• Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Traditional pig killing day - Valem Hungary
  • Close up of pigs head against black background
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting animals killing people in an ampitheatre, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. End of 2nd century AD, Sollertiana Domus. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting animals killing people in an ampitheatre, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. End of 2nd century AD, Sollertiana Domus. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting animals killing people in an ampitheatre, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. End of 2nd century AD, Sollertiana Domus. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against a white background
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting animals killing people in an ampitheatre, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. End of 2nd century AD, Sollertiana Domus. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against a black background
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting animals killing people in an ampitheatre, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. End of 2nd century AD, Sollertiana Domus. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting animals killing people in an ampitheatre, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. End of 2nd century AD, Sollertiana Domus. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against an art background
  • Late medieval inlay sculpture depicting a Griffin killing a mythical animal on the Facade of the Cattedrale di San Martino,  Duomo of Lucca, Tunscany, Italy,
  • Main portal lunette sculpture of St George, patron Saint of Farrara,  killing the Dragon, the work of the sculptor Nicholaus,  the 12th century Romanesque Ferrara Duomo, Italy
  • Main portal lunette sculpture of St George, patron Saint of Farrara,  killing the Dragon, the work of the sculptor Nicholaus,  the 12th century Romanesque Ferrara Duomo, Italy
  • Main portal lunette sculpture of St George, patron Saint of Farrara,  killing the Dragon, the work of the sculptor Nicholaus,  the 12th century Romanesque Ferrara Duomo, Italy
  • Sculpture of St Michael killing a dragon on the 12th century Romanesque facade of the Chiesa di San Pietro extra moenia (St Peters), Spoletto, Italy
  • Lion killing deer  from the "Satyr Hunting Wils Animals, freezes, 460 B.C.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-2-9 (sculpture B 2902- 298).
  • Lion killing deer  from the "Satyr Hunting Wils Animals, freezes, 460 B.C.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-2-9 (sculpture B 2902- 298).
  • Lion killing deer  from the "Satyr Hunting Wils Animals, freezes, 460 B.C.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-2-9 (sculpture B 2902- 298).
  • Roman sculpture bust of Septimius Severus made between 196 and 197 AD and excavated from Ostia. Severus became Roman emperor in 193 AD After deposing and killing the incumbent emperor Didius Julianus. In 202, he campaigned in Africa and Mauretania against the Garamantes; capturing their capital Garama and expanding the Limes Tripolitanus along the southern frontier of the empire. Late in his reign he travelled to Britain, strengthening Hadrian's Wall and reoccupying the Antonine Wall. Severus died in early 211 at Eboracum (today York, England), succeeded by his sons Caracalla and Geta who fought constantly until Caracalla had Geta murdered. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Septimius Severus made between 196 and 197 AD and excavated from Ostia. Severus became Roman emperor in 193 AD After deposing and killing the incumbent emperor Didius Julianus. In 202, he campaigned in Africa and Mauretania against the Garamantes; capturing their capital Garama and expanding the Limes Tripolitanus along the southern frontier of the empire. Late in his reign he travelled to Britain, strengthening Hadrian's Wall and reoccupying the Antonine Wall. Severus died in early 211 at Eboracum (today York, England), succeeded by his sons Caracalla and Geta who fought constantly until Caracalla had Geta murdered. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Septimius Severus made between 196 and 197 AD and excavated from Ostia. Severus became Roman emperor in 193 AD After deposing and killing the incumbent emperor Didius Julianus. In 202, he campaigned in Africa and Mauretania against the Garamantes; capturing their capital Garama and expanding the Limes Tripolitanus along the southern frontier of the empire. Late in his reign he travelled to Britain, strengthening Hadrian's Wall and reoccupying the Antonine Wall. Severus died in early 211 at Eboracum (today York, England), succeeded by his sons Caracalla and Geta who fought constantly until Caracalla had Geta murdered. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Septimius Severus made between 196 and 197 AD and excavated from Ostia. Severus became Roman emperor in 193 AD After deposing and killing the incumbent emperor Didius Julianus. In 202, he campaigned in Africa and Mauretania against the Garamantes; capturing their capital Garama and expanding the Limes Tripolitanus along the southern frontier of the empire. Late in his reign he travelled to Britain, strengthening Hadrian's Wall and reoccupying the Antonine Wall. Severus died in early 211 at Eboracum (today York, England), succeeded by his sons Caracalla and Geta who fought constantly until Caracalla had Geta murdered. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Septimius Severus made between 196 and 197 AD and excavated from Ostia. Severus became Roman emperor in 193 AD After deposing and killing the incumbent emperor Didius Julianus. In 202, he campaigned in Africa and Mauretania against the Garamantes; capturing their capital Garama and expanding the Limes Tripolitanus along the southern frontier of the empire. Late in his reign he travelled to Britain, strengthening Hadrian's Wall and reoccupying the Antonine Wall. Severus died in early 211 at Eboracum (today York, England), succeeded by his sons Caracalla and Geta who fought constantly until Caracalla had Geta murdered. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Lion killing deer  from the "Satyr Hunting Wils Animals, freezes, 460 B.C.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-2-9 (sculpture B 2902- 298).
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting animals killing people in an ampitheatre, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. End of 2nd century AD, Sollertiana Domus. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against a grey background
  • Picture & image of Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Herald's Wall Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This relief tells the story the killing of Humbaba, protective deity of the cedar forests, by Gilgamesh and Enkidu. The figures standing on both sides hold, with one hand, the arms of the figure in the middle transversally while they stab the dagger on the head of the figure.  <br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Herald's Wall Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This relief tells the story the killing of Humbaba, protective deity of the cedar forests, by Gilgamesh and Enkidu. The figures standing on both sides hold, with one hand, the arms of the figure in the middle transversally while they stab the dagger on the head of the figure.
  • Photo of Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Herald's Wall Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This relief tells the story the killing of Humbaba, protective deity of the cedar forests, by Gilgamesh and Enkidu. The figures standing on both sides hold, with one hand, the arms of the figure in the middle transversally while they stab the dagger on the head of the figure.  <br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Herald's Wall Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This relief tells the story the killing of Humbaba, protective deity of the cedar forests, by Gilgamesh and Enkidu. The figures standing on both sides hold, with one hand, the arms of the figure in the middle transversally while they stab the dagger on the head of the figure.<br />
<br />
Against a brown art background.
  • Roman Fresco of a cat killing a bird from  The Large Columbarium in Villa Doria Panphilj, Rome. A columbarium is usually a type of tomb with walls lined by niches that hold urns containing the ashes of the dead.  Large columbaria were built in Rome between the end of the Republican Era and the Flavio Principality (second half of the first century AD).  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.
  • Lion killing an animal. Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed  in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Roman sculpture bust of Septimius Severus made between 196 and 197 AD and excavated from Ostia. Severus became Roman emperor in 193 AD After deposing and killing the incumbent emperor Didius Julianus. In 202, he campaigned in Africa and Mauretania against the Garamantes; capturing their capital Garama and expanding the Limes Tripolitanus along the southern frontier of the empire. Late in his reign he travelled to Britain, strengthening Hadrian's Wall and reoccupying the Antonine Wall. Severus died in early 211 at Eboracum (today York, England), succeeded by his sons Caracalla and Geta who fought constantly until Caracalla had Geta murdered. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Septimius Severus made between 196 and 197 AD and excavated from Ostia. Severus became Roman emperor in 193 AD After deposing and killing the incumbent emperor Didius Julianus. In 202, he campaigned in Africa and Mauretania against the Garamantes; capturing their capital Garama and expanding the Limes Tripolitanus along the southern frontier of the empire. Late in his reign he travelled to Britain, strengthening Hadrian's Wall and reoccupying the Antonine Wall. Severus died in early 211 at Eboracum (today York, England), succeeded by his sons Caracalla and Geta who fought constantly until Caracalla had Geta murdered. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Septimius Severus made between 196 and 197 AD and excavated from Ostia. Severus became Roman emperor in 193 AD After deposing and killing the incumbent emperor Didius Julianus. In 202, he campaigned in Africa and Mauretania against the Garamantes; capturing their capital Garama and expanding the Limes Tripolitanus along the southern frontier of the empire. Late in his reign he travelled to Britain, strengthening Hadrian's Wall and reoccupying the Antonine Wall. Severus died in early 211 at Eboracum (today York, England), succeeded by his sons Caracalla and Geta who fought constantly until Caracalla had Geta murdered. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Lion killing deer  from the "Satyr Hunting Wils Animals, freezes, 460 B.C.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-2-9 (sculpture B 2902- 298).
  • Romanesque frescoes depicting Archangel Michael Killing a dragon  from the Church of Sant Miguel d’Engolasters, Les Escaldes, Andorra.. Painted around 1160. National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona. MNAC 15972
  • Romanesque frescoes depicting Archangel Michael Killing a dragon  from the Church of Sant Miguel d’Engolasters, Les Escaldes, Andorra.. Painted around 1160. National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona. MNAC 15972
  • 14th century medieval Gothic stained glass window showing scenes from the life of Jesus Christ, (from Bottom up) King Herod ordering the killing of the babies in his kingdom, Mary fleeing with the baby Jesus to Egypt and the Slaying of the Innocents.. The Gothic Cathedral Basilica of Saint Denis ( Basilique Saint-Denis ) Paris, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic of soldiers killing children from the 14th century " Slaughter of the Innocents" from the east wall of the ante baptistery. Basilica San Marco ( St Mark's Basilica ) Venice, Italy
  • Mosaic of soldiers killing children from the 14th century " Slaughter of the Innocents" from the east wall of the ante baptistery. Basilica San Marco ( St Mark's Basilica ) Venice, Italy
  • 13th century Medieval Romanesque Sculptures from the facade of St Mark's Basilica, Venice, depicting "Lust" and Samson killing the lion cubs.
  • 13th century Medieval Romanesque Sculptures from the facade of St Mark's Basilica, Venice, depicting "Lust" and Samson killing the lion cubs.
  • Lion killing deer  from the "Satyr Hunting Wils Animals, freezes, 460 B.C.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-2-9 (sculpture B 2902- 298).
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Herald's Wall Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This relief tells the story the killing of Humbaba, protective deity of the cedar forests, by Gilgamesh and Enkidu. The figures standing on both sides hold, with one hand, the arms of the figure in the middle transversally while they stab the dagger on the head of the figure.  <br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Roman sculpture bust of Septimius Severus made between 196 and 197 AD and excavated from Ostia. Severus became Roman emperor in 193 AD After deposing and killing the incumbent emperor Didius Julianus. In 202, he campaigned in Africa and Mauretania against the Garamantes; capturing their capital Garama and expanding the Limes Tripolitanus along the southern frontier of the empire. Late in his reign he travelled to Britain, strengthening Hadrian's Wall and reoccupying the Antonine Wall. Severus died in early 211 at Eboracum (today York, England), succeeded by his sons Caracalla and Geta who fought constantly until Caracalla had Geta murdered. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Septimius Severus made between 196 and 197 AD and excavated from Ostia. Severus became Roman emperor in 193 AD After deposing and killing the incumbent emperor Didius Julianus. In 202, he campaigned in Africa and Mauretania against the Garamantes; capturing their capital Garama and expanding the Limes Tripolitanus along the southern frontier of the empire. Late in his reign he travelled to Britain, strengthening Hadrian's Wall and reoccupying the Antonine Wall. Severus died in early 211 at Eboracum (today York, England), succeeded by his sons Caracalla and Geta who fought constantly until Caracalla had Geta murdered. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • 13th century Medieval Romanesque Sculptures from the facade of St Mark's Basilica, Venice, depicting "Lust" and Samson killing the lion cubs.
  • Mosaic of soldiers killing children from the 14th century " Slaughter of the Innocents" from the east wall of the ante baptistery. Basilica San Marco ( St Mark's Basilica ) Venice, Italy
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 1 - sculpture of a quail that it has just killed its young. This is based on a  bestiary story that tells of a Pelican that kills its young. It then pecks its breast to draw blood and sits on its dead offspring and the blood brings the young bird back to life. This is an allegory of Christ giving his blood on the cross for mankind. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpture of a man with an axe in one hand about to use it to kill a lion he is holding updide down in his other hand. Late Hittite Period - 900-700 BC. Adana Archaeology Museum, Turkey. Against a white background
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpture of a man with an axe in one hand about to use it to kill a lion he is holding updide down in his other hand. Late Hittite Period - 900-700 BC. Adana Archaeology Museum, Turkey. Against a black background
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpture of a man with an axe in one hand about to use it to kill a lion he is holding updide down in his other hand. Late Hittite Period - 900-700 BC. Adana Archaeology Museum, Turkey. Against a grey background
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpture of a man with an axe in one hand about to use it to kill a lion he is holding updide down in his other hand. Late Hittite Period - 900-700 BC. Adana Archaeology Museum, Turkey.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpture of a man with an axe in one hand about to use it to kill a lion he is holding updide down in his other hand. Late Hittite Period - 900-700 BC. Adana Archaeology Museum, Turkey. Against a grey art background
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpture of a god probably about to kill a lion (missing) with his axe. Late Hittite Period - 900-700 BC. Adana Archaeology Museum, Turkey. Against a white background
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpture of a god probably about to kill a lion (missing) with his axe. Late Hittite Period - 900-700 BC. Adana Archaeology Museum, Turkey. Against a grey background
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpture of a god probably about to kill a lion (missing) with his axe. Late Hittite Period - 900-700 BC. Adana Archaeology Museum, Turkey. Against a black background
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpture of a god probably about to kill a lion (missing) with his axe. Late Hittite Period - 900-700 BC. Adana Archaeology Museum, Turkey. Against a grey art background
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpture of a god probably about to kill a lion (missing) with his axe. Late Hittite Period - 900-700 BC. Adana Archaeology Museum, Turkey.
  • Painted colour verion of a Statue group identified as as the Laocoon described by Pliny as a masterpiece made by the sculptors of Rhodes. The Laocoon depicts a scene from the Trojan War in which Athena and Poseidon sent two great serpants to wrap themselves around Laocoon and his two sons to kill them. Circa 40-30BC, Pope Clement XIV coillection, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  grey art background
  • Painted colour verion of a Statue group identified as as the Laocoon described by Pliny as a masterpiece made by the sculptors of Rhodes. The Laocoon depicts a scene from the Trojan War in which Athena and Poseidon sent two great serpants to wrap themselves around Laocoon and his two sons to kill them. Circa 40-30BC, Pope Clement XIV coillection, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  grey art background
  • Painted colour verion of a Statue group identified as as the Laocoon described by Pliny as a masterpiece made by the sculptors of Rhodes. The Laocoon depicts a scene from the Trojan War in which Athena and Poseidon sent two great serpants to wrap themselves around Laocoon and his two sons to kill them. Circa 40-30BC, Pope Clement XIV coillection, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  grey art background
  • Painted colour verion of a Statue group identified as as the Laocoon described by Pliny as a masterpiece made by the sculptors of Rhodes. The Laocoon depicts a scene from the Trojan War in which Athena and Poseidon sent two great serpants to wrap themselves around Laocoon and his two sons to kill them. Circa 40-30BC, Pope Clement XIV coillection, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  grey art background
  • Painted colour verion of a Statue group identified as as the Laocoon described by Pliny as a masterpiece made by the sculptors of Rhodes. The Laocoon depicts a scene from the Trojan War in which Athena and Poseidon sent two great serpants to wrap themselves around Laocoon and his two sons to kill them. Circa 40-30BC, Pope Clement XIV coillection, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  grey art background
  • Late medieval relief sculpture depicting the labours for December with an animal being killed and astrological signs on the Facade of the Cattedrale di San Martino,  Duomo of Lucca, Tunscany, Italy,
  • Statue group identified as as the Laocoon described by Pliny as a masterpiece made by the sculptors of Rhodes. The Laocoon depicts a scene from the Trojan War in which Athena and Poseidon sent two great serpants to wrap themselves around Laocoon and his two sons to kill them. Circa 40-30BC, Pope Clement XIV coillection, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  white background
  • Statue group identified as as the Laocoon described by Pliny as a masterpiece made by the sculptors of Rhodes. The Laocoon depicts a scene from the Trojan War in which Athena and Poseidon sent two great serpants to wrap themselves around Laocoon and his two sons to kill them. Circa 40-30BC, Pope Clement XIV coillection, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  black background
  • Statue group identified as as the Laocoon described by Pliny as a masterpiece made by the sculptors of Rhodes. The Laocoon depicts a scene from the Trojan War in which Athena and Poseidon sent two great serpants to wrap themselves around Laocoon and his two sons to kill them. Circa 40-30BC, Pope Clement XIV coillection, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  grey background
  • Statue group identified as as the Laocoon described by Pliny as a masterpiece made by the sculptors of Rhodes. The Laocoon depicts a scene from the Trojan War in which Athena and Poseidon sent two great serpants to wrap themselves around Laocoon and his two sons to kill them. Circa 40-30BC, Pope Clement XIV coillection, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  grey art background
  • Statue group identified as as the Laocoon described by Pliny as a masterpiece made by the sculptors of Rhodes. The Laocoon depicts a scene from the Trojan War in which Athena and Poseidon sent two great serpants to wrap themselves around Laocoon and his two sons to kill them. Circa 40-30BC, Pope Clement XIV coillection, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  art background
  • Statue group identified as as the Laocoon described by Pliny as a masterpiece made by the sculptors of Rhodes. The Laocoon depicts a scene from the Trojan War in which Athena and Poseidon sent two great serpants to wrap themselves around Laocoon and his two sons to kill them. Circa 40-30BC, Pope Clement XIV coillection, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  black background
  • Statue group identified as as the Laocoon described by Pliny as a masterpiece made by the sculptors of Rhodes. The Laocoon depicts a scene from the Trojan War in which Athena and Poseidon sent two great serpants to wrap themselves around Laocoon and his two sons to kill them. Circa 40-30BC, Pope Clement XIV coillection, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  white background
  • Statue group identified as as the Laocoon described by Pliny as a masterpiece made by the sculptors of Rhodes. The Laocoon depicts a scene from the Trojan War in which Athena and Poseidon sent two great serpants to wrap themselves around Laocoon and his two sons to kill them. Circa 40-30BC, Pope Clement XIV coillection, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  art background
  • Statue group identified as as the Laocoon described by Pliny as a masterpiece made by the sculptors of Rhodes. The Laocoon depicts a scene from the Trojan War in which Athena and Poseidon sent two great serpants to wrap themselves around Laocoon and his two sons to kill them. Circa 40-30BC, Pope Clement XIV coillection, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  grey art background
  • Roman mosaic depicting The Education of Achilles by the Centaur Chiron. Achilles , left, is depicted riding a centaur ( mosaic of its body s missing) and is about to kill a deer. In the bottom right hand corner is a Chimera was, according to Greek mythology, a monstrous fire-breathing hybrid creature of Lycia in Asia Minor, composed of the parts of more than one animal. The mosaic follows the story of Bellerophon who was a ‘great slayer of monsters’. From Belalis Major (Henshir El-Fawar ) in the Beja region of Tunisia. Early 7th century AD.Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic depicting The Education of Achilles by the Centaur Chiron. Achilles , left, is depicted riding a centaur ( mosaic of its body s missing) and is about to kill a deer. In the bottom right hand corner is a Chimera was, according to Greek mythology, a monstrous fire-breathing hybrid creature of Lycia in Asia Minor, composed of the parts of more than one animal. The mosaic follows the story of Bellerophon who was a ‘great slayer of monsters’. From Belalis Major (Henshir El-Fawar ) in the Beja region of Tunisia. Early 7th century AD.Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic depicting The Education of Achilles by the Centaur Chiron. Achilles , left, is depicted riding a centaur ( mosaic of its body s missing) and is about to kill a deer. In the bottom right hand corner is a Chimera was, according to Greek mythology, a monstrous fire-breathing hybrid creature of Lycia in Asia Minor, composed of the parts of more than one animal. The mosaic follows the story of Bellerophon who was a ‘great slayer of monsters’. From Belalis Major (Henshir El-Fawar ) in the Beja region of Tunisia. Early 7th century AD.Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic depicting The Education of Achilles by the Centaur Chiron. Achilles , left, is depicted riding a centaur ( mosaic of its body s missing) and is about to kill a deer. In the bottom right hand corner is a Chimera was, according to Greek mythology, a monstrous fire-breathing hybrid creature of Lycia in Asia Minor, composed of the parts of more than one animal. The mosaic follows the story of Bellerophon who was a ‘great slayer of monsters’. From Belalis Major (Henshir El-Fawar ) in the Beja region of Tunisia. Early 7th century AD.Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 1 - sculpture of a quail that it has just killed its young. This is based on a  bestiary story that tells of a Pelican that kills its young. It then pecks its breast to draw blood and sits on its dead offspring and the blood brings the young bird back to life. This is an allegory of Christ giving his blood on the cross for mankind. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Tombstone of a man being killed by a logging accident ,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Road Kill - Fine Art Photos & Photography black & white  Prints
  • Close up of a RomanSebasteion relief sculpture of  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Tombstone of a carpenter, The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  S?pân?a, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan P?tra? (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a shepherd , The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  S?pân?a, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan P?tra? (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Tombstone showing a fiddler and man in traditional clothes, The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone showing an shepherd with his sythe,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a thresher showing a couple threshing wheat,   The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone showing a couple threshing wheat, The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a mother showing her with her sons in a kitchen,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone showing a man painting the tombstones,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone showing a man on his horse, The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a Husband showing him drinking with his wife, The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a soldier, The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a farmer on his tractor,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a lumberjack,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a house wife sitting at her table,   The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a school master,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a disabled man,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a lorry owner,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a washer women,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a house wife, The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a timber mill worker,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a fruit farmer,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Tombstone of a miner,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  S?pân?a, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan P?tra? (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  S?pân?a, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan P?tra? (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Tombstone showing a miner in a mine, The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone showing a miller bagging corn, The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone showing a logger chopping trees, The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone showing an aold women sitting at her table,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone showing a fiddler and a man dancing in traditional clothes,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone showing a fiddler and a man doing a traditional dance,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone showing a man doing a traditional dance,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a mother showing her with her sons,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a lorry owner and lorry,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone showing a man in traditional clothes, The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a farmer on the way to cut hay, The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a weaver,   The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a farmer picking fruit,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a shepherd in the fields,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of an army  tank driver,   The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a drinker in the pub,   The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a Colonel,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a man in traditional hat,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a forestery forman,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a forestery worker,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstones in  The Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.

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Browse pictures & images the treasured artefacts and antiquities exhibits from the great Museum of Europe and the Middle East. See the art and objects made by our ancestors.

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