• Smoked salmon rolls filled with cream cheese and cream cheese and peppers, in a party buffet setting.
  • Smoked salmon parcel filled with cream cheese and cream cheese and crab, in a party buffet setting.
  • Smoked salmon rolls filled with cream cheese and cream cheese and peppers, in a party buffet setting.
  • Smoked salmon parcel filled with cream cheese and cream cheese and crab, in a party buffet setting.
  • Crab mousse made into a ring and cut, in a party buffet setting.
  • The Unfinished rock monument of Midas, 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This rock facade was planned but never finished and so little is known about the unfinished Monument. It is also known locally as the Kucuk Yazilikaya ( “little written rock”), since it appears to have been planned as a smaller version of the Midas Monument, also called Yazilikaya. It measures 7m x 10m and faces west, unlike the other monument at Midas whose facades face east. Since it was never completed, it was gives some idea of the construction techniques : first the rock was flattened and then the facade was carved from the top down. The architectural frame and the ornament were carved at the same time. About  2m below the monument are a smaller facade, to the left and a small cut altar to the right.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of a prisoner of  Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of a prisoner of  Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Roman Sebasteion rrelief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Roman Sebasteion rrelief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Roman Sebasteion rrelief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Roman Sebasteion rrelief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of cryptoporticus A  of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
The paintings in the long corridor, which got light only from small high-placed windows, are on a white background. The illusionistic decoration shows a row of columns on a high socle decorated with "grottesche". In the background, pictures alternating theatrical scenes, scenes of worship, and landscapes seem to hang on a wall divided by pilasters. Some of the scenes are probably later restorations of the originals. <br />
In the upper part a loggia holding sphinxes and statues of divinities rests on caryatids (architectural supports in the form of female figures). <br />
Because there was limited time for excavation, only the more important decorative elements were removed from the walls. A drawing on the modern base on which the fragments are inserted gives an idea of the effect of the whole, which is known to us from a watercolor done at the time.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of cryptoporticus A  of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
The paintings in the long corridor, which got light only from small high-placed windows, are on a white background. The illusionistic decoration shows a row of columns on a high socle decorated with "grottesche". In the background, pictures alternating theatrical scenes, scenes of worship, and landscapes seem to hang on a wall divided by pilasters. Some of the scenes are probably later restorations of the originals. <br />
In the upper part a loggia holding sphinxes and statues of divinities rests on caryatids (architectural supports in the form of female figures). <br />
Because there was limited time for excavation, only the more important decorative elements were removed from the walls. A drawing on the modern base on which the fragments are inserted gives an idea of the effect of the whole, which is known to us from a watercolor done at the time.
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture, an allegory of an athletic contest [ Agon ]  Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. The pillar with a bearded head on it is Hermes the god of the gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victiry with a ribbon on a prize table. Two winged baby Eros figures are stuggling over a palm branch acting out the idea of a contest. The youthful figure is Agon himself who holds a palm of victory
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture, an allegory of an athletic contest [ Agon ]  Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. The pillar with a bearded head on it is Hermes the god of the gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victiry with a ribbon on a prize table. Two winged baby Eros figures are stuggling over a palm branch acting out the idea of a contest. The youthful figure is Agon himself who holds a palm of victory
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture, an allegory of an athletic contest [ Agon ]  Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. The pillar with a bearded head on it is Hermes the god of the gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victiry with a ribbon on a prize table. Two winged baby Eros figures are stuggling over a palm branch acting out the idea of a contest. The youthful figure is Agon himself who holds a palm of victory
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture, an allegory of an athletic contest [ Agon ]  Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. The pillar with a bearded head on it is Hermes the god of the gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victiry with a ribbon on a prize table. Two winged baby Eros figures are stuggling over a palm branch acting out the idea of a contest. The youthful figure is Agon himself who holds a palm of victory
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture, an allegory of an athletic contest [ Agon ]  Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. The pillar with a bearded head on it is Hermes the god of the gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victiry with a ribbon on a prize table. Two winged baby Eros figures are stuggling over a palm branch acting out the idea of a contest. The youthful figure is Agon himself who holds a palm of victory
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture, an allegory of an athletic contest [ Agon ]  Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. The pillar with a bearded head on it is Hermes the god of the gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victiry with a ribbon on a prize table. Two winged baby Eros figures are stuggling over a palm branch acting out the idea of a contest. The youthful figure is Agon himself who holds a palm of victory
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture, an allegory of an athletic contest [ Agon ]  Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. The pillar with a bearded head on it is Hermes the god of the gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victiry with a ribbon on a prize table. Two winged baby Eros figures are stuggling over a palm branch acting out the idea of a contest. The youthful figure is Agon himself who holds a palm of victory
  • The Unfinished rock monument of Midas, 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This rock facade was planned but never finished and so little is known about the unfinished Monument. It is also known locally as the Kucuk Yazilikaya ( “little written rock”), since it appears to have been planned as a smaller version of the Midas Monument, also called Yazilikaya. It measures 7m x 10m and faces west, unlike the other monument at Midas whose facades face east. Since it was never completed, it was gives some idea of the construction techniques : first the rock was flattened and then the facade was carved from the top down. The architectural frame and the ornament were carved at the same time. About  2m below the monument are a smaller facade, to the left and a small cut altar to the right.
  • The Unfinished rock monument of Midas, 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This rock facade was planned but never finished and so little is known about the unfinished Monument. It is also known locally as the Kucuk Yazilikaya ( “little written rock”), since it appears to have been planned as a smaller version of the Midas Monument, also called Yazilikaya. It measures 7m x 10m and faces west, unlike the other monument at Midas whose facades face east. Since it was never completed, it was gives some idea of the construction techniques : first the rock was flattened and then the facade was carved from the top down. The architectural frame and the ornament were carved at the same time. About  2m below the monument are a smaller facade, to the left and a small cut altar to the right.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • RomanSebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Roman Sebasteion rrelief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome

FunkyStock Picture Library Resource

Picture The Past

ABOUT

FunkyStock Picture Library free resource for professional editorial picture editors, picture researchers, historical scholars and students and enthusiasts who want to browse some of the best pictures and images of historic countries, historical places, archaeological sites and the very best museum antiquities and artefacts exhibits in Europe and the Middle East.

Pictures and Images can be downloaded or bought as stock photos or photo art prints.

COUNTRIES

Browse travel pictures and images of historic places and archaeological sites of countries in Europe and the Middle East.

VIEW COUNTRIES INDEX....

HISTORICAL

Explore the past through pictures and images of its historic places. See the great palaces, castles and cities of antiquity as well as the great archaeological sites where our ancestors made history.

EXPLORE HISTORICAL PLACES...

MUSEUMS

Browse pictures & images the treasured artefacts and antiquities exhibits from the great Museum of Europe and the Middle East. See the art and objects made by our ancestors.

SEE MUESEUM ANTIQUITIES....