• Oia ( Ia ) Santorini - Windmills and view of town , Greek Cyclades islands - Photos, pictures and images
  • Oia ( Ia ) Santorini - Windmills Greek Cyclades islands - Photos, pictures and images
  • Oia ( Ia ) Santorini - Windmills Greek Cyclades islands - Photos, pictures and images
  • Oia ( Ia ) Santorini - Windmills and view of town , Greek Cyclades islands - Photos, pictures and images
  • Oia ( Ia ) Santorini - Windmills Greek Cyclades islands - Photos, pictures and images
  • Runswick Bay - North Yorkshire - England disabled women paddling
  • Runswick Bay - North Yorkshire - England disabled women paddling
  • Picture and image of the stone sculptures of angels and a Sister of Charity. in memory of the surgeon Luigi Pastorini, the sculptor Navone has conceived a complex allegory, in which a feminine winged figure, representing the Medicine, distributes some wealth to a Sister of Charity who holds an ill baby. She is helped by another winged figure, the Munificence, whose regard is turned towards the deceased. The “Cappellone” Sisters – they are so named because of their large head covering – were so committed to provide aid to the poor that they have become the symbol of the assistance to the needy. Navone has succeeded in harmonizing the Medicine allegory and its delicacy with the raw representation of the poor people: in fact, as from the middle years of the bourgeois realism, the poor were portrayed in a very realistic way, without any idealization. Sculpted by G. Navone 1902. Section A, no 28,  The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculptures of angels and a Sister of Charity. in memory of the surgeon Luigi Pastorini, the sculptor Navone has conceived a complex allegory, in which a feminine winged figure, representing the Medicine, distributes some wealth to a Sister of Charity who holds an ill baby. She is helped by another winged figure, the Munificence, whose regard is turned towards the deceased. The “Cappellone” Sisters – they are so named because of their large head covering – were so committed to provide aid to the poor that they have become the symbol of the assistance to the needy. Navone has succeeded in harmonizing the Medicine allegory and its delicacy with the raw representation of the poor people: in fact, as from the middle years of the bourgeois realism, the poor were portrayed in a very realistic way, without any idealization. Sculpted by G. Navone 1902. Section A, no 28,  The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculptures of angels and a Sister of Charity. in memory of the surgeon Luigi Pastorini, the sculptor Navone has conceived a complex allegory, in which a feminine winged figure, representing the Medicine, distributes some wealth to a Sister of Charity who holds an ill baby. She is helped by another winged figure, the Munificence, whose regard is turned towards the deceased. The “Cappellone” Sisters – they are so named because of their large head covering – were so committed to provide aid to the poor that they have become the symbol of the assistance to the needy. Navone has succeeded in harmonizing the Medicine allegory and its delicacy with the raw representation of the poor people: in fact, as from the middle years of the bourgeois realism, the poor were portrayed in a very realistic way, without any idealization. Sculpted by G. Navone 1902. Section A, no 28,  The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to St Sylvester.  Bottom left - The young Sylvester presented by his mother to the priest Cyrinus, bottom right - Sylvester welcoming St Timothy to his house. Bottom side panels right - above right - Execution of St Timothy , side panel left - Death of the prefect Tarquin, who chokes on a fish bone. Two centre panels, left- Funeral of St Timothy, right - Sylvester refusing the prefect's orders to worship an idol. Top central oval panel - Sylvester released from prison by Pope Melchiades. Above left - People beg Sylvester (holding book) to become a deacon, above right - Sylvester is ordained by Melchiades as deacon. Top side panel , right - After the death of Melchiades Sylvester installed as Pope, left - Emperor Constantine falls ill (note doctor with urine flask). Top two panels - left -  Constantine orders sacrifices to an idol, right - Pope Sylvester and his followers flee persecution. Top central oval panel - Soldiers about to prepare a bath with the blood of 3000 children. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. white background.<br />
<br />
Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 255
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 255
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 255
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 255
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
In this statue of Sekhmet the goddess is called "mistress of Shenut" possibly linking her to the lioness goddess Repyt of Anthribis.  Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 248
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
In this statue of Sekhmet the goddess is called "mistress of Shenut" possibly linking her to the lioness goddess Repyt of Anthribis.  Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 248
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. black background.<br />
<br />
In this statue of Sekhmet the goddess is called "mistress of Shenut" possibly linking her to the lioness goddess Repyt of Anthribis.  Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 248
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
In this statue of Sekhmet the goddess is called "mistress of Shenut" possibly linking her to the lioness goddess Repyt of Anthribis.  Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 248
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 249
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 249
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
This statue is unfinished and is in the stage before polishing. Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 264
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
This statue is unfinished and is in the stage before polishing. Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 264
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. white background.<br />
<br />
This statue is unfinished and is in the stage before polishing. Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 264
  • Statue of Esculape or Asclepius - a second century AD Roman sculpture. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, his daughters included Hygieia, ”Hygiene” the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation as well as Iaso, the goddess of recuperation from illness and Aceso the goddess of the healing process.  The Albani Collection, Inv No.  Ma 929, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Esculape or Asclepius - a second century AD Roman sculpture. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, his daughters included Hygieia, ”Hygiene” the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation as well as Iaso, the goddess of recuperation from illness and Aceso the goddess of the healing process.  The Albani Collection, Inv No.  Ma 929, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Esculape or Asclepius - a second century AD Roman sculpture. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, his daughters included Hygieia, ”Hygiene” the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation as well as Iaso, the goddess of recuperation from illness and Aceso the goddess of the healing process.  The Albani Collection, Inv No.  Ma 929, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. Commodus was one of Rome’s bad crazy Emperors being sadistic and debauched with a harem of 300 concubines to choose from. His favourite role playing character was that of Hercules and Commodus ordered many statues to be made showing him dressed as Hercules with a lion's hide and a club. He thought of himself as the reincarnation of Hercules, frequently emulating the legendary hero's feats by appearing in the arena to fight a variety of wild animals. Commodus raised the ire of many military officials in Rome for his Hercules persona in the arena. Often, wounded soldiers and amputees would be placed in the arena for Commodus to slay with a sword. Commodus's eccentric behaviour would not stop there. Citizens of Rome missing their feet through accident or illness were taken to the arena, where they were tethered together for Commodus to club to death while pretending they were giants.[17] These acts may have contributed to his assassination. Such ruthless antics probably led to the violent death of Commodus when a wrestler assassinated him by strangling him to death. MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. Commodus was one of Rome’s bad crazy Emperors being sadistic and debauched with a harem of 300 concubines to choose from. His favourite role playing character was that of Hercules and Commodus ordered many statues to be made showing him dressed as Hercules with a lion's hide and a club. He thought of himself as the reincarnation of Hercules, frequently emulating the legendary hero's feats by appearing in the arena to fight a variety of wild animals. Commodus raised the ire of many military officials in Rome for his Hercules persona in the arena. Often, wounded soldiers and amputees would be placed in the arena for Commodus to slay with a sword. Commodus's eccentric behaviour would not stop there. Citizens of Rome missing their feet through accident or illness were taken to the arena, where they were tethered together for Commodus to club to death while pretending they were giants.[17] These acts may have contributed to his assassination. Such ruthless antics probably led to the violent death of Commodus when a wrestler assassinated him by strangling him to death.. MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. Commodus was one of Rome’s bad crazy Emperors being sadistic and debauched with a harem of 300 concubines to choose from. His favourite role playing character was that of Hercules and Commodus ordered many statues to be made showing him dressed as Hercules with a lion's hide and a club. He thought of himself as the reincarnation of Hercules, frequently emulating the legendary hero's feats by appearing in the arena to fight a variety of wild animals. Commodus raised the ire of many military officials in Rome for his Hercules persona in the arena. Often, wounded soldiers and amputees would be placed in the arena for Commodus to slay with a sword. Commodus's eccentric behaviour would not stop there. Citizens of Rome missing their feet through accident or illness were taken to the arena, where they were tethered together for Commodus to club to death while pretending they were giants.[17] These acts may have contributed to his assassination. Such ruthless antics probably led to the violent death of Commodus when a wrestler assassinated him by strangling him to death.. MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. black background.<br />
<br />
Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 255
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1156-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 251
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1156-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. white background.<br />
<br />
Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 251
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1156-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. black background.<br />
<br />
Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 251
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1156-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 251
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1156-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 251
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. white background.<br />
<br />
In this statue of Sekhmet the goddess is called "mistress of Shenut" possibly linking her to the lioness goddess Repyt of Anthribis.  Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 248
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. black background.<br />
<br />
In this statue of Sekhmet the goddess is called "mistress of Shenut" possibly linking her to the lioness goddess Repyt of Anthribis.  Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 248
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
In this statue of Sekhmet the goddess is called "mistress of Shenut" possibly linking her to the lioness goddess Repyt of Anthribis.  Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 248
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. white background.<br />
<br />
In this statue of Sekhmet the goddess is called "mistress of Shenut" possibly linking her to the lioness goddess Repyt of Anthribis.  Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 248
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
In this statue of Sekhmet the goddess is called "mistress of Shenut" possibly linking her to the lioness goddess Repyt of Anthribis.  Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 248
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
In this statue of Sekhmet the goddess is called "mistress of Shenut" possibly linking her to the lioness goddess Repyt of Anthribis.  Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 248
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
In this statue of Sekhmet the goddess is called "mistress of Shenut" possibly linking her to the lioness goddess Repyt of Anthribis.  Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 248
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. black background.<br />
<br />
Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 249
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. white background.<br />
<br />
Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 249
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 249
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. white background.<br />
<br />
This statue is unfinished and is in the stage before polishing. Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 264
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. black background.<br />
<br />
This statue is unfinished and is in the stage before polishing. Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 264
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
This statue is unfinished and is in the stage before polishing. Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 264
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. black background.<br />
<br />
This statue is unfinished and is in the stage before polishing. Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 264
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
This statue is unfinished and is in the stage before polishing. Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 264
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
This statue is unfinished and is in the stage before polishing. Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 264
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
This statue is unfinished and is in the stage before polishing. Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 264
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. black background.<br />
<br />
Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 263
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. white background.<br />
<br />
Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 263
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 263
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 263
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 263
  • Statue of Esculape or Asclepius - a second century AD Roman sculpture. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, his daughters included Hygieia, ”Hygiene” the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation as well as Iaso, the goddess of recuperation from illness and Aceso the goddess of the healing process.  The Albani Collection, Inv No.  Ma 929, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Esculape or Asclepius - a second century AD Roman sculpture. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, his daughters included Hygieia, ”Hygiene” the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation as well as Iaso, the goddess of recuperation from illness and Aceso the goddess of the healing process.  The Albani Collection, Inv No.  Ma 929, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. Commodus was one of Rome’s bad crazy Emperors being sadistic and debauched with a harem of 300 concubines to choose from. His favourite role playing character was that of Hercules and Commodus ordered many statues to be made showing him dressed as Hercules with a lion's hide and a club. He thought of himself as the reincarnation of Hercules, frequently emulating the legendary hero's feats by appearing in the arena to fight a variety of wild animals. Commodus raised the ire of many military officials in Rome for his Hercules persona in the arena. Often, wounded soldiers and amputees would be placed in the arena for Commodus to slay with a sword. Commodus's eccentric behaviour would not stop there. Citizens of Rome missing their feet through accident or illness were taken to the arena, where they were tethered together for Commodus to club to death while pretending they were giants.[17] These acts may have contributed to his assassination. Such ruthless antics probably led to the violent death of Commodus when a wrestler assassinated him by strangling him to death. MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD.Commodus was one of Rome’s bad crazy Emperors being sadistic and debauched with a harem of 300 concubines to choose from. His favourite role playing character was that of Hercules and Commodus ordered many statues to be made showing him dressed as Hercules with a lion's hide and a club. He thought of himself as the reincarnation of Hercules, frequently emulating the legendary hero's feats by appearing in the arena to fight a variety of wild animals. Commodus raised the ire of many military officials in Rome for his Hercules persona in the arena. Often, wounded soldiers and amputees would be placed in the arena for Commodus to slay with a sword. Commodus's eccentric behaviour would not stop there. Citizens of Rome missing their feet through accident or illness were taken to the arena, where they were tethered together for Commodus to club to death while pretending they were giants.[17] These acts may have contributed to his assassination. Such ruthless antics probably led to the violent death of Commodus when a wrestler assassinated him by strangling him to death. MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Statue of Esculape or Asclepius - a second century AD Roman sculpture. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, his daughters included Hygieia, ”Hygiene” the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation as well as Iaso, the goddess of recuperation from illness and Aceso the goddess of the healing process.  The Albani Collection, Inv No.  Ma 929, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Esculape or Asclepius - a second century AD Roman sculpture. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, his daughters included Hygieia, ”Hygiene” the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation as well as Iaso, the goddess of recuperation from illness and Aceso the goddess of the healing process.  The Albani Collection, Inv No.  Ma 929, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Esculape or Asclepius - a second century AD Roman sculpture. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, his daughters included Hygieia, ”Hygiene” the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation as well as Iaso, the goddess of recuperation from illness and Aceso the goddess of the healing process.  The Albani Collection, Inv No.  Ma 929, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Esculape or Asclepius - a second century AD Roman sculpture. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, his daughters included Hygieia, ”Hygiene” the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation as well as Iaso, the goddess of recuperation from illness and Aceso the goddess of the healing process.  The Albani Collection, Inv No.  Ma 929, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Esculape or Asclepius - a second century AD Roman sculpture. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, his daughters included Hygieia, ”Hygiene” the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation as well as Iaso, the goddess of recuperation from illness and Aceso the goddess of the healing process.  The Albani Collection, Inv No.  Ma 929, Louvre Museum, Paris.

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