). In his left hand remains the traces of a sword; his raised right arm probably leant on a spear. On his feat he wears shoes decorated at the ankles with a lion skin. The statue dates from the dynasty of the Antonine Emperors and is the dress of the supreme military commander.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman mask from the  National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman mask from the  National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panel of Medusa from a Roman ship, the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The head of the medusa is an example of refined craftsmanship. The detail of the hair, the scales, the snakes and the nostrils were made using hand held tools . the work is at its most frightening when viewed from a low anyle suggesting that it was designed to be places high up on the ship .  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman mask from the  National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panel of Medusa from a Roman ship, the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The head of the medusa is an example of refined craftsmanship. The detail of the hair, the scales, the snakes and the nostrils were made using hand held tools . the work is at its most frightening when viewed from a low anyle suggesting that it was designed to be places high up on the ship .  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panel of Medusa from a Roman ship, the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The head of the medusa is an example of refined craftsmanship. The detail of the hair, the scales, the snakes and the nostrils were made using hand held tools . the work is at its most frightening when viewed from a low anyle suggesting that it was designed to be places high up on the ship .  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panels that covered the end of the beams from a Roman ship, from the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The forearms were used to ward off evil the extended gesture was meant to keep danger away.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panels that covered the end of the beams from a Roman ship, from the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The forearms were used to ward off evil the extended gesture was meant to keep danger away.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panels that covered the end of the beams from a Roman ship, from the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The forearms were used to ward off evil the extended gesture was meant to keep danger away.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panels that covered the end of the beams from a Roman ship, from the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The forearms were used to ward off evil the extended gesture was meant to keep danger away.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panels that covered the end of the beams from a Roman ship, from the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The forearms were used to ward off evil the extended gesture was meant to keep danger away.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panels that covered the end of the beams from a Roman ship, from the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The forearms were used to ward off evil the extended gesture was meant to keep danger away.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panels that covered the end of the beams from a Roman ship, from the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The forearms were used to ward off evil the extended gesture was meant to keep danger away.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panels that covered the end of the beams from a Roman ship, from the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The forearms were used to ward off evil the extended gesture was meant to keep danger away.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman decoration panels that covered the end of the beams from a Roman ship, from the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The forearms were used to ward off evil the extended gesture was meant to keep danger away.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Double sided Roman herm of Dionysus from the mid 2nd cent. AD excavated from the via Sallustiani, Rome. This bust shows Dionysus with his traditional band around his head, he appears as a youthful man on one side and as a mature man with a beard on this sid.   The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Double sided Roman herm of Dionysus from the mid 2nd cent. AD excavated from the via Sallustiani, Rome. This bust shows Dionysus with his traditional band around his head, he appears as a youthful man on one side and as a mature man with a beard on this sid.   The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Hercules from the mid 2nd cent. AD excavated from the Via Appia. Hercules is portrayed as a mature man at rest, his naked body wrapped in a lion skin; he probably geld his club in his left hand. His style of dress was typical of that used in the Roman theatre. The statue of Hercules is a reworking of a Greek original dating from around the 2nd or 3rd cent. BC .  Inv  115165, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Hercules from the mid 2nd cent. AD excavated from the Via Appia. Hercules is portrayed as a mature man at rest, his naked body wrapped in a lion skin; he probably geld his club in his left hand. His style of dress was typical of that used in the Roman theatre. The statue of Hercules is a reworking of a Greek original dating from around the 2nd or 3rd cent. BC .  Inv  115165, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Hercules from the mid 2nd cent. AD excavated from the Via Appia. Hercules is portrayed as a mature man at rest, his naked body wrapped in a lion skin; he probably geld his club in his left hand. His style of dress was typical of that used in the Roman theatre. The statue of Hercules is a reworking of a Greek original dating from around the 2nd or 3rd cent. BC .  Inv  115165, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Hercules from the mid 2nd cent. AD excavated from the Via Appia. Hercules is portrayed as a mature man at rest, his naked body wrapped in a lion skin; he probably geld his club in his left hand. His style of dress was typical of that used in the Roman theatre. The statue of Hercules is a reworking of a Greek original dating from around the 2nd or 3rd cent. BC .  Inv  115165, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Silenus or Papposilenus from the mid 2nd cent. AD excavated from the Villa Spithoever, via Flavia, Rome, Italy. Papposilenus, the aged Silenus was tutor to Cionysus. In this statue he is portrayed with a hairy coat accentuating his wild nature. When the statue was complete it may have had its right arm held up grasping a bunch of grapes and a cup of wine in the left hand. The statue is copied from a late hellenistic original dating from 2nd cent. BC known as the satyr pouring wine by Greek sculptor Praxiteles circa 370-300 BC .  Inv  78294, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Silenus or Papposilenus from the mid 2nd cent. AD excavated from the Villa Spithoever, via Flavia, Rome, Italy. Papposilenus, the aged Silenus was tutor to Cionysus. In this statue he is portrayed with a hairy coat accentuating his wild nature. When the statue was complete it may have had its right arm held up grasping a bunch of grapes and a cup of wine in the left hand. The statue is copied from a late hellenistic original dating from 2nd cent. BC known as the satyr pouring wine by Greek sculptor Praxiteles circa 370-300 BC .  Inv  78294, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Silenus or Papposilenus from the mid 2nd cent. AD excavated from the Villa Spithoever, via Flavia, Rome, Italy. Papposilenus, the aged Silenus was tutor to Cionysus. In this statue he is portrayed with a hairy coat accentuating his wild nature. When the statue was complete it may have had its right arm held up grasping a bunch of grapes and a cup of wine in the left hand. The statue is copied from a late hellenistic original dating from 2nd cent. BC known as the satyr pouring wine by Greek sculptor Praxiteles circa 370-300 BC .  Inv  78294, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Silenus or Papposilenus from the mid 2nd cent. AD excavated from the Villa Spithoever, via Flavia, Rome, Italy. Papposilenus, the aged Silenus was tutor to Cionysus. In this statue he is portrayed with a hairy coat accentuating his wild nature. When the statue was complete it may have had its right arm held up grasping a bunch of grapes and a cup of wine in the left hand. The statue is copied from a late hellenistic original dating from 2nd cent. BC known as the satyr pouring wine by Greek sculptor Praxiteles circa 370-300 BC .  Inv  78294, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Silenus or Papposilenus from the mid 2nd cent. AD excavated from the Villa Spithoever, via Flavia, Rome, Italy. Papposilenus, the aged Silenus was tutor to Cionysus. In this statue he is portrayed with a hairy coat accentuating his wild nature. When the statue was complete it may have had its right arm held up grasping a bunch of grapes and a cup of wine in the left hand. The statue is copied from a late hellenistic original dating from 2nd cent. BC known as the satyr pouring wine by Greek sculptor Praxiteles circa 370-300 BC .  Inv  78294, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Silenus or Papposilenus from the mid 2nd cent. AD excavated from the Villa Spithoever, via Flavia, Rome, Italy. Papposilenus, the aged Silenus was tutor to Cionysus. In this statue he is portrayed with a hairy coat accentuating his wild nature. When the statue was complete it may have had its right arm held up grasping a bunch of grapes and a cup of wine in the left hand. The statue is copied from a late hellenistic original dating from 2nd cent. BC known as the satyr pouring wine by Greek sculptor Praxiteles circa 370-300 BC .  Inv  78294, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Silenus or Papposilenus from the mid 2nd cent. AD excavated from the Villa Spithoever, via Flavia, Rome, Italy. Papposilenus, the aged Silenus was tutor to Cionysus. In this statue he is portrayed with a hairy coat accentuating his wild nature. When the statue was complete it may have had its right arm held up grasping a bunch of grapes and a cup of wine in the left hand. The statue is copied from a late hellenistic original dating from 2nd cent. BC known as the satyr pouring wine by Greek sculptor Praxiteles circa 370-300 BC .  Inv  78294, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Silenus or Papposilenus from the mid 2nd cent. AD excavated from the Villa Spithoever, via Flavia, Rome, Italy. Papposilenus, the aged Silenus was tutor to Cionysus. In this statue he is portrayed with a hairy coat accentuating his wild nature. When the statue was complete it may have had its right arm held up grasping a bunch of grapes and a cup of wine in the left hand. The statue is copied from a late hellenistic original dating from 2nd cent. BC known as the satyr pouring wine by Greek sculptor Praxiteles circa 370-300 BC .  Inv  78294, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Silenus or Papposilenus from the second half of the 2nd cent. AD excavated from the Villa Marittima, Torre Astura Italy.  Silenus was the tutor to Dionysus is portrayed here as he was portrayed on stage in the Roman theatres. His mask is that of the theatre and he is wearing a lambskin cloak and hairy tights.  Inv 135769, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Silenus or Papposilenus from the second half of the 2nd cent. AD excavated from the Villa Marittima, Torre Astura Italy.  Silenus was the tutor to Dionysus is portrayed here as he was portrayed on stage in the Roman theatres. His mask is that of the theatre and he is wearing a lambskin cloak and hairy tights.  Inv 135769, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman relief sculpture panel decorated on both sides with masks from the second half of the 1st cent. AD excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Italy. The panel is sculpted on both sides; the front side depicts the half moon shaped face of a deity wearing a crown.  Inv 112158, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman relief sculpture panel decorated on both sides with masks from the second half of the 1st cent. AD excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Italy. The panel is sculpted on both sides; the front side depicts the half moon shaped face of a deity wearing a crown.  Inv 112158, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman relief sculpture panel decorated on both sides with masks from the second half of the 1st cent. AD excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Italy. The panel is sculpted on both sides; the front side depicts the half moon shaped face of a deity wearing a crown.  Inv 112158, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy

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