• Seated terracotta goddess, probably a sign of fertility. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a grey background
  • Seated terracotta goddess, probably a sign of fertility. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a white background
  • Seated terracotta goddess, probably a sign of fertility. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara
  • Terracotta Goddess figure which has been associated with agriculture & human fertility because of her big breasts and wide hips. She is depicted sitting between 2 leopards suggesting she was important. 5750 BC. . Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a black background
  • Seated terracotta goddess, probably a sign of fertility. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a gray mottled background
  • Terracotta Goddess figure which has been associated with agriculture & human fertility because of her big breasts and wide hips. She is depicted sitting between 2 leopards suggesting she was important. 5750 BC. . Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a white background
  • Terracotta Goddess figure which has been associated with agriculture & human fertility because of her big breasts and wide hips. She is depicted sitting between 2 leopards suggesting she was important. 5750 BC. . Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a grey background
  • Terracotta Goddess figure which has been associated with agriculture & human fertility because of her big breasts and wide hips. She is depicted sitting between 2 leopards suggesting she was important. 5750 BC. . Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a gray mottled background
  • Seated terracotta goddess, probably a sign of fertility. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a black background
  • Terracotta Goddess figure which has been associated with agriculture & human fertility because of her big breasts and wide hips. She is depicted sitting between 2 leopards suggesting she was important. 5750 BC. . Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara
  • Seated marble goddess. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara
  • Seated marble goddess. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a grey background
  • Middle Neolithic quartzose sandstone statue of a goddess from the archaeological site of Cott'e Baccas in Segarlu, Sardinia,. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum) - White Background
  • Middle Neolithic quartzose sandstone statue of a goddess from the archaeological site of Cott'e Baccas in Segarlu, Sardinia,. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum)  - Art Background
  • Small Early Neolithic calcareous alabaster  statue of a goddess sitting from Su Cungiau de Marcu, Declomputzu, Sardinia Italy. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum)  - Grey Background
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Seated marble goddess. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a white background
  • Seated marble goddess. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a black background
  • Seated marble goddess. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a gray mottled background
  • Middle Neolithic kaolinite statue of a goddess from the site of Su Anzu in Narbolia, Sardinia. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum) - Art Background
  • Middle Neolithic kaolinite statue of a goddess from the site of Su Anzu in Narbolia, Sardinia. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum) - White Background
  • Middle Neolithic kaolinite statue of a goddess from the site of Su Anzu in Narbolia, Sardinia. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum)  - Black Background
  • Middle Neolithic kaolinite statue of a goddess from the site of Su Anzu in Narbolia, Sardinia. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum) - Grey Background
  • Middle Neolithic kaolinite statue of a goddess from the site of Su Anzu in Narbolia, Sardinia. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum) - Art Grey Background
  • Middle Neolithic quartzose sandstone statue of a goddess from the archaeological site of Cott'e Baccas in Segarlu, Sardinia,. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum)  - Black Background
  • Middle Neolithic quartzose sandstone statue of a goddess from the archaeological site of Cott'e Baccas in Segarlu, Sardinia,. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum) - Grey Background
  • Middle Neolithic quartzose sandstone statue of a goddess from the archaeological site of Cott'e Baccas in Segarlu, Sardinia,. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum) - Art Grey Background
  • Small Early Neolithic calcareous alabaster  statue of a goddess sitting from Su Cungiau de Marcu, Declomputzu, Sardinia Italy. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum) - White Background
  • Small Early Neolithic calcareous alabaster  statue of a goddess sitting from Su Cungiau de Marcu, Declomputzu, Sardinia Italy. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum) - Art Background
  • Small Early Neolithic calcareous alabaster  statue of a goddess sitting from Su Cungiau de Marcu, Declomputzu, Sardinia Italy. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum)  - Black Background
  • Small Early Neolithic calcareous alabaster  statue of a goddess sitting from Su Cungiau de Marcu, Declomputzu, Sardinia Italy. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum) - Art Grey Background
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • Close up of the inscription dedicated to King Midas on the Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • Close up of the inscription dedicated to King Midas on the Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum exhibit, London.<br />
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. The sculpture here changes the pattern by raising the right arm to the neck, rather than making her arm cross her chest, this flattens the composition.
  • Middle Neoloithic statue from grave 410 of the hypogeic necropolis of cuccuru S'Arriu, Cabras, Sardinia, Italy. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum) - Art Grey Background
  • Middle Neoloithic statue from grave 410 of the hypogeic necropolis of cuccuru S'Arriu, Cabras, Sardinia, Italy. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum) - Art Background
  • Middle Neoloithic statue from grave 410 of the hypogeic necropolis of cuccuru S'Arriu, Cabras, Sardinia, Italy. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum)  - White Background
  • Middle Neoloithic statue from grave 410 of the hypogeic necropolis of cuccuru S'Arriu, Cabras, Sardinia, Italy. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum)  - Grey Background
  • Middle Neoloithic statue from grave 410 of the hypogeic necropolis of cuccuru S'Arriu, Cabras, Sardinia, Italy. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum) - Black Background
  • steps amd paths leading to the Phrygian water cistern of Midas city cut deep into the underground rock. 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • The Unfinished rock monument of Midas, 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This rock facade was planned but never finished and so little is known about the unfinished Monument. It is also known locally as the Kucuk Yazilikaya ( “little written rock”), since it appears to have been planned as a smaller version of the Midas Monument, also called Yazilikaya. It measures 7m x 10m and faces west, unlike the other monument at Midas whose facades face east. Since it was never completed, it was gives some idea of the construction techniques : first the rock was flattened and then the facade was carved from the top down. The architectural frame and the ornament were carved at the same time. About  2m below the monument are a smaller facade, to the left and a small cut altar to the right.
  • The Unfinished rock monument of Midas, 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This rock facade was planned but never finished and so little is known about the unfinished Monument. It is also known locally as the Kucuk Yazilikaya ( “little written rock”), since it appears to have been planned as a smaller version of the Midas Monument, also called Yazilikaya. It measures 7m x 10m and faces west, unlike the other monument at Midas whose facades face east. Since it was never completed, it was gives some idea of the construction techniques : first the rock was flattened and then the facade was carved from the top down. The architectural frame and the ornament were carved at the same time. About  2m below the monument are a smaller facade, to the left and a small cut altar to the right.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Greek marble Statue of Hermaphroditius ( Hermaphrodites) a mythical being that has both male & female characteristics. From Pergamum (Bergama) Turkey. Istanbul Archaeology Museum, Inv 363T Cat. Mendel 624.
  • Greek marble Statue of Hermaphroditius ( Hermaphrodites) a mythical being that has both male & female characteristics. From Pergamum (Bergama) Turkey. Istanbul Archaeology Museum, Inv 363T Cat. Mendel 624.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • steps amd paths leading to the Phrygian water cistern of Midas city cut deep into the underground rock. 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.
  • steps amd paths leading to the Phrygian water cistern of Midas city cut deep into the underground rock. 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • The Unfinished rock monument of Midas, 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This rock facade was planned but never finished and so little is known about the unfinished Monument. It is also known locally as the Kucuk Yazilikaya ( “little written rock”), since it appears to have been planned as a smaller version of the Midas Monument, also called Yazilikaya. It measures 7m x 10m and faces west, unlike the other monument at Midas whose facades face east. Since it was never completed, it was gives some idea of the construction techniques : first the rock was flattened and then the facade was carved from the top down. The architectural frame and the ornament were carved at the same time. About  2m below the monument are a smaller facade, to the left and a small cut altar to the right.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Greek marble Statue of Hermaphroditius ( Hermaphrodites) a mythical being that has both male & female characteristics. From Pergamum (Bergama) Turkey. Istanbul Archaeology Museum, Inv 363T Cat. Mendel 624.
  • Greek marble Statue of Hermaphroditius ( Hermaphrodites) a mythical being that has both male & female characteristics. From Pergamum (Bergama) Turkey. Istanbul Archaeology Museum, Inv 363T Cat. Mendel 624.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • Greek Classical Period Statue of Aphrodite made of Parian marble. Restored by the famous Italian Sculptor A. Canova ( 1757 - 1822 ), Aphrodite is standing nude apart from a richly draped himation which she retains with her left hand in front of her pudenda. 4th c. BC. Athens National Archaeological Museum cat No 3524, from the collection of Lord Hope, donated by M. Embeirikos in 1924.<br />
This statue of Aphrodite is a variant of the Aphrodite (Venus) of Cnidus and is a copy of a 2nd century AD copy of a 4th century  original by the ancient Greek sculptor Praxiteles of Athens. As with the Capitaline Venus, Aphrodite is rising from bathing and is covering her breasts with her right hand, unlike the other known variants of this pose the Aphrodite of the Athens museum is covered from the waste down with a drape.
  • Greek Classical Period Statue of Aphrodite made of Parian marble. Restored by the famous Italian Sculptor A. Canova ( 1757 - 1822 ), Aphrodite is standing nude apart from a richly draped himation which she retains with her left hand in front of her pudenda. 4th c. BC. Athens National Archaeological Museum cat No 3524, from the collection of Lord Hope, donated by M. Embeirikos in 1924.<br />
This statue of Aphrodite is a variant of the Aphrodite (Venus) of Cnidus and is a copy of a 2nd century AD copy of a 4th century  original by the ancient Greek sculptor Praxiteles of Athens. As with the Capitaline Venus, Aphrodite is rising from bathing and is covering her breasts with her right hand, unlike the other known variants of this pose the Aphrodite of the Athens museum is covered from the waste down with a drape.
  • Greek Classical Period Statue of Aphrodite made of Parian marble. Restored by the famous Italian Sculptor A. Canova ( 1757 - 1822 ), Aphrodite is standing nude apart from a richly draped himation which she retains with her left hand in front of her pudenda. 4th c. BC. Athens National Archaeological Museum cat No 3524, from the collection of Lord Hope, donated by M. Embeirikos in 1924.<br />
This statue of Aphrodite is a variant of the Aphrodite (Venus) of Cnidus and is a copy of a 2nd century AD copy of a 4th century  original by the ancient Greek sculptor Praxiteles of Athens. As with the Capitaline Venus, Aphrodite is rising from bathing and is covering her breasts with her right hand, unlike the other known variants of this pose the Aphrodite of the Athens museum is covered from the waste down with a drape.
  • Greek Classical Period Statue of Aphrodite made of Parian marble. Restored by the famous Italian Sculptor A. Canova ( 1757 - 1822 ), Aphrodite is standing nude apart from a richly draped himation which she retains with her left hand in front of her pudenda. 4th c. BC. Athens National Archaeological Museum cat No 3524, from the collection of Lord Hope, donated by M. Embeirikos in 1924.<br />
<br />
This statue of Aphrodite is a variant of the Aphrodite (Venus) of Cnidus and is a copy of a 2nd century AD copy of a 4th century  original by the ancient Greek sculptor Praxiteles of Athens. As with the Capitaline Venus, Aphrodite is rising from bathing and is covering her breasts with her right hand, unlike the other known variants of this pose the Aphrodite of the Athens museum is covered from the waste down with a drape.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • Ancient Egyptian case of the inner coffin of Nespamai depicting the goddess Nut. 500BC BC. Neues Museum Berlin AM 31213/2.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the goddess Roma and Ge (Earth),  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The goddess Roma holds a spear and wears a crown in the form of a city wall. Earth reclines half naked leaning on a pile of fruit. She holds a cornucopia full of more fruit. A baby child (now damaged) climbs up the horn she holds. The relief represents Earths fertility and abundance overseen by Rome.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the goddess Roma and Ge (Earth),  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a black background. <br />
<br />
The goddess Roma holds a spear and wears a crown in the form of a city wall. Earth reclines half naked leaning on a pile of fruit. She holds a cornucopia full of more fruit. A baby child (now damaged) climbs up the horn she holds. The relief represents Earths fertility and abundance overseen by Rome.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the goddess Roma and Ge (Earth),  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against an art background. <br />
<br />
The goddess Roma holds a spear and wears a crown in the form of a city wall. Earth reclines half naked leaning on a pile of fruit. She holds a cornucopia full of more fruit. A baby child (now damaged) climbs up the horn she holds. The relief represents Earths fertility and abundance overseen by Rome.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the goddess Roma and Ge (Earth),  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background. <br />
<br />
The goddess Roma holds a spear and wears a crown in the form of a city wall. Earth reclines half naked leaning on a pile of fruit. She holds a cornucopia full of more fruit. A baby child (now damaged) climbs up the horn she holds. The relief represents Earths fertility and abundance overseen by Rome.
  • Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Goddess. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Sitting in a chair without a backrest, the head and the face of the figure are completely destroyed. She has a long veil on her head, a long dress hanging down to her ankles, and the shoes with the curved ends. The stool under her feet indicates that she is an important person. She drinks something from the vessel in her right hand and she keeps the handled goblet in her hand a little higher.
  • Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone pane of Goddess. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Sitting in a chair without a backrest, the head and the face of the figure are completely destroyed. She has a long veil on her head, a long dress hanging down to her ankles, and the shoes with the curved ends. The stool under her feet indicates that she is an important person. She drinks something from the vessel in her right hand and she keeps the handled goblet in her hand a little higher.  <br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone pane of Goddess. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Sitting in a chair without a backrest, the head and the face of the figure are completely destroyed. She has a long veil on her head, a long dress hanging down to her ankles, and the shoes with the curved ends. The stool under her feet indicates that she is an important person. She drinks something from the vessel in her right hand and she keeps the handled goblet in her hand a little higher.  <br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone pane of Goddess. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Sitting in a chair without a backrest, the head and the face of the figure are completely destroyed. She has a long veil on her head, a long dress hanging down to her ankles, and the shoes with the curved ends. The stool under her feet indicates that she is an important person. She drinks something from the vessel in her right hand and she keeps the handled goblet in her hand a little higher.  <br />
<br />
Against a brown gray background.
  • Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone pane of Goddess. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Sitting in a chair without a backrest, the head and the face of the figure are completely destroyed. She has a long veil on her head, a long dress hanging down to her ankles, and the shoes with the curved ends. The stool under her feet indicates that she is an important person. She drinks something from the vessel in her right hand and she keeps the handled goblet in her hand a little higher.  <br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Photo of Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel  of Long Wall Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 BC. Anatolian Civilisations Museum.<br />
<br />
 The hieroglyphics reads; "I am Win-a-tis, beloved wife of my Lord Suhi, wherever and whenever my husband honours his name, he will honour my name as well with favours". Underneath, there are two goddess figures, one is naked with a horned head, holding her breasts with her hands. Her genitalia is indicated by a triangle. <br />
<br />
On a brown art background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel  of Long Wall Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 BC. Anatolian Civilisations Museum.<br />
<br />
 The hieroglyphics reads; "I am Win-a-tis, beloved wife of my Lord Suhi, wherever and whenever my husband honours his name, he will honour my name as well with favours". Underneath, there are two goddess figures, one is naked with a horned head, holding her breasts with her hands. Her genitalia is indicated by a triangle. <br />
<br />
On a White Background.
  • Picture & image of Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel  of Long Wall Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 BC. Anatolian Civilisations Museum.<br />
<br />
 The hieroglyphics reads; "I am Win-a-tis, beloved wife of my Lord Suhi, wherever and whenever my husband honours his name, he will honour my name as well with favours". Underneath, there are two goddess figures, one is naked with a horned head, holding her breasts with her hands. Her genitalia is indicated by a triangle. <br />
<br />
On a gray background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel  of Long Wall Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 BC. Anatolian Civilisations Museum.<br />
<br />
 The hieroglyphics reads; "I am Win-a-tis, beloved wife of my Lord Suhi, wherever and whenever my husband honours his name, he will honour my name as well with favours". Underneath, there are two goddess figures, one is naked with a horned head, holding her breasts with her hands. Her genitalia is indicated by a triangle. <br />
<br />
On a black background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel  of Long Wall Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 BC. Anatolian Civilisations Museum.<br />
<br />
 The hieroglyphics reads; "I am Win-a-tis, beloved wife of my Lord Suhi, wherever and whenever my husband honours his name, he will honour my name as well with favours". Underneath, there are two goddess figures, one is naked with a horned head, holding her breasts with her hands. Her genitalia is indicated by a triangle. <br />
<br />
On a grey art background.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of a Goddess inscribing a trophy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
A draped goddess strides forward to inscribe a military trophy to which is bound a kneeling female captive. The goddess is probably a personification such as Honour, Virtue or Courage.
  • Statue of Juno known as La Providence, a 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Rome, Italy. Juno is an ancient Roman goddess, the protector and special counselor of the state. As the patron goddess of Rome and the Roman Empire, Juno was called Regina ("Queen") and, together with Jupiter and Minerva, was worshipped as a triad on the Capitol (Juno Capitolina) in Rome. The Royal Collection Inv No. MR 333 or Ma 485, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Esculape or Asclepius - a second century AD Roman sculpture. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, his daughters included Hygieia, ”Hygiene” the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation as well as Iaso, the goddess of recuperation from illness and Aceso the goddess of the healing process.  The Albani Collection, Inv No.  Ma 929, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Esculape or Asclepius - a second century AD Roman sculpture. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, his daughters included Hygieia, ”Hygiene” the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation as well as Iaso, the goddess of recuperation from illness and Aceso the goddess of the healing process.  The Albani Collection, Inv No.  Ma 929, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Heyl Statue of Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love. 2nd century terracotta from the Heyl collection. This statuette is one of the most beautiful examples of ancient terracotta statues in existence. The close fitting robe or the goddess of love has slipped from her shoulders, her raised left leg perhaps stood on a pillar. The front of the figure, which was shaped in a mould, was carved using a modelling scraper and finally painted. Altes Museum Berlin
  • Heyl Statue of Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love. 2nd century terracotta from the Heyl collection. This statuette is one of the most beautiful examples of ancient terracotta statues in existence. The close fitting robe or the goddess of love has slipped from her shoulders, her raised left leg perhaps stood on a pillar. The front of the figure, which was shaped in a mould, was carved using a modelling scraper and finally painted. Altes Museum Berlin
  • Heyl Statue of Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love. 2nd century terracotta from the Heyl collection. This statuette is one of the most beautiful examples of ancient terracotta statues in existence. The close fitting robe or the goddess of love has slipped from her shoulders, her raised left leg perhaps stood on a pillar. The front of the figure, which was shaped in a mould, was carved using a modelling scraper and finally painted. Altes Museum Berlin
  • Heyl Statue of Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love. 2nd century terracotta from the Heyl collection. This statuette is one of the most beautiful examples of ancient terracotta statues in existence. The close fitting robe or the goddess of love has slipped from her shoulders, her raised left leg perhaps stood on a pillar. The front of the figure, which was shaped in a mould, was carved using a modelling scraper and finally painted. Altes Museum Berlin
  • Statue of Juno known as La Providence, a 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Rome, Italy. Juno is an ancient Roman goddess, the protector and special counselor of the state. As the patron goddess of Rome and the Roman Empire, Juno was called Regina ("Queen") and, together with Jupiter and Minerva, was worshipped as a triad on the Capitol (Juno Capitolina) in Rome. The Royal Collection Inv No. MR 333 or Ma 485, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Juno known as La Providence, a 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Rome, Italy. Juno is an ancient Roman goddess, the protector and special counselor of the state. As the patron goddess of Rome and the Roman Empire, Juno was called Regina ("Queen") and, together with Jupiter and Minerva, was worshipped as a triad on the Capitol (Juno Capitolina) in Rome. The Royal Collection Inv No. MR 333 or Ma 485, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Esculape or Asclepius - a second century AD Roman sculpture. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, his daughters included Hygieia, ”Hygiene” the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation as well as Iaso, the goddess of recuperation from illness and Aceso the goddess of the healing process.  The Albani Collection, Inv No.  Ma 929, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of a Goddess inscribing a trophy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
A draped goddess strides forward to inscribe a military trophy to which is bound a kneeling female captive. The goddess is probably a personification such as Honour, Virtue or Courage.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of a Goddess inscribing a trophy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
A draped goddess strides forward to inscribe a military trophy to which is bound a kneeling female captive. The goddess is probably a personification such as Honour, Virtue or Courage.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of a Goddess inscribing a trophy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
A draped goddess strides forward to inscribe a military trophy to which is bound a kneeling female captive. The goddess is probably a personification such as Honour, Virtue or Courage.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of a Goddess inscribing a trophy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
A draped goddess strides forward to inscribe a military trophy to which is bound a kneeling female captive. The goddess is probably a personification such as Honour, Virtue or Courage.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of a Goddess inscribing a trophy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
A draped goddess strides forward to inscribe a military trophy to which is bound a kneeling female captive. The goddess is probably a personification such as Honour, Virtue or Courage.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of a Goddess inscribing a trophy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
A draped goddess strides forward to inscribe a military trophy to which is bound a kneeling female captive. The goddess is probably a personification such as Honour, Virtue or Courage.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of a Goddess inscribing a trophy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
A draped goddess strides forward to inscribe a military trophy to which is bound a kneeling female captive. The goddess is probably a personification such as Honour, Virtue or Courage.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of a Goddess inscribing a trophy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
A draped goddess strides forward to inscribe a military trophy to which is bound a kneeling female captive. The goddess is probably a personification such as Honour, Virtue or Courage.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of a Goddess inscribing a trophy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
A draped goddess strides forward to inscribe a military trophy to which is bound a kneeling female captive. The goddess is probably a personification such as Honour, Virtue or Courage.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of a Goddess inscribing a trophy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
A draped goddess strides forward to inscribe a military trophy to which is bound a kneeling female captive. The goddess is probably a personification such as Honour, Virtue or Courage.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of a Goddess inscribing a trophy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
A draped goddess strides forward to inscribe a military trophy to which is bound a kneeling female captive. The goddess is probably a personification such as Honour, Virtue or Courage.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of a Goddess inscribing a trophy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
A draped goddess strides forward to inscribe a military trophy to which is bound a kneeling female captive. The goddess is probably a personification such as Honour, Virtue or Courage.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of a Goddess inscribing a trophy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
A draped goddess strides forward to inscribe a military trophy to which is bound a kneeling female captive. The goddess is probably a personification such as Honour, Virtue or Courage.
  • Roman SSebasteion relief  sculpture of a Goddess inscribing a trophy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
A draped goddess strides forward to inscribe a military trophy to which is bound a kneeling female captive. The goddess is probably a personification such as Honour, Virtue or Courage.
  • Statue of Juno known as La Providence, a 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Rome, Italy. Juno is an ancient Roman goddess, the protector and special counselor of the state. As the patron goddess of Rome and the Roman Empire, Juno was called Regina ("Queen") and, together with Jupiter and Minerva, was worshipped as a triad on the Capitol (Juno Capitolina) in Rome. The Royal Collection Inv No. MR 333 or Ma 485, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Juno known as La Providence, a 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Rome, Italy. Juno is an ancient Roman goddess, the protector and special counselor of the state. As the patron goddess of Rome and the Roman Empire, Juno was called Regina ("Queen") and, together with Jupiter and Minerva, was worshipped as a triad on the Capitol (Juno Capitolina) in Rome. The Royal Collection Inv No. MR 333 or Ma 485, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Juno known as La Providence, a 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Rome, Italy. Juno is an ancient Roman goddess, the protector and special counselor of the state. As the patron goddess of Rome and the Roman Empire, Juno was called Regina ("Queen") and, together with Jupiter and Minerva, was worshipped as a triad on the Capitol (Juno Capitolina) in Rome. The Royal Collection Inv No. MR 333 or Ma 485, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Esculape or Asclepius - a second century AD Roman sculpture. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, his daughters included Hygieia, ”Hygiene” the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation as well as Iaso, the goddess of recuperation from illness and Aceso the goddess of the healing process.  The Albani Collection, Inv No.  Ma 929, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Esculape or Asclepius - a second century AD Roman sculpture. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, his daughters included Hygieia, ”Hygiene” the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation as well as Iaso, the goddess of recuperation from illness and Aceso the goddess of the healing process.  The Albani Collection, Inv No.  Ma 929, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Heyl Statue of Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love. 2nd century terracotta from the Heyl collection. This statuette is one of the most beautiful examples of ancient terracotta statues in existence. The close fitting robe or the goddess of love has slipped from her shoulders, her raised left leg perhaps stood on a pillar. The front of the figure, which was shaped in a mould, was carved using a modelling scraper and finally painted. Altes Museum Berlin
  • Heyl Statue of Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love. 2nd century terracotta from the Heyl collection. This statuette is one of the most beautiful examples of ancient terracotta statues in existence. The close fitting robe or the goddess of love has slipped from her shoulders, her raised left leg perhaps stood on a pillar. The front of the figure, which was shaped in a mould, was carved using a modelling scraper and finally painted. Altes Museum Berlin
  • Heyl Statue of Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love. 2nd century terracotta from the Heyl collection. This statuette is one of the most beautiful examples of ancient terracotta statues in existence. The close fitting robe or the goddess of love has slipped from her shoulders, her raised left leg perhaps stood on a pillar. The front of the figure, which was shaped in a mould, was carved using a modelling scraper and finally painted. Altes Museum Berlin
  • Heyl Statue of Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love. 2nd century terracotta from the Heyl collection. This statuette is one of the most beautiful examples of ancient terracotta statues in existence. The close fitting robe or the goddess of love has slipped from her shoulders, her raised left leg perhaps stood on a pillar. The front of the figure, which was shaped in a mould, was carved using a modelling scraper and finally painted. Altes Museum Berlin
  • Statue of Juno known as La Providence, a 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Rome, Italy. Juno is an ancient Roman goddess, the protector and special counselor of the state. As the patron goddess of Rome and the Roman Empire, Juno was called Regina ("Queen") and, together with Jupiter and Minerva, was worshipped as a triad on the Capitol (Juno Capitolina) in Rome. The Royal Collection Inv No. MR 333 or Ma 485, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Juno known as La Providence, a 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Rome, Italy. Juno is an ancient Roman goddess, the protector and special counselor of the state. As the patron goddess of Rome and the Roman Empire, Juno was called Regina ("Queen") and, together with Jupiter and Minerva, was worshipped as a triad on the Capitol (Juno Capitolina) in Rome. The Royal Collection Inv No. MR 333 or Ma 485, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Esculape or Asclepius - a second century AD Roman sculpture. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, his daughters included Hygieia, ”Hygiene” the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation as well as Iaso, the goddess of recuperation from illness and Aceso the goddess of the healing process.  The Albani Collection, Inv No.  Ma 929, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Esculape or Asclepius - a second century AD Roman sculpture. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, his daughters included Hygieia, ”Hygiene” the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation as well as Iaso, the goddess of recuperation from illness and Aceso the goddess of the healing process.  The Albani Collection, Inv No.  Ma 929, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Esculape or Asclepius - a second century AD Roman sculpture. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, his daughters included Hygieia, ”Hygiene” the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation as well as Iaso, the goddess of recuperation from illness and Aceso the goddess of the healing process.  The Albani Collection, Inv No.  Ma 929, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Figures from the East Pediment of the Parthenon, Acropolis Athens. From left to right cat no K possibly the goddess Hestia ,L & M probably the goddess Aphrodite lying the the lap of Dione her mother. British Museum London Exhibit
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of the goddess Herma (day), Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Goddess  Herma or Day steadies a dramatically billowing cloak that frames her head. The motif , also visible on the Okeanos relief, indicates flying, floating and divine epiphany - the appearance of gods to mortals. Day would be paired with night : together they signify the eternity of the Roman imperial order.
  • Close up of Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the goddess Roma and Ge (Earth),  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a white background. <br />
<br />
The goddess Roma holds a spear and wears a crown in the form of a city wall. Earth reclines half naked leaning on a pile of fruit. She holds a cornucopia full of more fruit. A baby child (now damaged) climbs up the horn she holds. The relief represents Earths fertility and abundance overseen by Rome.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
A winged goddess Victory( Nike) flies past carrying a military trophy. She wears a long light dress and has one breast and one leg exposed. Her clothing is set in motion by her swift flight.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Long Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Goddess Kubaba. Goddess is depicted from the profile. The part below the chest of the relief is broken. She holds a pomegranate in her hands on her chest. She carries a one-horned headdress on her head. Her braided hair hangs down to her shoulder. The text in the hieroglyphics is not understood. The lower part of the relief has been restored. <br />
<br />
On a grey art background.
  • Statue of Esculape or Asclepius - a second century AD Roman sculpture. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, his daughters included Hygieia, ”Hygiene” the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation as well as Iaso, the goddess of recuperation from illness and Aceso the goddess of the healing process.  The Albani Collection, Inv No.  Ma 929, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Artimis and Doe also known as the Diana of Versailles. A 1st- 2nd century Imperial Roman marble statue of the Greek Goddess Artimis ( Roman Diana) copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  Louvre Mueum, Paris. Cat No MA 589<br />
The slightly over life size Diana (goddess of the hunt)  is accompanied by a under life size doe with antlers. She wears a short Dorian chiton, a himation around her waist, and sandals. She is looking to the right and with her right hand is starting to take an arrow out of a quiver on her back. The bow used to be in her left hand which is holding the deers antlers and part of it can be seen in this hand. This was a popular statue with replicas being found at Leptis Magna (Libya) and at Antalya (Turkey).
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of the goddess Herma (day), Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Goddess  Herma or Day steadies a dramatically billowing cloak that frames her head. The motif , also visible on the Okeanos relief, indicates flying, floating and divine epiphany - the appearance of gods to mortals. Day would be paired with night : together they signify the eternity of the Roman imperial order.
  • Roman SSebasteion relief sculpture of the goddess Herma (day), Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Goddess  Herma or Day steadies a dramatically billowing cloak that frames her head. The motif , also visible on the Okeanos relief, indicates flying, floating and divine epiphany - the appearance of gods to mortals. Day would be paired with night : together they signify the eternity of the Roman imperial order.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of the goddess Herma (day), Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Goddess  Herma or Day steadies a dramatically billowing cloak that frames her head. The motif , also visible on the Okeanos relief, indicates flying, floating and divine epiphany - the appearance of gods to mortals. Day would be paired with night : together they signify the eternity of the Roman imperial order.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of the goddess Herma (day), Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Goddess  Herma or Day steadies a dramatically billowing cloak that frames her head. The motif , also visible on the Okeanos relief, indicates flying, floating and divine epiphany - the appearance of gods to mortals. Day would be paired with night : together they signify the eternity of the Roman imperial order.
  • Close up of Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Close up of Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Close up of Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Close up of Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
A winged goddess Victory( Nike) flies past carrying a military trophy. She wears a long light dress and has one breast and one leg exposed. Her clothing is set in motion by her swift flight.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
A winged goddess Victory( Nike) flies past carrying a military trophy. She wears a long light dress and has one breast and one leg exposed. Her clothing is set in motion by her swift flight.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
A winged goddess Victory( Nike) flies past carrying a military trophy. She wears a long light dress and has one breast and one leg exposed. Her clothing is set in motion by her swift flight.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
A winged goddess Victory( Nike) flies past carrying a military trophy. She wears a long light dress and has one breast and one leg exposed. Her clothing is set in motion by her swift flight.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Long Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
Goddess Kubaba. Goddess is depicted from the profile. She holds a pomegranate in her hands on her chest. She carries a one-horned headdress on her head. Her braided hair hangs down to her shoulder . <br />
<br />
On a White Background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Long Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
Goddess Kubaba. Goddess is depicted from the profile. She holds a pomegranate in her hands on her chest. She carries a one-horned headdress on her head. Her braided hair hangs down to her shoulder . <br />
<br />
On a black background.
  • Picture & image of Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Long Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
Goddess Kubaba. Goddess is depicted from the profile. She holds a pomegranate in her hands on her chest. She carries a one-horned headdress on her head. Her braided hair hangs down to her shoulder . <br />
<br />
On a gray background.
  • Photo of Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Long Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
Goddess Kubaba. Goddess is depicted from the profile. She holds a pomegranate in her hands on her chest. She carries a one-horned headdress on her head. Her braided hair hangs down to her shoulder . <br />
<br />
On a brown art background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Long Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
Goddess Kubaba. Goddess is depicted from the profile. She holds a pomegranate in her hands on her chest. She carries a one-horned headdress on her head. Her braided hair hangs down to her shoulder . <br />
<br />
On a grey art background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Long Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Goddess Kubaba. Goddess is depicted from the profile. The part below the chest of the relief is broken. She holds a pomegranate in her hands on her chest. She carries a one-horned headdress on her head. Her braided hair hangs down to her shoulder. The text in the hieroglyphics is not understood. The lower part of the relief has been restored. <br />
<br />
On a White Background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Long Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Goddess Kubaba. Goddess is depicted from the profile. The part below the chest of the relief is broken. She holds a pomegranate in her hands on her chest. She carries a one-horned headdress on her head. Her braided hair hangs down to her shoulder. The text in the hieroglyphics is not understood. The lower part of the relief has been restored. <br />
<br />
On a black background.
  • Picture & image of Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Long Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Goddess Kubaba. Goddess is depicted from the profile. The part below the chest of the relief is broken. She holds a pomegranate in her hands on her chest. She carries a one-horned headdress on her head. Her braided hair hangs down to her shoulder. The text in the hieroglyphics is not understood. The lower part of the relief has been restored. <br />
<br />
On a gray background.
  • Photo of Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Long Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Goddess Kubaba. Goddess is depicted from the profile. The part below the chest of the relief is broken. She holds a pomegranate in her hands on her chest. She carries a one-horned headdress on her head. Her braided hair hangs down to her shoulder. The text in the hieroglyphics is not understood. The lower part of the relief has been restored. <br />
<br />
On a brown art background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Long Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Goddess Kubaba. Goddess is depicted from the profile. The part below the chest of the relief is broken. She holds a pomegranate in her hands on her chest. She carries a one-horned headdress on her head. Her braided hair hangs down to her shoulder. The text in the hieroglyphics is not understood. The lower part of the relief has been restored. <br />
<br />
On a White Background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Long Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Goddess Kubaba. Goddess is depicted from the profile. The part below the chest of the relief is broken. She holds a pomegranate in her hands on her chest. She carries a one-horned headdress on her head. Her braided hair hangs down to her shoulder. The text in the hieroglyphics is not understood. The lower part of the relief has been restored. <br />
<br />
On a black background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Long Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Goddess Kubaba. Goddess is depicted from the profile. The part below the chest of the relief is broken. She holds a pomegranate in her hands on her chest. She carries a one-horned headdress on her head. Her braided hair hangs down to her shoulder. The text in the hieroglyphics is not understood. The lower part of the relief has been restored. <br />
<br />
On a grey art background.
  • Picture & image of Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Long Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Goddess Kubaba. Goddess is depicted from the profile. The part below the chest of the relief is broken. She holds a pomegranate in her hands on her chest. She carries a one-horned headdress on her head. Her braided hair hangs down to her shoulder. The text in the hieroglyphics is not understood. The lower part of the relief has been restored. <br />
<br />
On a gray background.
  • Photo of Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Long Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Goddess Kubaba. Goddess is depicted from the profile. The part below the chest of the relief is broken. She holds a pomegranate in her hands on her chest. She carries a one-horned headdress on her head. Her braided hair hangs down to her shoulder. The text in the hieroglyphics is not understood. The lower part of the relief has been restored. <br />
<br />
On a brown art background.
  • Statue of Esculape or Asclepius - a second century AD Roman sculpture. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, his daughters included Hygieia, ”Hygiene” the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation as well as Iaso, the goddess of recuperation from illness and Aceso the goddess of the healing process.  The Albani Collection, Inv No.  Ma 929, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Artimis and Doe also known as the Diana of Versailles. A 1st- 2nd century Imperial Roman marble statue of the Greek Goddess Artimis ( Roman Diana) copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  Louvre Mueum, Paris. Cat No MA 589<br />
The slightly over life size Diana (goddess of the hunt)  is accompanied by a under life size doe with antlers. She wears a short Dorian chiton, a himation around her waist, and sandals. She is looking to the right and with her right hand is starting to take an arrow out of a quiver on her back. The bow used to be in her left hand which is holding the deers antlers and part of it can be seen in this hand. This was a popular statue with replicas being found at Leptis Magna (Libya) and at Antalya (Turkey).
  • Artimis and Doe also known as the Diana of Versailles. A 1st- 2nd century Imperial Roman marble statue of the Greek Goddess Artimis ( Roman Diana) copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  Louvre Mueum, Paris. Cat No MA 589<br />
The slightly over life size Diana (goddess of the hunt)  is accompanied by a under life size doe with antlers. She wears a short Dorian chiton, a himation around her waist, and sandals. She is looking to the right and with her right hand is starting to take an arrow out of a quiver on her back. The bow used to be in her left hand which is holding the deers antlers and part of it can be seen in this hand. This was a popular statue with replicas being found at Leptis Magna (Libya) and at Antalya (Turkey).
  • Ushabti box of Sched-es-en-mut. Egyptian painted wooden box panel of the deceased in front of a tree goddess, 1540-1075 BC . Neues Reiche Museum, Berlin. Cat No AM630
  • Ushabti box of Sched-es-en-mut. Egyptian painted wooden box panel of the deceased in front of a tree goddess, 1540-1075 BC . Neues Reiche Museum, Berlin. Cat No AM630
  • Ancient Egyptian case of the inner coffin of Nespamai depicting the goddess Nut. 500BC BC. Neues Museum Berlin AM 31213/2.
  • Ancient Egyptian case of the inner coffin of Nespamai depicting the goddess Nut. 500BC BC. Neues Museum Berlin AM 31213/2.
  • Ancient Egyptian case of the inner coffin of Nespamai depicting the goddess Nut. 500BC BC. Neues Museum Berlin AM 31213/2.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aphrodite crowned by Andreia, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
A draped goddess is crowned by a female warrior figure. The goddess is probably Aphrodite, while the warrior has a bare breated Amazonian dress and equipment (spear, sword strap and shield) worn by Roma or Andreia (Bravery)
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aphrodite crowned by Andreia, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
A draped goddess is crowned by a female warrior figure. The goddess is probably Aphrodite, while the warrior has a bare breated Amazonian dress and equipment (spear, sword strap and shield) worn by Roma or Andreia (Bravery)
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aphrodite crowned by Andreia, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
A draped goddess is crowned by a female warrior figure. The goddess is probably Aphrodite, while the warrior has a bare breated Amazonian dress and equipment (spear, sword strap and shield) worn by Roma or Andreia (Bravery)
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aphrodite crowned by Andreia, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
A draped goddess is crowned by a female warrior figure. The goddess is probably Aphrodite, while the warrior has a bare breated Amazonian dress and equipment (spear, sword strap and shield) worn by Roma or Andreia (Bravery)
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aphrodite crowned by Andreia, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
A draped goddess is crowned by a female warrior figure. The goddess is probably Aphrodite, while the warrior has a bare breated Amazonian dress and equipment (spear, sword strap and shield) worn by Roma or Andreia (Bravery)
  • RomanSebasteion relief  sculpture of Aphrodite crowned by Andreia, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
A draped goddess is crowned by a female warrior figure. The goddess is probably Aphrodite, while the warrior has a bare breated Amazonian dress and equipment (spear, sword strap and shield) worn by Roma or Andreia (Bravery)
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Selene. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/201. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
Selene is the goddess of the moon. She is the daughter of the Titans Hyperion and Theia; and sister of the sun-god Helios; and Eos; goddess of the dawn. She drives her moon chariot across the heavens.
  • Roman statue of Selene. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/201. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Selene is the goddess of the moon. She is the daughter of the Titans Hyperion and Theia; and sister of the sun-god Helios; and Eos; goddess of the dawn. She drives her moon chariot across the heavens.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/196. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/196. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no 2014/191 . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Hygieia. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no .Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.<br />
<br />
 Hygieia was one of the Aeclepiadae; the sons and daughters of the god of medicine; Asclepius; and the goddess of healing; Epione. She was the goddess of health; cleanliness and hygiene.
  • Roman statue of Hygieia. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no .Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
 Hygieia was one of the Aeclepiadae; the sons and daughters of the god of medicine; Asclepius; and the goddess of healing; Epione. She was the goddess of health; cleanliness and hygiene.
  • Roman statue of Modest Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Roman statue of Modest Aphrodite. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background<br />
<br />
Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans.
  • Hittite statue head of the Sun Goddess . Basalt, Hittie Period 1650 - 1450 BC. Hattusa Boğazkale. Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey. Against a black bacground.
  • Bronze Age Anatolian two headed disk shaped alabaster Goddess figurine - 19th to 17th century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey.
  • Bronze Age Anatolian four headed alabaster Goddess figurine - 19th to 17th century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey. Against a white background.
  • Bronze Age Anatolian four headed alabaster Goddess figurine - 19th to 17th century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey.  Against a black background.
  • Bronze Age Anatolian four headed alabaster Goddess figurine - 19th to 17th century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey.  Against a warn art background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of a Procession Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Goddess Kubaba. End of pannels. The godess is saeted on a chair which is on a lion. she hold a mirror in her right hand and a pomegranate in her left.<br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Procession. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Goddess Kubaba. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Procession for. There are four figures on the other face of the orthostat. The leftmost figure plays a pipe, while the other three figures play the drums. All of the figures have long skirts and same body heights.  <br />
<br />
Against a black background.

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