• Whole Pine Nut kernals - Stock Photos
  • Whole Pine Nut kernals - Stock Photos
  • Whole fresh pines nuts
  • Whole fresh pines nuts
  • Whole fresh pines nuts
  • Classic risotto with pesto sauce
  • festive Christmas decorations.
  • Christmas tree made up of festive christmas gifts and santas
  • Oils and vinegars bottles with spice jars in a kitchen store cupboard
  • Classic risotto with pesto sauce
  • Classic risotto with pesto sauce
  • Classic risotto with pesto sauce
  • Classic risotto with pesto sauce
  • festive Christmas decorations red and nativity
  • Christmas star made up of father christmas and snowmen.
  • Christmas tree made up of festive christmas gifts and santas
  • Painted Domestic Pine in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia. <br />
<br />
Domestic pine: present in the mystery rites of Cybele, Attis and Dionysus. Laurel: sacred to Apollo, symbol of triumph, it recalls the famous prodigy associated with Livia Drusilla.
  • Painted Domestic Pine in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia. <br />
<br />
Domestic pine: present in the mystery rites of Cybele, Attis and Dionysus. Laurel: sacred to Apollo, symbol of triumph, it recalls the famous prodigy associated with Livia Drusilla.
  • Painted Domestic Pine in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia. <br />
<br />
Domestic pine: present in the mystery rites of Cybele, Attis and Dionysus. Laurel: sacred to Apollo, symbol of triumph, it recalls the famous prodigy associated with Livia Drusilla.
  • Painted Domestic Pine in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia. <br />
<br />
Domestic pine: present in the mystery rites of Cybele, Attis and Dionysus. Laurel: sacred to Apollo, symbol of triumph, it recalls the famous prodigy associated with Livia Drusilla.
  • Painted Domestic Pine in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia. <br />
<br />
Domestic pine: present in the mystery rites of Cybele, Attis and Dionysus. Laurel: sacred to Apollo, symbol of triumph, it recalls the famous prodigy associated with Livia Drusilla.
  • Painted Domestic Pine in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia. <br />
<br />
Domestic pine: present in the mystery rites of Cybele, Attis and Dionysus. Laurel: sacred to Apollo, symbol of triumph, it recalls the famous prodigy associated with Livia Drusilla.
  • Brussels, bacon & pine nuts
  • Brussels, bacon & pine nuts
  • The protected Cephalonia Pine trees of Mount Ainos, Kefalonia, Ionian Islands, Greece.
  • Traditional hand made pine cone bauble Christmas decorations
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of King  Ashurnasirpal II dressed in Ritual robes, he is depicted twice on either side of the central sacred tree of life, flanked by winged protective spirits holding a bucket with holy water which they are sprinking with a symbolic pine cone. Above the tree of life is a winged disc with possible the sun god Shamash in it.  From Nimrud, Iraq,  865-860 B.C North West Palace. Room B, panel 23.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no WA 124531.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of King  Ashurnasirpal II dressed in Ritual robes, he is depicted twice on either side of the central sacred tree of life, flanked by winged protective spirits holding a bucket with holy water which they are sprinking with a symbolic pine cone. Above the tree of life is a winged disc with possible the sun god Shamash in it.  From Nimrud, Iraq,  865-860 B.C North West Palace. Room B, panel 23.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no WA 124531.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of King  Ashurnasirpal II dressed in Ritual robes, he is depicted twice on either side of the central sacred tree of life, flanked by winged protective spirits holding a bucket with holy water which they are sprinking with a symbolic pine cone. Above the tree of life is a winged disc with possible the sun god Shamash in it.  From Nimrud, Iraq,  865-860 B.C North West Palace. Room B, panel 23.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no WA 124531.
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of King  Ashurnasirpal II dressed in Ritual robes, he is depicted twice on either side of the central sacred tree of life, flanked by winged protective spirits holding a bucket with holy water which they are sprinking with a symbolic pine cone. Above the tree of life is a winged disc with possible the sun god Shamash in it.  From Nimrud, Iraq,  865-860 B.C North West Palace. Room B, panel 23.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit no WA 124531.
  • The Flaying of Marsyas - a 1st or 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Italy. In the contest between Apollo and Marsyas, the terms stated that the winner could treat the defeated party any way he wanted. Since the contest was judged by the Muses,[6] Marsyas naturally lost and was flayed alive in a cave near Celaenae for his hubris to challenge a god. Apollo then nailed Marsyas' skin to a pine tree,[7] near Lake Aulocrene (Karakuyu Gölü in Turkey).  Inv No. MR267 (Usual No Ma 542), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The Flaying of Marsyas - a 1st or 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Italy. In the contest between Apollo and Marsyas, the terms stated that the winner could treat the defeated party any way he wanted. Since the contest was judged by the Muses,[6] Marsyas naturally lost and was flayed alive in a cave near Celaenae for his hubris to challenge a god. Apollo then nailed Marsyas' skin to a pine tree,[7] near Lake Aulocrene (Karakuyu Gölü in Turkey).  Inv No. MR267 (Usual No Ma 542), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The Flaying of Marsyas - a 1st or 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Italy. In the contest between Apollo and Marsyas, the terms stated that the winner could treat the defeated party any way he wanted. Since the contest was judged by the Muses,[6] Marsyas naturally lost and was flayed alive in a cave near Celaenae for his hubris to challenge a god. Apollo then nailed Marsyas' skin to a pine tree,[7] near Lake Aulocrene (Karakuyu Gölü in Turkey).  Inv No. MR267 (Usual No Ma 542), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The Flaying of Marsyas - a 1st or 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Italy. In the contest between Apollo and Marsyas, the terms stated that the winner could treat the defeated party any way he wanted. Since the contest was judged by the Muses,[6] Marsyas naturally lost and was flayed alive in a cave near Celaenae for his hubris to challenge a god. Apollo then nailed Marsyas' skin to a pine tree,[7] near Lake Aulocrene (Karakuyu Gölü in Turkey).  Inv No. MR267 (Usual No Ma 542), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The Flaying of Marsyas - a 1st or 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Italy. In the contest between Apollo and Marsyas, the terms stated that the winner could treat the defeated party any way he wanted. Since the contest was judged by the Muses,[6] Marsyas naturally lost and was flayed alive in a cave near Celaenae for his hubris to challenge a god. Apollo then nailed Marsyas' skin to a pine tree,[7] near Lake Aulocrene (Karakuyu Gölü in Turkey).  Inv No. MR267 (Usual No Ma 542), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The Flaying of Marsyas - a 1st or 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Italy. In the contest between Apollo and Marsyas, the terms stated that the winner could treat the defeated party any way he wanted. Since the contest was judged by the Muses,[6] Marsyas naturally lost and was flayed alive in a cave near Celaenae for his hubris to challenge a god. Apollo then nailed Marsyas' skin to a pine tree,[7] near Lake Aulocrene (Karakuyu Gölü in Turkey).  Inv No. MR267 (Usual No Ma 542), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The Flaying of Marsyas - a 1st or 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Italy. In the contest between Apollo and Marsyas, the terms stated that the winner could treat the defeated party any way he wanted. Since the contest was judged by the Muses,[6] Marsyas naturally lost and was flayed alive in a cave near Celaenae for his hubris to challenge a god. Apollo then nailed Marsyas' skin to a pine tree,[7] near Lake Aulocrene (Karakuyu Gölü in Turkey).  Inv No. MR267 (Usual No Ma 542), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The Flaying of Marsyas - a 1st or 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Italy. In the contest between Apollo and Marsyas, the terms stated that the winner could treat the defeated party any way he wanted. Since the contest was judged by the Muses,[6] Marsyas naturally lost and was flayed alive in a cave near Celaenae for his hubris to challenge a god. Apollo then nailed Marsyas' skin to a pine tree,[7] near Lake Aulocrene (Karakuyu Gölü in Turkey).  Inv No. MR267 (Usual No Ma 542), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The Flaying of Marsyas - a 1st or 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Italy. In the contest between Apollo and Marsyas, the terms stated that the winner could treat the defeated party any way he wanted. Since the contest was judged by the Muses,[6] Marsyas naturally lost and was flayed alive in a cave near Celaenae for his hubris to challenge a god. Apollo then nailed Marsyas' skin to a pine tree,[7] near Lake Aulocrene (Karakuyu Gölü in Turkey).  Inv No. MR267 (Usual No Ma 542), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The Flaying of Marsyas - a 1st or 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Italy. In the contest between Apollo and Marsyas, the terms stated that the winner could treat the defeated party any way he wanted. Since the contest was judged by the Muses,[6] Marsyas naturally lost and was flayed alive in a cave near Celaenae for his hubris to challenge a god. Apollo then nailed Marsyas' skin to a pine tree,[7] near Lake Aulocrene (Karakuyu Gölü in Turkey).  Inv No. MR267 (Usual No Ma 542), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The protected Cephalonia Pine trees of Mount Ainos, Kefalonia, Ionian Islands, Greece.
  • The protected Cephalonia Pine trees of Mount Ainos, Kefalonia, Ionian Islands, Greece.
  • Pine trees in the snow at Grindelwald First
  • Pine trees in the snow at Grindelwald First
  • Landscape of Cantaloupe Melon Slice, on a pine table in a kitchen
  • Landscape of Cantaloupe Melon Slice, on a pine table in a kitchen
  • Landscape of Cantaloupe Melon Slice, on a pine table in a kitchen

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