• Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  "Poppy goddess: statue with raised arms and poppy seed crown,  Karphi Sanctuary 1300-1200 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum. <br />
<br />
The "Poppy Goddess" statuye is crowned with opium poppy seed heads. As opium is a hallucinogen that also sedates and has healing properties, experts assume this was the goddess of pain relief and healing/ During this period both Minoan and Mycenaean graves were found in Karphi snctuary so these cult gods are attributable to both cultures
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  "Poppy goddess: statue with raised arms and poppy seed crown,  Karphi Sanctuary 1300-1200 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, white background. <br />
<br />
The "Poppy Goddess" statuye is crowned with opium poppy seed heads. As opium is a hallucinogen that also sedates and has healing properties, experts assume this was the goddess of pain relief and healing/ During this period both Minoan and Mycenaean graves were found in Karphi snctuary so these cult gods are attributable to both cultures
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  "Poppy goddess: statue with raised arms and poppy seed crown,  Karphi Sanctuary 1300-1200 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, black background. <br />
<br />
The "Poppy Goddess" statuye is crowned with opium poppy seed heads. As opium is a hallucinogen that also sedates and has healing properties, experts assume this was the goddess of pain relief and healing/ During this period both Minoan and Mycenaean graves were found in Karphi snctuary so these cult gods are attributable to both cultures
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  "Poppy goddess: statue with raised arms and poppy seed crown,  Karphi Sanctuary 1300-1200 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background. <br />
<br />
The "Poppy Goddess" statuye is crowned with opium poppy seed heads. As opium is a hallucinogen that also sedates and has healing properties, experts assume this was the goddess of pain relief and healing/ During this period both Minoan and Mycenaean graves were found in Karphi snctuary so these cult gods are attributable to both cultures
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  "Poppy goddess: statue with raised arms and poppy seed crown,  Karphi Sanctuary 1300-1200 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background. <br />
<br />
The "Poppy Goddess" statuye is crowned with opium poppy seed heads. As opium is a hallucinogen that also sedates and has healing properties, experts assume this was the goddess of pain relief and healing/ During this period both Minoan and Mycenaean graves were found in Karphi snctuary so these cult gods are attributable to both cultures
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess tablet with raised arms, Kannia Sanctuary,  Gortys, 1350-1250 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, white background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms and crown,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms and bird crown,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Snake Goddess statue arms raised holding 2 snakes from the  Knossos-Temple Repositories 1650-1550 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, black background.<br />
<br />
The snake goddess stauettes are the most important cult objects found in the Knossos Temple Repositories. Dressed in fine garmets with a close fitting bodice with large breats these goddesses represent fertility and the natural world.
  • Minoan Snake Goddess statue arms raised holding 2 snakes from the  Knossos-Temple Repositories 1650-1550 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, grey background.<br />
<br />
The snake goddess stauettes are the most important cult objects found in the Knossos Temple Repositories. Dressed in fine garmets with a close fitting bodice with large breats these goddesses represent fertility and the natural world.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess tablet with raised arms, Kannia Sanctuary,  Gortys, 1350-1250 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, black background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess tablet with raised arms, Kannia Sanctuary,  Gortys, 1350-1250 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms holding snakes, Kannia Sanctuary,  Gortys, 1350-1250 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, black background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms holding snakes, Kannia Sanctuary,  Gortys, 1350-1250 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms, Kannia Sanctuary,  Gortys, 1350-1250 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, black background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms, Kannia Sanctuary,  Gortys, 1350-1250 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms and a crown of snakes, Kannia Sanctuary,  Gortys, 1350-1250 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, black background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms and a crown of snakes, Kannia Sanctuary,  Gortys, 1350-1250 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, white background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms and a crown of snakes, Kannia Sanctuary,  Gortys, 1350-1250 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms and horn crown,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, white background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms and horn crown,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms and horn crown,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms and horn crown,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms and crown,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, black background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms and crown,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms and bird crown,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, white background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms and bird crown,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess tablet with raised arms, Kannia Sanctuary,  Gortys, 1350-1250 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms holding snakes, Kannia Sanctuary,  Gortys, 1350-1250 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, white background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms holding snakes, Kannia Sanctuary,  Gortys, 1350-1250 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms holding snakes, Kannia Sanctuary,  Gortys, 1350-1250 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms, Kannia Sanctuary,  Gortys, 1350-1250 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms, Kannia Sanctuary,  Gortys, 1350-1250 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms and a crown of snakes, Kannia Sanctuary,  Gortys, 1350-1250 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms and a crown of snakes, Kannia Sanctuary,  Gortys, 1350-1250 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms and horn crown,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, black background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms and crown,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms and bird crown,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, black background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms and bird crown,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Snake Goddess statue arms raised holding 2 snakes from the  Knossos-Temple Repositories 1650-1550 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum.<br />
<br />
The snake goddess stauettes are the most important cult objects found in the Knossos Temple Repositories. Dressed in fine garmets with a close fitting bodice with large breats these goddesses represent fertility and the natural world.
  • Minoan Snake Goddess statue arms raised holding 2 snakes from the  Knossos-Temple Repositories 1650-1550 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, grey background.<br />
<br />
The snake goddess stauettes are the most important cult objects found in the Knossos Temple Repositories. Dressed in fine garmets with a close fitting bodice with large breats these goddesses represent fertility and the natural world.
  • Minoan Snake Goddess statue arms raised holding 2 snakes from the  Knossos-Temple Repositories 1650-1550 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum.<br />
<br />
The snake goddess stauettes are the most important cult objects found in the Knossos Temple Repositories. Dressed in fine garmets with a close fitting bodice with large breats these goddesses represent fertility and the natural world.
  • Minoan Snake Goddess statue with snakes entwined around her from the  Knossos-Temple Repositories 1650-1550 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum.<br />
<br />
The snake goddess stauettes are the most important cult objects found in the Knossos Temple Repositories. Dressed in fine garmets with a close fitting bodice with large breats these goddesses represent fertility and the natural world.
  • Minoan Snake Goddess statue with snakes entwined around her from the  Knossos-Temple Repositories 1650-1550 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, grey background.<br />
<br />
The snake goddess stauettes are the most important cult objects found in the Knossos Temple Repositories. Dressed in fine garmets with a close fitting bodice with large breats these goddesses represent fertility and the natural world.
  • Minoan Snake Goddess statue with snakes entwined around her from the  Knossos-Temple Repositories 1650-1550 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum.<br />
<br />
The snake goddess stauettes are the most important cult objects found in the Knossos Temple Repositories. Dressed in fine garmets with a close fitting bodice with large breats these goddesses represent fertility and the natural world.
  • Minoan Snake Goddess statue with snakes entwined around her from the  Knossos-Temple Repositories 1650-1550 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, grey background.<br />
<br />
The snake goddess stauettes are the most important cult objects found in the Knossos Temple Repositories. Dressed in fine garmets with a close fitting bodice with large breats these goddesses represent fertility and the natural world.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess tablet with raised arms, Kannia Sanctuary,  Gortys, 1350-1250 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms, Kannia Sanctuary,  Gortys, 1350-1250 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, white background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms and crown,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, white background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Snake Goddess statue with snakes entwined around her from the  Knossos-Temple Repositories 1650-1550 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, black background.<br />
<br />
The snake goddess stauettes are the most important cult objects found in the Knossos Temple Repositories. Dressed in fine garmets with a close fitting bodice with large breats these goddesses represent fertility and the natural world.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, white background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, white background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, black background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, black background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Seated terracotta goddess, probably a sign of fertility. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a white background
  • Seated terracotta goddess, probably a sign of fertility. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a grey background
  • Terracotta Goddess figure which has been associated with agriculture & human fertility because of her big breasts and wide hips. She is depicted sitting between 2 leopards suggesting she was important. 5750 BC. . Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a white background
  • Terracotta Goddess figure which has been associated with agriculture & human fertility because of her big breasts and wide hips. She is depicted sitting between 2 leopards suggesting she was important. 5750 BC. . Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a black background
  • Terracotta Goddess figure which has been associated with agriculture & human fertility because of her big breasts and wide hips. She is depicted sitting between 2 leopards suggesting she was important. 5750 BC. . Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a grey background
  • Terracotta Goddess figure which has been associated with agriculture & human fertility because of her big breasts and wide hips. She is depicted sitting between 2 leopards suggesting she was important. 5750 BC. . Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a gray mottled background
  • Terracotta Goddess figure which has been associated with agriculture & human fertility because of her big breasts and wide hips. She is depicted sitting between 2 leopards suggesting she was important. 5750 BC. . Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara
  • Seated terracotta goddess, probably a sign of fertility. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a black background
  • Seated terracotta goddess, probably a sign of fertility. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara
  • Seated terracotta goddess, probably a sign of fertility. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a gray mottled background
  • Seated marble goddess. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara
  • Seated marble goddess. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a grey background
  • Middle Neolithic kaolinite statue of a goddess from the site of Su Anzu in Narbolia, Sardinia. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum) - Art Grey Background
  • Seated marble goddess. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a white background
  • Seated marble goddess. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a black background
  • Seated marble goddess. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a gray mottled background
  • Middle Neolithic kaolinite statue of a goddess from the site of Su Anzu in Narbolia, Sardinia. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum) - Grey Background
  • Middle Neolithic quartzose sandstone statue of a goddess from the archaeological site of Cott'e Baccas in Segarlu, Sardinia,. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum) - White Background
  • Middle Neolithic quartzose sandstone statue of a goddess from the archaeological site of Cott'e Baccas in Segarlu, Sardinia,. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum)  - Black Background
  • Middle Neolithic quartzose sandstone statue of a goddess from the archaeological site of Cott'e Baccas in Segarlu, Sardinia,. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum) - Art Grey Background
  • Small Early Neolithic calcareous alabaster  statue of a goddess sitting from Su Cungiau de Marcu, Declomputzu, Sardinia Italy. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum)  - Grey Background
  • Small Early Neolithic calcareous alabaster  statue of a goddess sitting from Su Cungiau de Marcu, Declomputzu, Sardinia Italy. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum) - Art Grey Background
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Middle Neolithic kaolinite statue of a goddess from the site of Su Anzu in Narbolia, Sardinia. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum) - Art Background
  • Middle Neolithic kaolinite statue of a goddess from the site of Su Anzu in Narbolia, Sardinia. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum)  - Black Background
  • Middle Neolithic quartzose sandstone statue of a goddess from the archaeological site of Cott'e Baccas in Segarlu, Sardinia,. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum)  - Art Background
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Middle Neolithic kaolinite statue of a goddess from the site of Su Anzu in Narbolia, Sardinia. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum) - White Background
  • Middle Neolithic quartzose sandstone statue of a goddess from the archaeological site of Cott'e Baccas in Segarlu, Sardinia,. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum) - Grey Background
  • Small Early Neolithic calcareous alabaster  statue of a goddess sitting from Su Cungiau de Marcu, Declomputzu, Sardinia Italy. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum) - White Background
  • Small Early Neolithic calcareous alabaster  statue of a goddess sitting from Su Cungiau de Marcu, Declomputzu, Sardinia Italy. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum)  - Black Background
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Small Early Neolithic calcareous alabaster  statue of a goddess sitting from Su Cungiau de Marcu, Declomputzu, Sardinia Italy. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum) - Art Background
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • Hellenstic marble statue group of Aphrodite (Venus) with Pan and Eros, Circa 100 BC, House of Poseidonaistai of Beryttos, Delos, Athens National Archaeological Museum.  Cat no 3335. Against white.<br />
<br />
The nude goddess Aphrodite (Venus) attempte to fend off goat footed Pan who make erotic advances towards her. Aphrodite holds a sandal in her right hand threatening Pan while the winged god Eros comes to her aid. According to an inscription on the statues base it was dedicated to Dionysus of Beryttos (Beirut) to hai ancestral gods.
  • Hellenstic marble statue group of Aphrodite (Venus) with Pan and Eros, Circa 100 BC, House of Poseidonaistai of Beryttos, Delos, Athens National Archaeological Museum.  Cat no 3335. Against grey.<br />
<br />
The nude goddess Aphrodite (Venus) attempte to fend off goat footed Pan who make erotic advances towards her. Aphrodite holds a sandal in her right hand threatening Pan while the winged god Eros comes to her aid. According to an inscription on the statues base it was dedicated to Dionysus of Beryttos (Beirut) to hai ancestral gods.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • Hellenstic marble statue group of Aphrodite (Venus) with Pan and Eros, Circa 100 BC, House of Poseidonaistai of Beryttos, Delos, Athens National Archaeological Museum.  Cat no 3335. Against black<br />
<br />
The nude goddess Aphrodite (Venus) attempte to fend off goat footed Pan who make erotic advances towards her. Aphrodite holds a sandal in her right hand threatening Pan while the winged god Eros comes to her aid. According to an inscription on the statues base it was dedicated to Dionysus of Beryttos (Beirut) to hai ancestral gods.
  • Hellenstic marble statue group of Aphrodite (Venus) with Pan and Eros, Circa 100 BC, House of Poseidonaistai of Beryttos, Delos, Athens National Archaeological Museum.  Cat no 3335. Against grey.<br />
<br />
The nude goddess Aphrodite (Venus) attempte to fend off goat footed Pan who make erotic advances towards her. Aphrodite holds a sandal in her right hand threatening Pan while the winged god Eros comes to her aid. According to an inscription on the statues base it was dedicated to Dionysus of Beryttos (Beirut) to hai ancestral gods.
  • Hellenstic marble statue group of Aphrodite (Venus) with Pan and Eros, Circa 100 BC, House of Poseidonaistai of Beryttos, Delos, Athens National Archaeological Museum.  Cat no 3335. Against black<br />
<br />
The nude goddess Aphrodite (Venus) attempte to fend off goat footed Pan who make erotic advances towards her. Aphrodite holds a sandal in her right hand threatening Pan while the winged god Eros comes to her aid. According to an inscription on the statues base it was dedicated to Dionysus of Beryttos (Beirut) to hai ancestral gods.
  • Hellenstic marble statue group of Aphrodite (Venus) with Pan and Eros, Circa 100 BC, House of Poseidonaistai of Beryttos, Delos, Athens National Archaeological Museum.  Cat no 3335. Against grey.<br />
<br />
The nude goddess Aphrodite (Venus) attempte to fend off goat footed Pan who make erotic advances towards her. Aphrodite holds a sandal in her right hand threatening Pan while the winged god Eros comes to her aid. According to an inscription on the statues base it was dedicated to Dionysus of Beryttos (Beirut) to hai ancestral gods.
  • Hellenstic marble statue group of Aphrodite (Venus) with Pan and Eros, Circa 100 BC, House of Poseidonaistai of Beryttos, Delos, Athens National Archaeological Museum.  Cat no 3335. Against grey.<br />
<br />
The nude goddess Aphrodite (Venus) attempte to fend off goat footed Pan who make erotic advances towards her. Aphrodite holds a sandal in her right hand threatening Pan while the winged god Eros comes to her aid. According to an inscription on the statues base it was dedicated to Dionysus of Beryttos (Beirut) to hai ancestral gods.
  • Hellenstic marble statue group of Aphrodite (Venus) with Pan and Eros, Circa 100 BC, House of Poseidonaistai of Beryttos, Delos, Athens National Archaeological Museum.  Cat no 3335. Against black<br />
<br />
The nude goddess Aphrodite (Venus) attempte to fend off goat footed Pan who make erotic advances towards her. Aphrodite holds a sandal in her right hand threatening Pan while the winged god Eros comes to her aid. According to an inscription on the statues base it was dedicated to Dionysus of Beryttos (Beirut) to hai ancestral gods.
  • Hellenstic marble statue group of Aphrodite (Venus) with Pan and Eros, Circa 100 BC, House of Poseidonaistai of Beryttos, Delos, Athens National Archaeological Museum.  Cat no 3335.<br />
<br />
The nude goddess Aphrodite (Venus) attempte to fend off goat footed Pan who make erotic advances towards her. Aphrodite holds a sandal in her right hand threatening Pan while the winged god Eros comes to her aid. According to an inscription on the statues base it was dedicated to Dionysus of Beryttos (Beirut) to hai ancestral gods.
  • Hellenstic marble statue group of Aphrodite (Venus) with Pan and Eros, Circa 100 BC, House of Poseidonaistai of Beryttos, Delos, Athens National Archaeological Museum.  Cat no 3335. Against grey.<br />
<br />
The nude goddess Aphrodite (Venus) attempte to fend off goat footed Pan who make erotic advances towards her. Aphrodite holds a sandal in her right hand threatening Pan while the winged god Eros comes to her aid. According to an inscription on the statues base it was dedicated to Dionysus of Beryttos (Beirut) to hai ancestral gods.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • Close up of the inscription dedicated to King Midas on the Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum exhibit, London.<br />
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. The sculpture here changes the pattern by raising the right arm to the neck, rather than making her arm cross her chest, this flattens the composition.
  • Hellenstic marble statue group of Aphrodite (Venus) with Pan and Eros, Circa 100 BC, House of Poseidonaistai of Beryttos, Delos, Athens National Archaeological Museum.  Cat no 3335. Against white.<br />
<br />
The nude goddess Aphrodite (Venus) attempte to fend off goat footed Pan who make erotic advances towards her. Aphrodite holds a sandal in her right hand threatening Pan while the winged god Eros comes to her aid. According to an inscription on the statues base it was dedicated to Dionysus of Beryttos (Beirut) to hai ancestral gods.
  • Hellenstic marble statue group of Aphrodite (Venus) with Pan and Eros, Circa 100 BC, House of Poseidonaistai of Beryttos, Delos, Athens National Archaeological Museum.  Cat no 3335.<br />
<br />
The nude goddess Aphrodite (Venus) attempte to fend off goat footed Pan who make erotic advances towards her. Aphrodite holds a sandal in her right hand threatening Pan while the winged god Eros comes to her aid. According to an inscription on the statues base it was dedicated to Dionysus of Beryttos (Beirut) to hai ancestral gods.
  • Hellenstic marble statue group of Aphrodite (Venus) with Pan and Eros, Circa 100 BC, House of Poseidonaistai of Beryttos, Delos, Athens National Archaeological Museum.  Cat no 3335. Against grey.<br />
<br />
The nude goddess Aphrodite (Venus) attempte to fend off goat footed Pan who make erotic advances towards her. Aphrodite holds a sandal in her right hand threatening Pan while the winged god Eros comes to her aid. According to an inscription on the statues base it was dedicated to Dionysus of Beryttos (Beirut) to hai ancestral gods.
  • Hellenstic marble statue group of Aphrodite (Venus) with Pan and Eros, Circa 100 BC, House of Poseidonaistai of Beryttos, Delos, Athens National Archaeological Museum.  Cat no 3335.<br />
<br />
The nude goddess Aphrodite (Venus) attempte to fend off goat footed Pan who make erotic advances towards her. Aphrodite holds a sandal in her right hand threatening Pan while the winged god Eros comes to her aid. According to an inscription on the statues base it was dedicated to Dionysus of Beryttos (Beirut) to hai ancestral gods.
  • Hellenstic marble statue group of Aphrodite (Venus) with Pan and Eros, Circa 100 BC, House of Poseidonaistai of Beryttos, Delos, Athens National Archaeological Museum.  Cat no 3335. Against white.<br />
<br />
The nude goddess Aphrodite (Venus) attempte to fend off goat footed Pan who make erotic advances towards her. Aphrodite holds a sandal in her right hand threatening Pan while the winged god Eros comes to her aid. According to an inscription on the statues base it was dedicated to Dionysus of Beryttos (Beirut) to hai ancestral gods.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • Close up of the inscription dedicated to King Midas on the Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Minoan cult model of a 3 wheeled chariot drawn by a bull with a charioteer,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background. <br />
<br />
During this period both Minoan and Mycenaean graves were found in Karphi snctuary so these cult gods are attributable to both cultures
  • Minoan cult model of a 3 wheeled chariot drawn by a bull with a charioteer,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background. <br />
<br />
During this period both Minoan and Mycenaean graves were found in Karphi snctuary so these cult gods are attributable to both cultures
  • Minoan cult model of a 3 wheeled chariot drawn by a bull with a charioteer,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, black background. <br />
<br />
During this period both Minoan and Mycenaean graves were found in Karphi snctuary so these cult gods are attributable to both cultures
  • Minoan cult model of a 3 wheeled chariot drawn by a bull with a charioteer,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background. <br />
<br />
During this period both Minoan and Mycenaean graves were found in Karphi snctuary so these cult gods are attributable to both cultures
  • Minoan cult model of a 3 wheeled chariot drawn by a bull with a charioteer,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum. <br />
<br />
During this period both Minoan and Mycenaean graves were found in Karphi snctuary so these cult gods are attributable to both cultures
  • Minoan cult svoitive tablet,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, white background. <br />
<br />
During this period both Minoan and Mycenaean graves were found in Karphi snctuary so these cult gods are attributable to both cultures
  • Minoan cult svoitive tablet,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background. <br />
<br />
During this period both Minoan and Mycenaean graves were found in Karphi snctuary so these cult gods are attributable to both cultures
  • Minoan cult model of a 3 wheeled chariot drawn by a bull with a charioteer,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, white background. <br />
<br />
During this period both Minoan and Mycenaean graves were found in Karphi snctuary so these cult gods are attributable to both cultures
  • Minoan cult model of a 3 wheeled chariot drawn by a bull with a charioteer,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, white background. <br />
<br />
During this period both Minoan and Mycenaean graves were found in Karphi snctuary so these cult gods are attributable to both cultures
  • Minoan cult svoitive tablet,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, black background. <br />
<br />
During this period both Minoan and Mycenaean graves were found in Karphi snctuary so these cult gods are attributable to both cultures
  • Minoan cult svoitive tablet,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background. <br />
<br />
During this period both Minoan and Mycenaean graves were found in Karphi snctuary so these cult gods are attributable to both cultures
  • Minoan cult svoitive tablet,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum. <br />
<br />
During this period both Minoan and Mycenaean graves were found in Karphi snctuary so these cult gods are attributable to both cultures
  • Minoan cult model of a 3 wheeled chariot drawn by a bull with a charioteer,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum. <br />
<br />
During this period both Minoan and Mycenaean graves were found in Karphi snctuary so these cult gods are attributable to both cultures
  • Middle Neoloithic statue from grave 410 of the hypogeic necropolis of cuccuru S'Arriu, Cabras, Sardinia, Italy. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum)  - White Background
  • Middle Neoloithic statue from grave 410 of the hypogeic necropolis of cuccuru S'Arriu, Cabras, Sardinia, Italy. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum) - Art Background
  • Middle Neoloithic statue from grave 410 of the hypogeic necropolis of cuccuru S'Arriu, Cabras, Sardinia, Italy. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum)  - Grey Background
  • Middle Neoloithic statue from grave 410 of the hypogeic necropolis of cuccuru S'Arriu, Cabras, Sardinia, Italy. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum) - Black Background
  • Middle Neoloithic statue from grave 410 of the hypogeic necropolis of cuccuru S'Arriu, Cabras, Sardinia, Italy. Museo archeologico nazionale, Cagliari, Italy. (National Archaeological Museum) - Art Grey Background
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • steps amd paths leading to the Phrygian water cistern of Midas city cut deep into the underground rock. 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • The Unfinished rock monument of Midas, 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This rock facade was planned but never finished and so little is known about the unfinished Monument. It is also known locally as the Kucuk Yazilikaya ( “little written rock”), since it appears to have been planned as a smaller version of the Midas Monument, also called Yazilikaya. It measures 7m x 10m and faces west, unlike the other monument at Midas whose facades face east. Since it was never completed, it was gives some idea of the construction techniques : first the rock was flattened and then the facade was carved from the top down. The architectural frame and the ornament were carved at the same time. About  2m below the monument are a smaller facade, to the left and a small cut altar to the right.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Greek marble Statue of Hermaphroditius ( Hermaphrodites) a mythical being that has both male & female characteristics. From Pergamum (Bergama) Turkey. Istanbul Archaeology Museum, Inv 363T Cat. Mendel 624.
  • Greek marble Statue of Hermaphroditius ( Hermaphrodites) a mythical being that has both male & female characteristics. From Pergamum (Bergama) Turkey. Istanbul Archaeology Museum, Inv 363T Cat. Mendel 624.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • Greek Classical Period Statue of Aphrodite made of Parian marble. Restored by the famous Italian Sculptor A. Canova ( 1757 - 1822 ), Aphrodite is standing nude apart from a richly draped himation which she retains with her left hand in front of her pudenda. 4th c. BC. Athens National Archaeological Museum cat No 3524, from the collection of Lord Hope, donated by M. Embeirikos in 1924.<br />
This statue of Aphrodite is a variant of the Aphrodite (Venus) of Cnidus and is a copy of a 2nd century AD copy of a 4th century  original by the ancient Greek sculptor Praxiteles of Athens. As with the Capitaline Venus, Aphrodite is rising from bathing and is covering her breasts with her right hand, unlike the other known variants of this pose the Aphrodite of the Athens museum is covered from the waste down with a drape.
  • Greek Classical Period Statue of Aphrodite made of Parian marble. Restored by the famous Italian Sculptor A. Canova ( 1757 - 1822 ), Aphrodite is standing nude apart from a richly draped himation which she retains with her left hand in front of her pudenda. 4th c. BC. Athens National Archaeological Museum cat No 3524, from the collection of Lord Hope, donated by M. Embeirikos in 1924.<br />
<br />
This statue of Aphrodite is a variant of the Aphrodite (Venus) of Cnidus and is a copy of a 2nd century AD copy of a 4th century  original by the ancient Greek sculptor Praxiteles of Athens. As with the Capitaline Venus, Aphrodite is rising from bathing and is covering her breasts with her right hand, unlike the other known variants of this pose the Aphrodite of the Athens museum is covered from the waste down with a drape.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • steps amd paths leading to the Phrygian water cistern of Midas city cut deep into the underground rock. 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • The Unfinished rock monument of Midas, 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This rock facade was planned but never finished and so little is known about the unfinished Monument. It is also known locally as the Kucuk Yazilikaya ( “little written rock”), since it appears to have been planned as a smaller version of the Midas Monument, also called Yazilikaya. It measures 7m x 10m and faces west, unlike the other monument at Midas whose facades face east. Since it was never completed, it was gives some idea of the construction techniques : first the rock was flattened and then the facade was carved from the top down. The architectural frame and the ornament were carved at the same time. About  2m below the monument are a smaller facade, to the left and a small cut altar to the right.
  • The Unfinished rock monument of Midas, 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This rock facade was planned but never finished and so little is known about the unfinished Monument. It is also known locally as the Kucuk Yazilikaya ( “little written rock”), since it appears to have been planned as a smaller version of the Midas Monument, also called Yazilikaya. It measures 7m x 10m and faces west, unlike the other monument at Midas whose facades face east. Since it was never completed, it was gives some idea of the construction techniques : first the rock was flattened and then the facade was carved from the top down. The architectural frame and the ornament were carved at the same time. About  2m below the monument are a smaller facade, to the left and a small cut altar to the right.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Greek marble Statue of Hermaphroditius ( Hermaphrodites) a mythical being that has both male & female characteristics. From Pergamum (Bergama) Turkey. Istanbul Archaeology Museum, Inv 363T Cat. Mendel 624.
  • Greek marble Statue of Hermaphroditius ( Hermaphrodites) a mythical being that has both male & female characteristics. From Pergamum (Bergama) Turkey. Istanbul Archaeology Museum, Inv 363T Cat. Mendel 624.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • Greek Classical Period Statue of Aphrodite made of Parian marble. Restored by the famous Italian Sculptor A. Canova ( 1757 - 1822 ), Aphrodite is standing nude apart from a richly draped himation which she retains with her left hand in front of her pudenda. 4th c. BC. Athens National Archaeological Museum cat No 3524, from the collection of Lord Hope, donated by M. Embeirikos in 1924.<br />
This statue of Aphrodite is a variant of the Aphrodite (Venus) of Cnidus and is a copy of a 2nd century AD copy of a 4th century  original by the ancient Greek sculptor Praxiteles of Athens. As with the Capitaline Venus, Aphrodite is rising from bathing and is covering her breasts with her right hand, unlike the other known variants of this pose the Aphrodite of the Athens museum is covered from the waste down with a drape.
  • Greek Classical Period Statue of Aphrodite made of Parian marble. Restored by the famous Italian Sculptor A. Canova ( 1757 - 1822 ), Aphrodite is standing nude apart from a richly draped himation which she retains with her left hand in front of her pudenda. 4th c. BC. Athens National Archaeological Museum cat No 3524, from the collection of Lord Hope, donated by M. Embeirikos in 1924.<br />
This statue of Aphrodite is a variant of the Aphrodite (Venus) of Cnidus and is a copy of a 2nd century AD copy of a 4th century  original by the ancient Greek sculptor Praxiteles of Athens. As with the Capitaline Venus, Aphrodite is rising from bathing and is covering her breasts with her right hand, unlike the other known variants of this pose the Aphrodite of the Athens museum is covered from the waste down with a drape.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • steps amd paths leading to the Phrygian water cistern of Midas city cut deep into the underground rock. 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Ancient Egyptian case of the inner coffin of Nespamai depicting the goddess Nut. 500BC BC. Neues Museum Berlin AM 31213/2.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the goddess Roma and Ge (Earth),  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a black background. <br />
<br />
The goddess Roma holds a spear and wears a crown in the form of a city wall. Earth reclines half naked leaning on a pile of fruit. She holds a cornucopia full of more fruit. A baby child (now damaged) climbs up the horn she holds. The relief represents Earths fertility and abundance overseen by Rome.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the goddess Roma and Ge (Earth),  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against an art background. <br />
<br />
The goddess Roma holds a spear and wears a crown in the form of a city wall. Earth reclines half naked leaning on a pile of fruit. She holds a cornucopia full of more fruit. A baby child (now damaged) climbs up the horn she holds. The relief represents Earths fertility and abundance overseen by Rome.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the goddess Roma and Ge (Earth),  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background. <br />
<br />
The goddess Roma holds a spear and wears a crown in the form of a city wall. Earth reclines half naked leaning on a pile of fruit. She holds a cornucopia full of more fruit. A baby child (now damaged) climbs up the horn she holds. The relief represents Earths fertility and abundance overseen by Rome.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the goddess Roma and Ge (Earth),  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The goddess Roma holds a spear and wears a crown in the form of a city wall. Earth reclines half naked leaning on a pile of fruit. She holds a cornucopia full of more fruit. A baby child (now damaged) climbs up the horn she holds. The relief represents Earths fertility and abundance overseen by Rome.
  • Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Goddess. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Sitting in a chair without a backrest, the head and the face of the figure are completely destroyed. She has a long veil on her head, a long dress hanging down to her ankles, and the shoes with the curved ends. The stool under her feet indicates that she is an important person. She drinks something from the vessel in her right hand and she keeps the handled goblet in her hand a little higher.
  • Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone pane of Goddess. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Sitting in a chair without a backrest, the head and the face of the figure are completely destroyed. She has a long veil on her head, a long dress hanging down to her ankles, and the shoes with the curved ends. The stool under her feet indicates that she is an important person. She drinks something from the vessel in her right hand and she keeps the handled goblet in her hand a little higher.  <br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone pane of Goddess. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Sitting in a chair without a backrest, the head and the face of the figure are completely destroyed. She has a long veil on her head, a long dress hanging down to her ankles, and the shoes with the curved ends. The stool under her feet indicates that she is an important person. She drinks something from the vessel in her right hand and she keeps the handled goblet in her hand a little higher.  <br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone pane of Goddess. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Sitting in a chair without a backrest, the head and the face of the figure are completely destroyed. She has a long veil on her head, a long dress hanging down to her ankles, and the shoes with the curved ends. The stool under her feet indicates that she is an important person. She drinks something from the vessel in her right hand and she keeps the handled goblet in her hand a little higher.  <br />
<br />
Against a brown gray background.
  • Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone pane of Goddess. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Sitting in a chair without a backrest, the head and the face of the figure are completely destroyed. She has a long veil on her head, a long dress hanging down to her ankles, and the shoes with the curved ends. The stool under her feet indicates that she is an important person. She drinks something from the vessel in her right hand and she keeps the handled goblet in her hand a little higher.  <br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Picture & image of Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel  of Long Wall Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 BC. Anatolian Civilisations Museum.<br />
<br />
 The hieroglyphics reads; "I am Win-a-tis, beloved wife of my Lord Suhi, wherever and whenever my husband honours his name, he will honour my name as well with favours". Underneath, there are two goddess figures, one is naked with a horned head, holding her breasts with her hands. Her genitalia is indicated by a triangle. <br />
<br />
On a gray background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel  of Long Wall Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 BC. Anatolian Civilisations Museum.<br />
<br />
 The hieroglyphics reads; "I am Win-a-tis, beloved wife of my Lord Suhi, wherever and whenever my husband honours his name, he will honour my name as well with favours". Underneath, there are two goddess figures, one is naked with a horned head, holding her breasts with her hands. Her genitalia is indicated by a triangle. <br />
<br />
On a grey art background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel  of Long Wall Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 BC. Anatolian Civilisations Museum.<br />
<br />
 The hieroglyphics reads; "I am Win-a-tis, beloved wife of my Lord Suhi, wherever and whenever my husband honours his name, he will honour my name as well with favours". Underneath, there are two goddess figures, one is naked with a horned head, holding her breasts with her hands. Her genitalia is indicated by a triangle. <br />
<br />
On a black background.
  • Photo of Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel  of Long Wall Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 BC. Anatolian Civilisations Museum.<br />
<br />
 The hieroglyphics reads; "I am Win-a-tis, beloved wife of my Lord Suhi, wherever and whenever my husband honours his name, he will honour my name as well with favours". Underneath, there are two goddess figures, one is naked with a horned head, holding her breasts with her hands. Her genitalia is indicated by a triangle. <br />
<br />
On a brown art background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel  of Long Wall Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 BC. Anatolian Civilisations Museum.<br />
<br />
 The hieroglyphics reads; "I am Win-a-tis, beloved wife of my Lord Suhi, wherever and whenever my husband honours his name, he will honour my name as well with favours". Underneath, there are two goddess figures, one is naked with a horned head, holding her breasts with her hands. Her genitalia is indicated by a triangle. <br />
<br />
On a White Background.
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
In this statue of Sekhmet the goddess is called "mistress of Shenut" possibly linking her to the lioness goddess Repyt of Anthribis.  Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 248
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
In this statue of Sekhmet the goddess is called "mistress of Shenut" possibly linking her to the lioness goddess Repyt of Anthribis.  Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 248
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. black background.<br />
<br />
In this statue of Sekhmet the goddess is called "mistress of Shenut" possibly linking her to the lioness goddess Repyt of Anthribis.  Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 248
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. white background.<br />
<br />
In this statue of Sekhmet the goddess is called "mistress of Shenut" possibly linking her to the lioness goddess Repyt of Anthribis.  Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 248
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
In this statue of Sekhmet the goddess is called "mistress of Shenut" possibly linking her to the lioness goddess Repyt of Anthribis.  Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 248
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. black background.<br />
<br />
In this statue of Sekhmet the goddess is called "mistress of Shenut" possibly linking her to the lioness goddess Repyt of Anthribis.  Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 248
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
In this statue of Sekhmet the goddess is called "mistress of Shenut" possibly linking her to the lioness goddess Repyt of Anthribis.  Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 248
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
In this statue of Sekhmet the goddess is called "mistress of Shenut" possibly linking her to the lioness goddess Repyt of Anthribis.  Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 248
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
In this statue of Sekhmet the goddess is called "mistress of Shenut" possibly linking her to the lioness goddess Repyt of Anthribis.  Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 248
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. white background.<br />
<br />
In this statue of Sekhmet the goddess is called "mistress of Shenut" possibly linking her to the lioness goddess Repyt of Anthribis.  Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 248
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
In this statue of Sekhmet the goddess is called "mistress of Shenut" possibly linking her to the lioness goddess Repyt of Anthribis.  Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 248
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 255
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. white background.<br />
<br />
Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 249
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 249
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. white background.<br />
<br />
This statue is unfinished and is in the stage before polishing. Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 264
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
This statue is unfinished and is in the stage before polishing. Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 264
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. black background.<br />
<br />
Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 263
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 263
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of a Goddess inscribing a trophy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
A draped goddess strides forward to inscribe a military trophy to which is bound a kneeling female captive. The goddess is probably a personification such as Honour, Virtue or Courage.
  • Roman SSebasteion relief  sculpture of a Goddess inscribing a trophy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
A draped goddess strides forward to inscribe a military trophy to which is bound a kneeling female captive. The goddess is probably a personification such as Honour, Virtue or Courage.
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. white background.<br />
<br />
Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 255
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. black background.<br />
<br />
Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 255
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 255
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 255
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1156-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 251

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