• View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Genna Arrele II. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The remains of a representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Piscina ‘E Sali IV site,  Laconi.  Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir.  From Barrili I site, Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Cabamadau, Villa Sant’ Antonia. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. White background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Cabamadau, Villa Sant’ Antonia. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with the bottom of a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Piscina ‘E Sali V site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Black background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with the bottom of a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Piscina ‘E Sali V site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Genna Arrele II. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Genna Arrele II. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Grey background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Pranu Maore I site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Grey background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Piscina ‘E Sali II site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Black background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir.  Excavated from Piscina ‘E Sali V site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Piscina ‘E Sali VI site,  Laconi.  Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Black background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Genna Arrele II. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from S’Arretzraxiu, Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Black background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from S’Arretzraxiu, Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Cabamadau, Villa Sant’ Antonia. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Grey background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Cabamadau, Villa Sant’ Antonia. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Black background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure with the remains of a  carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Cuccu de Lai,  Samugheo. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. White background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure with the remains of a  carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Cuccu de Lai,  Samugheo. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Black background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Barilli I site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Grey background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Pranu Maore I site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. White background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Pranu Maore I site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Pranu Maore I site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Perida Iddocca VII site,  Laconi.  Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Piscina ‘E Sali II site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. White background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Piscina ‘E Sali II site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Central fragment of a Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure would have started at the top with the remaons of  a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir.  Excavated from Piscina ‘E Sali VI site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Black background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir.  Excavated from Piscina ‘E Sali V site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. White background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir.  Excavated from Barrili II site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir.  From Barrili I site, Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. White background.
  • Top section of a Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. Excavated from Amassed VII, Allai. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Grey background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. Excavated from Amassed VII, Allai.  Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. White background.
  • Fragment of a Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with acarving of a horizontal knife on its face side.   Excavated from Montes I, Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. White background.
  • Fragmant of a Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carving of a knife on its face side.  Excavated from Palas de Nuraxi II, Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Black background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone which represents a standing figure. Excavated from Bau Carradore III site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Black background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Piscina ‘E Sali VI site,  Laconi.  Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Piscina ‘E Sali II site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The remains of a representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Piscina ‘E Sali IV site,  Laconi.  Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Grey background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with the bottom of a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Piscina ‘E Sali V site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Grey background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir.  From Barrili I site, Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Piscina ‘E Sali VI site,  Laconi.  Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Grey background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. Excavated from Genna Arrele II. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Black background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Bau Carradore II, Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. White background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Cabamadau, Villa Sant’ Antonia. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Grey background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. Excavated from Paule Luturru,  Samugheo. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. Excavated from Paule Luturru,  Samugheo. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Black background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone which represents a standing figure. Excavated from Bau Carradore III site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Grey background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Barilli I site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. White background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Piscina ‘E Sali II site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Black background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Piscina ‘E Sali II site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. White background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Piscina ‘E Sali II site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Grey background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The remains of a representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Piscina ‘E Sali IV site,  Laconi.  Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Central fragment of a Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure would have started at the top with the remaons of  a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir.  Excavated from Piscina ‘E Sali VI site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Grey background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir.  Excavated from Barrili II site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir.  From Barrili I site, Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Genna Arrele II. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. White background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Genna Arrele II. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Grey background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from S’Arretzraxiu, Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Perida Iddocca VII site,  Laconi.  Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Black background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Piscina ‘E Sali VI site,  Laconi.  Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. White background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Piscina ‘E Sali II site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Grey background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Piscina ‘E Sali II site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The remains of a representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Piscina ‘E Sali IV site,  Laconi.  Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. White background.
  • Central fragment of a Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure would have started at the top with the remaons of  a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir.  Excavated from Piscina ‘E Sali VI site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. White background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir.  From Barrili I site, Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Black background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Genna Arrele II. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. White background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Genna Arrele II. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. White background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure with the remains of a  carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Cuccu de Lai,  Samugheo. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with the bottom of a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Piscina ‘E Sali V site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. White background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with the bottom of a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Piscina ‘E Sali V site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Genna Arrele II. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from S’Arretzraxiu, Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Grey background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Bau Carradore II, Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Bau Carradore II, Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above.Excavated from Nuraghe Orrubiu IV, Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. White background.
  • Fragment of a Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with acarving of a horizontal knife on its face side.   Excavated from Montes I, Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Black background.
  • Fragmant of a Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carving of a knife on its face side.  Excavated from Palas de Nuraxi II, Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Fragmant of a Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carving of a knife on its face side.  Excavated from Palas de Nuraxi II, Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Cabamadau, Villa Sant’ Antonia. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. Excavated from Paule Luturru,  Samugheo. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone which represents a standing figure. Excavated from Bau Carradore III site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. White background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone which represents a standing figure. Excavated from Bau Carradore III site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Grey background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone which represents a standing figure. Excavated from Bau Carradore III site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The remains of a representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Piscina ‘E Sali IV site,  Laconi.  Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Black background.
  • Central fragment of a Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure would have started at the top with the remaons of  a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir.  Excavated from Piscina ‘E Sali VI site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Barilli I site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. Excavated from Genna Arrele II. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Grey background.
  • Fragmant of a Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carving of a knife on its face side.  Excavated from Palas de Nuraxi II, Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. White background.
  • Fragmant of a Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carving of a knife on its face side.  Excavated from Palas de Nuraxi II, Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Black background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Cabamadau, Villa Sant’ Antonia. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. White background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. Excavated from Paule Luturru,  Samugheo. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir.  Excavated from Piscina ‘E Sali V site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Black background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir.  Excavated from Barrili II site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. White background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir.  From Barrili I site, Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir.  From Barrili I site, Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Black background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Genna Arrele II. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Black background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Genna Arrele II. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Grey background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Genna Arrele II. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Top section of a Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. Excavated from Amassed VII, Allai. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Black background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from S’Arretzraxiu, Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. White background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Bau Carradore II, Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Black background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Bau Carradore II, Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Grey background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Cabamadau, Villa Sant’ Antonia. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side.  Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Grey background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. Excavated from Paule Luturru,  Samugheo. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Grey background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Barilli I site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Black background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Pranu Maore I site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Black background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Perida Iddocca VII site,  Laconi.  Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. White background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir.  Excavated from Piscina ‘E Sali V site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir.  Excavated from Piscina ‘E Sali V site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Grey background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir.  Excavated from Barrili II site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Black background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir.  Excavated from Barrili II site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Grey background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir.  From Barrili I site, Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Grey background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir.  From Barrili I site, Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. White background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir.  From Barrili I site, Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Grey background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. Excavated from Genna Arrele II. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. White background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Genna Arrele II. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Genna Arrele II. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Black background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Genna Arrele II. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Black background.
  • Fragmant of a Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carving of a knife on its face side.  Excavated from Palas de Nuraxi II, Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Grey background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side.  Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Black background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. Excavated from Paule Luturru,  Samugheo. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. White background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure with the remains of a  carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Cuccu de Lai,  Samugheo. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Perida Iddocca VII site,  Laconi.  Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. Excavated from Amassed VII, Allai.  Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Cabamadau, Villa Sant’ Antonia. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side.  Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Perida Iddocca VII site,  Laconi.  Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Grey background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Piscina ‘E Sali II site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Top section of a Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. Excavated from Amassed VII, Allai. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, . White background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone which represents a standing figure. Excavated from Bau Carradore III site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone which represents a standing figure. Excavated from Bau Carradore III site,  Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Black background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above.Excavated from Nuraghe Orrubiu IV, Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Grey background.
  • Fragment of a Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with acarving of a horizontal knife on its face side.   Excavated from Montes I, Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Grey background.
  • Fragment of a Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with acarving of a horizontal knife on its face side.   Excavated from Montes I, Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Fragment of a Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with acarving of a horizontal knife on its face side.   Excavated from Montes I, Laconi. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. at the bottom is a carving of a dagger running horizontally across the menhir. Excavated from Cabamadau, Villa Sant’ Antonia. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. Black background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side.  Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. White background.
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side.  Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy
  • Late European Neolithic prehistoric Menhir standing stone with carvings on its face side. The representation of a stylalised male figure starts at the top with a long nose from which 2 eyebrows arch around the top of the stone. below this is a carving of a falling figure with head at the bottom and 2 curved arms encircling a body above. Excavated from Paule Luturru,  Samugheo. Menhir Museum, Museo della Statuaria Prehistorica in Sardegna, Museum of Prehoistoric Sardinian Statues, Palazzo Aymerich, Laconi, Sardinia, Italy. White background.

FunkyStock Picture Library Resource

Picture The Past

ABOUT

FunkyStock Picture Library free resource for professional editorial picture editors, picture researchers, historical scholars and students and enthusiasts who want to browse some of the best pictures and images of historic countries, historical places, archaeological sites and the very best museum antiquities and artefacts exhibits in Europe and the Middle East.

Pictures and Images can be downloaded or bought as stock photos or photo art prints.

COUNTRIES

Browse travel pictures and images of historic places and archaeological sites of countries in Europe and the Middle East.

VIEW COUNTRIES INDEX....

HISTORICAL

Explore the past through pictures and images of its historic places. See the great palaces, castles and cities of antiquity as well as the great archaeological sites where our ancestors made history.

EXPLORE HISTORICAL PLACES...

MUSEUMS

Browse pictures & images the treasured artefacts and antiquities exhibits from the great Museum of Europe and the Middle East. See the art and objects made by our ancestors.

SEE MUESEUM ANTIQUITIES....