• Murren fenicular Train - Switzerland
  • House decorated with traditional folk art. Mykonos, Cyclades Islands, Greece.
  • Low growing vines of Santorini, Greece
  • Low growing vines of Santorini, Greece
  • organic farm goats cheese. Langres. Honfleur market France
  • Goats soft whole cheese on a cheese market stall Honfleur Normandy France
  • Honfleur vegatable market with boxes of vegetables
  • Savoy Cabbage  market France
  • Sausage stall with French Salamis
  • Sausage stall with French Salamis
  • Sausage stall with French Salamis
  • Sausage stall with French Salamis
  • Cheese Stall Honfleur market France
  • Bunches of Organic carrots with their leaves on a market stall France
  • Syros Sausages "skordoloukanika" (sausages with garlic),  Syros Island [ ????? ] , Greek Cyclades Islands
  • Murren fenicular Train - Switzerland
  • House decorated with traditional folk art. Mykonos, Cyclades Islands, Greece.
  • House decorated with traditional folk art. Mykonos, Cyclades Islands, Greece.
  • Low growing vines of Santorini, Greece
  • Low growing vines of Santorini, Greece
  • Low growing vines of Santorini, Greece
  • Low growing vines of Santorini, Greece
  • Low growing vines of Santorini, Greece
  • organic farm goats cheese. Langres. Honfleur market France
  • Whole Cheese ready to cut on a cheese stall at a market in Honfleur Normandy France
  • Whole Cheese ready to cut on a cheese stall at a market in Honfleur Normandy France
  • Goats soft whole cheese on a cheese market stall Honfleur Normandy France
  • Valencay Goats soft whole cheese on a cheese market stall Honfleur Normandy France
  • Honfleur vegatable market with boxes of vegetables
  • Savoy Cabbage  market France
  • vegatable market with boxes of vegetables
  • Sausage stall with French Salamis
  • Sausage stall with French Salamis
  • Sausage stall with French Salamis
  • Sausage stall with French Salamis
  • Sausage stall with French Salamis
  • Cheese market Stall Honfleur market France
  • Sausage stall with French Salamis
  • Cheese Stall Honfleur market France
  • Cheese Stall Honfleur market France
  • Cheese Stall Honfleur market France
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • Pictures & images of the interior frescoes on the barrel vaulted roof of of Ubisa St. George Georgian Orthodox medieval monastery, Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
The 14th century lavish interior frescoes were painted by Gerasim in a local style known as Palaeologus  following Byzantine influences.
  • Pictures & images of the interior frescoes of Christ Pantocrator in the Apse of Ubisa St. George Georgian Orthodox medieval monastery, Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
The 14th century lavish interior frescoes were painted by Gerasim in a local style known as Palaeologus  following Byzantine influences.
  • Pictures & images of the interior frescoes on the barrel vaulted roof of of Ubisa St. George Georgian Orthodox medieval monastery, Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
The 14th century lavish interior frescoes were painted by Gerasim in a local style known as Palaeologus  following Byzantine influences.
  • Pictures & images of the interior frescoes on the barrel vaulted roof of of Ubisa St. George Georgian Orthodox medieval monastery, Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
The 14th century lavish interior frescoes were painted by Gerasim in a local style known as Palaeologus  following Byzantine influences.
  • Pictures & images of the interior frescoes of Ubisa St. George Georgian Orthodox medieval monastery, Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
The 14th century lavish interior frescoes were painted by Gerasim in a local style known as Palaeologus  following Byzantine influences.
  • Pictures & images of the interior frescoes of Ubisa St. George Georgian Orthodox medieval monastery, Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
The 14th century lavish interior frescoes were painted by Gerasim in a local style known as Palaeologus  following Byzantine influences.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of a prisoner of  Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of a prisoner of  Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   <br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   <br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Roman Sebasteion rrelief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Roman Sebasteion rrelief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Royal Hero with hunting dogs,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
A diademed youth stands with his horse and hunting dogs. At the left an oval shield (foreign) hangs from a leafless tree, against which leans a long thin club. The Royal hero in this and the relief to the left is probably a local founder such as Assyrian King Ninos, claimed as founder of their city by the Aphrodisians.
  • RomanSebasteion relief  sculpture of Royal Hero with hunting dogs,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
A diademed youth stands with his horse and hunting dogs. At the left an oval shield (foreign) hangs from a leafless tree, against which leans a long thin club. The Royal hero in this and the relief to the left is probably a local founder such as Assyrian King Ninos, claimed as founder of their city by the Aphrodisians.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Nysa and baby Dionysus Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The nymph Nysa has the baby Dionysus on her lap. He reaches out to a bunch of grapes held up by a satyr, one of his woodland followers. Dionysus was the son of Zeus by Semele, and was given the nymphs of Mt Nysa for an upbringing in the wilds, safe from the eyes of Hera, Zeus’s wife. Nysa was located in the Meander Valley, near Aphrodisias: the story was local.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Nysa and baby Dionysus Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The nymph Nysa has the baby Dionysus on her lap. He reaches out to a bunch of grapes held up by a satyr, one of his woodland followers. Dionysus was the son of Zeus by Semele, and was given the nymphs of Mt Nysa for an upbringing in the wilds, safe from the eyes of Hera, Zeus’s wife. Nysa was located in the Meander Valley, near Aphrodisias: the story was local.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Meleager and a boar Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Meleager stands naked in front of a rocky outcrop. In the foreground lies a dead Calydonian boar, Above, a local nymph emerges from behind a fold in the landscape. The boar hunt took place on the imposing Mt Zygos at Calydon.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Meleager and a boar Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Meleager stands naked in front of a rocky outcrop. In the foreground lies a dead Calydonian boar, Above, a local nymph emerges from behind a fold in the landscape. The boar hunt took place on the imposing Mt Zygos at Calydon.
  • 6th century Inscription of the great hall of the synagogue of Nam-Ham-mam-Lif in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis, present day Tunisia. The mosaic floor of the vestibule (porticus) was an offering from Asterius son of Rusticus, the Head of the Jewish community who was working in the Naro jewellers trade. The mosaic reads in Latin  "Asterius, filius Rustici, arcosinagogi, margaritari, (de d(onis) dei partemporticites-selavit".  The Bardo National Museum, Tunis Tunisia.  Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The so called synagogue of Naro (Hammam-Lif, Tunisia), discovered in 1883, is a square buil-ding (20 by 20 m), consisting of several rooms and hallways communicating with an inner courtyard. The plan is inspired by traditional domestic architecture of Roman Africa. The room, dedicated to religious ceremonies, was paved with a magnificent mosaic of several figured panels with an iconography highlighting Judaeo-Christian concepts, attesting a proselyte attitude addressing a local Judaic community, who was very active between the late fifth c. and the early sixth century AD.
  • 6th century Inscription of the great hall of the synagogue of Nam-Ham-mam-Lif in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis, present day Tunisia. The mosaic floor of the vestibule (porticus) was an offering from Asterius son of Rusticus, the Head of the Jewish community who was working in the Naro jewellers trade. The mosaic reads in Latin  "Asterius, filius Rustici, arcosinagogi, margaritari, (de d(onis) dei partemporticites-selavit".  The Bardo National Museum, Tunis Tunisia<br />
<br />
The so called synagogue of Naro (Hammam-Lif, Tunisia), discovered in 1883, is a square buil-ding (20 by 20 m), consisting of several rooms and hallways communicating with an inner courtyard. The plan is inspired by traditional domestic architecture of Roman Africa. The room, dedicated to religious ceremonies, was paved with a magnificent mosaic of several figured panels with an iconography highlighting Judaeo-Christian concepts, attesting a proselyte attitude addressing a local Judaic community, who was very active between the late fifth c. and the early sixth century AD.
  • Roman head sculpture in the ‘Italic cubism ‘ style, 2nd - 3rd century BC, found in the foundations of the Ministery of Finance on the via XX Septembre, Rome. The head, the back of which was not completed, shows markedly realistic, clear features. The style, a blend of Greek art and Italic traditions, is traceable to Etruscan portraiture of the so called ‘Italic cubism’ of the 3rd century BC, and local stone used was well suited to this genre. It is believed to be the only known example of this style and has been roughly dated to between the 3rd and 2nd century BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman head sculpture in the ‘Italic cubism ‘ style, 2nd - 3rd century BC, found in the foundations of the Ministery of Finance on the via XX Septembre, Rome. The head, the back of which was not completed, shows markedly realistic, clear features. The style, a blend of Greek art and Italic traditions, is traceable to Etruscan portraiture of the so called ‘Italic cubism’ of the 3rd century BC, and local stone used was well suited to this genre. It is believed to be the only known example of this style and has been roughly dated to between the 3rd and 2nd century BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman head sculpture in the ‘Italic cubism ‘ style, 2nd - 3rd century BC, found in the foundations of the Ministery of Finance on the via XX Septembre, Rome. The head, the back of which was not completed, shows markedly realistic, clear features. The style, a blend of Greek art and Italic traditions, is traceable to Etruscan portraiture of the so called ‘Italic cubism’ of the 3rd century BC, and local stone used was well suited to this genre. It is believed to be the only known example of this style and has been roughly dated to between the 3rd and 2nd century BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman head sculpture in the ‘Italic cubism ‘ style, 2nd - 3rd century BC, found in the foundations of the Ministery of Finance on the via XX Septembre, Rome. The head, the back of which was not completed, shows markedly realistic, clear features. The style, a blend of Greek art and Italic traditions, is traceable to Etruscan portraiture of the so called ‘Italic cubism’ of the 3rd century BC, and local stone used was well suited to this genre. It is believed to be the only known example of this style and has been roughly dated to between the 3rd and 2nd century BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman head sculpture in the ‘Italic cubism ‘ style, 2nd - 3rd century BC, found in the foundations of the Ministery of Finance on the via XX Septembre, Rome. The head, the back of which was not completed, shows markedly realistic, clear features. The style, a blend of Greek art and Italic traditions, is traceable to Etruscan portraiture of the so called ‘Italic cubism’ of the 3rd century BC, and local stone used was well suited to this genre. It is believed to be the only known example of this style and has been roughly dated to between the 3rd and 2nd century BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • South Porch, Right Portal, Left Jambs. Cathedral of Chartres, France. Gothic statue of the four ?Confessors? important intellectual and spiritual leaders, most of whom lived during the early centuries of the Church. They stand on historiated socles- there are canopies offer their heads with architectural motifs. From left to right they are .1) Laumer (also called Lomer or Laudomarus), a local saint who was founder and Abbot of the nearby monastery of Corbion in the 6th century..2) Pope Leo I, an influential early Pope.3) a figure that is either Ambrose or Thomas Becket .4) Nicholas, bishop of Myra (two of his miracles appear in the tympanum).The figure of Laumer was added after the rest of the portal was created. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Cres old Town harbour with small local fising boats, Cres Island, Croatia
  • Cres old Town harbour with small local fising boats, Cres Island, Croatia
  • Cres old Town harbour with small local fising boats, Cres Island, Croatia
  • Cres old Town harbour with small local fising boats, Cres Island, Croatia
  • Cres old Town harbour with small local fising boats, Cres Island, Croatia
  • Cres old Town harbour with small local fising boats, Cres Island, Croatia
  • Cres old Town harbour with small local fising boats, Cres Island, Croatia
  • Cres old Town harbour with small local fising boats, Cres Island, Croatia
  • Cres old Town harbour with small local fising boats, Cres Island, Croatia
  • Cres old Town harbour with small local fising boats, Cres Island, Croatia
  • Cres old Town harbour with small local fising boats, Cres Island, Croatia
  • Cres old Town harbour with small local fising boats, Cres Island, Croatia
  • Cres old Town harbour with small local fising boats, Cres Island, Croatia
  • Cres old Town harbour with small local fising boats, Cres Island, Croatia
  • Cres old Town harbour with small local fising boats, Cres Island, Croatia
  • Local fishing boats in the port of Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Local fishing boats in the port of Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Local fishing boats in the port of Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Local fishing boats in the port of Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Local fishing boats in the port of Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • traditional children dancers in local german Svab traditional  dress - Annual wine harvest festival ( szuret fesztival ) . Hajos ( Hajós); Hungary
  • traditional children dancers in local german Svab traditional  dress - Annual wine harvest festival ( szuret fesztival ) . Hajos ( Hajós); Hungary
  • traditional children dancers in local german Svab traditional  dress - Annual wine harvest festival ( szuret fesztival ) . Hajos ( Hajós); Hungary
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of Wahka son of Neferhoptep, Middle Kingdom, 13th Dynasty, (1760 BC), Qaw el-Kebir, Tomb 7. Egyptian Museum, Turin. black background. <br />
<br />
This exceptional example of a private sculpture depicts a provincial official in almost Royal size and attitude. It was found inside the largest funerary chapel in Qaw el-Kebir, built of governor Wahka II around 1850 BC, The style indicates a date about a century later at a time when local governors did not build large tombs anymore. The statue was therefore installed by another Wahka into his ancestors chapel to keep the memory of his glorious lineage alive. Schiapelli excavations Cat 4265.
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of Wahka son of Neferhoptep, Middle Kingdom, 13th Dynasty, (1760 BC), Qaw el-Kebir, Tomb 7. Egyptian Museum, Turin. white background,<br />
<br />
This exceptional example of a private sculpture depicts a provincial official in almost Royal size and attitude. It was found inside the largest funerary chapel in Qaw el-Kebir, built of governor Wahka II around 1850 BC, The style indicates a date about a century later at a time when local governors did not build large tombs anymore. The statue was therefore installed by another Wahka into his ancestors chapel to keep the memory of his glorious lineage alive. Schiapelli excavations Cat 4265.
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of Wahka son of Neferhoptep, Middle Kingdom, 13th Dynasty, (1760 BC), Qaw el-Kebir, Tomb 7. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background. <br />
<br />
This exceptional example of a private sculpture depicts a provincial official in almost Royal size and attitude. It was found inside the largest funerary chapel in Qaw el-Kebir, built of governor Wahka II around 1850 BC, The style indicates a date about a century later at a time when local governors did not build large tombs anymore. The statue was therefore installed by another Wahka into his ancestors chapel to keep the memory of his glorious lineage alive. Schiapelli excavations Cat 4265.
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of Wahka son of Neferhoptep, Middle Kingdom, 13th Dynasty, (1760 BC), Qaw el-Kebir, Tomb 7. Egyptian Museum, Turin.<br />
<br />
This exceptional example of a private sculpture depicts a provincial official in almost Royal size and attitude. It was found inside the largest funerary chapel in Qaw el-Kebir, built of governor Wahka II around 1850 BC, The style indicates a date about a century later at a time when local governors did not build large tombs anymore. The statue was therefore installed by another Wahka into his ancestors chapel to keep the memory of his glorious lineage alive. Schiapelli excavations Cat 4265.
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of Wahka son of Neferhoptep, Middle Kingdom, 13th Dynasty, (1760 BC), Qaw el-Kebir, Tomb 7. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background. <br />
<br />
This exceptional example of a private sculpture depicts a provincial official in almost Royal size and attitude. It was found inside the largest funerary chapel in Qaw el-Kebir, built of governor Wahka II around 1850 BC, The style indicates a date about a century later at a time when local governors did not build large tombs anymore. The statue was therefore installed by another Wahka into his ancestors chapel to keep the memory of his glorious lineage alive. Schiapelli excavations Cat 4265.
  • Pictures & images of the interior frescoes of Ubisa St. George Georgian Orthodox medieval monastery, Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
The 14th century lavish interior frescoes were painted by Gerasim in a local style known as Palaeologus  following Byzantine influences.
  • Pictures & images of the interior frescoes of Ubisa St. George Georgian Orthodox medieval monastery, Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
The 14th century lavish interior frescoes were painted by Gerasim in a local style known as Palaeologus  following Byzantine influences.
  • Pictures & images of the interior frescoes of Ubisa St. George Georgian Orthodox medieval monastery, Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
The 14th century lavish interior frescoes were painted by Gerasim in a local style known as Palaeologus  following Byzantine influences.
  • Pictures & images of the interior frescoes of Ubisa St. George Georgian Orthodox medieval monastery, Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
The 14th century lavish interior frescoes were painted by Gerasim in a local style known as Palaeologus  following Byzantine influences.
  • Pictures & images of the interior frescoes of a Georgian King and Queen Ubisa St. George Georgian Orthodox medieval monastery, Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
The 14th century lavish interior frescoes were painted by Gerasim in a local style known as Palaeologus  following Byzantine influences.
  • Pictures & images of the interior frescoes of Christ Pantocrator in the Apse of Ubisa St. George Georgian Orthodox medieval monastery, Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
The 14th century lavish interior frescoes were painted by Gerasim in a local style known as Palaeologus  following Byzantine influences.
  • Pictures & images of the interior frescoes of the Last Supper, Ubisa St. George Georgian Orthodox medieval monastery, Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
The 14th century lavish interior frescoes were painted by Gerasim in a local style known as Palaeologus  following Byzantine influences.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   <br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   <br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   <br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • RomanSebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Roman Sebasteion rrelief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Roman Sebasteion rrelief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Roman Sebasteion rrelief  sculpture of Emperor Claudius as God of sea and land,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Emperor as god Claudius strides forward in a divine epiphany, drapery billowing around his head. He receives a cornucopia with fruits of the earth from a figure emerging from the ground, anda ship’s steering oar from a marine tritoness with fish legs. The idea is clear: the god-emperor guarantees the prosperity of land and sea. The relief is a remarkable local visualisation - elevated and panegyrical - of the emperor’s role as a universal saviour and divine protector.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Royal Hero with hunting dogs,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
<br />
A diademed youth stands with his horse and hunting dogs. At the left an oval shield (foreign) hangs from a leafless tree, against which leans a long thin club. The Royal hero in this and the relief to the left is probably a local founder such as Assyrian King Ninos, claimed as founder of their city by the Aphrodisians.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Royal Hero with hunting dogs,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
A diademed youth stands with his horse and hunting dogs. At the left an oval shield (foreign) hangs from a leafless tree, against which leans a long thin club. The Royal hero in this and the relief to the left is probably a local founder such as Assyrian King Ninos, claimed as founder of their city by the Aphrodisians.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Royal Hero with hunting dogs,  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
A diademed youth stands with his horse and hunting dogs. At the left an oval shield (foreign) hangs from a leafless tree, against which leans a long thin club. The Royal hero in this and the relief to the left is probably a local founder such as Assyrian King Ninos, claimed as founder of their city by the Aphrodisians.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Nysa and baby Dionysus Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The nymph Nysa has the baby Dionysus on her lap. He reaches out to a bunch of grapes held up by a satyr, one of his woodland followers. Dionysus was the son of Zeus by Semele, and was given the nymphs of Mt Nysa for an upbringing in the wilds, safe from the eyes of Hera, Zeus’s wife. Nysa was located in the Meander Valley, near Aphrodisias: the story was local.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Nysa and baby Dionysus Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The nymph Nysa has the baby Dionysus on her lap. He reaches out to a bunch of grapes held up by a satyr, one of his woodland followers. Dionysus was the son of Zeus by Semele, and was given the nymphs of Mt Nysa for an upbringing in the wilds, safe from the eyes of Hera, Zeus’s wife. Nysa was located in the Meander Valley, near Aphrodisias: the story was local.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Nysa and baby Dionysus Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The nymph Nysa has the baby Dionysus on her lap. He reaches out to a bunch of grapes held up by a satyr, one of his woodland followers. Dionysus was the son of Zeus by Semele, and was given the nymphs of Mt Nysa for an upbringing in the wilds, safe from the eyes of Hera, Zeus’s wife. Nysa was located in the Meander Valley, near Aphrodisias: the story was local.
  • RomanSebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Meleager and a boar Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Meleager stands naked in front of a rocky outcrop. In the foreground lies a dead Calydonian boar, Above, a local nymph emerges from behind a fold in the landscape. The boar hunt took place on the imposing Mt Zygos at Calydon.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Meleager and a boar Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Meleager stands naked in front of a rocky outcrop. In the foreground lies a dead Calydonian boar, Above, a local nymph emerges from behind a fold in the landscape. The boar hunt took place on the imposing Mt Zygos at Calydon.
  • Roman Sebasteion rrelief  sculpture of  Meleager and a boar Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Meleager stands naked in front of a rocky outcrop. In the foreground lies a dead Calydonian boar, Above, a local nymph emerges from behind a fold in the landscape. The boar hunt took place on the imposing Mt Zygos at Calydon.
  • 6th century Inscription of the great hall of the synagogue of Nam-Ham-mam-Lif in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis, present day Tunisia. The mosaic floor of the vestibule (porticus) was an offering from Asterius son of Rusticus, the Head of the Jewish community who was working in the Naro jewellers trade. The mosaic reads in Latin  "Asterius, filius Rustici, arcosinagogi, margaritari, (de d(onis) dei partemporticites-selavit".  The Bardo National Museum, Tunis Tunisia.  Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The so called synagogue of Naro (Hammam-Lif, Tunisia), discovered in 1883, is a square buil-ding (20 by 20 m), consisting of several rooms and hallways communicating with an inner courtyard. The plan is inspired by traditional domestic architecture of Roman Africa. The room, dedicated to religious ceremonies, was paved with a magnificent mosaic of several figured panels with an iconography highlighting Judaeo-Christian concepts, attesting a proselyte attitude addressing a local Judaic community, who was very active between the late fifth c. and the early sixth century AD.
  • 6th century Inscription of the great hall of the synagogue of Nam-Ham-mam-Lif in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis, present day Tunisia. The mosaic floor of the vestibule (porticus) was an offering from Asterius son of Rusticus, the Head of the Jewish community who was working in the Naro jewellers trade. The mosaic reads in Latin  "Asterius, filius Rustici, arcosinagogi, margaritari, (de d(onis) dei partemporticites-selavit".  The Bardo National Museum, Tunis Tunisia.   Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The so called synagogue of Naro (Hammam-Lif, Tunisia), discovered in 1883, is a square buil-ding (20 by 20 m), consisting of several rooms and hallways communicating with an inner courtyard. The plan is inspired by traditional domestic architecture of Roman Africa. The room, dedicated to religious ceremonies, was paved with a magnificent mosaic of several figured panels with an iconography highlighting Judaeo-Christian concepts, attesting a proselyte attitude addressing a local Judaic community, who was very active between the late fifth c. and the early sixth century AD.
  • 6th century Inscription of the great hall of the synagogue of Nam-Ham-mam-Lif in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis, present day Tunisia. The mosaic floor of the vestibule (porticus) was an offering from Asterius son of Rusticus, the Head of the Jewish community who was working in the Naro jewellers trade. The mosaic reads in Latin  "Asterius, filius Rustici, arcosinagogi, margaritari, (de d(onis) dei partemporticites-selavit".  The Bardo National Museum, Tunis Tunisia. Against a grey art background.<br />
<br />
The so called synagogue of Naro (Hammam-Lif, Tunisia), discovered in 1883, is a square buil-ding (20 by 20 m), consisting of several rooms and hallways communicating with an inner courtyard. The plan is inspired by traditional domestic architecture of Roman Africa. The room, dedicated to religious ceremonies, was paved with a magnificent mosaic of several figured panels with an iconography highlighting Judaeo-Christian concepts, attesting a proselyte attitude addressing a local Judaic community, who was very active between the late fifth c. and the early sixth century AD.
  • Roman mosaic of two Gazelles facing inwards either side of a vase, Eastern Mediterranean, the beginning of the 6th century AD. The mosaic design is typical of  church  floors in front of the choir. The choice of gazelles is rare though and indicates a local flavour to the content. Inv 3673, The Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Roman head sculpture in the ‘Italic cubism ‘ style, 2nd - 3rd century BC, found in the foundations of the Ministery of Finance on the via XX Septembre, Rome. The head, the back of which was not completed, shows markedly realistic, clear features. The style, a blend of Greek art and Italic traditions, is traceable to Etruscan portraiture of the so called ‘Italic cubism’ of the 3rd century BC, and local stone used was well suited to this genre. It is believed to be the only known example of this style and has been roughly dated to between the 3rd and 2nd century BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman head sculpture in the ‘Italic cubism ‘ style, 2nd - 3rd century BC, found in the foundations of the Ministery of Finance on the via XX Septembre, Rome. The head, the back of which was not completed, shows markedly realistic, clear features. The style, a blend of Greek art and Italic traditions, is traceable to Etruscan portraiture of the so called ‘Italic cubism’ of the 3rd century BC, and local stone used was well suited to this genre. It is believed to be the only known example of this style and has been roughly dated to between the 3rd and 2nd century BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman head sculpture in the ‘Italic cubism ‘ style, 2nd - 3rd century BC, found in the foundations of the Ministery of Finance on the via XX Septembre, Rome. The head, the back of which was not completed, shows markedly realistic, clear features. The style, a blend of Greek art and Italic traditions, is traceable to Etruscan portraiture of the so called ‘Italic cubism’ of the 3rd century BC, and local stone used was well suited to this genre. It is believed to be the only known example of this style and has been roughly dated to between the 3rd and 2nd century BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman head sculpture in the ‘Italic cubism ‘ style, 2nd - 3rd century BC, found in the foundations of the Ministery of Finance on the via XX Septembre, Rome. The head, the back of which was not completed, shows markedly realistic, clear features. The style, a blend of Greek art and Italic traditions, is traceable to Etruscan portraiture of the so called ‘Italic cubism’ of the 3rd century BC, and local stone used was well suited to this genre. It is believed to be the only known example of this style and has been roughly dated to between the 3rd and 2nd century BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman head sculpture in the ‘Italic cubism ‘ style, 2nd - 3rd century BC, found in the foundations of the Ministery of Finance on the via XX Septembre, Rome. The head, the back of which was not completed, shows markedly realistic, clear features. The style, a blend of Greek art and Italic traditions, is traceable to Etruscan portraiture of the so called ‘Italic cubism’ of the 3rd century BC, and local stone used was well suited to this genre. It is believed to be the only known example of this style and has been roughly dated to between the 3rd and 2nd century BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • .South Porch, Right Portal, Left Jambs c. 1194-1230,  Cathedral of Notre Dame, Chartres, France. From left to right they are .1) Laumer (also called Lomer or Laudomarus), a local saint who was founder and Abbot of the nearby monastery of Corbion in the 6th century..2) Pope Leo I, an influential early Pope.3) a figure that is either Ambrose or Thomas Becket . A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • South Porch, Right Portal, Left Jambs. Cathedral of Chartres, France. Gothic statue of the four ?Confessors? important intellectual and spiritual leaders, most of whom lived during the early centuries of the Church. They stand on historiated socles- there are canopies offer their heads with architectural motifs. From left to right they are .1) Laumer (also called Lomer or Laudomarus), a local saint who was founder and Abbot of the nearby monastery of Corbion in the 6th century..2) Pope Leo I, an influential early Pope.3) a figure that is either Ambrose or Thomas Becket .4) Nicholas, bishop of Myra (two of his miracles appear in the tympanum).The figure of Laumer was added after the rest of the portal was created. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • South Porch, Right Portal, Left Jambs. Cathedral of Chartres, France. Gothic statue of the four ?Confessors? important intellectual and spiritual leaders, most of whom lived during the early centuries of the Church. They stand on historiated socles- there are canopies offer their heads with architectural motifs. From left to right they are .1) Laumer (also called Lomer or Laudomarus), a local saint who was founder and Abbot of the nearby monastery of Corbion in the 6th century..2) Pope Leo I, an influential early Pope.3) a figure that is either Ambrose or Thomas Becket .4) Nicholas, bishop of Myra (two of his miracles appear in the tympanum).The figure of Laumer was added after the rest of the portal was created. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Cres old Town harbour with small local fising boats, Cres Island, Croatia
  • Cres old Town harbour with small local fising boats, Cres Island, Croatia
  • Cres old Town harbour with small local fising boats, Cres Island, Croatia
  • Cres old Town harbour with small local fising boats, Cres Island, Croatia
  • Cres old Town harbour with small local fising boats, Cres Island, Croatia
  • Cres old Town harbour with small local fising boats, Cres Island, Croatia
  • Cres old Town harbour with small local fising boats, Cres Island, Croatia
  • Cres old Town harbour with small local fising boats, Cres Island, Croatia
  • Cres old Town harbour with small local fising boats, Cres Island, Croatia
  • Cres old Town harbour with small local fising boats, Cres Island, Croatia
  • Cres old Town harbour with small local fising boats, Cres Island, Croatia
  • Cres old Town harbour with small local fising boats, Cres Island, Croatia
  • Cres old Town harbour with small local fising boats, Cres Island, Croatia
  • Cres old Town harbour with small local fising boats, Cres Island, Croatia
  • Cres old Town harbour with small local fising boats, Cres Island, Croatia

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