• Neo-Assyrian basalt statue of King Shalmaneser III (858-824 B.C) . Inscription reads "Shalmaneser, the great king, the mighty king, king of all four region, the powerful and the mighty rival of the princes of the whole earth the great ones, the kings, son of Assur-Nasirapli, King of the universe, King of Assyria, grandson of ~Tukultiu-Ninurta, King of the Universe, King of Assyria". The inscription continues with his campaigns &b deeds in Uratu, Syria, Que & Tabal ending " At the time I rebuilt the walls of my city Ashur from their foundations to their summits. I made an image of my royal self and set it up in the metal gate". From Assur ( Qala't Sharqat) Iraq. Istanbul Archaeological Museum, Inv no. 4650.
  • 810-783 B.C Neo-Assyrian Stele with relief sculpture & inscription to King Adad-Nirari III (son of Samsi-Adad V, King of Assyria) praying to the gods. The inscription reports King Adad-Nirari III's campaign against Palestine in which he marched on Damascus and caused such terror that King Mari I surrendered the Royal city of Damascus paying a tribute of 100 talents of gold.  Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. No 2828.
  • Limestone Sculpted relief Stele with inscription to King Sennacherib. The relief shows Assyrian King Sennacherib  praying in front of divine symbols. 705 - 681 B.C Nineveh ( Kuyunjik ) . The inscription tells of King Sennacherib's great feats of war and the building works in Nineveh. It starts " Sennacheribs, the great king, mighty king, king of the universe, king of the Assyria, king of the four regions of the wold, favourite of the great gods". It continues " I led my armies from one end of the earth to the other and brought in submission at my feet all princes, dwelling in palaces, of the four quarters of the world". of his great worked " I enlarged the site of Nineveh, my royal city, I made its market streets wider". further " The wall and outer wall I caused skilfully constructed and raised them mountain high. I widened them to 100 cubits ( 50m )". Istanbul Archaeological Exhibit no. 1.
  • Chaldean Assyrian relief sculpture slab from the northwest palace of King Ashurnasirpal II of a Genie standing. 881-859 B.C form Nimrud or Nimrut ( Kalhu or Kalah). Istanbul Archaeological exhibit Inv. No. 5.
  • Chaldean Assyrian relief sculpture slab from the northwest palace of King Ashurnasirpal II of a Genie standing. 881-859 B.C form Nimrud or Nimrut ( Kalhu or Kalah). Istanbul Archaeological exhibit Inv. No. 5.
  • Chaldean Assyrian relief sculpture slab from the northwest palace of King Ashurnasirpal II of a Genie standing in front of the tree of life. 881-859 B.C form Nimrud or Nimrut ( Kalhu or Kalah). Istanbul Archaeological exhibit Inv. No. 4.
  • Chaldean Assyrian relief sculpture slab from the northwest palace of King Ashurnasirpal II of a Genie standing. 881-859 B.C form Nimrud or Nimrut ( Kalhu or Kalah). Istanbul Archaeological exhibit Inv. No. 6.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of an eagle headed protective spirit  from Nimrud, Iraq.  The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water. 865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room F, panel 3.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit  ref WA 124584-5
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of a female protective spirit  from Nimrud, Iraq.  865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room I.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit  ref WA 124581
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit with an eagles Head from Nimrud, Iraq.  The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water from the bucket it is holding. The rosette bracelet worn around the wrist symbolises divine power. 865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room G, panelled d1. ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 124576
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit with an eagles Head from Nimrud, Iraq.  The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water from the bucket it is holding. The rosette bracelet worn around the wrist symbolises divine power. 865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room I. ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 118921
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit with an eagles Head from Nimrud, Iraq.  The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water from the bucket it is holding. The rosette bracelet worn around the wrist symbolises divine power. 865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room I. ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 118921
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit with an eagles Head from Nimrud, Iraq.  The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water from the bucket it is holding. The rosette bracelet worn around the wrist symbolises divine power. 865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room I. ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 118921
  • Chaldean Assyrian relief sculpture slab from the northwest palace of King Ashurnasirpal II of a Genie standing. 881-859 B.C form Nimrud or Nimrut ( Kalhu or Kalah). Istanbul Archaeological exhibit Inv. No. 5.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of a female protective spirit  from Nimrud, Iraq.  865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room I.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit  ref WA 124581
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit with an eagles Head from Nimrud, Iraq. The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water from the bucket it is holding.  865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room G, panelled d1. ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 124576
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit with an eagles Head from Nimrud, Iraq.  The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water from the bucket it is holding. The rosette bracelet worn around the wrist symbolises divine power. 865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room G, panelled d1. ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 124576
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit with an eagles Head from Nimrud, Iraq.  The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water from the bucket it is holding. The rosette bracelet worn around the wrist symbolises divine power. 865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room G, panelled d1. ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 124576
  • Sculpted Assyrian relief panels of Royal Chariot & Guards  from Hadatu ( Aslantas ) around 800 B.C. Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv No. 1946
  • Sculpted Assyrian relief panels of mace bearers from Hadatu ( Aslantas ) around 800 B.C. Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv No. 14-10
  • Chaldean Assyrian relief sculpture slab from the northwest palace of King Ashurnasirpal II of a Genie standing. 881-859 B.C form Nimrud or Nimrut ( Kalhu or Kalah). Istanbul Archaeological exhibit Inv. No. 5.
  • Chaldean Assyrian relief sculpture slab from the northwest palace of King Ashurnasirpal II of a Genie standing. 881-859 B.C form Nimrud or Nimrut ( Kalhu or Kalah). Istanbul Archaeological exhibit Inv. No. 5.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit from Nimrud, Iraq.  865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room Z.  ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 118874
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit holdingpomegrantes from Nimrud, Iraq.  865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room Z.  ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 118874
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit with an eagles Head from Nimrud, Iraq. The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water from the bucket it is holding.  865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room G, panelled d1. ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 124576
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit with an eagles Head from Nimrud, Iraq.  The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water from the bucket it is holding. The rosette bracelet worn around the wrist symbolises divine power. 865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room I. ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 118921
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit with an eagles Head from Nimrud, Iraq.  The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water from the bucket it is holding. The rosette bracelet worn around the wrist symbolises divine power. 865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room G, panelled d1. ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 124576
  • Roman statue of Hercules. Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Inv no . Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ flight from Troy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Aineas in armour carries his aged farther Anchises on his shoulders and leads his young son Lulus by his hand. They are fleeing from the sack of Troy. The figure floating behind is Aphrodite, Aineas’ mother: she is helping their escape. Old Anchises carries a round box that held images of Troy’s ancestral gods.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ flight from Troy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Aineas in armour carries his aged farther Anchises on his shoulders and leads his young son Lulus by his hand. They are fleeing from the sack of Troy. The figure floating behind is Aphrodite, Aineas’ mother: she is helping their escape. Old Anchises carries a round box that held images of Troy’s ancestral gods.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ flight from Troy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
Aineas in armour carries his aged farther Anchises on his shoulders and leads his young son Lulus by his hand. They are fleeing from the sack of Troy. The figure floating behind is Aphrodite, Aineas’ mother: she is helping their escape. Old Anchises carries a round box that held images of Troy’s ancestral gods.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ flight from Troy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
Aineas in armour carries his aged farther Anchises on his shoulders and leads his young son Lulus by his hand. They are fleeing from the sack of Troy. The figure floating behind is Aphrodite, Aineas’ mother: she is helping their escape. Old Anchises carries a round box that held images of Troy’s ancestral gods.
  • Close up of a RomanSebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ flight from Troy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Aineas in armour carries his aged farther Anchises on his shoulders and leads his young son Lulus by his hand. They are fleeing from the sack of Troy. The figure floating behind is Aphrodite, Aineas’ mother: she is helping their escape. Old Anchises carries a round box that held images of Troy’s ancestral gods.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ flight from Troy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Aineas in armour carries his aged farther Anchises on his shoulders and leads his young son Lulus by his hand. They are fleeing from the sack of Troy. The figure floating behind is Aphrodite, Aineas’ mother: she is helping their escape. Old Anchises carries a round box that held images of Troy’s ancestral gods.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ flight from Troy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Aineas in armour carries his aged farther Anchises on his shoulders and leads his young son Lulus by his hand. They are fleeing from the sack of Troy. The figure floating behind is Aphrodite, Aineas’ mother: she is helping their escape. Old Anchises carries a round box that held images of Troy’s ancestral gods.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ flight from Troy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Aineas in armour carries his aged farther Anchises on his shoulders and leads his young son Lulus by his hand. They are fleeing from the sack of Troy. The figure floating behind is Aphrodite, Aineas’ mother: she is helping their escape. Old Anchises carries a round box that held images of Troy’s ancestral gods.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Nero , Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Naked warrior emperor Nero holds the orb of world rule in one hand and crowns the military trophy with the other. Between the trophy and the emperor stands a bound captive boy. He wears long barbarian trousers and looks up at Nero.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Nero , Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Naked warrior emperor Nero holds the orb of world rule in one hand and crowns the military trophy with the other. Between the trophy and the emperor stands a bound captive boy. He wears long barbarian trousers and looks up at Nero.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Nero , Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Naked warrior emperor Nero holds the orb of world rule in one hand and crowns the military trophy with the other. Between the trophy and the emperor stands a bound captive boy. He wears long barbarian trousers and looks up at Nero.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ flight from Troy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
Aineas in armour carries his aged farther Anchises on his shoulders and leads his young son Lulus by his hand. They are fleeing from the sack of Troy. The figure floating behind is Aphrodite, Aineas’ mother: she is helping their escape. Old Anchises carries a round box that held images of Troy’s ancestral gods.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ flight from Troy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
Aineas in armour carries his aged farther Anchises on his shoulders and leads his young son Lulus by his hand. They are fleeing from the sack of Troy. The figure floating behind is Aphrodite, Aineas’ mother: she is helping their escape. Old Anchises carries a round box that held images of Troy’s ancestral gods.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ flight from Troy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
Aineas in armour carries his aged farther Anchises on his shoulders and leads his young son Lulus by his hand. They are fleeing from the sack of Troy. The figure floating behind is Aphrodite, Aineas’ mother: she is helping their escape. Old Anchises carries a round box that held images of Troy’s ancestral gods.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the Three Graces, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
The Three Graces stand in their familiar hellenistic composition. They were handmaids of Aphrodite and appeared in this form on the decoration of her cult statue at Aphrodisias. Their names evoked their character: Euphrosyne (joy), Aglaia (Splendour) and Thaleia (Bloom).
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the Three Graces, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
The Three Graces stand in their familiar hellenistic composition. They were handmaids of Aphrodite and appeared in this form on the decoration of her cult statue at Aphrodisias. Their names evoked their character: Euphrosyne (joy), Aglaia (Splendour) and Thaleia (Bloom).
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   <br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   <br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture, Aphrodisias of Dionysus as a baby, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Baby Dionysus is handed from one nymph to another for suckling. A bearded Silenos gestures excitedly. The scene is set at Nysa in the Meander Valley, where Zeus had his gifted child Dionysos, born to him by Semele and brought up in the wilds out of the view of Hera.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aphrodite crowned by Andreia, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
A draped goddess is crowned by a female warrior figure. The goddess is probably Aphrodite, while the warrior has a bare breated Amazonian dress and equipment (spear, sword strap and shield) worn by Roma or Andreia (Bravery)
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Two princes, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Two princes stand like statues, naked, wearing cloaks. The left figure holds the orb of the world in one hand, a symbol of  world rule that indicates he is the imperial heir, and in the other a ship’s stern ornament (aphlaston), a symbol of naval victory. They and probably Gius and Lucius, the grandsons of Augustus, or Nero and Britanicus, Claudius’ heir.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of a Goddess inscribing a trophy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
A draped goddess strides forward to inscribe a military trophy to which is bound a kneeling female captive. The goddess is probably a personification such as Honour, Virtue or Courage.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Nero with captive, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Naked warrior emperor Nero holds the orb of world rule in one hand and crowns the military trophy with the other. Between the trophy and the emperor stands a bound captive boy. He wears long barbarian trousers and looks up at Nero.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Nero with captive, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Naked warrior emperor Nero holds the orb of world rule in one hand and crowns the military trophy with the other. Between the trophy and the emperor stands a bound captive boy. He wears long barbarian trousers and looks up at Nero.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Nero with captive, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Naked warrior emperor Nero holds the orb of world rule in one hand and crowns the military trophy with the other. Between the trophy and the emperor stands a bound captive boy. He wears long barbarian trousers and looks up at Nero.
  • Roman Sebasteion rrelief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Roman Sebasteion rrelief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Ares, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The nude and classically7 styled young god wears only a helmet and holds a spear (missing) in one hand and a shield in the other. At the left stands cuirass, and at the upper right corner hangs his sword. Ares was a god of war and was not later defaced by Christians probably because he so closely resembles a young emperor.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ flight from Troy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Aineas in armour carries his aged farther Anchises on his shoulders and leads his young son Lulus by his hand. They are fleeing from the sack of Troy. The figure floating behind is Aphrodite, Aineas’ mother: she is helping their escape. Old Anchises carries a round box that held images of Troy’s ancestral gods.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ flight from Troy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Aineas in armour carries his aged farther Anchises on his shoulders and leads his young son Lulus by his hand. They are fleeing from the sack of Troy. The figure floating behind is Aphrodite, Aineas’ mother: she is helping their escape. Old Anchises carries a round box that held images of Troy’s ancestral gods.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the Three Graces, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The Three Graces stand in their familiar hellenistic composition. They were handmaids of Aphrodite and appeared in this form on the decoration of her cult statue at Aphrodisias. Their names evoked their character: Euphrosyne (joy), Aglaia (Splendour) and Thaleia (Bloom).
  • Roman SSebasteion  relief  sculpture of Apollo and Royal Hero Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Apollo sits on a raised platform with his tripod at his oracular shrine. He is approached by two figures. A women greets  the god with a raised hand. With her is a hero wearing a travelling cloak and the flat headband or diadem of a king. He has come to consult Apollo, probably about a city foundation.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Royal Hero with hunting dogs,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
A diademed youth stands with his horse and hunting dogs. At the left an oval shield (foreign) hangs from a leafless tree, against which leans a long thin club. The Royal hero in this and the relief to the left is probably a local founder such as Assyrian King Ninos, claimed as founder of their city by the Aphrodisians.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Io and Argos Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
A powerful hero is folding a sword gazing closely at a half naked and dishevelled young heroine who sits on a chest like stool. Between, on a pillar base stood a small, separately added statue of a goddess ( now missing). The scene follows a scheme used in the relief panels “Io guarded by Argos”. Io was one of Zeus’s lovers, and Argos was a watchful giant sent to guard her by Hera, Zeus’s wife.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Bellerophon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Bellerophon was a Lykian hero and was claimed as a founder of Aphrodisias. He holds his winged horse Pegasos. The deign was modelled on another relief panel in the series “Royal hero with Dod Hunting”. The carving is poor and the sculptor may have been a novice.modelled
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Three Heroes and a Dog Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Two heroes stand in front of a third hero who ia seated on a rock and pats the head of a bitch hound. They are hunters and the relief is partnered by the reliefs of Melager and Atalante and Meleaner and boar
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Meleager and Atalante  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Meleager sits on a rock tying his sandal. Below him lies a fierce hunting dog with a broad collar. On one side a god or another hero wearing a rounded hat was crowning Meleager ( arm missing). On the other side stands the huntress Atalante, Meleager’s lover: she wears a short dress and quiver, and lifts her cloak at the shoulder in a gesture of modesty.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture, Aphrodisias of Dionysus as a baby, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Baby Dionysus is handed from one nymph to another for suckling. A bearded Silenos gestures excitedly. The scene is set at Nysa in the Meander Valley, where Zeus had his gifted child Dionysos, born to him by Semele and brought up in the wilds out of the view of Hera.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture, Aphrodisias of Dionysus as a baby, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Baby Dionysus is handed from one nymph to another for suckling. A bearded Silenos gestures excitedly. The scene is set at Nysa in the Meander Valley, where Zeus had his gifted child Dionysos, born to him by Semele and brought up in the wilds out of the view of Hera.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture, Aphrodisias of Dionysus as a baby, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.      Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Baby Dionysus is handed from one nymph to another for suckling. A bearded Silenos gestures excitedly. The scene is set at Nysa in the Meander Valley, where Zeus had his gifted child Dionysos, born to him by Semele and brought up in the wilds out of the view of Hera.
  • Detail of a  Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Achilles and a dying Amazon, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.       Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Achilles supports the dying Amazon queen Penthesilea whom he has mortally wounded. Her double headed axe slips from her hands. The queen had come to fight against the Greeks in the Trojan war and Achilles fell in love with her.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of a seated god or king, , Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
 An older bearded god or mythological King sits on a throne. He held a sceptre and wears a royal diadem and a richly carved tunic and cloak
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Nero , Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Naked warrior emperor Nero holds the orb of world rule in one hand and crowns the military trophy with the other. Between the trophy and the emperor stands a bound captive boy. He wears long barbarian trousers and looks up at Nero.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of a prisoner of  Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    <br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of the goddess Herma (day), Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Goddess  Herma or Day steadies a dramatically billowing cloak that frames her head. The motif , also visible on the Okeanos relief, indicates flying, floating and divine epiphany - the appearance of gods to mortals. Day would be paired with night : together they signify the eternity of the Roman imperial order.
  • Close up of Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Nero being crowned emperor by Agrippina, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Agrippina crowns her young son Nero with a laurel wreath. She carries a cornucopia, a symbol of Fortune and Plenty, and he wears the armour and cloak of a Roman commander, with a helmet on the ground near his feet. The scene refers to Nero’s accession as emperor in AD 54, and belongs before AD 59 when Nero had Agrippina murdered.
  • Close up of Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Nero being crowned emperor by Agrippina, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Agrippina crowns her young son Nero with a laurel wreath. She carries a cornucopia, a symbol of Fortune and Plenty, and he wears the armour and cloak of a Roman commander, with a helmet on the ground near his feet. The scene refers to Nero’s accession as emperor in AD 54, and belongs before AD 59 when Nero had Agrippina murdered.
  • Close up of Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Close up of Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  an Imperial prince as Diokouros son of zeus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
An imperial youth wearing a military cloak and cuirass of a commander holds the reins of hios horse. This panel is next to a Claudius panel so is probably of Britanicus or Nero the emperors son and intended successor
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Claudius and Agrippina, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Claudius in heroic nudity and military cloak shakes hands with his wife Agrippina and is crowned by the Roman people or the Senate wearing a toga. The subject is imperial concord with the traditional Roman state. Agrippina holds ears of wheat: like Demeter goddess of fertility. The emperor is crowned with an oak wreath, the Corona civica or “citizen crow”, awarded to Roman leaders for saving citizens lives: the emperor id therefore represented as saviour of the people.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  an Imperial prince as Diokouros, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
An imperial youth wearing a military cloak and cuirass of a commander holds the reins of hios horse. This panel is next to a Claudius panel so is probably of Britanicus or Nero the emperors son and intended successor
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  an Imperial prince as Diokouros, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
An imperial youth wearing a military cloak and cuirass of a commander holds the reins of hios horse. This panel is next to a Claudius panel so is probably of Britanicus or Nero the emperors son and intended successor
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Victory of the Emperors, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The inscription identifies the subject of the relief panel as the “Victory of the Emperors” (Neike Sebaston), and refers to the conquest of Armenia and Britannica in its adjacent relief panels. A half naked Victory flies diagonally across the panel, carrying a military trophy over her shoulder. A small winged Eros, now damaged was clinging to the end of the trophy pole. Victory was a key imperial attribute
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Victory of the Emperors, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The inscription identifies the subject of the relief panel as the “Victory of the Emperors” (Neike Sebaston), and refers to the conquest of Armenia and Britannica in its adjacent relief panels. A half naked Victory flies diagonally across the panel, carrying a military trophy over her shoulder. A small winged Eros, now damaged was clinging to the end of the trophy pole. Victory was a key imperial attribute
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Victory of the Emperors, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The inscription identifies the subject of the relief panel as the “Victory of the Emperors” (Neike Sebaston), and refers to the conquest of Armenia and Britannica in its adjacent relief panels. A half naked Victory flies diagonally across the panel, carrying a military trophy over her shoulder. A small winged Eros, now damaged was clinging to the end of the trophy pole. Victory was a key imperial attribute
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of emperor Claudius and Britannia, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Naked warrior emperor Claudius is about to deliver a death blow to the slumped Britannia. He wears a helmet, cloak and sword belt with a scabbard. Britannia wears a tunic with one breast exposed like the Amazon figures she was modelled on. The inscription reads: Tiberios Klaudios Kaiser - Bretannia.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of emperor Claudius and Britannia, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Naked warrior emperor Claudius is about to deliver a death blow to the slumped Britannia. He wears a helmet, cloak and sword belt with a scabbard. Britannia wears a tunic with one breast exposed like the Amazon figures she was modelled on. The inscription reads: Tiberios Klaudios Kaiser - Bretannia.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the Emperor and Roman People, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The emperor is a naked warrior and is crowned by a personification of the Roman People or the Senate wearing a toga, the stately civilian dress of a Roman Citizen. The crown is an oak wreath, the corona civica or “civic crown” awarded for saving citizens lives. The emperor is setting up a battlefield trophy beneath which kneels an anguished barbarian women captive
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the Emperor and Roman People, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The emperor is a naked warrior and is crowned by a personification of the Roman People or the Senate wearing a toga, the stately civilian dress of a Roman Citizen. The crown is an oak wreath, the corona civica or “civic crown” awarded for saving citizens lives. The emperor is setting up a battlefield trophy beneath which kneels an anguished barbarian women captive
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Two princes, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Two princes stand like statues, naked, wearing cloaks. The left figure holds the orb of the world in one hand, a symbol of  world rule that indicates he is the imperial heir, and in the other a ship’s stern ornament (aphlaston), a symbol of naval victory. They and probably Gius and Lucius, the grandsons of Augustus, or Nero and Britanicus, Claudius’ heir.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Two princes, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Two princes stand like statues, naked, wearing cloaks. The left figure holds the orb of the world in one hand, a symbol of  world rule that indicates he is the imperial heir, and in the other a ship’s stern ornament (aphlaston), a symbol of naval victory. They and probably Gius and Lucius, the grandsons of Augustus, or Nero and Britanicus, Claudius’ heir.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
A winged goddess Victory( Nike) flies past carrying a military trophy. She wears a long light dress and has one breast and one leg exposed. Her clothing is set in motion by her swift flight.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Leda and swan, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Zeus disguised as a swan assaults Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed foot on the thigh of modest, struggling Leda. The swan is supported from behind a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which were born Helen and the Dionskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Poseidon and Amphitrite,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The two god-like tritons, Poseidon and Amphitrite, are seated on two sea horses accompanied by two fish legged tritons below. Between the tritons sits a sea-putto of baby triton. The male god is in the form of Poseidon crowned by his wife Amphitrite. Unusually he wears a military cloak and they might be an emperor and his wife (such as Claudius and Agrippina) in the guise of Poseidon and Amphitrite
  • Close up of a RomanSebasteion relief  sculpture of Roma armed, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Roma is equipped with a spear, helmet, round shield and imperial style armour. Blow crouches a naked bearded prisoner, with hands tied behind his back and a skin knotted around his neck. He turns to look up at Roma
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of a Goddess inscribing a trophy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
A draped goddess strides forward to inscribe a military trophy to which is bound a kneeling female captive. The goddess is probably a personification such as Honour, Virtue or Courage.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Nero with captive, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Naked warrior emperor Nero holds the orb of world rule in one hand and crowns the military trophy with the other. Between the trophy and the emperor stands a bound captive boy. He wears long barbarian trousers and looks up at Nero.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Ares, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The nude and classically7 styled young god wears only a helmet and holds a spear (missing) in one hand and a shield in the other. At the left stands cuirass, and at the upper right corner hangs his sword. Ares was a god of war and was not later defaced by Christians probably because he so closely resembles a young emperor.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Ares, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The nude and classically7 styled young god wears only a helmet and holds a spear (missing) in one hand and a shield in the other. At the left stands cuirass, and at the upper right corner hangs his sword. Ares was a god of war and was not later defaced by Christians probably because he so closely resembles a young emperor.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Ares, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The nude and classically7 styled young god wears only a helmet and holds a spear (missing) in one hand and a shield in the other. At the left stands cuirass, and at the upper right corner hangs his sword. Ares was a god of war and was not later defaced by Christians probably because he so closely resembles a young emperor.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ flight from Troy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Aineas in armour carries his aged farther Anchises on his shoulders and leads his young son Lulus by his hand. They are fleeing from the sack of Troy. The figure floating behind is Aphrodite, Aineas’ mother: she is helping their escape. Old Anchises carries a round box that held images of Troy’s ancestral gods.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ flight from Troy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Aineas in armour carries his aged farther Anchises on his shoulders and leads his young son Lulus by his hand. They are fleeing from the sack of Troy. The figure floating behind is Aphrodite, Aineas’ mother: she is helping their escape. Old Anchises carries a round box that held images of Troy’s ancestral gods.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the Three Graces, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Three Graces stand in their familiar hellenistic composition. They were handmaids of Aphrodite and appeared in this form on the decoration of her cult statue at Aphrodisias. Their names evoked their character: Euphrosyne (joy), Aglaia (Splendour) and Thaleia (Bloom).
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the Three Graces, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The Three Graces stand in their familiar hellenistic composition. They were handmaids of Aphrodite and appeared in this form on the decoration of her cult statue at Aphrodisias. Their names evoked their character: Euphrosyne (joy), Aglaia (Splendour) and Thaleia (Bloom).
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Royal Hero with hunting dogs,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
A diademed youth stands with his horse and hunting dogs. At the left an oval shield (foreign) hangs from a leafless tree, against which leans a long thin club. The Royal hero in this and the relief to the left is probably a local founder such as Assyrian King Ninos, claimed as founder of their city by the Aphrodisians.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Herakles or Hercules, Nessos and Deianira Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The centaur Nessos agreed to carry Herakles’ (Hercules) wife Deianira across the river Euenos in Aitolia but tried to rape her in mid-stream. I the struggle that followed we see Herakles about to deliver a crushing blow with his club. Nessos has been beaten to her knees but is still fighting. Behind the centaur is the partly disrobed figure of Deianira
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Herakles or Hercules Drunk Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Herakles or Hercules staggers along drunk, supported by a small satyr from the entourage of Dionysus. He is wearing the head ribbon of a drinking party, where he has been in a drinking contest with Dionysus. The wine god has conquered even the mighty hero of the Twelve Labours.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Herakles or Hercules Drunk Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Herakles or Hercules staggers along drunk, supported by a small satyr from the entourage of Dionysus. He is wearing the head ribbon of a drinking party, where he has been in a drinking contest with Dionysus. The wine god has conquered even the mighty hero of the Twelve Labours.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Nysa and baby Dionysus Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The nymph Nysa has the baby Dionysus on her lap. He reaches out to a bunch of grapes held up by a satyr, one of his woodland followers. Dionysus was the son of Zeus by Semele, and was given the nymphs of Mt Nysa for an upbringing in the wilds, safe from the eyes of Hera, Zeus’s wife. Nysa was located in the Meander Valley, near Aphrodisias: the story was local.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Dionysus Drunk Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
A prancing woodland nymph leads drunken Dionysus who supports himself languidly on a small satyr. This is an image of Dionysian enjoyment and pleasure, hellenistic in style and fluently designed
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Dionysus Drunk Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
A prancing woodland nymph leads drunken Dionysus who supports himself languidly on a small satyr. This is an image of Dionysian enjoyment and pleasure, hellenistic in style and fluently designed
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Io and Argos Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
<br />
A powerful hero is folding a sword gazing closely at a half naked and dishevelled young heroine who sits on a chest like stool. Between, on a pillar base stood a small, separately added statue of a goddess ( now missing). The scene follows a scheme used in the relief panels “Io guarded by Argos”. Io was one of Zeus’s lovers, and Argos was a watchful giant sent to guard her by Hera, Zeus’s wife.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Apollo and a Muse Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
On the left stood Apollo, one foot raised on a rock, playing his lyre which rests on top of the omphalos (the earth’s navel stone, tied down at Delphi(. On the right stands a muse holding one arm of Apollos lyre.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Bellerophon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Bellerophon was a Lykian hero and was claimed as a founder of Aphrodisias. He holds his winged horse Pegasos. The deign was modelled on another relief panel in the series “Royal hero with Dod Hunting”. The carving is poor and the sculptor may have been a novice.modelled
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of an Heroic Couple Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
A heroine sits on a rock with one breast bare. In the front of her stands a young hero. Between them a small statue of Aphrodite stands on a support. The subject is a love encounter, but it is not clear which of many possible heroic couple was intended.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background. <br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture, Aphrodisias of Dionysus as a baby, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.      Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Baby Dionysus is handed from one nymph to another for suckling. A bearded Silenos gestures excitedly. The scene is set at Nysa in the Meander Valley, where Zeus had his gifted child Dionysos, born to him by Semele and brought up in the wilds out of the view of Hera.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture, Aphrodisias of Dionysus as a baby, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
Baby Dionysus is handed from one nymph to another for suckling. A bearded Silenos gestures excitedly. The scene is set at Nysa in the Meander Valley, where Zeus had his gifted child Dionysos, born to him by Semele and brought up in the wilds out of the view of Hera.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture, Aphrodisias of Dionysus as a baby, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Baby Dionysus is handed from one nymph to another for suckling. A bearded Silenos gestures excitedly. The scene is set at Nysa in the Meander Valley, where Zeus had his gifted child Dionysos, born to him by Semele and brought up in the wilds out of the view of Hera.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture, Aphrodisias of Dionysus as a baby, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a grey background.<br />
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Baby Dionysus is handed from one nymph to another for suckling. A bearded Silenos gestures excitedly. The scene is set at Nysa in the Meander Valley, where Zeus had his gifted child Dionysos, born to him by Semele and brought up in the wilds out of the view of Hera.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of a seated god or king, , Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
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 An older bearded god or mythological King sits on a throne. He held a sceptre and wears a royal diadem and a richly carved tunic and cloak
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture, Aphrodisias of Dionysus as a baby, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    Against a black background.<br />
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Baby Dionysus is handed from one nymph to another for suckling. A bearded Silenos gestures excitedly. The scene is set at Nysa in the Meander Valley, where Zeus had his gifted child Dionysos, born to him by Semele and brought up in the wilds out of the view of Hera.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
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The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Agon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
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The scene is an allegory of the athletic contest (or agon). The pillar was a beareded head of Hermes the god of the Gymnasium. Nearby is a palm of victory and a prize table with victory ribbon on it. Two winged baby Eros figures are struggling over a palm branch ( mostly broken): they act out the idea of contest, which is personified in the youthful figure behind. He hold another palm of victory: he is Agon himself.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   <br />
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Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   <br />
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Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Bellerophon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    <br />
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Bellerophon was a Lykian hero and was claimed as a founder of Aphrodisias. He holds his winged horse Pegasos. The deign was modelled on another relief panel in the series “Royal hero with Dod Hunting”. The carving is poor and the sculptor may have been a novice.modelled
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Bellerophon Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    <br />
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Bellerophon was a Lykian hero and was claimed as a founder of Aphrodisias. He holds his winged horse Pegasos. The deign was modelled on another relief panel in the series “Royal hero with Dod Hunting”. The carving is poor and the sculptor may have been a novice.modelled
  • Close up of Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Meleager and Atalante  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    <br />
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Meleager sits on a rock tying his sandal. Below him lies a fierce hunting dog with a broad collar. On one side a god or another hero wearing a rounded hat was crowning Meleager ( arm missing). On the other side stands the huntress Atalante, Meleager’s lover: she wears a short dress and quiver, and lifts her cloak at the shoulder in a gesture of modesty.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    <br />
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Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Interior of Aphrodisias Museum, showing Roman Sebasteion relief sculptures,   Aphrodisias, Turkey.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Krete Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
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The classical hairstyle, dress and pose characterises the figure of civilised and free,
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos of the Dacians Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
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The Dacians are shown as a captive Barbarian woman. Her arms are crossed in submission, her thick dress slips off the shoulder slightly partly revealing her breast. The forepart of a small bull stands in profile behind. Dacia (modern Romania) was claimed by Augustus as a conquest in 1BC to 4AD
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos of the Dacians Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
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The Dacians are shown as a captive Barbarian woman. Her arms are crossed in submission, her thick dress slips off the shoulder slightly partly revealing her breast. The forepart of a small bull stands in profile behind. Dacia (modern Romania) was claimed by Augustus as a conquest in 1BC to 4AD
  • Close up of Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture personifing a Balkan Warrior  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a white background.<br />
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The relief figure personifies a Balkan Warrior tribe defeated by Tiberius in AD 6-8 before he became emperor. She wears a classical dress, cloak and helmet and carries a small shield and probably once a spear. A builder’s inscription, “Pirouston”, written above the shield, ensured the relief was put on the right base
  • Close up of Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture personifing a Balkan Warrior  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a black background.<br />
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The relief figure personifies a Balkan Warrior tribe defeated by Tiberius in AD 6-8 before he became emperor. She wears a classical dress, cloak and helmet and carries a small shield and probably once a spear. A builder’s inscription, “Pirouston”, written above the shield, ensured the relief was put on the right base
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos with belted peplos, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
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The matronly figure wears a belted classical dress (peplos) and held her long cloak up behind. The square hole above her shoulder with a corresponding hole in the back, was for lifting the finished relief into the ancient building by crane.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos with belted peplos, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
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The matronly figure wears a belted classical dress (peplos) and held her long cloak up behind. The square hole above her shoulder with a corresponding hole in the back, was for lifting the finished relief into the ancient building by crane.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos with belted peplos, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
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The matronly figure wears a belted classical dress (peplos) and held her long cloak up behind. The square hole above her shoulder with a corresponding hole in the back, was for lifting the finished relief into the ancient building by crane.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos with belted peplos, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
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The matronly figure wears a belted classical dress (peplos) and held her long cloak up behind. The square hole above her shoulder with a corresponding hole in the back, was for lifting the finished relief into the ancient building by crane.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of the god Okeanos (Ocean), Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
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The bearded of Okeanos makes an epiphany, controlling his cloak which billows around his head. Ocean would be paired with Earth: together they represented empire without end, over land and sea
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of the god Okeanos (Ocean), Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
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The bearded of Okeanos makes an epiphany, controlling his cloak which billows around his head. Ocean would be paired with Earth: together they represented empire without end, over land and sea
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of the god Okeanos (Ocean), Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
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The bearded of Okeanos makes an epiphany, controlling his cloak which billows around his head. Ocean would be paired with Earth: together they represented empire without end, over land and sea
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of the goddess Herma (day), Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.<br />
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Goddess  Herma or Day steadies a dramatically billowing cloak that frames her head. The motif , also visible on the Okeanos relief, indicates flying, floating and divine epiphany - the appearance of gods to mortals. Day would be paired with night : together they signify the eternity of the Roman imperial order.
  • Roman SSebasteion relief sculpture of the goddess Herma (day), Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a black background.<br />
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Goddess  Herma or Day steadies a dramatically billowing cloak that frames her head. The motif , also visible on the Okeanos relief, indicates flying, floating and divine epiphany - the appearance of gods to mortals. Day would be paired with night : together they signify the eternity of the Roman imperial order.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of the goddess Herma (day), Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
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Goddess  Herma or Day steadies a dramatically billowing cloak that frames her head. The motif , also visible on the Okeanos relief, indicates flying, floating and divine epiphany - the appearance of gods to mortals. Day would be paired with night : together they signify the eternity of the Roman imperial order.
  • Close up of Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Nero being crowned emperor by Agrippina, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
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Agrippina crowns her young son Nero with a laurel wreath. She carries a cornucopia, a symbol of Fortune and Plenty, and he wears the armour and cloak of a Roman commander, with a helmet on the ground near his feet. The scene refers to Nero’s accession as emperor in AD 54, and belongs before AD 59 when Nero had Agrippina murdered.
  • Close up of Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Nero being crowned emperor by Agrippina, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
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Agrippina crowns her young son Nero with a laurel wreath. She carries a cornucopia, a symbol of Fortune and Plenty, and he wears the armour and cloak of a Roman commander, with a helmet on the ground near his feet. The scene refers to Nero’s accession as emperor in AD 54, and belongs before AD 59 when Nero had Agrippina murdered.
  • Close up of Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Nero being crowned emperor by Agrippina, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
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Agrippina crowns her young son Nero with a laurel wreath. She carries a cornucopia, a symbol of Fortune and Plenty, and he wears the armour and cloak of a Roman commander, with a helmet on the ground near his feet. The scene refers to Nero’s accession as emperor in AD 54, and belongs before AD 59 when Nero had Agrippina murdered.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Nero being crowned emperor by Agrippina, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
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Agrippina crowns her young son Nero with a laurel wreath. She carries a cornucopia, a symbol of Fortune and Plenty, and he wears the armour and cloak of a Roman commander, with a helmet on the ground near his feet. The scene refers to Nero’s accession as emperor in AD 54, and belongs before AD 59 when Nero had Agrippina murdered.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Nero being crowned emperor by Agrippina, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
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Agrippina crowns her young son Nero with a laurel wreath. She carries a cornucopia, a symbol of Fortune and Plenty, and he wears the armour and cloak of a Roman commander, with a helmet on the ground near his feet. The scene refers to Nero’s accession as emperor in AD 54, and belongs before AD 59 when Nero had Agrippina murdered.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Nero being crowned emperor by Agrippina, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
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Agrippina crowns her young son Nero with a laurel wreath. She carries a cornucopia, a symbol of Fortune and Plenty, and he wears the armour and cloak of a Roman commander, with a helmet on the ground near his feet. The scene refers to Nero’s accession as emperor in AD 54, and belongs before AD 59 when Nero had Agrippina murdered.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
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The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Augustus and Goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
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The naked emperor Augustus stands in majesty with the winged goddess Victory(Nike). He carried a spear and has an eagle, the bird representing Zeus, at his feet. Victory is crowning a military trophy - a rough post with enemy armour attached to it. Beneath the trophy is a barbarian captive, his hands tied behind his back.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Claudius and Agrippina, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
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Claudius in heroic nudity and military cloak shakes hands with his wife Agrippina and is crowned by the Roman people or the Senate wearing a toga. The subject is imperial concord with the traditional Roman state. Agrippina holds ears of wheat: like Demeter goddess of fertility. The emperor is crowned with an oak wreath, the Corona civica or “citizen crow”, awarded to Roman leaders for saving citizens lives: the emperor id therefore represented as saviour of the people.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Claudius and Agrippina, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
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Claudius in heroic nudity and military cloak shakes hands with his wife Agrippina and is crowned by the Roman people or the Senate wearing a toga. The subject is imperial concord with the traditional Roman state. Agrippina holds ears of wheat: like Demeter goddess of fertility. The emperor is crowned with an oak wreath, the Corona civica or “citizen crow”, awarded to Roman leaders for saving citizens lives: the emperor id therefore represented as saviour of the people.
  • Roman Sebasteion releif sculpture of emperor Claudius and Agrippina, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
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Claudius in heroic nudity and military cloak shakes hands with his wife Agrippina and is crowned by the Roman people or the Senate wearing a toga. The subject is imperial concord with the traditional Roman state. Agrippina holds ears of wheat: like Demeter goddess of fertility. The emperor is crowned with an oak wreath, the Corona civica or “citizen crow”, awarded to Roman leaders for saving citizens lives: the emperor id therefore represented as saviour of the people.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the goddess Roma and Ge (Earth),  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a black background. <br />
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The goddess Roma holds a spear and wears a crown in the form of a city wall. Earth reclines half naked leaning on a pile of fruit. She holds a cornucopia full of more fruit. A baby child (now damaged) climbs up the horn she holds. The relief represents Earths fertility and abundance overseen by Rome.
  • Close up of Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Nero conquering Armenia depicting a fallen female representing Armenia,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   <br />
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Nero, wearing only a cloak and sword strap, supports a slumped naked Armenia by her upper arms. She wears a soft eastern hat, and her bow and quiver are next to her. The heroic composition likens them to Achilles and the Amazon Queen Penthesilea. The inscription reads: Armenia - (Neron) Klaudios Drousos Kaisar Sebastos Germanikos.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Nero conquering Armenia Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
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Nero, wearing only a cloak and sword strap, supports a slumped naked Armenia by her upper arms. She wears a soft eastern hat, and her bow and quiver are next to her. The heroic composition likens them to Achilles and the Amazon Queen Penthesilea. The inscription reads: Armenia - (Neron) Klaudios Drousos Kaisar Sebastos Germanikos.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of emperor Claudius and Britannia, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
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Naked warrior emperor Claudius is about to deliver a death blow to the slumped Britannia. He wears a helmet, cloak and sword belt with a scabbard. Britannia wears a tunic with one breast exposed like the Amazon figures she was modelled on. The inscription reads: Tiberios Klaudios Kaiser - Bretannia.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of emperor Claudius and Britannia, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
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Naked warrior emperor Claudius is about to deliver a death blow to the slumped Britannia. He wears a helmet, cloak and sword belt with a scabbard. Britannia wears a tunic with one breast exposed like the Amazon figures she was modelled on. The inscription reads: Tiberios Klaudios Kaiser - Bretannia.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of emperor Claudius and Britannia, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
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Naked warrior emperor Claudius is about to deliver a death blow to the slumped Britannia. He wears a helmet, cloak and sword belt with a scabbard. Britannia wears a tunic with one breast exposed like the Amazon figures she was modelled on. The inscription reads: Tiberios Klaudios Kaiser - Bretannia.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of emperor Claudius and Britannia, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
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Naked warrior emperor Claudius is about to deliver a death blow to the slumped Britannia. He wears a helmet, cloak and sword belt with a scabbard. Britannia wears a tunic with one breast exposed like the Amazon figures she was modelled on. The inscription reads: Tiberios Klaudios Kaiser - Bretannia.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of emperor Claudius and Britannia, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
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Naked warrior emperor Claudius is about to deliver a death blow to the slumped Britannia. He wears a helmet, cloak and sword belt with a scabbard. Britannia wears a tunic with one breast exposed like the Amazon figures she was modelled on. The inscription reads: Tiberios Klaudios Kaiser - Bretannia.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of emperor Claudius and Britannia, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
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Naked warrior emperor Claudius is about to deliver a death blow to the slumped Britannia. He wears a helmet, cloak and sword belt with a scabbard. Britannia wears a tunic with one breast exposed like the Amazon figures she was modelled on. The inscription reads: Tiberios Klaudios Kaiser - Bretannia.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of emperor Claudius and Britannia, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Naked warrior emperor Claudius is about to deliver a death blow to the slumped Britannia. He wears a helmet, cloak and sword belt with a scabbard. Britannia wears a tunic with one breast exposed like the Amazon figures she was modelled on. The inscription reads: Tiberios Klaudios Kaiser - Bretannia.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of emperor Tiberius with a captive Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
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The naked emperor Tiberius stands frontally holding a spear and shield wearing a cloak and a sword strap. Besides him stands a barbarian
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of emperor Tiberius with a captive Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
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The naked emperor Tiberius stands frontally holding a spear and shield wearing a cloak and a sword strap. Besides him stands a barbarian
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aphrodite crowned by Andreia, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
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A draped goddess is crowned by a female warrior figure. The goddess is probably Aphrodite, while the warrior has a bare breated Amazonian dress and equipment (spear, sword strap and shield) worn by Roma or Andreia (Bravery)
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aphrodite crowned by Andreia, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
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A draped goddess is crowned by a female warrior figure. The goddess is probably Aphrodite, while the warrior has a bare breated Amazonian dress and equipment (spear, sword strap and shield) worn by Roma or Andreia (Bravery)
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aphrodite crowned by Andreia, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
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A draped goddess is crowned by a female warrior figure. The goddess is probably Aphrodite, while the warrior has a bare breated Amazonian dress and equipment (spear, sword strap and shield) worn by Roma or Andreia (Bravery)
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aphrodite crowned by Andreia, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
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A draped goddess is crowned by a female warrior figure. The goddess is probably Aphrodite, while the warrior has a bare breated Amazonian dress and equipment (spear, sword strap and shield) worn by Roma or Andreia (Bravery)
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the Emperor and Roman People, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
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The emperor is a naked warrior and is crowned by a personification of the Roman People or the Senate wearing a toga, the stately civilian dress of a Roman Citizen. The crown is an oak wreath, the corona civica or “civic crown” awarded for saving citizens lives. The emperor is setting up a battlefield trophy beneath which kneels an anguished barbarian women captive
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the Emperor and Roman People, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
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The emperor is a naked warrior and is crowned by a personification of the Roman People or the Senate wearing a toga, the stately civilian dress of a Roman Citizen. The crown is an oak wreath, the corona civica or “civic crown” awarded for saving citizens lives. The emperor is setting up a battlefield trophy beneath which kneels an anguished barbarian women captive
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the Emperor and Roman People, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The emperor is a naked warrior and is crowned by a personification of the Roman People or the Senate wearing a toga, the stately civilian dress of a Roman Citizen. The crown is an oak wreath, the corona civica or “civic crown” awarded for saving citizens lives. The emperor is setting up a battlefield trophy beneath which kneels an anguished barbarian women captive
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the Emperor and Roman People, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
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The emperor is a naked warrior and is crowned by a personification of the Roman People or the Senate wearing a toga, the stately civilian dress of a Roman Citizen. The crown is an oak wreath, the corona civica or “civic crown” awarded for saving citizens lives. The emperor is setting up a battlefield trophy beneath which kneels an anguished barbarian women captive
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Two princes, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against an art background.<br />
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Two princes stand like statues, naked, wearing cloaks. The left figure holds the orb of the world in one hand, a symbol of  world rule that indicates he is the imperial heir, and in the other a ship’s stern ornament (aphlaston), a symbol of naval victory. They and probably Gius and Lucius, the grandsons of Augustus, or Nero and Britanicus, Claudius’ heir.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
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A winged goddess Victory( Nike) flies past carrying a military trophy. She wears a long light dress and has one breast and one leg exposed. Her clothing is set in motion by her swift flight.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
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A winged goddess Victory( Nike) flies past carrying a military trophy. She wears a long light dress and has one breast and one leg exposed. Her clothing is set in motion by her swift flight.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the goddess Victory, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
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A winged goddess Victory( Nike) flies past carrying a military trophy. She wears a long light dress and has one breast and one leg exposed. Her clothing is set in motion by her swift flight.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Leda and swan, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
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Zeus disguised as a swan assaults Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed foot on the thigh of modest, struggling Leda. The swan is supported from behind a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which were born Helen and the Dionskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Leda and swan, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
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Zeus disguised as a swan assaults Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed foot on the thigh of modest, struggling Leda. The swan is supported from behind a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which were born Helen and the Dionskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Leda and swan, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Zeus disguised as a swan assaults Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed foot on the thigh of modest, struggling Leda. The swan is supported from behind a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which were born Helen and the Dionskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Leda and swan, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Zeus disguised as a swan assaults Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed foot on the thigh of modest, struggling Leda. The swan is supported from behind a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which were born Helen and the Dionskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Leda and swan, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Zeus disguised as a swan assaults Spartan princess Leda. The bird stands on the tips of its outspread wings and presses its webbed foot on the thigh of modest, struggling Leda. The swan is supported from behind a small Eros. From this encounter came a large egg from which were born Helen and the Dionskouroi twins, Kastor and Polydeukes
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Poseidon and Amphitrite,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The two god-like tritons, Poseidon and Amphitrite, are seated on two sea horses accompanied by two fish legged tritons below. Between the tritons sits a sea-putto of baby triton. The male god is in the form of Poseidon crowned by his wife Amphitrite. Unusually he wears a military cloak and they might be an emperor and his wife (such as Claudius and Agrippina) in the guise of Poseidon and Amphitrite
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Poseidon and Amphitrite,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The two god-like tritons, Poseidon and Amphitrite, are seated on two sea horses accompanied by two fish legged tritons below. Between the tritons sits a sea-putto of baby triton. The male god is in the form of Poseidon crowned by his wife Amphitrite. Unusually he wears a military cloak and they might be an emperor and his wife (such as Claudius and Agrippina) in the guise of Poseidon and Amphitrite
  • Close up of a RomanSebasteion relief  sculpture of Roma armed, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Roma is equipped with a spear, helmet, round shield and imperial style armour. Blow crouches a naked bearded prisoner, with hands tied behind his back and a skin knotted around his neck. He turns to look up at Roma
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Roma armed, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Roma is equipped with a spear, helmet, round shield and imperial style armour. Blow crouches a naked bearded prisoner, with hands tied behind his back and a skin knotted around his neck. He turns to look up at Roma
  • Roman Sebastian relief  sculpture of Roma armed, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Roma is equipped with a spear, helmet, round shield and imperial style armour. Blow crouches a naked bearded prisoner, with hands tied behind his back and a skin knotted around his neck. He turns to look up at Roma
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of a Goddess inscribing a trophy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
A draped goddess strides forward to inscribe a military trophy to which is bound a kneeling female captive. The goddess is probably a personification such as Honour, Virtue or Courage.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Roma armed, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Roma is equipped with a spear, helmet, round shield and imperial style armour. Blow crouches a naked bearded prisoner, with hands tied behind his back and a skin knotted around his neck. He turns to look up at Roma
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of a Goddess inscribing a trophy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
A draped goddess strides forward to inscribe a military trophy to which is bound a kneeling female captive. The goddess is probably a personification such as Honour, Virtue or Courage.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of a Goddess inscribing a trophy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
A draped goddess strides forward to inscribe a military trophy to which is bound a kneeling female captive. The goddess is probably a personification such as Honour, Virtue or Courage.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of a Goddess inscribing a trophy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
A draped goddess strides forward to inscribe a military trophy to which is bound a kneeling female captive. The goddess is probably a personification such as Honour, Virtue or Courage.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of a Goddess inscribing a trophy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
A draped goddess strides forward to inscribe a military trophy to which is bound a kneeling female captive. The goddess is probably a personification such as Honour, Virtue or Courage.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of a Goddess inscribing a trophy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
A draped goddess strides forward to inscribe a military trophy to which is bound a kneeling female captive. The goddess is probably a personification such as Honour, Virtue or Courage.
  • Roman SSebasteion relief  sculpture of a Goddess inscribing a trophy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
A draped goddess strides forward to inscribe a military trophy to which is bound a kneeling female captive. The goddess is probably a personification such as Honour, Virtue or Courage.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Nero with captive, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Naked warrior emperor Nero holds the orb of world rule in one hand and crowns the military trophy with the other. Between the trophy and the emperor stands a bound captive boy. He wears long barbarian trousers and looks up at Nero.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Nero with captive, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Naked warrior emperor Nero holds the orb of world rule in one hand and crowns the military trophy with the other. Between the trophy and the emperor stands a bound captive boy. He wears long barbarian trousers and looks up at Nero.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Nero with captive, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Naked warrior emperor Nero holds the orb of world rule in one hand and crowns the military trophy with the other. Between the trophy and the emperor stands a bound captive boy. He wears long barbarian trousers and looks up at Nero.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Nero with captive, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Naked warrior emperor Nero holds the orb of world rule in one hand and crowns the military trophy with the other. Between the trophy and the emperor stands a bound captive boy. He wears long barbarian trousers and looks up at Nero.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Nero with captive, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Naked warrior emperor Nero holds the orb of world rule in one hand and crowns the military trophy with the other. Between the trophy and the emperor stands a bound captive boy. He wears long barbarian trousers and looks up at Nero.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Nero with captive, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Naked warrior emperor Nero holds the orb of world rule in one hand and crowns the military trophy with the other. Between the trophy and the emperor stands a bound captive boy. He wears long barbarian trousers and looks up at Nero.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Roman Sebasteion rrelief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Roman Sebasteion rrelief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Hygieia, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Hygieia, the goddess of Health, hold a flat bowl (phiale) from which she feeds a snake. The snake is wound twice around her forearm. A plump naked child sits on a square pedestal. Hygieia was the daughter of the healing god Asklepios, with whom she is paired here
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Hygieia, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Hygieia, the goddess of Health, hold a flat bowl (phiale) from which she feeds a snake. The snake is wound twice around her forearm. A plump naked child sits on a square pedestal. Hygieia was the daughter of the healing god Asklepios, with whom she is paired here
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Ares, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The nude and classically7 styled young god wears only a helmet and holds a spear (missing) in one hand and a shield in the other. At the left stands cuirass, and at the upper right corner hangs his sword. Ares was a god of war and was not later defaced by Christians probably because he so closely resembles a young emperor.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Ares, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The nude and classically7 styled young god wears only a helmet and holds a spear (missing) in one hand and a shield in the other. At the left stands cuirass, and at the upper right corner hangs his sword. Ares was a god of war and was not later defaced by Christians probably because he so closely resembles a young emperor.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ arrival in Italy Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Poseidon stands naked over a sea going ship stopped at a short column. SA dolphin jumps between his legs. Aineas, his head veiled in the Roman manner, pours a libation, a thanks offering for his safe arrival in Italy. Behing Poseidon’s shoulders, a separately worked young male head was inserted into the background, maybe a deceased companion of Aineas.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ arrival in Italy Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Poseidon stands naked over a sea going ship stopped at a short column. SA dolphin jumps between his legs. Aineas, his head veiled in the Roman manner, pours a libation, a thanks offering for his safe arrival in Italy. Behing Poseidon’s shoulders, a separately worked young male head was inserted into the background, maybe a deceased companion of Aineas.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ arrival in Italy Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Poseidon stands naked over a sea going ship stopped at a short column. SA dolphin jumps between his legs. Aineas, his head veiled in the Roman manner, pours a libation, a thanks offering for his safe arrival in Italy. Behing Poseidon’s shoulders, a separately worked young male head was inserted into the background, maybe a deceased companion of Aineas.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of the Three Graces, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The Three Graces stand in their familiar hellenistic composition. They were handmaids of Aphrodite and appeared in this form on the decoration of her cult statue at Aphrodisias. Their names evoked their character: Euphrosyne (joy), Aglaia (Splendour) and Thaleia (Bloom).
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Apollo and Royal Hero Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Apollo sits on a raised platform with his tripod at his oracular shrine. He is approached by two figures. A women greets  the god with a raised hand. With her is a hero wearing a travelling cloak and the flat headband or diadem of a king. He has come to consult Apollo, probably about a city foundation.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Apollo and Royal Hero Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
Apollo sits on a raised platform with his tripod at his oracular shrine. He is approached by two figures. A women greets  the god with a raised hand. With her is a hero wearing a travelling cloak and the flat headband or diadem of a king. He has come to consult Apollo, probably about a city foundation.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Royal Hero with hunting dogs,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
<br />
A diademed youth stands with his horse and hunting dogs. At the left an oval shield (foreign) hangs from a leafless tree, against which leans a long thin club. The Royal hero in this and the relief to the left is probably a local founder such as Assyrian King Ninos, claimed as founder of their city by the Aphrodisians.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Royal Hero with hunting dogs,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
A diademed youth stands with his horse and hunting dogs. At the left an oval shield (foreign) hangs from a leafless tree, against which leans a long thin club. The Royal hero in this and the relief to the left is probably a local founder such as Assyrian King Ninos, claimed as founder of their city by the Aphrodisians.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Herakles or Hercules, Nessos and Deianira Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The centaur Nessos agreed to carry Herakles’ (Hercules) wife Deianira across the river Euenos in Aitolia but tried to rape her in mid-stream. I the struggle that followed we see Herakles about to deliver a crushing blow with his club. Nessos has been beaten to her knees but is still fighting. Behind the centaur is the partly disrobed figure of Deianira
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Herakles or Hercules Drunk Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Herakles or Hercules staggers along drunk, supported by a small satyr from the entourage of Dionysus. He is wearing the head ribbon of a drinking party, where he has been in a drinking contest with Dionysus. The wine god has conquered even the mighty hero of the Twelve Labours.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Demeter and Triptolemos, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Deneter - stately, veiled and holding a sceptre - hands a bunch of wheat stalks to the young hero Trptolomos. Demeter was the grain goddess, and it was Triptolemos, a hero from Eleusis near Athens, whom she chose to bring grain cultivation to mankind
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Demeter and Triptolemos, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Deneter - stately, veiled and holding a sceptre - hands a bunch of wheat stalks to the young hero Trptolomos. Demeter was the grain goddess, and it was Triptolemos, a hero from Eleusis near Athens, whom she chose to bring grain cultivation to mankind
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Demeter and Triptolemos, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Deneter - stately, veiled and holding a sceptre - hands a bunch of wheat stalks to the young hero Trptolomos. Demeter was the grain goddess, and it was Triptolemos, a hero from Eleusis near Athens, whom she chose to bring grain cultivation to mankind
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Nysa and baby Dionysus Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The nymph Nysa has the baby Dionysus on her lap. He reaches out to a bunch of grapes held up by a satyr, one of his woodland followers. Dionysus was the son of Zeus by Semele, and was given the nymphs of Mt Nysa for an upbringing in the wilds, safe from the eyes of Hera, Zeus’s wife. Nysa was located in the Meander Valley, near Aphrodisias: the story was local.

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