• Hittite ceremonial stone cult axe head. Hittite Period 1650 - 1450 BC, Ortakoy Sapinuva . Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey. Against a white bacground.
  • Hittite ceremonial stone cult axe head. Hittite Period 1650 - 1450 BC, Ortakoy Sapinuva . Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey
  • Hittite ceremonial stone cult axe head. Hittite Period 1650 - 1450 BC, Ortakoy Sapinuva . Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey. Against a grey bacground.
  • Hittite ceremonial stone cult axe head. Hittite Period 1650 - 1450 BC, Ortakoy Sapinuva . Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey. Against a white bacground.
  • Hittite ceremonial stone cult axe head. Hittite Period 1650 - 1450 BC, Ortakoy Sapinuva . Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey. Against a black bacground.
  • Hittite ceremonial stone cult axe head. Hittite Period 1650 - 1450 BC, Ortakoy Sapinuva . Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey
  • Hittite ceremonial stone cult axe head. Hittite Period 1650 - 1450 BC, Ortakoy Sapinuva . Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey. Against a warm art bacground.
  • Hittite ceremonial stone cult axe head. Hittite Period 1650 - 1450 BC, Ortakoy Sapinuva . Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey. Against a black bacground.
  • Hittite ceremonial stone cult axe head. Hittite Period 1650 - 1450 BC, Ortakoy Sapinuva . Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey. Against a warm art bacground.
  • Hittite ceremonial stone cult axe head. Hittite Period 1650 - 1450 BC, Ortakoy Sapinuva . Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey. Against a grey bacground.
  • Minoan  bull's head rhython libation vessel, Machlos 1500-1450 BC; Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, black background.
  • Minoan  bull's head rhython libation vessel, Machlos 1500-1450 BC; Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, grey background.
  • The Minoan clay bull's head rhython lbation vessel,  Palaikastro 1500-1450 BC; Heraklion Archaeological  Museum.
  • Minoan  bull's head rhython libation vessel, Gournia 1600-1450 BC; Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, grey background
  • Small Alabaster Statue head grave stone from the Yemen, 1st cent. B.C . Istanbul Archaeological Museum, Inv. 7670.
  • Minoan  bull's head rhython libation vessel, Machlos 1500-1450 BC; Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, white background.
  • Minoan  bull's head rhython libation vessel, Machlos 1500-1450 BC; Heraklion Archaeological  Museum.
  • The Minoan clay bull's head rhython lbation vessel,  Palaikastro 1500-1450 BC; Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, black background
  • The Minoan clay bull's head rhython lbation vessel,  Palaikastro 1500-1450 BC; Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, white background
  • The Minoan clay bull's head rhython lbation vessel,  Palaikastro 1500-1450 BC; Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, grey background
  • The Minoan clay bull's head rhython lbation vessel,  Palaikastro 1500-1450 BC; Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, grey background
  • Minoan  bull's head rhython libation vessel, Gournia 1600-1450 BC; Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, white background.
  • Minoan  bull's head rhython libation vessel, Gournia 1600-1450 BC; Heraklion Archaeological  Museum. , black background
  • Minoan  bull's head rhython libation vessel, Gournia 1600-1450 BC; Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, grey background
  • Minoan  bull's head rhython libation vessel, Gournia 1600-1450 BC; Heraklion Archaeological  Museum.
  • Small Alabaster Statue head grave stone from the Yemen, 1st cent. B.C . Istanbul Archaeological Museum, Inv. 7670.
  • Small Alabaster Statue head grave stone from the Yemen, 1st cent. B.C . Istanbul Archaeological Museum, Inv. 7670.
  • Wild thistle seed head, Syros Greece
  • Wild thistle seed head, Syros Greece
  • Wild thistle seed head, Syros Greece
  • Minoan  bull's head rhython libation vessel, Machlos 1500-1450 BC; Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, grey background.
  • Wild thistle seed head, Syros Greece
  • A unique plaster head of a women, possibly a goddess of sphinx, one of the few examples of Mycenaean plater art. The severe expression is excentualted by red and black paint and the small hair curls fall from below a polos 9 a cylindrical cap). From one of the cult areas of the acropolis of  Mycenae, Greece. 13th century BC, cat no: 4575,  National Archaeological Museum, Athens.
  • A unique plaster head of a women, possibly a goddess of sphinx, one of the few examples of Mycenaean plater art. The severe expression is excentualted by red and black paint and the small hair curls fall from below a polos 9 a cylindrical cap). From one of the cult areas of the acropolis of  Mycenae, Greece. 13th century BC, cat no: 4575,  National Archaeological Museum, Athens.
  • Decorative grave head stone - Naxos Greek Cyclades Islands
  • Zolnay Bull's head fountain, Pecs ( Pécs ) - European Cultural City of The Year 2010 , Hungary
  • Zolnay Bull's head fountain, Pecs ( Pécs ) - European Cultural City of The Year 2010 , Hungary
  • Zolnay Bull's head fountain, Pecs ( Pécs ) - European Cultural City of The Year 2010 , Hungary
  • Zolnay Bull's head fountain, Pecs ( Pécs ) - European Cultural City of The Year 2010 , Hungary
  • Zolnay Bull's head fountain, Pecs ( Pécs ) - European Cultural City of The Year 2010 , Hungary
  • Dolls head with staring eyes
  • A unique plaster head of a women, possibly a goddess of sphinx, one of the few examples of Mycenaean plater art. The severe expression is excentualted by red and black paint and the small hair curls fall from below a polos 9 a cylindrical cap). From one of the cult areas of the acropolis of  Mycenae, Greece. 13th century BC, cat no: 4575,  National Archaeological Museum, Athens.
  • A unique plaster head of a women, possibly a goddess of sphinx, one of the few examples of Mycenaean plater art. The severe expression is excentualted by red and black paint and the small hair curls fall from below a polos 9 a cylindrical cap). From one of the cult areas of the acropolis of  Mycenae, Greece. 13th century BC, cat no: 4575,  National Archaeological Museum, Athens.
  • Decorative grave head stone - Naxos Greek Cyclades Islands
  • Dandelion clock seed head
  • Zolnay Bull's head fountain, Pecs ( Pécs ) - European Cultural City of The Year 2010 , Hungary
  • Zolnay Bull's head fountain, Pecs ( Pécs ) - European Cultural City of The Year 2010 , Hungary
  • Zolnay Bull's head fountain, Pecs ( Pécs ) - European Cultural City of The Year 2010 , Hungary
  • Zolnay Bull's head fountain, Pecs ( Pécs ) - European Cultural City of The Year 2010 , Hungary
  • Zolnay Bull's head fountain, Pecs ( Pécs ) - European Cultural City of The Year 2010 , Hungary
  • Zolnay Bull's head fountain, Pecs ( Pécs ) - European Cultural City of The Year 2010 , Hungary
  • Close up of pigs head against black background
  • Ricinus Carmencita Red seed heads - Syros Greece
  • Ricinus Carmencita Red seed heads - Syros Greece
  • Field of Sunflower flowering heads
  • Field of Sunflower flowering heads
  • Field of Sunflower flowering heads
  • Field of Sunflower flowering heads
  • Field of Sunflower flowering heads
  • Field of Sunflower flowering heads
  • Field of Sunflower flowering heads
  • Field of Sunflower flowering heads
  • Field of Sunflower flowering heads
  • Field of Sunflower flowering heads
  • Field of Sunflower flowering heads
  • Field of Sunflower flowering heads
  • Field of Sunflower flowering heads
  • Field of Sunflower flowering heads
  • Field of Sunflower flowering heads
  • Field of Sunflower flowering heads
  • Field of Sunflower flowering heads
  • Field of Sunflower flowering heads
  • Field of Sunflower flowering heads
  • Field of Sunflower flowering heads
  • Field of Sunflower flowering heads
  • Field of Sunflower flowering heads
  • Field of Sunflower flowering heads
  • Field of Sunflower flowering heads
  • Field of Sunflower flowering heads
  • Field of Sunflower flowering heads
  • Field of Sunflower flowering heads
  • Field of Sunflower flowering heads
  • Minoan  cult bronze double axe 'labrys' &  bronze spearhead from "warrior grave" at Knossos-Zafer Papoura,  1600-1400 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, white background.<br />
<br />
In Minoan Crete, the double axe was an important sacred symbol of the supposed Minoan religion. In Crete it never accompanies male gods, only female goddesses. It seems that it was the symbol of the arche of the creation (Mater-arche).
  • Minoan  cult bronze double axe 'labrys' &  bronze spearhead from "warrior grave" at Knossos-Zafer Papoura,  1600-1400 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, black background.<br />
<br />
In Minoan Crete, the double axe was an important sacred symbol of the supposed Minoan religion. In Crete it never accompanies male gods, only female goddesses. It seems that it was the symbol of the arche of the creation (Mater-arche).
  • Minoan  cult bronze double axe 'labrys' &  bronze spearhead from "warrior grave" at Knossos-Zafer Papoura,  1600-1400 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, grey background.<br />
<br />
In Minoan Crete, the double axe was an important sacred symbol of the supposed Minoan religion. In Crete it never accompanies male gods, only female goddesses. It seems that it was the symbol of the arche of the creation (Mater-arche).
  • Minoan  cult bronze double axe 'labrys' &  bronze spearhead from "warrior grave" at Knossos-Zafer Papoura,  1600-1400 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, grey background.<br />
<br />
In Minoan Crete, the double axe was an important sacred symbol of the supposed Minoan religion. In Crete it never accompanies male gods, only female goddesses. It seems that it was the symbol of the arche of the creation (Mater-arche).
  • Minoan  cult bronze double axe 'labrys' &  bronze spearhead from "warrior grave" at Knossos-Zafer Papoura,  1600-1400 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum.<br />
<br />
In Minoan Crete, the double axe was an important sacred symbol of the supposed Minoan religion. In Crete it never accompanies male gods, only female goddesses. It seems that it was the symbol of the arche of the creation (Mater-arche).
  • Minoan  bronze spearhead from "warrior grave" at Knossos-Zafer Papoura,  1400-1300 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, white background.
  • Minoan  bronze spearhead from "warrior grave" at Knossos-Zafer Papoura,  1400-1300 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, black background.
  • Minoan  bronze spearhead from "warrior grave" at Knossos-Zafer Papoura,  1400-1300 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum.
  • Minoan  bronze spearhead from "warrior grave" at Knossos-Zafer Papoura,  1400-1300 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, grey background.
  • Minoan  bronze spearhead from "warrior grave" at Knossos-Zafer Papoura,  1400-1300 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, grey background.
  • Colouful sculpture of female african coloured with paints
  • Roman portrait head of a women wearing a priestess crown. Found in Aphrodisias Theatre. First Century AD. Aphrodisias Archaeology Museum Turkey
  • Ancient Egyptian Greywacke statue head . 27 th Dynasty 500 BC . Neues Museum Berlin Cat No: AM 31196.
  • Granite ancient Egyptian statue head of a man with a beard. 1st Century BC . Neues Reich Museum Berlin Cat No: AM 10660.
  • Portrait head sculpture of the Roman emperor Lucius Verus ( AD 161-169). Pentalic marble found in Athens.
  • Portrait head sculpture of the Roman emperor Lucius Verus ( AD 161-169). Pentalic marble found in Athens.
  • Portrait head sculpture of the Roman emperor Lucius Verus ( AD 161-169). Pentalic marble found in Athens.
  • Roman portrait head of a women wearing a priestess crown. Found in Aphrodisias Theatre. First Century AD. Aphrodisias Archaeology Museum Turkey
  • Granite ancient Egyptian statue head of a man from Thebes. 2000 BC . Neues Reich Museum Berlin Cat No: AM 1254.
  • Black obsidian arrow heads. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara
  • Dandelion clocks seed heads
  • Dandelion clocks seed heads
  • Black obsidian arrow heads. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a grey background
  • Black obsidian arrow heads. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a white background
  • Black obsidian arrow heads. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a gray mottled background
  • Black obsidian arrow heads. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a black background
  • Fresh broccoli heads
  • Fresh broccoli heads
  • Riund Headed Rampion - Phyteuma orbiculara. Alpine summer meadow.  Bernese Alps Switzerland.
  • Dandelion clocks seed heads
  • Dandelion clocks seed heads
  • Cotton Grass seeds - Syros, Greece
  • Medley of brocoli, cauliflower, carrots and potoes, vegetable food photos
  • Ancient Egyptian sculpture of the head of a criosphinx, sandstone, New Kigdom, 18th Dynasty, (1390-1353 BC), Karnak, Temple of Khonsu. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background,<br />
<br />
From the New kingdom onwards a particular image of the god Amon was adopted, the criosphinx, which was a sphinx whose human head was replaced by the head of a ram, the animal form of Amon. A large number of criosphinx are still standing in Karnak today. Drovetti collection. C 846.
  • Ancient Egyptian sculpture of the head of a criosphinx, sandstone, New Kigdom, 18th Dynasty, (1390-1353 BC), Karnak, Temple of Khonsu. Egyptian Museum, Turin. black background,<br />
<br />
From the New kingdom onwards a particular image of the god Amon was adopted, the criosphinx, which was a sphinx whose human head was replaced by the head of a ram, the animal form of Amon. A large number of criosphinx are still standing in Karnak today. Drovetti collection. C 846.
  • Ancient Egyptian sculpture of the head of a criosphinx, sandstone, New Kigdom, 18th Dynasty, (1390-1353 BC), Karnak, Temple of Khonsu. Egyptian Museum, Turin. white background,<br />
<br />
From the New kingdom onwards a particular image of the god Amon was adopted, the criosphinx, which was a sphinx whose human head was replaced by the head of a ram, the animal form of Amon. A large number of criosphinx are still standing in Karnak today. Drovetti collection. C 846.
  • Ancient Egyptian sculpture of the head of a criosphinx, sandstone, New Kigdom, 18th Dynasty, (1390-1353 BC), Karnak, Temple of Khonsu. Egyptian Museum, Turin. <br />
<br />
From the New kingdom onwards a particular image of the god Amon was adopted, the criosphinx, which was a sphinx whose human head was replaced by the head of a ram, the animal form of Amon. A large number of criosphinx are still standing in Karnak today. Drovetti collection. C 846.
  • Ancient Egyptian sculpture of the head of a criosphinx, sandstone, New Kigdom, 18th Dynasty, (1390-1353 BC), Karnak, Temple of Khonsu. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background,<br />
<br />
From the New kingdom onwards a particular image of the god Amon was adopted, the criosphinx, which was a sphinx whose human head was replaced by the head of a ram, the animal form of Amon. A large number of criosphinx are still standing in Karnak today. Drovetti collection. C 846.
  • Fine Minoan translucent limestone lioness head shaped rhython from the  Knossos Palace Repositories 1600-1500 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, grey background.<br />
<br />
This exquitely worked lioness head rhython has a hole in the muzzle for pouring liquid offerings. The nose and eyes were originally inlaid
  • Fine Minoan translucent limestone lioness head shaped rhython from the  Knossos Palace Repositories 1600-1500 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum.<br />
<br />
This exquitely worked lioness head rhython has a hole in the muzzle for pouring liquid offerings. The nose and eyes were originally inlaid
  • Fine Minoan translucent limestone lioness head shaped rhython from the  Knossos Palace Repositories 1600-1500 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, black background.<br />
<br />
This exquitely worked lioness head rhython has a hole in the muzzle for pouring liquid offerings. The nose and eyes were originally inlaid
  • Fine Minoan translucent limestone lioness head shaped rhython from the  Knossos Palace Repositories 1600-1500 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum.<br />
<br />
This exquitely worked lioness head rhython has a hole in the muzzle for pouring liquid offerings. The nose and eyes were originally inlaid
  • Fine Minoan translucent limestone lioness head shaped rhython from the  Knossos Palace Repositories 1600-1500 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, grey background.<br />
<br />
This exquitely worked lioness head rhython has a hole in the muzzle for pouring liquid offerings. The nose and eyes were originally inlaid
  • Minoan  bulss head shaped rhython with go;d horns, from the  Knossos-Little Palace 1600-1450 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum.<br />
<br />
There is a hole on the bulls neck for filling the hollow head and a hoile in its snout for pouring.
  • Minoan  bulss head shaped rhython with go;d horns, from the  Knossos-Little Palace 1600-1450 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, black background.<br />
<br />
There is a hole on the bulls neck for filling the hollow head and a hoile in its snout for pouring.
  • Minoan  bulss head shaped rhython with go;d horns, from the  Knossos-Little Palace 1600-1450 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, grey background.<br />
<br />
There is a hole on the bulls neck for filling the hollow head and a hoile in its snout for pouring.
  • Minoan  bulss head shaped rhython with go;d horns, from the  Knossos-Little Palace 1600-1450 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum.<br />
<br />
There is a hole on the bulls neck for filling the hollow head and a hoile in its snout for pouring.
  • Minoan  bulss head shaped rhython with go;d horns, from the  Knossos-Little Palace 1600-1450 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, grey background.<br />
<br />
There is a hole on the bulls neck for filling the hollow head and a hoile in its snout for pouring.
  • Phrygian terracotta decorated bull head shaped cult vessel. 8th-7th century BC . Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey
  • Hittite terra cotta head of a lion. Hittite Period 1650 - 1450 BC, Ortakoy Sapinuva . Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey. Against a grey bacground.
  • Phrygian terracotta decorated bull head shaped cult vessel. 8th-7th century BC . Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey
  • Phrygian terracotta decorated bull head shaped cult vessel. 8th-7th century BC . Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey
  • Phrygian terracotta decorated bull head shaped cult vessel. 8th-7th century BC . Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey
  • Phrygian terracotta decorated bull head shaped cult vessel. 8th-7th century BC . Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey
  • Hittite terra cotta head of a lion. Hittite Period 1650 - 1450 BC, Ortakoy Sapinuva . Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey. Against a white bacground.
  • Hittite terra cotta head of a lion. Hittite Period 1650 - 1450 BC, Ortakoy Sapinuva . Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey. Against a black bacground.
  • Hittite terra cotta head of a lion. Hittite Period 1650 - 1450 BC, Ortakoy Sapinuva . Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey
  • Hittite terra cotta head of a lion. Hittite Period 1650 - 1450 BC, Ortakoy Sapinuva . Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey. Against a warm art bacground.
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 30 - sculpture of of a muzzled bears head with two humans in its mouth, their heads poking out either side of its head.  The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Gothic wood statue of the Head of Christ by  Jaume Cascalls. Carved alabaster with polychrome and gilt remains.  This head must have belonged to a Recumbent Christ which could have formed part of a sculptural group of the Holy Sepulchre. It probably came from the chapel of Corpus Christi of the convent of Sant Agustí Vell, Barcelona.<br />
Jaume Cascalls is one of the most important sculptors of the fourteenth century in Catalonia. This is borne out by his involvement over almost thirty years with the project of the royal pantheon in Poblet for King Peter the Ceremonious and with other large undertakings of the time. Today, on stylistic grounds, he is credited with this 'Head of Christ', which must have formed part of a sculptural group of the Holy Sepulchre, presumably from the church of the convent of Sant Agustí Vell in Barcelona. The break in the neck suggests it belonged to a full-length recumbent Christ, like the one kept at Sant Feliu in Girona and also attributed to Cascalls. National Museum of Catalan Art, inv no: 034879-000
  • Gothic wood statue of the Head of Christ by  Jaume Cascalls. Carved alabaster with polychrome and gilt remains.  This head must have belonged to a Recumbent Christ which could have formed part of a sculptural group of the Holy Sepulchre. It probably came from the chapel of Corpus Christi of the convent of Sant Agustí Vell, Barcelona.<br />
Jaume Cascalls is one of the most important sculptors of the fourteenth century in Catalonia. This is borne out by his involvement over almost thirty years with the project of the royal pantheon in Poblet for King Peter the Ceremonious and with other large undertakings of the time. Today, on stylistic grounds, he is credited with this 'Head of Christ', which must have formed part of a sculptural group of the Holy Sepulchre, presumably from the church of the convent of Sant Agustí Vell in Barcelona. The break in the neck suggests it belonged to a full-length recumbent Christ, like the one kept at Sant Feliu in Girona and also attributed to Cascalls. National Museum of Catalan Art, inv no: 034879-000
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 30 - sculpture of of a muzzled bears head with two humans in its mouth, their heads poking out either side of its head.  The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Roman bust of Alexander the Great, 2nd cent B.C bronze with gold leaf. The head is from a smaller than life size statue. The elongated curls, the parted locks and the diadem that fastens the hair at the back, are clear indications that the head is a portrait of the Macedonian King Alexander the Great (356-323 B.C.). Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman sculpture head of Hercules, mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Vale Giardino, Nemi. The head was probably made separately for the insertion onto a statue, probably depicting the gold seated. The work is a copy of a Greek original of the late Hellenistic period, inspired by a statue by the Greek sculptor Lysippos of Sicyon known as the ‘Herakles Epitapezios’ sculpted around 300 BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Satatue known as the Sitting captive - a Roman sculpture of the 1st or 2nd century SAD made out of  Green Breche stone from the Wadi Hammamat, Egypt. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The body can be dated  to the 1st century AD and is probably from the near east. The recomposed statue , named the defeated barbarian king, was the centre piece of a room in the Villa Albani (1692-1779) in Rome.  The Albani Collection, Inv No. LL 17 or Ma 1383, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman marble head of Aphrodite (Venus)  known as the “Kaufmann head” once conserved in Berlin. Circa 150 BC found in Asia Minor.  Inv MND 2027 ( or Ma 3518) Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman bust of Alexander the Great, 2nd cent B.C bronze with gold leaf. The head is from a smaller than life size statue. The elongated curls, the parted locks and the diadem that fastens the hair at the back, are clear indications that the head is a portrait of the Macedonian King Alexander the Great (356-323 B.C.). Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman bust of Alexander the Great, 2nd cent B.C bronze with gold leaf. The head is from a smaller than life size statue. The elongated curls, the parted locks and the diadem that fastens the hair at the back, are clear indications that the head is a portrait of the Macedonian King Alexander the Great (356-323 B.C.). Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman bust of Alexander the Great, 2nd cent B.C bronze with gold leaf. The head is from a smaller than life size statue. The elongated curls, the parted locks and the diadem that fastens the hair at the back, are clear indications that the head is a portrait of the Macedonian King Alexander the Great (356-323 B.C.). Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture head of Hercules, mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Vale Giardino, Nemi. The head was probably made separately for the insertion onto a statue, probably depicting the gold seated. The work is a copy of a Greek original of the late Hellenistic period, inspired by a statue by the Greek sculptor Lysippos of Sicyon known as the ‘Herakles Epitapezios’ sculpted around 300 BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture head of Hercules, mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Vale Giardino, Nemi. The head was probably made separately for the insertion onto a statue, probably depicting the gold seated. The work is a copy of a Greek original of the late Hellenistic period, inspired by a statue by the Greek sculptor Lysippos of Sicyon known as the ‘Herakles Epitapezios’ sculpted around 300 BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture head of Hercules, mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Vale Giardino, Nemi. The head was probably made separately for the insertion onto a statue, probably depicting the gold seated. The work is a copy of a Greek original of the late Hellenistic period, inspired by a statue by the Greek sculptor Lysippos of Sicyon known as the ‘Herakles Epitapezios’ sculpted around 300 BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture head of Hercules, mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Vale Giardino, Nemi. The head was probably made separately for the insertion onto a statue, probably depicting the gold seated. The work is a copy of a Greek original of the late Hellenistic period, inspired by a statue by the Greek sculptor Lysippos of Sicyon known as the ‘Herakles Epitapezios’ sculpted around 300 BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture with an unrelated head  of Lucius Verus, body 50-75 AD head 160-169 AD, inv 6081 - Farnese Collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Satatue known as the Sitting captive - a Roman sculpture of the 1st or 2nd century SAD made out of  Green Breche stone from the Wadi Hammamat, Egypt. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The body can be dated  to the 1st century AD and is probably from the near east. The recomposed statue , named the defeated barbarian king, was the centre piece of a room in the Villa Albani (1692-1779) in Rome.  The Albani Collection, Inv No. LL 17 or Ma 1383, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Satatue known as the Sitting captive - a Roman sculpture of the 1st or 2nd century SAD made out of  Green Breche stone from the Wadi Hammamat, Egypt. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The body can be dated  to the 1st century AD and is probably from the near east. The recomposed statue , named the defeated barbarian king, was the centre piece of a room in the Villa Albani (1692-1779) in Rome.  The Albani Collection, Inv No. LL 17 or Ma 1383, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Satatue known as the Sitting captive - a Roman sculpture of the 1st or 2nd century SAD made out of  Green Breche stone from the Wadi Hammamat, Egypt. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The body can be dated  to the 1st century AD and is probably from the near east. The recomposed statue , named the defeated barbarian king, was the centre piece of a room in the Villa Albani (1692-1779) in Rome.  The Albani Collection, Inv No. LL 17 or Ma 1383, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Satatue known as the Sitting captive - a Roman sculpture of the 1st or 2nd century SAD made out of  Green Breche stone from the Wadi Hammamat, Egypt. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The body can be dated  to the 1st century AD and is probably from the near east. The recomposed statue , named the defeated barbarian king, was the centre piece of a room in the Villa Albani (1692-1779) in Rome.  The Albani Collection, Inv No. LL 17 or Ma 1383, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman marble head of Aphrodite (Venus)  known as the “Kaufmann head” once conserved in Berlin. Circa 150 BC found in Asia Minor.  Inv MND 2027 ( or Ma 3518) Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman marble head of Aphrodite (Venus)  known as the “Kaufmann head” once conserved in Berlin. Circa 150 BC found in Asia Minor.  Inv MND 2027 ( or Ma 3518) Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman marble head of Aphrodite (Venus)  known as the “Kaufmann head” once conserved in Berlin. Circa 150 BC found in Asia Minor.  Inv MND 2027 ( or Ma 3518) Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman marble head of Aphrodite (Venus)  known as the “Kaufmann head” once conserved in Berlin. Circa 150 BC found in Asia Minor.  Inv MND 2027 ( or Ma 3518) Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The Kaufmann Aphrodite head. 2nd century Roman marble copy modelled on the statue head of Aphrodite of Cnidus by Praixitele. Many Roman replicas exist of the Aphrodite of Cnidus which is one of the most famous statues of antiquity. The statue depicts the goddess bathing with a vase of water beside her. The lost original is a Hellenistic Greek sculpture made in 360-350 BC which is attributed to Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Tradition has it that the model for the original was the lover of sculptor Phryne. The original is the oldest known female nude in Greek sculpture. Borghese Collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv no MR657 ( Usual No Ma 421)
  • The Kaufmann Aphrodite head. 2nd century Roman marble copy modelled on the statue head of Aphrodite of Cnidus by Praixitele. Many Roman replicas exist of the Aphrodite of Cnidus which is one of the most famous statues of antiquity. The statue depicts the goddess bathing with a vase of water beside her. The lost original is a Hellenistic Greek sculpture made in 360-350 BC which is attributed to Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Tradition has it that the model for the original was the lover of sculptor Phryne. The original is the oldest known female nude in Greek sculpture. Borghese Collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv no MR657 ( Usual No Ma 421)
  • The Kaufmann Aphrodite head. 2nd century Roman marble copy modelled on the statue head of Aphrodite of Cnidus by Praixitele. Many Roman replicas exist of the Aphrodite of Cnidus which is one of the most famous statues of antiquity. The statue depicts the goddess bathing with a vase of water beside her. The lost original is a Hellenistic Greek sculpture made in 360-350 BC which is attributed to Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Tradition has it that the model for the original was the lover of sculptor Phryne. The original is the oldest known female nude in Greek sculpture. Borghese Collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv no MR657 ( Usual No Ma 421)
  • The Kaufmann Aphrodite head. 2nd century Roman marble copy modelled on the statue head of Aphrodite of Cnidus by Praixitele. Many Roman replicas exist of the Aphrodite of Cnidus which is one of the most famous statues of antiquity. The statue depicts the goddess bathing with a vase of water beside her. The lost original is a Hellenistic Greek sculpture made in 360-350 BC which is attributed to Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Tradition has it that the model for the original was the lover of sculptor Phryne. The original is the oldest known female nude in Greek sculpture. Borghese Collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv no MR657 ( Usual No Ma 421)
  • Roman bust of Alexander the Great, 2nd cent B.C bronze with gold leaf. The head is from a smaller than life size statue. The elongated curls, the parted locks and the diadem that fastens the hair at the back, are clear indications that the head is a portrait of the Macedonian King Alexander the Great (356-323 B.C.). Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman bust of Alexander the Great, 2nd cent B.C bronze with gold leaf. The head is from a smaller than life size statue. The elongated curls, the parted locks and the diadem that fastens the hair at the back, are clear indications that the head is a portrait of the Macedonian King Alexander the Great (356-323 B.C.). Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman bust of Alexander the Great, 2nd cent B.C bronze with gold leaf. The head is from a smaller than life size statue. The elongated curls, the parted locks and the diadem that fastens the hair at the back, are clear indications that the head is a portrait of the Macedonian King Alexander the Great (356-323 B.C.). Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman bust of Alexander the Great, 2nd cent B.C bronze with gold leaf. The head is from a smaller than life size statue. The elongated curls, the parted locks and the diadem that fastens the hair at the back, are clear indications that the head is a portrait of the Macedonian King Alexander the Great (356-323 B.C.). Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman bust of Alexander the Great, 2nd cent B.C bronze with gold leaf. The head is from a smaller than life size statue. The elongated curls, the parted locks and the diadem that fastens the hair at the back, are clear indications that the head is a portrait of the Macedonian King Alexander the Great (356-323 B.C.). Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture head of Hercules, mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Vale Giardino, Nemi. The head was probably made separately for the insertion onto a statue, probably depicting the gold seated. The work is a copy of a Greek original of the late Hellenistic period, inspired by a statue by the Greek sculptor Lysippos of Sicyon known as the ‘Herakles Epitapezios’ sculpted around 300 BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture head of Hercules, mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Vale Giardino, Nemi. The head was probably made separately for the insertion onto a statue, probably depicting the gold seated. The work is a copy of a Greek original of the late Hellenistic period, inspired by a statue by the Greek sculptor Lysippos of Sicyon known as the ‘Herakles Epitapezios’ sculpted around 300 BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture head of Hercules, mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Vale Giardino, Nemi. The head was probably made separately for the insertion onto a statue, probably depicting the gold seated. The work is a copy of a Greek original of the late Hellenistic period, inspired by a statue by the Greek sculptor Lysippos of Sicyon known as the ‘Herakles Epitapezios’ sculpted around 300 BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture head of Hercules, mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Vale Giardino, Nemi. The head was probably made separately for the insertion onto a statue, probably depicting the gold seated. The work is a copy of a Greek original of the late Hellenistic period, inspired by a statue by the Greek sculptor Lysippos of Sicyon known as the ‘Herakles Epitapezios’ sculpted around 300 BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Satatue known as the Sitting captive - a Roman sculpture of the 1st or 2nd century SAD made out of  Green Breche stone from the Wadi Hammamat, Egypt. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The body can be dated  to the 1st century AD and is probably from the near east. The recomposed statue , named the defeated barbarian king, was the centre piece of a room in the Villa Albani (1692-1779) in Rome.  The Albani Collection, Inv No. LL 17 or Ma 1383, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Satatue known as the Sitting captive - a Roman sculpture of the 1st or 2nd century SAD made out of  Green Breche stone from the Wadi Hammamat, Egypt. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The body can be dated  to the 1st century AD and is probably from the near east. The recomposed statue , named the defeated barbarian king, was the centre piece of a room in the Villa Albani (1692-1779) in Rome.  The Albani Collection, Inv No. LL 17 or Ma 1383, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Satatue known as the Sitting captive - a Roman sculpture of the 1st or 2nd century SAD made out of  Green Breche stone from the Wadi Hammamat, Egypt. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The body can be dated  to the 1st century AD and is probably from the near east. The recomposed statue , named the defeated barbarian king, was the centre piece of a room in the Villa Albani (1692-1779) in Rome.  The Albani Collection, Inv No. LL 17 or Ma 1383, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman marble head of Aphrodite (Venus)  known as the “Kaufmann head” once conserved in Berlin. Circa 150 BC found in Asia Minor.  Inv MND 2027 ( or Ma 3518) Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman marble head of Aphrodite (Venus)  known as the “Kaufmann head” once conserved in Berlin. Circa 150 BC found in Asia Minor.  Inv MND 2027 ( or Ma 3518) Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman marble head of Aphrodite (Venus)  known as the “Kaufmann head” once conserved in Berlin. Circa 150 BC found in Asia Minor.  Inv MND 2027 ( or Ma 3518) Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman marble sculpture with an unrelated head  of Lucius Verus, body 50-75 AD head 160-169 AD, inv 6081, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture with an unrelated head  of Lucius Verus, body 50-75 AD head 160-169 AD, inv 6081, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture with an unrelated head  of Lucius Verus, body 50-75 AD head 160-169 AD, inv 6081, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture with an unrelated head  of Lucius Verus, body 50-75 AD head 160-169 AD, inv 6081, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • The Kaufmann Aphrodite head. 2nd century Roman marble copy modelled on the statue head of Aphrodite of Cnidus by Praixitele. Many Roman replicas exist of the Aphrodite of Cnidus which is one of the most famous statues of antiquity. The statue depicts the goddess bathing with a vase of water beside her. The lost original is a Hellenistic Greek sculpture made in 360-350 BC which is attributed to Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Tradition has it that the model for the original was the lover of sculptor Phryne. The original is the oldest known female nude in Greek sculpture. Borghese Collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv no MR657 ( Usual No Ma 421)
  • The Kaufmann Aphrodite head. 2nd century Roman marble copy modelled on the statue head of Aphrodite of Cnidus by Praixitele. Many Roman replicas exist of the Aphrodite of Cnidus which is one of the most famous statues of antiquity. The statue depicts the goddess bathing with a vase of water beside her. The lost original is a Hellenistic Greek sculpture made in 360-350 BC which is attributed to Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Tradition has it that the model for the original was the lover of sculptor Phryne. The original is the oldest known female nude in Greek sculpture. Borghese Collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv no MR657 ( Usual No Ma 421)
  • The Kilamuwa Stela a stele of King Kilamuwa, from the Kingdom of Sam'al. The stele is a 16-line text in Phoenician. King Kilamuwa is shown standing on the upper left and addressing four Canaanite god-insignias with his right arm and finger. His left hand is draped at his left side holding a wilted lotus flower, a symbol of a king's death. He is dressed in king's regalia with hat, and his figure stands at the beginning of the first nine lines of the text.. Basalt  9th-century BC. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin.  The text reads "I am Kilamuwa, the son of King Haya'. King Gabar reigned over Ya'diya-(Sam'al) but achieved nothing.<br />
Then came Bamah, and he achieved nothing.<br />
My own father, Haya', did nothing with his reign.<br />
My brother, Sha'il, also did nothing.<br />
It was I, Kilamuwa...who managed to do what none of my ancestors had.<br />
My father's kingdom was beset by powerful, predatory kings, all holding out their hands, demanding to be fed.<br />
But I raged amongst them like a fire, burning their beards and consuming their outstretched hands.<br />
Only the Danunian kings overmastered me; I had to call on the King of Assyria to assist me...<br />
I, Kilamuwa, the son of Haya', ascended my father's throne.<br />
Under their previous kings, the [people] had howled like dogs.<br />
But I was a father, a mother and a brother to them.<br />
I gave gold, silver and cattle to men who had never so much as seen the face of a sheep before.<br />
Those who had never even seen linen all their lives I clothed in byssus-cloth from head to foot.<br />
I took the [people] by the hand and in their souls they looked to me just as the orphan looks to his mother."<br />
"Whoever of my sons comes after me and interferes with this inscription, may he be dishonoured among the people...<br />
And if anyone should damage this inscription,<br />
Let Gabar's god Ba'al-Samad destroy his head,<br />
And let Bamah's god Ba'al Hamon destroy his head..."<br />
Together with Reχub-ʾEl, the Lord of the Palace
  • Gothic wood statue of the Head of Christ by  Jaume Cascalls. Carved alabaster with polychrome and gilt remains.  This head must have belonged to a Recumbent Christ which could have formed part of a sculptural group of the Holy Sepulchre. It probably came from the chapel of Corpus Christi of the convent of Sant Agustí Vell, Barcelona.<br />
Jaume Cascalls is one of the most important sculptors of the fourteenth century in Catalonia. This is borne out by his involvement over almost thirty years with the project of the royal pantheon in Poblet for King Peter the Ceremonious and with other large undertakings of the time. Today, on stylistic grounds, he is credited with this 'Head of Christ', which must have formed part of a sculptural group of the Holy Sepulchre, presumably from the church of the convent of Sant Agustí Vell in Barcelona. The break in the neck suggests it belonged to a full-length recumbent Christ, like the one kept at Sant Feliu in Girona and also attributed to Cascalls. National Museum of Catalan Art, inv no: 034879-000
  • Gothic wood statue of the Head of Christ by  Jaume Cascalls. Carved alabaster with polychrome and gilt remains.  This head must have belonged to a Recumbent Christ which could have formed part of a sculptural group of the Holy Sepulchre. It probably came from the chapel of Corpus Christi of the convent of Sant Agustí Vell, Barcelona.<br />
Jaume Cascalls is one of the most important sculptors of the fourteenth century in Catalonia. This is borne out by his involvement over almost thirty years with the project of the royal pantheon in Poblet for King Peter the Ceremonious and with other large undertakings of the time. Today, on stylistic grounds, he is credited with this 'Head of Christ', which must have formed part of a sculptural group of the Holy Sepulchre, presumably from the church of the convent of Sant Agustí Vell in Barcelona. The break in the neck suggests it belonged to a full-length recumbent Christ, like the one kept at Sant Feliu in Girona and also attributed to Cascalls. National Museum of Catalan Art, inv no: 034879-000
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The Kaufmann Aphrodite head. 2nd century Roman marble copy modelled on the statue head of Aphrodite of Cnidus by Praixitele. Many Roman replicas exist of the Aphrodite of Cnidus which is one of the most famous statues of antiquity. The statue depicts the goddess bathing with a vase of water beside her. The lost original is a Hellenistic Greek sculpture made in 360-350 BC which is attributed to Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Tradition has it that the model for the original was the lover of sculptor Phryne. The original is the oldest known female nude in Greek sculpture. Borghese Collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv no MR657 ( Usual No Ma 421)
  • Gothic wood statue of the Head of Christ by  Jaume Cascalls. Carved alabaster with polychrome and gilt remains.  This head must have belonged to a Recumbent Christ which could have formed part of a sculptural group of the Holy Sepulchre. It probably came from the chapel of Corpus Christi of the convent of Sant Agustí Vell, Barcelona.<br />
Jaume Cascalls is one of the most important sculptors of the fourteenth century in Catalonia. This is borne out by his involvement over almost thirty years with the project of the royal pantheon in Poblet for King Peter the Ceremonious and with other large undertakings of the time. Today, on stylistic grounds, he is credited with this 'Head of Christ', which must have formed part of a sculptural group of the Holy Sepulchre, presumably from the church of the convent of Sant Agustí Vell in Barcelona. The break in the neck suggests it belonged to a full-length recumbent Christ, like the one kept at Sant Feliu in Girona and also attributed to Cascalls. National Museum of Catalan Art, inv no: 034879-000
  • Gothic wood statue of the Head of Christ by  Jaume Cascalls. Carved alabaster with polychrome and gilt remains.  This head must have belonged to a Recumbent Christ which could have formed part of a sculptural group of the Holy Sepulchre. It probably came from the chapel of Corpus Christi of the convent of Sant Agustí Vell, Barcelona.<br />
Jaume Cascalls is one of the most important sculptors of the fourteenth century in Catalonia. This is borne out by his involvement over almost thirty years with the project of the royal pantheon in Poblet for King Peter the Ceremonious and with other large undertakings of the time. Today, on stylistic grounds, he is credited with this 'Head of Christ', which must have formed part of a sculptural group of the Holy Sepulchre, presumably from the church of the convent of Sant Agustí Vell in Barcelona. The break in the neck suggests it belonged to a full-length recumbent Christ, like the one kept at Sant Feliu in Girona and also attributed to Cascalls. National Museum of Catalan Art, inv no: 034879-000
  • Gothic wood statue of the Head of Christ by  Jaume Cascalls. Carved alabaster with polychrome and gilt remains.  This head must have belonged to a Recumbent Christ which could have formed part of a sculptural group of the Holy Sepulchre. It probably came from the chapel of Corpus Christi of the convent of Sant Agustí Vell, Barcelona.<br />
Jaume Cascalls is one of the most important sculptors of the fourteenth century in Catalonia. This is borne out by his involvement over almost thirty years with the project of the royal pantheon in Poblet for King Peter the Ceremonious and with other large undertakings of the time. Today, on stylistic grounds, he is credited with this 'Head of Christ', which must have formed part of a sculptural group of the Holy Sepulchre, presumably from the church of the convent of Sant Agustí Vell in Barcelona. The break in the neck suggests it belonged to a full-length recumbent Christ, like the one kept at Sant Feliu in Girona and also attributed to Cascalls. National Museum of Catalan Art, inv no: 034879-000
  • Gothic statue of the Head of Christ by  Jaume Cascalls. Carved alabaster with polychrome and gilt remains.  This head must have belonged to a Recumbent Christ which could have formed part of a sculptural group of the Holy Sepulchre. It probably came from the chapel of Corpus Christi of the convent of Sant Agustí Vell, Barcelona.<br />
Jaume Cascalls is one of the most important sculptors of the fourteenth century in Catalonia. This is borne out by his involvement over almost thirty years with the project of the royal pantheon in Poblet for King Peter the Ceremonious and with other large undertakings of the time. Today, on stylistic grounds, he is credited with this 'Head of Christ', which must have formed part of a sculptural group of the Holy Sepulchre, presumably from the church of the convent of Sant Agustí Vell in Barcelona. The break in the neck suggests it belonged to a full-length recumbent Christ, like the one kept at Sant Feliu in Girona and also attributed to Cascalls. National Museum of Catalan Art, inv no: 034879-000
  • Ancient Egyptian head rest for sleeping on, type 1 . Egyptian Museum, Turin. White background.<br />
<br />
Ancient egyptian headrests were used to raise the head whist sleeping. Padding was laid over the wooden headrest to make it more comfortable.
  • Ancient Egyptian head rest for sleeping on, type 1 . Egyptian Museum, Turin. <br />
<br />
Ancient egyptian headrests were used to raise the head whist sleeping. Padding was laid over the wooden headrest to make it more comfortable.
  • Ancient Egyptian head rest for sleeping on, type 1 . Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background<br />
<br />
Ancient egyptian headrests were used to raise the head whist sleeping. Padding was laid over the wooden headrest to make it more comfortable.
  • Ancient Egyptian statue head of a monarch, limestone, Middle Kingdom, mis 12th Dynasty, (1900-1850 BC), Qqw el-Kebir, tomb of Ibu. Egyptian Museum, Turin. white background<br />
<br />
Since this statue head comes from the tomb of Ibu it is likely that they depict a powerful gosvenor, although the incsription is lost. It can be dated by its style which is close to the statues of Amenemhat II and Sesostris II. Schiaparelli excavations. Cat 4410 & 4414
  • Ancient Egyptian statue head of a monarch, limestone, Middle Kingdom, mis 12th Dynasty, (1900-1850 BC), Qqw el-Kebir, tomb of Ibu. Egyptian Museum, Turin. white background.<br />
<br />
Since this statue head comes from the tomb of Ibu it is likely that they depict a powerful gosvenor, although the incsription is lost. It can be dated by its style which is close to the statues of Amenemhat II and Sesostris II. Schiaparelli excavations. Cat 4410 & 4414
  • Ancient Egyptian statue head of a monarch, limestone, Middle Kingdom, mis 12th Dynasty, (1900-1850 BC), Qqw el-Kebir, tomb of Ibu. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.<br />
<br />
Since this statue head comes from the tomb of Ibu it is likely that they depict a powerful gosvenor, although the incsription is lost. It can be dated by its style which is close to the statues of Amenemhat II and Sesostris II. Schiaparelli excavations. Cat 4410 & 4414
  • Ancient Egyptian statue head of a monarch, limestone, Middle Kingdom, mis 12th Dynasty, (1900-1850 BC), Qqw el-Kebir, tomb of Ibu. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.<br />
<br />
Since this statue head comes from the tomb of Ibu it is likely that they depict a powerful gosvenor, although the incsription is lost. It can be dated by its style which is close to the statues of Amenemhat II and Sesostris II. Schiaparelli excavations. Cat 4410 & 4414
  • Ancient Egyptian statue head of a monarch, limestone, Middle Kingdom, mis 12th Dynasty, (1900-1850 BC), Qqw el-Kebir, tomb of Ibu. Egyptian Museum, Turin. white background.<br />
<br />
Since this statue head comes from the tomb of Ibu it is likely that they depict a powerful gosvenor, although the incsription is lost. It can be dated by its style which is close to the statues of Amenemhat II and Sesostris II. Schiaparelli excavations. Cat 4410 & 4414
  • Ancient Egyptian statue head of a monarch, limestone, Middle Kingdom, mis 12th Dynasty, (1900-1850 BC), Qqw el-Kebir, tomb of Ibu. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.<br />
<br />
Since this statue head comes from the tomb of Ibu it is likely that they depict a powerful gosvenor, although the incsription is lost. It can be dated by its style which is close to the statues of Amenemhat II and Sesostris II. Schiaparelli excavations. Cat 4410 & 4414
  • Minoan clay lion's head rhython, Akrotiri, Thira (Santorini) National Archaeological Museum Athens. 17th-16th cent BC.<br />
<br />
Created in a naturalistic style, this lions head rhython has a small pouring hole in its muzzle and would have been used during ceremonies
  • Minoan clay lion's head rhython, Akrotiri, Thira (Santorini) National Archaeological Museum Athens. 17th-16th cent BC.<br />
<br />
Created in a naturalistic style, this lions head rhython has a small pouring hole in its muzzle and would have been used during ceremonies
  • Minoan clay lion's head rhython, Akrotiri, Thira (Santorini) National Archaeological Museum Athens. 17th-16th cent BC.<br />
<br />
Created in a naturalistic style, this lions head rhython has a small pouring hole in its muzzle and would have been used during ceremonies
  • Roman head sculpture in the ‘Italic cubism ‘ style, 2nd - 3rd century BC, found in the foundations of the Ministery of Finance on the via XX Septembre, Rome. The head, the back of which was not completed, shows markedly realistic, clear features. The style, a blend of Greek art and Italic traditions, is traceable to Etruscan portraiture of the so called ‘Italic cubism’ of the 3rd century BC, and local stone used was well suited to this genre. It is believed to be the only known example of this style and has been roughly dated to between the 3rd and 2nd century BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman head sculpture in the ‘Italic cubism ‘ style, 2nd - 3rd century BC, found in the foundations of the Ministery of Finance on the via XX Septembre, Rome. The head, the back of which was not completed, shows markedly realistic, clear features. The style, a blend of Greek art and Italic traditions, is traceable to Etruscan portraiture of the so called ‘Italic cubism’ of the 3rd century BC, and local stone used was well suited to this genre. It is believed to be the only known example of this style and has been roughly dated to between the 3rd and 2nd century BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman head sculpture in the ‘Italic cubism ‘ style, 2nd - 3rd century BC, found in the foundations of the Ministery of Finance on the via XX Septembre, Rome. The head, the back of which was not completed, shows markedly realistic, clear features. The style, a blend of Greek art and Italic traditions, is traceable to Etruscan portraiture of the so called ‘Italic cubism’ of the 3rd century BC, and local stone used was well suited to this genre. It is believed to be the only known example of this style and has been roughly dated to between the 3rd and 2nd century BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman head sculpture in the ‘Italic cubism ‘ style, 2nd - 3rd century BC, found in the foundations of the Ministery of Finance on the via XX Septembre, Rome. The head, the back of which was not completed, shows markedly realistic, clear features. The style, a blend of Greek art and Italic traditions, is traceable to Etruscan portraiture of the so called ‘Italic cubism’ of the 3rd century BC, and local stone used was well suited to this genre. It is believed to be the only known example of this style and has been roughly dated to between the 3rd and 2nd century BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman head sculpture in the ‘Italic cubism ‘ style, 2nd - 3rd century BC, found in the foundations of the Ministery of Finance on the via XX Septembre, Rome. The head, the back of which was not completed, shows markedly realistic, clear features. The style, a blend of Greek art and Italic traditions, is traceable to Etruscan portraiture of the so called ‘Italic cubism’ of the 3rd century BC, and local stone used was well suited to this genre. It is believed to be the only known example of this style and has been roughly dated to between the 3rd and 2nd century BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Ancient Egyptian head rest for sleeping on, type 1 . Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background<br />
<br />
Ancient egyptian headrests were used to raise the head whist sleeping. Padding was laid over the wooden headrest to make it more comfortable.
  • Ancient Egyptian head rest for sleeping on, type 1 . Egyptian Museum, Turin. Black background. <br />
<br />
Ancient egyptian headrests were used to raise the head whist sleeping. Padding was laid over the wooden headrest to make it more comfortable.
  • Ancient Egyptian statue head of a monarch, limestone, Middle Kingdom, mis 12th Dynasty, (1900-1850 BC), Qqw el-Kebir, tomb of Ibu. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background<br />
<br />
Since this statue head comes from the tomb of Ibu it is likely that they depict a powerful gosvenor, although the incsription is lost. It can be dated by its style which is close to the statues of Amenemhat II and Sesostris II. Schiaparelli excavations. Cat 4410 & 4414
  • Ancient Egyptian statue head of a monarch, limestone, Middle Kingdom, mis 12th Dynasty, (1900-1850 BC), Qqw el-Kebir, tomb of Ibu. Egyptian Museum, Turin.  black background,<br />
<br />
Since this statue head comes from the tomb of Ibu it is likely that they depict a powerful gosvenor, although the incsription is lost. It can be dated by its style which is close to the statues of Amenemhat II and Sesostris II. Schiaparelli excavations. Cat 4410 & 4414

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