• Fresh picked Sambucus berries commonly known as elder or elderberry
  • Fresh picked Sambucus berries commonly known as elder or elderberry against a white background
  • Fresh picked Sambucus berries commonly known as elder or elderberry against a white background
  • Fresh picked Sambucus berries commonly known as elder or elderberry
  • Fresh picked Sambucus berries commonly known as elder or elderberry
  • Bunch of Wild Elderberries
  • Bunch of Wild Elderberries
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Dogerr, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian relief sculpted orthostat stone panel Andesite, Atateirk Orman ciftligi, Ankara, 12OO-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Winged griffin with a bird's head and a lion's body. There is a bird's head at the end of its tail. The chest was processed like fish scales. Its wing extends along the body. Muscles in its legs are schematic. <br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Photo of Phrygian relief sculpted orthostat stone panel Andesite, Atateirk Orman ciftligi, Ankara, 12OO-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Winged griffin with a bird's head and a lion's body. There is a bird's head at the end of its tail. The chest was processed like fish scales. Its wing extends along the body. Muscles in its legs are schematic. <br />
<br />
Against a brown art background.
  • Phrygian relief sculpted orthostat stone panel Andesite, Atateirk Orman ciftligi, Ankara, 12OO-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Winged griffin with a bird's head and a lion's body. There is a bird's head at the end of its tail. The chest was processed like fish scales. Its wing extends along the body. Muscles in its legs are schematic. <br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • The sword of God from the Sancutary of Yazilikaza, Hattusha, Turkey. Probably the weirdest representation of the rock sanctuary Yazilikaza, shows a sword God. He is waering a high pointed cap, whose ornamented with horns showing he is a divine character. The lower part of his body is formed of two hanging lions that merge into a sword blade . The body of God seems to form the sword handle and the sword being stuck into the ground could indicate that there is a god of the underworld. Cast from the original. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • The sword of God from the Sancutary of Yazilikaza, Hattusha, Turkey. Probably the weirdest representation of the rock sanctuary Yazilikaza, shows a sword God. He is waering a high pointed cap, whose ornamented with horns showing he is a divine character. The lower part of his body is formed of two hanging lions that merge into a sword blade . The body of God seems to form the sword handle and the sword being stuck into the ground could indicate that there is a god of the underworld. Cast from the original. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Phrygian relief sculpted orthostat stone panel Andesite, Atateirk Orman ciftligi, Ankara, 12OO-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Winged griffin with a bird's head and a lion's body. There is a bird's head at the end of its tail. The chest was processed like fish scales. Its wing extends along the body. Muscles in its legs are schematic. <br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Pictures & images of Phrygian relief sculpted orthostat stone panel Andesite, Atateirk Orman ciftligi, Ankara, 12OO-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Winged griffin with a bird's head and a lion's body. There is a bird's head at the end of its tail. The chest was processed like fish scales. Its wing extends along the body. Muscles in its legs are schematic. <br />
<br />
Against a gray background.
  • The Sword God from the Sancutary of Yazilikaza, Hattusha, Turkey. Probably the weirdest representation of the rock sanctuary Yazilikaza, shows a sword God. He is waering a high pointed cap, whose ornamented with horns showing he is a divine character. The lower part of his body is formed of two hanging lions that merge into a sword blade . The body of God seems to form the sword handle and the sword being stuck into the ground could indicate that there is a god of the underworld. Cast from the original. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • The sword of God from the Sancutary of Yazilikaza, Hattusha, Turkey. Probably the weirdest representation of the rock sanctuary Yazilikaza, shows a sword God. He is waering a high pointed cap, whose ornamented with horns showing he is a divine character. The lower part of his body is formed of two hanging lions that merge into a sword blade . The body of God seems to form the sword handle and the sword being stuck into the ground could indicate that there is a god of the underworld. Cast from the original. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • The sword of God from the Sancutary of Yazilikaza, Hattusha, Turkey. Probably the weirdest representation of the rock sanctuary Yazilikaza, shows a sword God. He is waering a high pointed cap, whose ornamented with horns showing he is a divine character. The lower part of his body is formed of two hanging lions that merge into a sword blade . The body of God seems to form the sword handle and the sword being stuck into the ground could indicate that there is a god of the underworld. Cast from the original. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • An exposed skeleton which were found in pits under the floors of some houses. On the wall are frescoes of what look like vultures, Scholars belive that dead bodies were subject to excarnation which means that their flesh was stripped from the body to leave the skeleton. A reconstruction of one of four Catalhoyuk houses to help archaeologists understand the finished structure of excavated ruins. 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • An exposed skeleton which were found in pits under the floors of some houses. On the wall are frescoes of what look like vultures, Scholars belive that dead bodies were subject to excarnation which means that their flesh was stripped from the body to leave the skeleton. A reconstruction of one of four Catalhoyuk houses to help archaeologists understand the finished structure of excavated ruins. 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • An exposed skeleton which were found in pits under the floors of some houses. On the wall are frescoes of what look like vultures, Scholars belive that dead bodies were subject to excarnation which means that their flesh was stripped from the body to leave the skeleton. A reconstruction of one of four Catalhoyuk houses to help archaeologists understand the finished structure of excavated ruins. 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • An exposed skeleton which were found in pits under the floors of some houses. On the wall are frescoes of what look like vultures, Scholars belive that dead bodies were subject to excarnation which means that their flesh was stripped from the body to leave the skeleton. A reconstruction of one of four Catalhoyuk houses to help archaeologists understand the finished structure of excavated ruins. 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • A Colossal Statue of the Weather God Hadad found near Gerdshin near Sam'al / Zincirli , Turkey. The lower part of the body of the statue has Aramaic text which starts " I am Panamuwa, the son of QRL, the king of Ja'udi, I have erected this statue of Hadad, at my eternal grave.  Originally the statue would have held lightening rods and an axe. On his round cap are bull horns known as the symbols of divinity. The weather God brought the rains which in the dry areas of Mesopotamia was all important. The inscription goes on to read " May the soul of Panamuwa eat with Hadad, May the soul of Panamuwa drink with Hadad". Basalt 775 BC, Pergamon Museum Berlin, inv no VA 2882.
  • A Colossal Statue of the Weather God Hadad found near Gerdshin near Sam'al / Zincirli , Turkey. The lower part of the body of the statue has Aramaic text which starts " I am Panamuwa, the son of QRL, the king of Ja'udi, I have erected this statue of Hadad, at my eternal grave.  Originally the statue would have held lightening rods and an axe. On his round cap are bull horns known as the symbols of divinity. The weather God brought the rains which in the dry areas of Mesopotamia was all important. The inscription goes on to read " May the soul of Panamuwa eat with Hadad, May the soul of Panamuwa drink with Hadad". Basalt 775 BC, Pergamon Museum Berlin, inv no VA 2882.
  • A Colossal Statue of the Weather God Hadad found near Gerdshin near Sam'al / Zincirli , Turkey. The lower part of the body of the statue has Aramaic text which starts " I am Panamuwa, the son of QRL, the king of Ja'udi, I have erected this statue of Hadad, at my eternal grave.  Originally the statue would have held lightening rods and an axe. On his round cap are bull horns known as the symbols of divinity. The weather God brought the rains which in the dry areas of Mesopotamia was all important. The inscription goes on to read " May the soul of Panamuwa eat with Hadad, May the soul of Panamuwa drink with Hadad". Basalt 775 BC, Pergamon Museum Berlin, inv no VA 2882.
  • A Colossal Statue of the Weather God Hadad found near Gerdshin near Sam'al / Zincirli , Turkey. The lower part of the body of the statue has Aramaic text which starts " I am Panamuwa, the son of QRL, the king of Ja'udi, I have erected this statue of Hadad, at my eternal grave.  Originally the statue would have held lightening rods and an axe. On his round cap are bull horns known as the symbols of divinity. The weather God brought the rains which in the dry areas of Mesopotamia was all important. The inscription goes on to read " May the soul of Panamuwa eat with Hadad, May the soul of Panamuwa drink with Hadad". Basalt 775 BC, Pergamon Museum Berlin, inv no VA 2882.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • close up of the facade and relief sculptures of the Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • close up of the facade and relief sculptures of the Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Close up of two sphinxes relief scul[ptures of the Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Close up of two sphinxes relief scul[ptures of the Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Close up of 2 standing lions of the Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Ahiyakup, Ankara Phrygian, 1200-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Sphinx. Curly-haired and bearded, the figure has the head of a human and the body of a lion, with its wings extending down to its tail. Muscles in its legs are schematic. There is a band on its head. <br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Phrygian relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Ahiyakup, Ankara Phrygian, 1200-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Sphinx. Curly-haired and bearded, the figure has the head of a human and the body of a lion, with its wings extending down to its tail. Muscles in its legs are schematic. There is a band on its head. <br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Phrygian relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Ahiyakup, Ankara Phrygian, 1200-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Sphinx. Curly-haired and bearded, the figure has the head of a human and the body of a lion, with its wings extending down to its tail. Muscles in its legs are schematic. There is a band on its head. <br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Pictures & images of Phrygian relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Ahiyakup, Ankara Phrygian, 1200-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Sphinx. Curly-haired and bearded, the figure has the head of a human and the body of a lion, with its wings extending down to its tail. Muscles in its legs are schematic. There is a band on its head. <br />
<br />
Against a gray background.
  • Photo of Phrygian relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Ahiyakup, Ankara Phrygian, 1200-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Sphinx. Curly-haired and bearded, the figure has the head of a human and the body of a lion, with its wings extending down to its tail. Muscles in its legs are schematic. There is a band on its head. <br />
<br />
Against a brown art background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel from Water Gate Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
 A portion of the body and the feet of the Sphinx. Its chest was processed as fish flakes. Parallel lines on its wings draw attention.  <br />
<br />
On a white background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel from Water Gate Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
 A portion of the body and the feet of the Sphinx. Its chest was processed as fish flakes. Parallel lines on its wings draw attention.<br />
<br />
On a black background.
  • Picture & image of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel from Water Gate Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
 A portion of the body and the feet of the Sphinx. Its chest was processed as fish flakes. Parallel lines on its wings draw attention.  <br />
<br />
On a gray background.
  • Photo of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel from Water Gate Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
 A portion of the body and the feet of the Sphinx. Its chest was processed as fish flakes. Parallel lines on its wings draw attention.  <br />
<br />
On a brown art background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel from Water Gate Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
 A portion of the body and the feet of the Sphinx. Its chest was processed as fish flakes. Parallel lines on its wings draw attention.  <br />
<br />
On a grey art background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Procession. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Goddess Kubaba. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Procession for. There are four figures on the other face of the orthostat. The leftmost figure plays a pipe, while the other three figures play the drums. All of the figures have long skirts and same body heights.  <br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Procession. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Goddess Kubaba. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Procession for. There are four figures on the other face of the orthostat. The leftmost figure plays a pipe, while the other three figures play the drums. All of the figures have long skirts and same body heights.  <br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Photo of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Procession. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Goddess Kubaba. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Procession for. There are four figures on the other face of the orthostat. The leftmost figure plays a pipe, while the other three figures play the drums. All of the figures have long skirts and same body heights.  <br />
<br />
Against a brown art background.
  • Picture & image of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Procession. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Goddess Kubaba. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Procession for. There are four figures on the other face of the orthostat. The leftmost figure plays a pipe, while the other three figures play the drums. All of the figures have long skirts and same body heights.  <br />
<br />
Against a gray background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Procession. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Goddess Kubaba. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Procession for. There are four figures on the other face of the orthostat. The leftmost figure plays a pipe, while the other three figures play the drums. All of the figures have long skirts and same body heights.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Herald's Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Bird-headed, winged figures of human body. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
These figures are called as "Winged Griffin Demons". Embossing is constructed symmetrically. Their hands are on their heads. It is assumed that they carry the heavens.
  • Picture & image of Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Herald's Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Bird-headed, winged figures of human body. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
These figures are called as "Winged Griffin Demons". Embossing is constructed symmetrically. Their hands are on their heads. It is assumed that they carry the heavens. <br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Photo of Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Herald's Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Bird-headed, winged figures of human body. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
These figures are called as "Winged Griffin Demons". Embossing is constructed symmetrically. Their hands are on their heads. It is assumed that they carry the heavens. <br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Herald's Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Bird-headed, winged figures of human body. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
These figures are called as "Winged Griffin Demons". Embossing is constructed symmetrically. Their hands are on their heads. It is assumed that they carry the heavens. <br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Herald's Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Bird-headed, winged figures of human body. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
These figures are called as "Winged Griffin Demons". Embossing is constructed symmetrically. Their hands are on their heads. It is assumed that they carry the heavens. <br />
<br />
Against a brown art background.
  • Picture & image of Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Herald's Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Bird-headed, winged figures of human body. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
These figures are called as "Winged Griffin Demons". Embossing is constructed symmetrically. Their hands are on their heads. It is assumed that they carry the heavens. <br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Photo of Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Herald's Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Bird-headed, winged figures of human body. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
These figures are called as "Winged Griffin Demons". Embossing is constructed symmetrically. Their hands are on their heads. It is assumed that they carry the heavens. <br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Herald's Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Bird-headed, winged figures of human body. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
These figures are called as "Winged Griffin Demons". Embossing is constructed symmetrically. Their hands are on their heads. It is assumed that they carry the heavens.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Herald's Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Bird-headed, winged figures of human body. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
These figures are called as "Winged Griffin Demons". Embossing is constructed symmetrically. Their hands are on their heads. It is assumed that they carry the heavens. <br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Herald's Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Bird-headed, winged figures of human body. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
These figures are called as "Winged Griffin Demons". Embossing is constructed symmetrically. Their hands are on their heads. It is assumed that they carry the heavens. <br />
<br />
Against a brown art background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Herald's Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Bird-headed, winged figures of human body. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
These figures are called as "Winged Griffin Demons". Embossing is constructed symmetrically. Their hands are on their heads. It is assumed that they carry the heavens.
  • Picture & image of Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Herald's Wall. Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the left is a winged mixed creature with a human head and body who has a scorpion tail and bird legs; on the right is a human-like god. The figures fight with a winged bull standing on its hind legs. The scorpion-man is known as Girtablull.<br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Photo of Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Herald's Wall. Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the left is a winged mixed creature with a human head and body who has a scorpion tail and bird legs; on the right is a human-like god. The figures fight with a winged bull standing on its hind legs. The scorpion-man is known as Girtablull. <br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Herald's Wall. Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the left is a winged mixed creature with a human head and body who has a scorpion tail and bird legs; on the right is a human-like god. The figures fight with a winged bull standing on its hind legs. The scorpion-man is known as Girtablull. <br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Herald's Wall. Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the left is a winged mixed creature with a human head and body who has a scorpion tail and bird legs; on the right is a human-like god. The figures fight with a winged bull standing on its hind legs. The scorpion-man is known as Girtablull.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Herald's Wall. Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the left is a winged mixed creature with a human head and body who has a scorpion tail and bird legs; on the right is a human-like god. The figures fight with a winged bull standing on its hind legs. The scorpion-man is known as Girtablull. <br />
<br />
Against a brown art background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted stone panel. Lion. Aslantepe Gate Limestone, Aslantepe, Malatya, 1200-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
The lion on the left of the two lions at the gate of the palace. His head and his front part were processed as high embossing and his body as regular embossing. The signs behind the lion and over his tail read; "Halposulupis, Mighty (?) King".<br />
<br />
Against a brown art background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted stone panel. Lion. Aslantepe Gate Limestone, Aslantepe, Malatya, 1200-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The lion on the left of the two lions at the gate of the palace. His head and his front part were processed as high embossing and his body as regular embossing. The signs behind the lion and over his tail read; "Halposulupis, Mighty (?) King".<br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted stone panel. Lion. Aslantepe Gate Limestone, Aslantepe, Malatya, 1200-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The lion on the left of the two lions at the gate of the palace. His head and his front part were processed as high embossing and his body as regular embossing. The signs behind the lion and over his tail read; "Halposulupis, Mighty (?) King".<br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted stone panel. Lion. Aslantepe Gate Limestone, Aslantepe, Malatya, 1200-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The lion on the left of the two lions at the gate of the palace. His head and his front part were processed as high embossing and his body as regular embossing. The signs behind the lion and over his tail read; "Halposulupis, Mighty (?) King".<br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted stone panel. Lion. Aslantepe Gate Limestone, Aslantepe, Malatya, 1200-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The lion on the left of the two lions at the gate of the palace. His head and his front part were processed as high embossing and his body as regular embossing. The signs behind the lion and over his tail read; "Halposulupis, Mighty (?) King".<br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted stone panel. Lion. Aslantepe Gate Limestone, Aslantepe, Malatya, 1200-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The lion on the left of the two lions at the gate of the palace. His head and his front part were processed as high embossing and his body as regular embossing. The signs behind the lion and over his tail read; "Halposulupis, Mighty (?) King".<br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted stone panel. Lion. Aslantepe Gate Limestone, Aslantepe, Malatya, 1200-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The lion on the left of the two lions at the gate of the palace. His head and his front part were processed as high embossing and his body as regular embossing. The signs behind the lion and over his tail read; "Halposulupis, Mighty (?) King".<br />
<br />
Against a gray background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted stone panel. Lion. Aslantepe Gate Limestone, Aslantepe, Malatya, 1200-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The lion on the left of the two lions at the gate of the palace. His head and his front part were processed as high embossing and his body as regular embossing. The signs behind the lion and over his tail read; "Halposulupis, Mighty (?) King".<br />
<br />
Against a brown art background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted stone panel. Lion. Aslantepe Gate Limestone, Aslantepe, Malatya, 1200-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The lion on the left of the two lions at the gate of the palace. His head and his front part were processed as high embossing and his body as regular embossing. The signs behind the lion and over his tail read; "Halposulupis, Mighty (?) King".<br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Roman relief decorated garland osthotek cremation container, 2nd century AD. An ostothec is used to preserve the ashes and bones of the dead bodies after their cremation, takes its form from a small sarcophagus. This ostothec is a miniature example of the garland sarcophagus. Adana Archaeology Museum, Turkey. Against a white background
  • Roman relief decorated garland osthotek cremation container, 2nd century AD. An ostothec is used to preserve the ashes and bones of the dead bodies after their cremation, takes its form from a small sarcophagus. This ostothec is a miniature example of the garland sarcophagus. Adana Archaeology Museum, Turkey. Against a black background
  • Roman relief decorated garland osthotek cremation container, 2nd century AD. An ostothec is used to preserve the ashes and bones of the dead bodies after their cremation, takes its form from a small sarcophagus. This ostothec is a miniature example of the garland sarcophagus. Adana Archaeology Museum, Turkey. Against a grey background
  • Roman relief decorated garland osthotek cremation container, 2nd century AD. An ostothec is used to preserve the ashes and bones of the dead bodies after their cremation, takes its form from a small sarcophagus. This ostothec is a miniature example of the garland sarcophagus. Adana Archaeology Museum, Turkey
  • Roman relief decorated garland osthotek cremation container, 2nd century AD. An ostothec is used to preserve the ashes and bones of the dead bodies after their cremation, takes its form from a small sarcophagus. This ostothec is a miniature example of the garland sarcophagus. Adana Archaeology Museum, Turkey. Against a warm art background
  • Roman relief decorated garland osthotek cremation container, 2nd century AD. An ostothec is used to preserve the ashes and bones of the dead bodies after their cremation, takes its form from a small sarcophagus. This ostothec is a miniature example of the garland sarcophagus. Adana Archaeology Museum, Turkey. Against a white background
  • Roman relief decorated garland osthotek cremation container, 2nd century AD. An ostothec is used to preserve the ashes and bones of the dead bodies after their cremation, takes its form from a small sarcophagus. This ostothec is a miniature example of the garland sarcophagus. Adana Archaeology Museum, Turkey. Against a black background
  • Roman relief decorated garland osthotek cremation container, 2nd century AD. An ostothec is used to preserve the ashes and bones of the dead bodies after their cremation, takes its form from a small sarcophagus. This ostothec is a miniature example of the garland sarcophagus. Adana Archaeology Museum, Turkey. Against a grey background
  • Roman relief decorated garland osthotek cremation container, 2nd century AD. An ostothec is used to preserve the ashes and bones of the dead bodies after their cremation, takes its form from a small sarcophagus. This ostothec is a miniature example of the garland sarcophagus. Adana Archaeology Museum, Turkey. Against a warm art background
  • Roman relief sculpted Ostothec cremation sarcophagus, 2nd century AD, Perge. An ostothec is used to preserve the ashes and bones of the dead bodies after their cremation, takes its form from a small sarcophagus. This ostothec is a miniature example of the garland sarcophagus. Antalya Archaeology Museum, Turkey. Against a white background.
  • Roman relief sculpted Ostothec cremation sarcophagus, 2nd century AD, Perge. An ostothec is used to preserve the ashes and bones of the dead bodies after their cremation, takes its form from a small sarcophagus. This ostothec is a miniature example of the garland sarcophagus. Antalya Archaeology Museum, Turkey.  Against a black background.
  • Roman relief sculpted Ostothec cremation sarcophagus, 2nd century AD, Perge. An ostothec is used to preserve the ashes and bones of the dead bodies after their cremation, takes its form from a small sarcophagus. This ostothec is a miniature example of the garland sarcophagus. Antalya Archaeology Museum, Turkey
  • Roman relief sculpted Ostothec cremation sarcophagus, 2nd century AD, Perge. An ostothec is used to preserve the ashes and bones of the dead bodies after their cremation, takes its form from a small sarcophagus. This ostothec is a miniature example of the garland sarcophagus. Antalya Archaeology Museum, Turkey. Against a white background.
  • Roman relief sculpted Ostothec cremation sarcophagus, 2nd century AD, Perge. An ostothec is used to preserve the ashes and bones of the dead bodies after their cremation, takes its form from a small sarcophagus. This ostothec is a miniature example of the garland sarcophagus. Antalya Archaeology Museum, Turkey.  Against a black background.
  • Roman relief sculpted Ostothec cremation sarcophagus, 2nd century AD, Perge. An ostothec is used to preserve the ashes and bones of the dead bodies after their cremation, takes its form from a small sarcophagus. This ostothec is a miniature example of the garland sarcophagus. Antalya Archaeology Museum, Turkey. Against a grey background.. Against a warm art background.
  • Roman relief sculpted Ostothec cremation sarcophagus, 2nd century AD, Perge. An ostothec is used to preserve the ashes and bones of the dead bodies after their cremation, takes its form from a small sarcophagus. This ostothec is a miniature example of the garland sarcophagus. Antalya Archaeology Museum, Turkey
  • Roman relief sculpted Ostothec cremation sarcophagus, 2nd century AD, Perge. An ostothec is used to preserve the ashes and bones of the dead bodies after their cremation, takes its form from a small sarcophagus. This ostothec is a miniature example of the garland sarcophagus. Antalya Archaeology Museum, Turkey
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Water Gate. Basalt, 900 - 700 BC. Anatolian Civilisations Museum. Ankara. Turkey.<br />
<br />
Fragment of Two bull men holding the trunk of the tree in the middle. The faces of the figures, having tufts in both temples over the chain, have been depicted from the front direction. The horned figures with bull like ears and legs have human bodies. <br />
<br />
On a white background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel from Water Gate Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C.  Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Two bull-men holding the trunk of the tree in the middle. The faces of the figures, having tufts in both temples over the chain, have been depicted from the front direction. The horned figures with bull-like ears and legs have human bodies. <br />
<br />
On a white background.
  • Picture & image of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Water Gate. Basalt, 900 - 700 BC. Anatolian Civilisations Museum. Ankara. Turkey.<br />
<br />
Fragment of Two bull men holding the trunk of the tree in the middle. The faces of the figures, having tufts in both temples over the chain, have been depicted from the front direction. The horned figures with bull like ears and legs have human bodies.<br />
<br />
On a gray background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Water Gate. Basalt, 900 - 700 BC. Anatolian Civilisations Museum. Ankara. Turkey.<br />
<br />
Fragment of Two bull men holding the trunk of the tree in the middle. The faces of the figures, having tufts in both temples over the chain, have been depicted from the front direction. The horned figures with bull like ears and legs have human bodies. <br />
<br />
On a black background.
  • Photo of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Water Gate. Basalt, 900 - 700 BC. Anatolian Civilisations Museum. Ankara. Turkey.<br />
<br />
Fragment of Two bull men holding the trunk of the tree in the middle. The faces of the figures, having tufts in both temples over the chain, have been depicted from the front direction. The horned figures with bull like ears and legs have human bodies. <br />
<br />
On a brown art background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Water Gate. Basalt, 900 - 700 BC. Anatolian Civilisations Museum. Ankara. Turkey.<br />
<br />
Fragment of Two bull men holding the trunk of the tree in the middle. The faces of the figures, having tufts in both temples over the chain, have been depicted from the front direction. The horned figures with bull like ears and legs have human bodies. <br />
<br />
On a grey art background.
  • Picture & image of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel from Water Gate Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C.  Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Two bull-men holding the trunk of the tree in the middle. The faces of the figures, having tufts in both temples over the chain, have been depicted from the front direction. The horned figures with bull-like ears and legs have human bodies. <br />
<br />
On a gray background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel from Water Gate Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C.  Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Two bull-men holding the trunk of the tree in the middle. The faces of the figures, having tufts in both temples over the chain, have been depicted from the front direction. The horned figures with bull-like ears and legs have human bodies. <br />
<br />
On a black background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel from Water Gate Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C.  Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Two bull-men holding the trunk of the tree in the middle. The faces of the figures, having tufts in both temples over the chain, have been depicted from the front direction. The horned figures with bull-like ears and legs have human bodies. <br />
<br />
On a grey art background.
  • Photo of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel from Water Gate Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C.  Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Two bull-men holding the trunk of the tree in the middle. The faces of the figures, having tufts in both temples over the chain, have been depicted from the front direction. The horned figures with bull-like ears and legs have human bodies. <br />
<br />
On a brown art background.
  • Picture of Neo-Hittite orthostat describing the legend of Gilgamesh from Karkamis,, Turkey. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Mythological scene. The 2 figures in the center are flanked by lion headed men who have one fist outstretched and are known as Ugallu. The 2 figures in the middle holding spears are men with bodies of bulls known as Kusarikku. 3
  • Picture of Neo-Hittite orthostat describing the legend of Gilgamesh from Karkamis,, Turkey. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Mythological scene. The 2 figures in the center are flanked by lion headed men who have one fist outstretched and are known as Ugallu. The 2 figures in the middle holding spears are men with bodies of bulls known as Kusarikku. 2
  • Picture of Neo-Hittite orthostat describing the legend of Gilgamesh from Karkamis,, Turkey. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Mythological scene. The 2 figures in the center are flanked by lion headed men who have one fist outstretched and are known as Ugallu. The 2 figures in the middle holding spears are men with bodies of bulls known as Kusarikku. 5
  • Picture of Neo-Hittite orthostat describing the legend of Gilgamesh from Karkamis,, Turkey. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Mythological scene. The 2 figures in the center are flanked by lion headed men who have one fist outstretched and are known as Ugallu. The 2 figures in the middle holding spears are men with bodies of bulls known as Kusarikku. 1
  • Roman relief decorated garland osthotec cremation container, 2nd century AD. An ostothec is used to preserve the ashes and bones of the dead bodies after their cremation, takes its form from a small sarcophagus. This ostothec is a miniature example of the garland sarcophagus. Adana Archaeology Museum, Turkey
  • Roman relief sculpted Ostothec cremation sarcophagus, 2nd century AD, Perge. An ostothec is used to preserve the ashes and bones of the dead bodies after their cremation, takes its form from a small sarcophagus. This ostothec is a miniature example of the garland sarcophagus. Antalya Archaeology Museum, Turkey
  • Roman relief sculpted Ostothec cremation sarcophagus, 2nd century AD, Perge. An ostothec is used to preserve the ashes and bones of the dead bodies after their cremation, takes its form from a small sarcophagus. This ostothec is a miniature example of the garland sarcophagus. Antalya Archaeology Museum, Turkey. Against a warm art background.
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 28 (similar style to No 44) - sculpture of a female exhibitionist known as a Sheela-na-gig. The sculpture shows a female with a huge round head and puny body with her hand holding open a grossly enlarged vulva. It seems unlikely that this image is of a pornographic nature because it is on a church, and is more likely a warning against the temptations of women. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 28 (similar style to No 44) - sculpture of a female exhibitionist known as a Sheela-na-gig. The sculpture shows a female with a huge round head and puny body with her hand holding open a grossly enlarged vulva. It seems unlikely that this image is of a pornographic nature because it is on a church, and is more likely a warning against the temptations of women. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Statue of Antinous - a 2nd century Roman sculpture in marble from Italy. The statue is a montage of a more modern head of Antinous with an older body in the style of Hercules. Inv No. MR 74 (Usual No Ma 2243), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Antinous - a 2nd century Roman sculpture in marble from Italy. The statue is a montage of a more modern head of Antinous with an older body in the style of Hercules. Inv No. MR 74 (Usual No Ma 2243), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Antinous - a 2nd century Roman sculpture in marble from Italy. The statue is a montage of a more modern head of Antinous with an older body in the style of Hercules. Inv No. MR 74 (Usual No Ma 2243), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Antinous - a 2nd century Roman sculpture in marble from Italy. The statue is a montage of a more modern head of Antinous with an older body in the style of Hercules. Inv No. MR 74 (Usual No Ma 2243), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • This 2nd to 3rd century Italian marble statue of Venus (Aphrodite) is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369)
  • This 2nd to 3rd century Italian marble statue of Venus (Aphrodite) is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369)
  • This 2nd to 3rd century Italian marble statue of Venus (Aphrodite) is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369)
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • This 2nd to 3rd century Italian marble statue of Venus (Aphrodite) is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369)
  • This 2nd to 3rd century Italian marble statue of Venus (Aphrodite) is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369)
  • This 2nd to 3rd century Italian marble statue of Venus (Aphrodite) is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369)
  • This 2nd to 3rd century Italian marble statue of Venus (Aphrodite) is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369)
  • This 2nd to 3rd century Italian marble statue of Venus (Aphrodite) is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369)
  • This 2nd to 3rd century Italian marble statue of Venus (Aphrodite) is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369)
  • Sculpture of Lapiths and  Centaurs battling from the Metope of the Parthenon on the Acropolis of Athens. South Metope no II. Also known as the Elgin marbles. British Museum London. The Lapith holds a Centaur by the throat. The diagnal of the Lapiths body across the Centaur is often used in Greek Classical art to depict strife.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • This 2nd to 3rd century Italian marble statue of Venus (Aphrodite) is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369)
  • This 2nd to 3rd century Italian marble statue of Venus (Aphrodite) is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369)
  • This 2nd to 3rd century Italian marble statue of Venus (Aphrodite) is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369)
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Sculpture of Lapiths and  Centaurs battling from the Metope of the Parthenon on the Acropolis of Athens. South Metope no II. Also known as the Elgin marbles. British Museum London. The Lapith holds a Centaur by the throat. The diagnal of the Lapiths body across the Centaur is often used in Greek Classical art to depict strife.
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 28 (similar style to No 44) - sculpture of a female exhibitionist known as a Sheela-na-gig. The sculpture shows a female with a huge round head and puny body with her hand holding open a grossly enlarged vulva. It seems unlikely that this image is of a pornographic nature because it is on a church, and is more likely a warning against the temptations of women. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 28 (similar style to No 44) - sculpture of a female exhibitionist known as a Sheela-na-gig. The sculpture shows a female with a huge round head and puny body with her hand holding open a grossly enlarged vulva. It seems unlikely that this image is of a pornographic nature because it is on a church, and is more likely a warning against the temptations of women. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 28 (similar style to No 44) - sculpture of a female exhibitionist known as a Sheela-na-gig. The sculpture shows a female with a huge round head and puny body with her hand holding open a grossly enlarged vulva. It seems unlikely that this image is of a pornographic nature because it is on a church, and is more likely a warning against the temptations of women. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Statue of Antinous - a 2nd century Roman sculpture in marble from Italy. The statue is a montage of a more modern head of Antinous with an older body in the style of Hercules. Inv No. MR 74 (Usual No Ma 2243), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Antinous - a 2nd century Roman sculpture in marble from Italy. The statue is a montage of a more modern head of Antinous with an older body in the style of Hercules. Inv No. MR 74 (Usual No Ma 2243), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Antinous - a 2nd century Roman sculpture in marble from Italy. The statue is a montage of a more modern head of Antinous with an older body in the style of Hercules. Inv No. MR 74 (Usual No Ma 2243), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Antinous - a 2nd century Roman sculpture in marble from Italy. The statue is a montage of a more modern head of Antinous with an older body in the style of Hercules. Inv No. MR 74 (Usual No Ma 2243), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Antinous - a 2nd century Roman sculpture in marble from Italy. The statue is a montage of a more modern head of Antinous with an older body in the style of Hercules. Inv No. MR 74 (Usual No Ma 2243), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • This 2nd to 3rd century Italian marble statue of Venus (Aphrodite) is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369)
  • This 2nd to 3rd century Italian marble statue of Venus (Aphrodite) is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369)
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 28 (similar style to No 44) - sculpture of a female exhibitionist known as a Sheela-na-gig. The sculpture shows a female with a huge round head and puny body with her hand holding open a grossly enlarged vulva. It seems unlikely that this image is of a pornographic nature because it is on a church, and is more likely a warning against the temptations of women. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Statue of Antinous - a 2nd century Roman sculpture in marble from Italy. The statue is a montage of a more modern head of Antinous with an older body in the style of Hercules. Inv No. MR 74 (Usual No Ma 2243), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • This 2nd to 3rd century Italian marble statue of Venus (Aphrodite) is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369)
  • This 2nd to 3rd century Italian marble statue of Venus (Aphrodite) is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369)
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 50  -  sculpture of.a curious scene. A beaked headed creature holds down a man below its body and is pushing its beak into the mans mouth, The beaked creature seems to be holding something in its right hand which it is eating The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Satatue known as the Sitting captive - a Roman sculpture of the 1st or 2nd century SAD made out of  Green Breche stone from the Wadi Hammamat, Egypt. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The body can be dated  to the 1st century AD and is probably from the near east. The recomposed statue , named the defeated barbarian king, was the centre piece of a room in the Villa Albani (1692-1779) in Rome.  The Albani Collection, Inv No. LL 17 or Ma 1383, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 35  -  sculpture of.a curious scene. A beaked headed creature holds down a man below its body and is pushing its beak into the mans mouth, The beaked creature seems to be holding something in its right hand which it is eating The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Satatue known as the Sitting captive - a Roman sculpture of the 1st or 2nd century SAD made out of  Green Breche stone from the Wadi Hammamat, Egypt. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The body can be dated  to the 1st century AD and is probably from the near east. The recomposed statue , named the defeated barbarian king, was the centre piece of a room in the Villa Albani (1692-1779) in Rome.  The Albani Collection, Inv No. LL 17 or Ma 1383, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 50  -  sculpture of.a curious scene. A beaked headed creature holds down a man below its body and is pushing its beak into the mans mouth, The beaked creature seems to be holding something in its right hand which it is eating The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 35  -  sculpture of.a curious scene. A beaked headed creature holds down a man below its body and is pushing its beak into the mans mouth, The beaked creature seems to be holding something in its right hand which it is eating The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 35  -  sculpture of.a curious scene. A beaked headed creature holds down a man below its body and is pushing its beak into the mans mouth, The beaked creature seems to be holding something in its right hand which it is eating The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Satatue known as the Sitting captive - a Roman sculpture of the 1st or 2nd century SAD made out of  Green Breche stone from the Wadi Hammamat, Egypt. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The body can be dated  to the 1st century AD and is probably from the near east. The recomposed statue , named the defeated barbarian king, was the centre piece of a room in the Villa Albani (1692-1779) in Rome.  The Albani Collection, Inv No. LL 17 or Ma 1383, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Satatue known as the Sitting captive - a Roman sculpture of the 1st or 2nd century SAD made out of  Green Breche stone from the Wadi Hammamat, Egypt. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The body can be dated  to the 1st century AD and is probably from the near east. The recomposed statue , named the defeated barbarian king, was the centre piece of a room in the Villa Albani (1692-1779) in Rome.  The Albani Collection, Inv No. LL 17 or Ma 1383, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Satatue known as the Sitting captive - a Roman sculpture of the 1st or 2nd century SAD made out of  Green Breche stone from the Wadi Hammamat, Egypt. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The body can be dated  to the 1st century AD and is probably from the near east. The recomposed statue , named the defeated barbarian king, was the centre piece of a room in the Villa Albani (1692-1779) in Rome.  The Albani Collection, Inv No. LL 17 or Ma 1383, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Satatue known as the Sitting captive - a Roman sculpture of the 1st or 2nd century SAD made out of  Green Breche stone from the Wadi Hammamat, Egypt. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The body can be dated  to the 1st century AD and is probably from the near east. The recomposed statue , named the defeated barbarian king, was the centre piece of a room in the Villa Albani (1692-1779) in Rome.  The Albani Collection, Inv No. LL 17 or Ma 1383, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 50  -  sculpture of.a curious scene. A beaked headed creature holds down a man below its body and is pushing its beak into the mans mouth, The beaked creature seems to be holding something in its right hand which it is eating The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 35  -  sculpture of.a curious scene. A beaked headed creature holds down a man below its body and is pushing its beak into the mans mouth, The beaked creature seems to be holding something in its right hand which it is eating The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 50  -  sculpture of.a curious scene. A beaked headed creature holds down a man below its body and is pushing its beak into the mans mouth, The beaked creature seems to be holding something in its right hand which it is eating The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy

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