• The early renaissance clock tower of Torre dell' Orologio, San Marco district, Venice, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Venetia, Italy, Europe
  • The early renaissance clock tower of Torre dell' Orologio, San Marco district, Venice, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Venetia, Italy, Europe
  • The early renaissance clock tower of Torre dell' Orologio, San Marco district, Venice, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Venetia, Italy, Europe
  • The early renaissance clock tower of Torre dell' Orologio, San Marco district, Venice, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Venetia, Italy, Europe
  • The early renaissance clock tower of Torre dell' Orologio, San Marco district, Venice, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Venetia, Italy, Europe
  • The early renaissance clock tower of Torre dell' Orologio, San Marco district, Venice, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Venetia, Italy, Europe
  • The early renaissance clock tower of Torre dell' Orologio, San Marco district, Venice, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Venetia, Italy, Europe
  • The early renaissance clock tower of Torre dell' Orologio, San Marco district, Venice, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Venetia, Italy, Europe
  • The early renaissance clock tower of Torre dell' Orologio, San Marco district, Venice, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Venetia, Italy, Europe
  • The early renaissance clock tower of Torre dell' Orologio, San Marco district, Venice, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Venetia, Italy, Europe
  • The early renaissance clock tower of Torre dell' Orologio, San Marco district, Venice, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Venetia, Italy, Europe
  • The early renaissance clock tower of Torre dell' Orologio, San Marco district, Venice, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Venetia, Italy, Europe
  • The early renaissance clock tower of Torre dell' Orologio, San Marco district, Venice, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Venetia, Italy, Europe
  • The early renaissance clock tower of Torre dell' Orologio, San Marco district, Venice, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Venetia, Italy, Europe
  • The early renaissance clock tower of Torre dell' Orologio, San Marco district, Venice, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Venetia, Italy, Europe
  • The early renaissance clock tower of Torre dell' Orologio, San Marco district, Venice, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Venetia, Italy, Europe
  • The early renaissance clock tower of Torre dell' Orologio, San Marco district, Venice, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Venetia, Italy, Europe
  • Close up of the clock face on the The Bell Tower - Saint Mark's Square  - Venice Italy
  • Close up of the clock face on the The Bell Tower - Saint Mark's Square  - Venice Italy
  • Close up of the clock face on the The Bell Tower - Saint Mark's Square  - Venice Italy
  • Close up of the clock face on the The Bell Tower - Saint Mark's Square  - Venice Italy
  • The early renaissance clock tower of Torre dell' Orologio, San Marco district, Venice, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Venetia, Italy, Europe
  • The early renaissance clock tower of Torre dell' Orologio, San Marco district, Venice, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Venetia, Italy, Europe
  • The early renaissance clock tower of Torre dell' Orologio, San Marco district, Venice, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Venetia, Italy, Europe
  • Close up of the clock face on the The Bell Tower - Saint Mark's Square  - Venice Italy
  • Wood Church of  the orthodox  Cuvioasa Paraschiva , Poienile Izei, Maramures, Northern Transylvania, Romania. Romania. UNESCO World Heritage Site.  The Church of the Holy Parasceve (Poienile Izei) is one of the oldest of the wooden churches of Maramure? (1604), and reveals two phases in the development of such buildings. The first can be seen in the lower part of the walls with a sanctuary based on a square plan, a typical feature of the oldest wooden buildings. In the 18th century, the walls were raised, the naos was covered by a semi-circular vault, and the interior was decorated with paintings. The portico was added during the first half of the 19th century.
  • Ancient violin shaped schematic figure from the Pelos phase,  'Kusura type', probably from Asia Minor. Early Cycladic period I 3200-2800 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Cat no 961.  Against white.
  • Ancient violin shaped schematic figure from the Pelos phase,  'Kusura type', probably from Asia Minor. Early Cycladic period I 3200-2800 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Cat no 961.   Against black
  • Ancient violin shaped schematic figure from the Pelos phase,  'Kusura type', probably from Asia Minor. Early Cycladic period I 3200-2800 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Cat no 961. Grey Background.
  • Ancient violin shaped schematic figure from the Pelos phase,  'Kusura type', probably from Asia Minor. Early Cycladic period I 3200-2800 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Cat no 961
  • Ancient violin shaped schematic figure from the Pelos phase,  'Kusura type', probably from Asia Minor. Early Cycladic period I 3200-2800 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Cat no 961. Grey Background.
  • Ancient spade shaped schematic figure from the Pelos phase,   probably from Asia Minor. Early Cycladic period I 3200-2800 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Cat no 333.  Against white.
  • Ancient spade shaped schematic figure from the Pelos phase,   probably from Asia Minor. Early Cycladic period I 3200-2800 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Cat no 333. Grey Background.
  • Ancient spade shaped schematic figure from the Pelos phase,   probably from Asia Minor. Early Cycladic period I 3200-2800 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Cat no 333
  • Ancient spade shaped schematic figure from the Pelos phase,   probably from Asia Minor. Early Cycladic period I 3200-2800 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Cat no 333
  • Ancient spade shaped schematic figure from the Pelos phase,   probably from Asia Minor. Early Cycladic period I 3200-2800 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Cat no 333. Grey Background.
  • Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase , (2800-2300 BC). Attributed to the 'Copenhagen Master' Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against white.<br />
<br />
The short legs have no knees and end in rudimentary feet. The legs probably broke at the knees and an artists remodelled  the truncated legs with toes. It is a rare example of remodelling in Cycladic art
  • Cycladic statue figurine of the naturalistic 'Plastira' type of Paros from Glypha cemetery, grave 23, Cat no 4762. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   White background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This type of Cycladic figurine stand with feet lat to the ground with detailed facial features and ears to make a more realistic statue.
  • Cycladic statue figurine of the naturalistic 'Plastira' type of Paros from Glypha cemetery, grave 23, Cat no 4762. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Black background.<br />
<br />
This type of Cycladic figurine stand with feet lat to the ground with detailed facial features and ears to make a more realistic statue.
  • Cycladic statue figurine of the naturalistic 'Plastira' type of Paros from Glypha cemetery, grave 23, Cat no 4762. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens. <br />
<br />
This type of Cycladic figurine stand with feet lat to the ground with detailed facial features and ears to make a more realistic statue.
  • Cycladic statue figurine of the naturalistic 'Plastira' type of Paros from Glypha cemetery, grave 23, Cat no 4762. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens. <br />
<br />
This type of Cycladic figurine stand with feet lat to the ground with detailed facial features and ears to make a more realistic statue.
  • Cycladic statue figurine of the naturalistic 'Plastira' type of Paros from Glypha cemetery, grave 23, Cat no 4762. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Gray background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This type of Cycladic figurine stand with feet lat to the ground with detailed facial features and ears to make a more realistic statue.
  • Cycladic statue figurine of the naturalistic 'Plastira' type of Paros. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   White background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This type of Cycladic figurine stand with feet lat to the ground with detailed facial features and ears to make a more realistic statue.
  • Cycladic statue figurine of the naturalistic 'Plastira' type of Paros. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Black background.<br />
<br />
This type of Cycladic figurine stand with feet lat to the ground with detailed facial features and ears to make a more realistic statue.
  • Cycladic statue figurine of the naturalistic 'Plastira' type of Paros. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Grey background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This type of Cycladic figurine stand with feet lat to the ground with detailed facial features and ears to make a more realistic statue.
  • Cycladic statue figurine of the naturalistic 'Plastira' type of Paros. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens. <br />
<br />
This type of Cycladic figurine stand with feet lat to the ground with detailed facial features and ears to make a more realistic statue.
  • Cycladic statue figurine of the naturalistic 'Plastira' type of Paros. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Gray background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This type of Cycladic figurine stand with feet lat to the ground with detailed facial features and ears to make a more realistic statue.
  • Cycladic statue figurine of the naturalistic 'Plastira' type of Paros. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   White background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This type of Cycladic figurine stand with feet lat to the ground with detailed facial features and ears to make a more realistic statue. This statue is of a hunter or warrior as it bears an incised weapon strap across its chest and holds a knife.
  • Cycladic statue figurine of the naturalistic 'Plastira' type of Paros. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Black background.<br />
This type of Cycladic figurine stand with feet lat to the ground with detailed facial features and ears to make a more realistic statue. This statue is of a hunter or warrior as it bears an incised weapon strap across its chest and holds a knife.
  • Cycladic statue figurine of the naturalistic 'Plastira' type of Paros. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Grey background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This type of Cycladic figurine stand with feet lat to the ground with detailed facial features and ears to make a more realistic statue. This statue is of a hunter or warrior as it bears an incised weapon strap across its chest and holds a knife.
  • Cycladic statue figurine of the naturalistic 'Plastira' type of Paros. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens. <br />
<br />
This type of Cycladic figurine stand with feet lat to the ground with detailed facial features and ears to make a more realistic statue. This statue is of a hunter or warrior as it bears an incised weapon strap across its chest and holds a knife.
  • Cycladic statue figurine of the naturalistic 'Plastira' type of Paros. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Gray background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This type of Cycladic figurine stand with feet lat to the ground with detailed facial features and ears to make a more realistic statue. This statue is of a hunter or warrior as it bears an incised weapon strap across its chest and holds a knife.
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic statue torso fragment: Canonical spedos variety , Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase 2800-2300 BC. Cycladic Museum of Art, Athens.   Against black<br />
<br />
Arrtibuted to 'Goulandris Master'.  A very rare unique example of a canonical Spedos variety Cycladic statue of a male. The genetals are carved in the round in a naturalistic manner and unusually the forearms dont touch as in the female figures. This is a totaly unique example of a Cycladic canonical male figure of monumental dimensions.
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic statue torso fragment: Canonical spedos variety , Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase 2800-2300 BC. Cycladic Museum of Art, Athens. Female figurine statuette : Cycladic Canonical type, Kapsala variety. Against white.<br />
<br />
Arrtibuted to 'Goulandris Master'.  A very rare unique example of a canonical Spedos variety Cycladic statue of a male. The genetals are carved in the round in a naturalistic manner and unusually the forearms dont touch as in the female figures. This is a totaly unique example of a Cycladic canonical male figure of monumental dimensions.
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic statue torso fragment: Canonical spedos variety , Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase 2800-2300 BC. Cycladic Museum of Art, Athens.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
Arrtibuted to 'Goulandris Master'.  A very rare unique example of a canonical Spedos variety Cycladic statue of a male. The genetals are carved in the round in a naturalistic manner and unusually the forearms dont touch as in the female figures. This is a totaly unique example of a Cycladic canonical male figure of monumental dimensions.
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic statue torso fragment: Canonical spedos variety , Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase 2800-2300 BC. Cycladic Museum of Art, Athens. <br />
<br />
Arrtibuted to 'Goulandris Master'.  A very rare unique example of a canonical Spedos variety Cycladic statue of a male. The genetals are carved in the round in a naturalistic manner and unusually the forearms dont touch as in the female figures. This is a totaly unique example of a Cycladic canonical male figure of monumental dimensions.
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic statue torso fragment: Canonical spedos variety , Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase 2800-2300 BC. Cycladic Museum of Art, Athens.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
Arrtibuted to 'Goulandris Master'.  A very rare unique example of a canonical Spedos variety Cycladic statue of a male. The genetals are carved in the round in a naturalistic manner and unusually the forearms dont touch as in the female figures. This is a totaly unique example of a Cycladic canonical male figure of monumental dimensions.
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic female figurine of the canonical type, Dokathismata and Spedos variety, Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase, 2800-2300 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens. Grey Background. <br />
<br />
Considered to be an intermediate or transitional form between the Dokathismata and Spedos varieties/
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic female figurine of the canonical type, Dokathismata and Spedos variety, Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase, 2800-2300 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens. Against white.<br />
<br />
Considered to be an intermediate or transitional form between the Dokathismata and Spedos varieties/
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic female figurine of the canonical type, Dokathismata and Spedos variety, Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase, 2800-2300 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens.   Against black<br />
<br />
Considered to be an intermediate or transitional form between the Dokathismata and Spedos varieties/
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic female figurine of the canonical type, Dokathismata and Spedos variety, Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase, 2800-2300 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens. Grey Background. <br />
<br />
Considered to be an intermediate or transitional form between the Dokathismata and Spedos varieties/
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic female figurine of the canonical type, Dokathismata and Spedos variety, Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase, 2800-2300 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens.<br />
<br />
Considered to be an intermediate or transitional form between the Dokathismata and Spedos varieties/
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic female figurine of the canonical type, Dokathismata variety, Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase, 2800-2300 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens. Against white.<br />
<br />
Attributed to the 'Ashmolean Museum Master'
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic female figurine of the canonical type, Dokathismata variety, Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase, 2800-2300 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens. Grey Background. <br />
<br />
Attributed to the 'Ashmolean Museum Master'
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic female figurine of the canonical type, Dokathismata variety, Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase, 2800-2300 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens.<br />
<br />
Attributed to the 'Ashmolean Museum Master'
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic female figurine of the canonical type, Dokathismata variety, Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase, 2800-2300 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens.  Against black<br />
<br />
Attributed to the 'Ashmolean Museum Master'
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic female figurine of the canonical type, Dokathismata variety, Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase, 2800-2300 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens. Grey Background. <br />
<br />
Attributed to the 'Ashmolean Museum Master'
  • Cycladic Post Canonical type, Chalandrian variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II Late Syros phase, (2500-2300 BC), Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 102.  Against white.
  • Cycladic Post Canonical type, Chalandrian variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II Late Syros phase, (2500-2300 BC), Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 102.   Against black
  • Cycladic Post Canonical type, Chalandrian variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II Late Syros phase, (2500-2300 BC), Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 102.  Against Grey Background.
  • Cycladic Post Canonical type, Chalandrian variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II Late Syros phase, (2500-2300 BC), Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 102
  • Cycladic Post Canonical type, Chalandrian variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II Late Syros phase, (2500-2300 BC), Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 102.  Against Grey Background.
  • Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase , (2800-2300 BC). Attributed to the 'Copenhagen Master' Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against Grey Background. <br />
<br />
The short legs have no knees and end in rudimentary feet. The legs probably broke at the knees and an artists remodelled  the truncated legs with toes. It is a rare example of remodelling in Cycladic art
  • Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase , (2800-2300 BC). Attributed to the 'Copenhagen Master' Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,   Against black<br />
<br />
The short legs have no knees and end in rudimentary feet. The legs probably broke at the knees and an artists remodelled  the truncated legs with toes. It is a rare example of remodelling in Cycladic art
  • Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase , (2800-2300 BC). Attributed to the 'Copenhagen Master' Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, <br />
<br />
The short legs have no knees and end in rudimentary feet. The legs probably broke at the knees and an artists remodelled  the truncated legs with toes. It is a rare example of remodelling in Cycladic art
  • Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase , (2800-2300 BC). Attributed to the 'Copenhagen Master' Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against Grey Background. <br />
<br />
The short legs have no knees and end in rudimentary feet. The legs probably broke at the knees and an artists remodelled  the truncated legs with toes. It is a rare example of remodelling in Cycladic art
  • Large Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine head. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase , (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 284.  Against white.
  • Large Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine head. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase , (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 284.   Against black
  • Large Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine head. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase , (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 284.  Against Grey Background.
  • Large Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine head. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase , (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 284
  • Large Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine head. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase , (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 284.  Against Grey Background.
  • Female Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase , (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against white.<br />
<br />
Traces of painted decoration in red were found on the face and trunk. The nose was painted completely and four verticle bands are visible in the forehead, three on the neck and traces of bands on the chest and oblique bands on the forearms, seven on the left four on the right.
  • Female Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase , (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against Grey Background. <br />
<br />
Traces of painted decoration in red were found on the face and trunk. The nose was painted completely and four verticle bands are visible in the forehead, three on the neck and traces of bands on the chest and oblique bands on the forearms, seven on the left four on the right.
  • Female Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase , (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against black<br />
<br />
Traces of painted decoration in red were found on the face and trunk. The nose was painted completely and four verticle bands are visible in the forehead, three on the neck and traces of bands on the chest and oblique bands on the forearms, seven on the left four on the right.
  • Female Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase , (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, <br />
<br />
Traces of painted decoration in red were found on the face and trunk. The nose was painted completely and four verticle bands are visible in the forehead, three on the neck and traces of bands on the chest and oblique bands on the forearms, seven on the left four on the right.
  • Female Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase , (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against Grey Background. <br />
<br />
Traces of painted decoration in red were found on the face and trunk. The nose was painted completely and four verticle bands are visible in the forehead, three on the neck and traces of bands on the chest and oblique bands on the forearms, seven on the left four on the right.
  • Large Female Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase , 1.4m high (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against Grey Background. <br />
<br />
This impressive Cycladic statue is distinguished by its clear outlines and perfect proportions as well as plasticity of form. A sense of movement is introduced into the staue by its left hip being raised and a slight inclination of the head to the right. This movement gives the statue an air of mysetery and makes it a precursor of the later Archaic statue forms. This sense of movement also sets this Cycladic statue apart from other of the period. It was probably a cult statue and stood at the shrine of a cult goddess.
  • Large Female Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase , 1.4m high (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against white.<br />
<br />
This impressive Cycladic statue is distinguished by its clear outlines and perfect proportions as well as plasticity of form. A sense of movement is introduced into the staue by its left hip being raised and a slight inclination of the head to the right. This movement gives the statue an air of mysetery and makes it a precursor of the later Archaic statue forms. This sense of movement also sets this Cycladic statue apart from other of the period. It was probably a cult statue and stood at the shrine of a cult goddess.
  • Large Female Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase , 1.4m high (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against Grey Background. <br />
<br />
This impressive Cycladic statue is distinguished by its clear outlines and perfect proportions as well as plasticity of form. A sense of movement is introduced into the staue by its left hip being raised and a slight inclination of the head to the right. This movement gives the statue an air of mysetery and makes it a precursor of the later Archaic statue forms. This sense of movement also sets this Cycladic statue apart from other of the period. It was probably a cult statue and stood at the shrine of a cult goddess.
  • Large Female Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase , 1.4m high (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, <br />
<br />
This impressive Cycladic statue is distinguished by its clear outlines and perfect proportions as well as plasticity of form. A sense of movement is introduced into the staue by its left hip being raised and a slight inclination of the head to the right. This movement gives the statue an air of mysetery and makes it a precursor of the later Archaic statue forms. This sense of movement also sets this Cycladic statue apart from other of the period. It was probably a cult statue and stood at the shrine of a cult goddess.
  • Large Female Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase , 1.4m high (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against black<br />
<br />
This impressive Cycladic statue is distinguished by its clear outlines and perfect proportions as well as plasticity of form. A sense of movement is introduced into the staue by its left hip being raised and a slight inclination of the head to the right. This movement gives the statue an air of mysetery and makes it a precursor of the later Archaic statue forms. This sense of movement also sets this Cycladic statue apart from other of the period. It was probably a cult statue and stood at the shrine of a cult goddess.
  • Female Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 282.  Against black
  • Female Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 282.  Against white.
  • Female Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 282.  Against Grey Background.
  • Female Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 282.  Against Grey Background.
  • Female Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 282
  • Female Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against white.<br />
<br />
The cycladic figurine has a band etched high on its forehead and a large area on the back of the head of spiralling curls. The surface has probably been protected by paint and the outline of the left eye paint is still detectable as a greyish tinge. It can be assumed that both hair and eyes were painted. Canonical type, Spedos variety
  • Female Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against black.<br />
<br />
The cycladic figurine has a band etched high on its forehead and a large area on the back of the head of spiralling curls. The surface has probably been protected by paint and the outline of the left eye paint is still detectable as a greyish tinge. It can be assumed that both hair and eyes were painted. Canonical type, Spedos variety
  • Female Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against Grey Background. <br />
<br />
The cycladic figurine has a band etched high on its forehead and a large area on the back of the head of spiralling curls. The surface has probably been protected by paint and the outline of the left eye paint is still detectable as a greyish tinge. It can be assumed that both hair and eyes were painted. Canonical type, Spedos variety
  • Female Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,<br />
<br />
The cycladic figurine has a band etched high on its forehead and a large area on the back of the head of spiralling curls. The surface has probably been protected by paint and the outline of the left eye paint is still detectable as a greyish tinge. It can be assumed that both hair and eyes were painted. Canonical type, Spedos variety
  • Female Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against Grey Background. <br />
<br />
The cycladic figurine has a band etched high on its forehead and a large area on the back of the head of spiralling curls. The surface has probably been protected by paint and the outline of the left eye paint is still detectable as a greyish tinge. It can be assumed that both hair and eyes were painted. Canonical type, Spedos variety
  • Cycladic violin shaped figurine. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   White background.
  • Cycladic violin shaped figurine. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Grey background.
  • Cycladic violin shaped figurine. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.
  • Cycladic violin shaped figurine. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Black background.
  • Cycladic violin shaped figurine. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   White background.
  • Cycladic violin shaped figurine. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Gray background.
  • Cycladic violin shaped figurine. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Black background.
  • Cycladic violin shaped figurine. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Grey background.
  • Cycladic violin shaped figurine. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.
  • Cycladic violin shaped figurine. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Gray background.
  • Cycladic violin shaped figurine. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800). National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Black background.<br />
<br />
This Cycladic violin shaped figurine has two holes in its neck which were provavly used to hold its broken neck together with wire or cord.
  • Cycladic violin shaped figurine. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   White background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This Cycladic violin shaped figurine has two holes in its neck which were provavly used to hold its broken neck together with wire or cord.
  • Cycladic violin shaped figurine. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Grey background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This Cycladic violin shaped figurine has two holes in its neck which were provavly used to hold its broken neck together with wire or cord.
  • Cycladic violin shaped figurine. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800). National Archaeological Museum, Athens. <br />
<br />
This Cycladic violin shaped figurine has two holes in its neck which were provavly used to hold its broken neck together with wire or cord.
  • Cycladic violin shaped figurine. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Gray background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This Cycladic violin shaped figurine has two holes in its neck which were provavly used to hold its broken neck together with wire or cord.
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval relief carved architectural panels from the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval relief carved architectural panels from the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval relief carved architectural panels from the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval relief carved architectural panels from the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval relief carved architectural panels from the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave tomb of the Church of the Dormition cave cemetery, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings of the Dormition of the Virgin, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings of the Dormition of the Virgin, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings of Queen Tamar & Giorgi III, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings of Queen Tamar & Giorgi III, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings of Queen Tamar & Giorgi III, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings of Queen Tamar & Giorgi III, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior frescoes, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition Georgian inscription over door, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition Georgian inscription over door, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave interior of the city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave interior of the city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave interior of the city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave interior of the city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave interior of the city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave interior of the city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave interior of the city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave interior of the city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • 16th century flamboyant gothic Astrological Clock in the choir screen  of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. The chancel screen includes, on the south side, an impressive astrological clock dating from the 16th century. It told not only the time but the day of the week, the month of the year, the time of sunrise and sunset, the phase of the moon and the current sign of the zodiac. Its inner works were partially destroyed in 1793.
  • 16th century flamboyant gothic Astrological Clock in the choir screen  of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. The chancel screen includes, on the south side, an impressive astrological clock dating from the 16th century. It told not only the time but the day of the week, the month of the year, the time of sunrise and sunset, the phase of the moon and the current sign of the zodiac. Its inner works were partially destroyed in 1793.
  • 16th century flamboyant gothic Astrological Clock in the choir screen  of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. The chancel screen includes, on the south side, an impressive astrological clock dating from the 16th century. It told not only the time but the day of the week, the month of the year, the time of sunrise and sunset, the phase of the moon and the current sign of the zodiac. Its inner works were partially destroyed in 1793.
  • 16th century flamboyant gothic Astrological Clock in the choir screen  of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. The chancel screen includes, on the south side, an impressive astrological clock dating from the 16th century. It told not only the time but the day of the week, the month of the year, the time of sunrise and sunset, the phase of the moon and the current sign of the zodiac. Its inner works were partially destroyed in 1793.
  • 16th century flamboyant gothic Astrological Clock in the choir screen  of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. The chancel screen includes, on the south side, an impressive astrological clock dating from the 16th century. It told not only the time but the day of the week, the month of the year, the time of sunrise and sunset, the phase of the moon and the current sign of the zodiac. Its inner works were partially destroyed in 1793.
  • 16th century flamboyant gothic Astrological Clock in the choir screen  of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. The chancel screen includes, on the south side, an impressive astrological clock dating from the 16th century. It told not only the time but the day of the week, the month of the year, the time of sunrise and sunset, the phase of the moon and the current sign of the zodiac. Its inner works were partially destroyed in 1793.

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Picture The Past

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FunkyStock Picture Library free resource for professional editorial picture editors, picture researchers, historical scholars and students and enthusiasts who want to browse some of the best pictures and images of historic countries, historical places, archaeological sites and the very best museum antiquities and artefacts exhibits in Europe and the Middle East.

Pictures and Images can be downloaded or bought as stock photos or photo art prints.

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Browse travel pictures and images of historic places and archaeological sites of countries in Europe and the Middle East.

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Browse pictures & images the treasured artefacts and antiquities exhibits from the great Museum of Europe and the Middle East. See the art and objects made by our ancestors.

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