• The Hungarian National Theatre, Budapest Hungary
  • The Hungarian National Theatre, Budapest Hungary
  • children playing - Runswick Bay - North Yorkshire - England
  • Runswick Bay - North Yorkshire - England - family making sand castles
  • Runswick Bay - North Yorkshire - England - family making sand castles
  • Runswick Bay - North Yorkshire - England - family making sand castles
  • Photo of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Procession. Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Musicians. Two musicians with short arms, wearing long dresses and wide belts; one plays a Saz (a stringed musical instrument) with tassels on the handle while the other plays the flute. The third small figure holds castanets (?) in his hands. The figure on the right wears a short skirt, contrary to the others. She dances over her finger tips with her hands over her head. <br />
<br />
Against a brown art background.
  • Picture & image of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Procession. Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Musicians. Two musicians with short arms, wearing long dresses and wide belts; one plays a Saz (a stringed musical instrument) with tassels on the handle while the other plays the flute. The third small figure holds castanets (?) in his hands. The figure on the right wears a short skirt, contrary to the others. She dances over her finger tips with her hands over her head. <br />
<br />
Against a gray background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Procession. Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Musicians. Two musicians with short arms, wearing long dresses and wide belts; one plays a Saz (a stringed musical instrument) with tassels on the handle while the other plays the flute. The third small figure holds castanets (?) in his hands. The figure on the right wears a short skirt, contrary to the others. She dances over her finger tips with her hands over her head.  <br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Procession. Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Musicians. Two musicians with short arms, wearing long dresses and wide belts; one plays a Saz (a stringed musical instrument) with tassels on the handle while the other plays the flute. The third small figure holds castanets (?) in his hands. The figure on the right wears a short skirt, contrary to the others. She dances over her finger tips with her hands over her head.<br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Procession. Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Musicians. Two musicians with short arms, wearing long dresses and wide belts; one plays a Saz (a stringed musical instrument) with tassels on the handle while the other plays the flute. The third small figure holds castanets (?) in his hands. The figure on the right wears a short skirt, contrary to the others. She dances over her finger tips with her hands over her head.  <br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Procession. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Goddess Kubaba. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Procession for. There are four figures on the other face of the orthostat. The leftmost figure plays a pipe, while the other three figures play the drums. All of the figures have long skirts and same body heights.  <br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Procession. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Goddess Kubaba. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Procession for. There are four figures on the other face of the orthostat. The leftmost figure plays a pipe, while the other three figures play the drums. All of the figures have long skirts and same body heights.  <br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Photo of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Procession. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Goddess Kubaba. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Procession for. There are four figures on the other face of the orthostat. The leftmost figure plays a pipe, while the other three figures play the drums. All of the figures have long skirts and same body heights.  <br />
<br />
Against a brown art background.
  • Picture & image of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Procession. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Goddess Kubaba. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Procession for. There are four figures on the other face of the orthostat. The leftmost figure plays a pipe, while the other three figures play the drums. All of the figures have long skirts and same body heights.  <br />
<br />
Against a gray background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Procession. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Goddess Kubaba. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Procession for. There are four figures on the other face of the orthostat. The leftmost figure plays a pipe, while the other three figures play the drums. All of the figures have long skirts and same body heights.
  • Roman statue of a young Satyr from the Hadranic period circa 117-138 AD excavated from an area near the via XX Settembre and Via Firenza, Rome, Italy. A young Satyr, wearing a panther’s skin tied on the right shoulder, plays the tibia oblique (flute) whist reclining next to a tree trunk. The statue is based on a Greek prototype from the school of Greek sculptor Praxiteles created around 300 BC.  Inv 551, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Bab Mansour gate, named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732. The design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. It has zellij mosaics and the marble columns were taken from the Roman ruins of Volubilis. Meknes, Morocco
  • Pictures of a Roman mosaics design depicting Dionysus Riding a Panther, from Abdel Jelil. 2nd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic depicts Dionysus riding a Panther spilling a glass of wine he is holding. Behind him, a satyr wearing a panther skin plays a flute. In front of Dionysus a Bacchante is praying to Priapus,  a minor god of fertility. Surrounding the scene is a wreath designs with a medallion in each corner containing a wild boar, a panther, and lions.
  • Pictures of a Roman mosaics design depicting Dionysus Riding a Panther, from Abdel Jelil. 2nd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic depicts Dionysus riding a Panther spilling a glass of wine he is holding. Behind him, a satyr wearing a panther skin plays a flute. In front of Dionysus a Bacchante is praying to Priapus,  a minor god of fertility. Surrounding the scene is a wreath designs with a medallion in each corner containing a wild boar, a panther, and lions.
  • Pictures of a Roman mosaics design depicting Dionysus Riding a Panther, from Abdel Jelil. 2nd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against a balck background<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic depicts Dionysus riding a Panther spilling a glass of wine he is holding. Behind him, a satyr wearing a panther skin plays a flute. In front of Dionysus a Bacchante is praying to Priapus,  a minor god of fertility. Surrounding the scene is a wreath designs with a medallion in each corner containing a wild boar, a panther, and lions.
  • Pictures of a Roman mosaics design depicting Dionysus Riding a Panther, from Abdel Jelil. 2nd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic depicts Dionysus riding a Panther spilling a glass of wine he is holding. Behind him, a satyr wearing a panther skin plays a flute. In front of Dionysus a Bacchante is praying to Priapus,  a minor god of fertility. Surrounding the scene is a wreath designs with a medallion in each corner containing a wild boar, a panther, and lions.
  • Pictures of a Roman mosaics design depicting Dionysus Riding a Panther, from Abdel Jelil. 2nd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic depicts Dionysus riding a Panther spilling a glass of wine he is holding. Behind him, a satyr wearing a panther skin plays a flute. In front of Dionysus a Bacchante is praying to Priapus,  a minor god of fertility. Surrounding the scene is a wreath designs with a medallion in each corner containing a wild boar, a panther, and lions.
  • Pictures of a Roman mosaics design depicting Dionysus Riding a Panther, from Abdel Jelil. 2nd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against a grey background<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic depicts Dionysus riding a Panther spilling a glass of wine he is holding. Behind him, a satyr wearing a panther skin plays a flute. In front of Dionysus a Bacchante is praying to Priapus,  a minor god of fertility. Surrounding the scene is a wreath designs with a medallion in each corner containing a wild boar, a panther, and lions.
  • Pictures of a Roman mosaics design depicting Dionysus Riding a Panther, from Abdel Jelil. 2nd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against a balck background<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic depicts Dionysus riding a Panther spilling a glass of wine he is holding. Behind him, a satyr wearing a panther skin plays a flute. In front of Dionysus a Bacchante is praying to Priapus,  a minor god of fertility. Surrounding the scene is a wreath designs with a medallion in each corner containing a wild boar, a panther, and lions.
  • Pictures of a Roman mosaics design depicting Dionysus Riding a Panther, from Abdel Jelil. 2nd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic depicts Dionysus riding a Panther spilling a glass of wine he is holding. Behind him, a satyr wearing a panther skin plays a flute. In front of Dionysus a Bacchante is praying to Priapus,  a minor god of fertility. Surrounding the scene is a wreath designs with a medallion in each corner containing a wild boar, a panther, and lions.
  • Pictures of a Roman mosaics design depicting Dionysus Riding a Panther, from Abdel Jelil. 2nd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against an art  background<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic depicts Dionysus riding a Panther spilling a glass of wine he is holding. Behind him, a satyr wearing a panther skin plays a flute. In front of Dionysus a Bacchante is praying to Priapus,  a minor god of fertility. Surrounding the scene is a wreath designs with a medallion in each corner containing a wild boar, a panther, and lions.
  • Pictures of a Roman mosaics design depicting Dionysus Riding a Panther, from Abdel Jelil. 2nd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against a grey background<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic depicts Dionysus riding a Panther spilling a glass of wine he is holding. Behind him, a satyr wearing a panther skin plays a flute. In front of Dionysus a Bacchante is praying to Priapus,  a minor god of fertility. Surrounding the scene is a wreath designs with a medallion in each corner containing a wild boar, a panther, and lions.
  • Photo of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel from Water Gate Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 BC.  Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The figure sitting on a stool to the left of the table holds a goblet in his right hand which he raised upwards. Behind, there is a servant with a fan in his hand. On the other side of the table is another servant waits with a vessel in the hands. The rightmost figure plays a Saz (a stringed musical instrument) with the tassel on the handle. <br />
<br />
On a brown art background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel from Water Gate Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 BC.  Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The figure sitting on a stool to the left of the table holds a goblet in his right hand which he raised upwards. Behind, there is a servant with a fan in his hand. On the other side of the table is another servant waits with a vessel in the hands. The rightmost figure plays a Saz (a stringed musical instrument) with the tassel on the handle. <br />
<br />
On a white background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel from Water Gate Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 BC.  Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The figure sitting on a stool to the left of the table holds a goblet in his right hand which he raised upwards. Behind, there is a servant with a fan in his hand. On the other side of the table is another servant waits with a vessel in the hands. The rightmost figure plays a Saz (a stringed musical instrument) with the tassel on the handle. <br />
<br />
On a black background.
  • Picture & image of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel from Water Gate Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 BC.  Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The figure sitting on a stool to the left of the table holds a goblet in his right hand which he raised upwards. Behind, there is a servant with a fan in his hand. On the other side of the table is another servant waits with a vessel in the hands. The rightmost figure plays a Saz (a stringed musical instrument) with the tassel on the handle. <br />
<br />
On a gray background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel from Water Gate Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 BC.  Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The figure sitting on a stool to the left of the table holds a goblet in his right hand which he raised upwards. Behind, there is a servant with a fan in his hand. On the other side of the table is another servant waits with a vessel in the hands. The rightmost figure plays a Saz (a stringed musical instrument) with the tassel on the handle. <br />
<br />
On a grey art background.
  • Roman statue of a young Satyr from the Hadranic period circa 117-138 AD excavated from an area near the via XX Settembre and Via Firenza, Rome, Italy. A young Satyr, wearing a panther’s skin tied on the right shoulder, plays the tibia oblique (flute) whist reclining next to a tree trunk. The statue is based on a Greek prototype from the school of Greek sculptor Praxiteles created around 300 BC.  Inv 551, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of a young Satyr from the Hadranic period circa 117-138 AD excavated from an area near the via XX Settembre and Via Firenza, Rome, Italy. A young Satyr, wearing a panther’s skin tied on the right shoulder, plays the tibia oblique (flute) whist reclining next to a tree trunk. The statue is based on a Greek prototype from the school of Greek sculptor Praxiteles created around 300 BC.  Inv 551, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of a young Satyr from the Hadranic period circa 117-138 AD excavated from an area near the via XX Settembre and Via Firenza, Rome, Italy. A young Satyr, wearing a panther’s skin tied on the right shoulder, plays the tibia oblique (flute) whist reclining next to a tree trunk. The statue is based on a Greek prototype from the school of Greek sculptor Praxiteles created around 300 BC.  Inv 551, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of a young Satyr from the Hadranic period circa 117-138 AD excavated from an area near the via XX Settembre and Via Firenza, Rome, Italy. A young Satyr, wearing a panther’s skin tied on the right shoulder, plays the tibia oblique (flute) whist reclining next to a tree trunk. The statue is based on a Greek prototype from the school of Greek sculptor Praxiteles created around 300 BC.  Inv 551, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of a young Satyr from the Hadranic period circa 117-138 AD excavated from an area near the via XX Settembre and Via Firenza, Rome, Italy. A young Satyr, wearing a panther’s skin tied on the right shoulder, plays the tibia oblique (flute) whist reclining next to a tree trunk. The statue is based on a Greek prototype from the school of Greek sculptor Praxiteles created around 300 BC.  Inv 551, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of a young Satyr from the Hadranic period circa 117-138 AD excavated from an area near the via XX Settembre and Via Firenza, Rome, Italy. A young Satyr, wearing a panther’s skin tied on the right shoulder, plays the tibia oblique (flute) whist reclining next to a tree trunk. The statue is based on a Greek prototype from the school of Greek sculptor Praxiteles created around 300 BC.  Inv 551, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of a young Satyr from the Hadranic period circa 117-138 AD excavated from an area near the via XX Settembre and Via Firenza, Rome, Italy. A young Satyr, wearing a panther’s skin tied on the right shoulder, plays the tibia oblique (flute) whist reclining next to a tree trunk. The statue is based on a Greek prototype from the school of Greek sculptor Praxiteles created around 300 BC.  Inv 551, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of a young Satyr from the Hadranic period circa 117-138 AD excavated from an area near the via XX Settembre and Via Firenza, Rome, Italy. A young Satyr, wearing a panther’s skin tied on the right shoulder, plays the tibia oblique (flute) whist reclining next to a tree trunk. The statue is based on a Greek prototype from the school of Greek sculptor Praxiteles created around 300 BC.  Inv 551, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of a young Satyr from the Hadranic period circa 117-138 AD excavated from an area near the via XX Settembre and Via Firenza, Rome, Italy. A young Satyr, wearing a panther’s skin tied on the right shoulder, plays the tibia oblique (flute) whist reclining next to a tree trunk. The statue is based on a Greek prototype from the school of Greek sculptor Praxiteles created around 300 BC.  Inv 551, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Zellij mosaics and arabesque Moorish plasterwork of the Bab Mansour gate. Named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732 the design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. Meknes Morocco
  • Zellij mosaics and arabesque Moorish plasterwork of the Bab Mansour gate. Named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732 the design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. Meknes Morocco
  • Zellij mosaics and arabesque Moorish plasterwork of the Bab Mansour gate. Named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732 the design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. Meknes Morocco
  • Bab Mansour gate, named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732. The design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. It has zellij mosaics and the marble columns were taken from the Roman ruins of Volubilis. Meknes, Morocco
  • Zellij mosaics and arabesque Moorish plasterwork of the Bab Mansour gate. Named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732 the design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. Meknes Morocco
  • Bab Mansour gate, named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732. The design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. It has zellij mosaics and the marble columns were taken from the Roman ruins of Volubilis. Meknes, Morocco
  • Zellij mosaics and arabesque Moorish plasterwork of the Bab Mansour gate. Named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732 the design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. Meknes Morocco
  • Zellij mosaics and arabesque Moorish plasterwork of the Bab Mansour gate. Named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732 the design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. Meknes Morocco
  • Zellij mosaics and arabesque Moorish plasterwork of the Bab Mansour gate. Named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732 the design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. Meknes Morocco
  • Bab Mansour gate, named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732. The design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. It has zellij mosaics and the marble columns were taken from the Roman ruins of Volubilis. Meknes, Morocco
  • Bab Mansour gate, named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732. The design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. It has zellij mosaics and the marble columns were taken from the Roman ruins of Volubilis. Meknes, Morocco
  • Bab Mansour gate, named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732. The design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. It has zellij mosaics and the marble columns were taken from the Roman ruins of Volubilis. Meknes, Morocco
  • Zellij mosaics and arabesque Moorish plasterwork of the Bab Mansour gate. Named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732 the design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. Meknes Morocco
  • Zellij mosaics and arabesque Moorish plasterwork of the Bab Mansour gate. Named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732 the design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. Meknes Morocco
  • Zellij mosaics and arabesque Moorish plasterwork of the Bab Mansour gate. Named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732 the design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. Meknes Morocco
  • Zellij mosaics and arabesque Moorish plasterwork of the Bab Mansour gate. Named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732 the design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. Meknes Morocco
  • Zellij mosaics and arabesque Moorish plasterwork of the Bab Mansour gate. Named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732 the design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. Meknes Morocco
  • Pictures of a Roman mosaics design depicting Dionysus Riding a Panther, from Abdel Jelil. 2nd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against a white background<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic depicts Dionysus riding a Panther spilling a glass of wine he is holding. Behind him, a satyr wearing a panther skin plays a flute. In front of Dionysus a Bacchante is praying to Priapus,  a minor god of fertility. Surrounding the scene is a wreath designs with a medallion in each corner containing a wild boar, a panther, and lions.
  • Pictures of a Roman mosaics design depicting Dionysus Riding a Panther, from Abdel Jelil. 2nd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against a white background<br />
<br />
The Roman mosaic depicts Dionysus riding a Panther spilling a glass of wine he is holding. Behind him, a satyr wearing a panther skin plays a flute. In front of Dionysus a Bacchante is praying to Priapus,  a minor god of fertility. Surrounding the scene is a wreath designs with a medallion in each corner containing a wild boar, a panther, and lions.
  • Zellij mosaics and arabesque Moorish plasterwork of the Bab Mansour gate. Named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732 the design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. Meknes Morocco
  • Zellij mosaics and arabesque Moorish plasterwork of the Bab Mansour gate. Named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732 the design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. Meknes Morocco
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Pan teaching Daphnis to play the pipes, a Roman copy late 2nd century BC Hellenistic Geek original attributed to Rodes sculptor Heliodoros. Pan's and Daphnis' heads and Daphnis' right arm are restorations.  The Farnese collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Pan teaching Daphnis to play the pipes, a Roman copy late 2nd century BC Hellenistic Geek original attributed to Rodes sculptor Heliodoros. Pan's and Daphnis' heads and Daphnis' right arm are restorations.  The Farnese collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Pan teaching Daphnis to play the pipes, a Roman copy late 2nd century BC Hellenistic Geek original attributed to Rodes sculptor Heliodoros. Pan's and Daphnis' heads and Daphnis' right arm are restorations.  The Farnese collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Pan teaching Daphnis to play the pipes, a Roman copy late 2nd century BC Hellenistic Geek original attributed to Rodes sculptor Heliodoros. Pan's and Daphnis' heads and Daphnis' right arm are restorations.  The Farnese collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Pan teaching Daphnis to play the pipes, a Roman copy late 2nd century BC Hellenistic Geek original attributed to Rodes sculptor Heliodoros. Pan's and Daphnis' heads and Daphnis' right arm are restorations.  The Farnese collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Pan teaching Daphnis to play the pipes, a Roman copy late 2nd century BC Hellenistic Geek original attributed to Rodes sculptor Heliodoros. Pan's and Daphnis' heads and Daphnis' right arm are restorations.  The Farnese collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Pan teaching Daphnis to play the pipes, a Roman copy late 2nd century BC Hellenistic Geek original attributed to Rodes sculptor Heliodoros. Pan's and Daphnis' heads and Daphnis' right arm are restorations.  The Farnese collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Pan teaching Daphnis to play the pipes, a Roman copy late 2nd century BC Hellenistic Geek original attributed to Rodes sculptor Heliodoros. Pan's and Daphnis' heads and Daphnis' right arm are restorations.  The Farnese collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Pan teaching Daphnis to play the pipes, a Roman copy late 2nd century BC Hellenistic Geek original attributed to Rodes sculptor Heliodoros. Pan's and Daphnis' heads and Daphnis' right arm are restorations.  The Farnese collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Pan teaching Daphnis to play the pipes, a Roman copy late 2nd century BC Hellenistic Geek original attributed to Rodes sculptor Heliodoros. Pan's and Daphnis' heads and Daphnis' right arm are restorations.  The Farnese collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Pan teaching Daphnis to play the pipes, a Roman copy late 2nd century BC Hellenistic Geek original attributed to Rodes sculptor Heliodoros. Pan's and Daphnis' heads and Daphnis' right arm are restorations.  The Farnese collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Pan teaching Daphnis to play the pipes, a Roman copy late 2nd century BC Hellenistic Geek original attributed to Rodes sculptor Heliodoros. Pan's and Daphnis' heads and Daphnis' right arm are restorations.  The Farnese collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Pan teaching Daphnis to play the pipes, a Roman copy late 2nd century BC Hellenistic Geek original attributed to Rodes sculptor Heliodoros. Pan's and Daphnis' heads and Daphnis' right arm are restorations.  The Farnese collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Pan teaching Daphnis to play the pipes, a Roman copy late 2nd century BC Hellenistic Geek original attributed to Rodes sculptor Heliodoros. Pan's and Daphnis' heads and Daphnis' right arm are restorations.  The Farnese collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Pan teaching Daphnis to play the pipes, a Roman copy late 2nd century BC Hellenistic Geek original attributed to Rodes sculptor Heliodoros. Pan's and Daphnis' heads and Daphnis' right arm are restorations.  The Farnese collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Pan teaching Daphnis to play the pipes, a Roman copy late 2nd century BC Hellenistic Geek original attributed to Rodes sculptor Heliodoros. Pan's and Daphnis' heads and Daphnis' right arm are restorations.  The Farnese collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Pan teaching Daphnis to play the pipes, a Roman copy late 2nd century BC Hellenistic Geek original attributed to Rodes sculptor Heliodoros. Pan's and Daphnis' heads and Daphnis' right arm are restorations.  The Farnese collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Pan teaching Daphnis to play the pipes, a Roman copy late 2nd century BC Hellenistic Geek original attributed to Rodes sculptor Heliodoros. Pan's and Daphnis' heads and Daphnis' right arm are restorations.  The Farnese collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Pan teaching Daphnis to play the pipes, a Roman copy late 2nd century BC Hellenistic Geek original attributed to Rodes sculptor Heliodoros. Pan's and Daphnis' heads and Daphnis' right arm are restorations.  The Farnese collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Pan teaching Daphnis to play the pipes, a Roman copy late 2nd century BC Hellenistic Geek original attributed to Rodes sculptor Heliodoros. Pan's and Daphnis' heads and Daphnis' right arm are restorations.  The Farnese collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Pan teaching Daphnis to play the pipes, a Roman copy late 2nd century BC Hellenistic Geek original attributed to Rodes sculptor Heliodoros. Pan's and Daphnis' heads and Daphnis' right arm are restorations.  The Farnese collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Pan teaching Daphnis to play the pipes, a Roman copy late 2nd century BC Hellenistic Geek original attributed to Rodes sculptor Heliodoros. Pan's and Daphnis' heads and Daphnis' right arm are restorations.  The Farnese collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Pan teaching Daphnis to play the pipes, a Roman copy late 2nd century BC Hellenistic Geek original attributed to Rodes sculptor Heliodoros. Pan's and Daphnis' heads and Daphnis' right arm are restorations.  The Farnese collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Pan teaching Daphnis to play the pipes, a Roman copy late 2nd century BC Hellenistic Geek original attributed to Rodes sculptor Heliodoros. Pan's and Daphnis' heads and Daphnis' right arm are restorations.  The Farnese collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Pan teaching Daphnis to play the pipes, a Roman copy late 2nd century BC Hellenistic Geek original attributed to Rodes sculptor Heliodoros. Pan's and Daphnis' heads and Daphnis' right arm are restorations.  The Farnese collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman mosaic of a Young boy playing with snakes, possibly an early Christian mosaic. Syria or Lebanon, 5th century AD. Cubes of marble and limestone. Dressed in a long tunic, the child playing with two snakes could be illustrating a passage from the Book of Isai (11.6 to 8). This fragmented mosaic panel once continued in upper part, as indicated by the animal hoofs, and to the right of the mosaic are remains of a Greek inscription. inv 5094. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Crucifiction fresco on the Church of San Vigilio in Pinzolo, part of its mural painting “the Dance of Death” painted by Simone Baschenis of Averaria in1539, Pinzolo, Trentino, Italy.<br />
<br />
The mural continues for another 21 meters with a long procession with 40 figures. The Mural opens on its left with a skeleton on the throne, bearing a sceptre and the crown and playing a bagpipe. These skeletons are playing the music which is the backdrop to “Dance of Death” ( Danza macabra ) and suggests that they are playing with our fate on earth.<br />
<br />
 To the right of the skeletons playing music is a depiction of the crucification. Christ is depicted on the cross with an arrow in him that has been fired by a skeleton with a bow. This suggests that because Christ was a man he suffered the fate of death as we all will.
  • The Church of San Vigilio in Pinzolo and its fresco paintings “Dance of Death” painted by Simone Baschenis of Averaria in1539, Pinzolo, Trentino, Italy.<br />
<br />
The mural continues for another 21 meters with a long procession with 40 figures. The Mural opens on its left with a skeleton on the throne, bearing a sceptre and the crown and playing a bagpipe. These skeletons are playing the music which is the backdrop to “Dance of Death” ( Danza macabra ) and suggests that they are playing with our fate on earth.<br />
<br />
 To the right of the skeletons playing music is a depiction of the crucification. Christ is depicted on the cross with an arrow in him that has been fired by a skeleton with a bow. This suggests that because Christ was a man he suffered the fate of death as we all will.
  • The Church of San Vigilio in Pinzolo and its fresco paintings “Dance of Death” painted by Simone Baschenis of Averaria in1539, Pinzolo, Trentino, Italy.<br />
<br />
The Mural opens on its left with a skeleton on the throne, bearing a sceptre and the crown and playing a bagpipe. These skeletons are playing the music which is the backdrop to “Dance of Death” ( Danza macabra ) and suggests that they are playing with our fate on earth. <br />
<br />
The mural continues for another 21 meters with a long procession with 40 figures. To the right of the skeletons playing music is a depiction of the crucification. Christ is depicted on the cross with an arrow in him that has been fired by a skeleton with a bow. This suggests that because Christ was a man he suffered the fate of death as we all will. After Christ is a Pope also pierced by a spear, as are all the human figures in the mural. Next to the pope is a cardinal, a cleric and a monk all of whom have succumbed to the arrows of the skeletons. This tableau is a reminder to the hierarchy of the church that even they are not immune from death. The procession continues with a depiction of a king then nobility followed by knights and soldiers and a beggar man with no legs. Between each figure are skeletons holding bows and arrows, banners with writings on them or a shovel to dig a grave. After the beggar mad there are figures of women ending with a small skeleton and a cherub. To the far right a skeleton on a horse is riding into the procession holding a bow and arrow ready to far. To procession ends with the Angel Gabriel and the devil discussing the fates of the those in the procession as to whether they go to Heaven or to Purgatory and Hell.
  • Crucifiction fresco on the Church of San Vigilio in Pinzolo, part of its mural painting “the Dance of Death” painted by Simone Baschenis of Averaria in1539, Pinzolo, Trentino, Italy.<br />
<br />
The mural continues for another 21 meters with a long procession with 40 figures.<br />
<br />
The Mural opens on its left with a skeleton on the throne, bearing a sceptre and the crown and playing a bagpipe. These skeletons are playing the music which is the backdrop to “Dance of Death” ( Danza macabra ) and suggests that they are playing with our fate on earth.<br />
<br />
 To the right of the skeletons playing music is a depiction of the crucification. Christ is depicted on the cross with an arrow in him that has been fired by a skeleton with a bow. This suggests that because Christ was a man he suffered the fate of death as we all will.<br />
After Christ is a Pope also pierced by a spear, as are all the human figures in the mural.
  • Roman mosaic of a Young boy playing with snakes, possibly an early Christian mosaic. Syria or Lebanon, 5th century AD. Cubes of marble and limestone. Dressed in a long tunic, the child playing with two snakes could be illustrating a passage from the Book of Isai (11.6 to 8). This fragmented mosaic panel once continued in upper part, as indicated by the animal hoofs, and to the right of the mosaic are remains of a Greek inscription. inv 5094. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Roman mosaic of a Young boy playing with snakes, possibly an early Christian mosaic. Syria or Lebanon, 5th century AD. Cubes of marble and limestone. Dressed in a long tunic, the child playing with two snakes could be illustrating a passage from the Book of Isai (11.6 to 8). This fragmented mosaic panel once continued in upper part, as indicated by the animal hoofs, and to the right of the mosaic are remains of a Greek inscription. inv 5094. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Crucifiction fresco on the Church of San Vigilio in Pinzolo, part of its mural painting “the Dance of Death” painted by Simone Baschenis of Averaria in1539, Pinzolo, Trentino, Italy.<br />
<br />
The mural continues for another 21 meters with a long procession with 40 figures. The Mural opens on its left with a skeleton on the throne, bearing a sceptre and the crown and playing a bagpipe. These skeletons are playing the music which is the backdrop to “Dance of Death” ( Danza macabra ) and suggests that they are playing with our fate on earth.<br />
<br />
 To the right of the skeletons playing music is a depiction of the crucification. Christ is depicted on the cross with an arrow in him that has been fired by a skeleton with a bow. This suggests that because Christ was a man he suffered the fate of death as we all will.
  • Roman mosaic of a Young boy playing with snakes, possibly an early Christian mosaic. Syria or Lebanon, 5th century AD. Cubes of marble and limestone. Dressed in a long tunic, the child playing with two snakes could be illustrating a passage from the Book of Isai (11.6 to 8). This fragmented mosaic panel once continued in upper part, as indicated by the animal hoofs, and to the right of the mosaic are remains of a Greek inscription. inv 5094. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • The Spring fresco Minoan Wall painting from Akrotiri, National archaeological Musuem Athens Minoan artefact. 17th-16th cent BC.<br />
<br />
The Minoan 'Spring Fresco' is the only fresco found in situ at Akritiri covering three walls. It depicts the rocky Theran lanscape of Santorini before the volcanic eruption: clusetrs of red lilies with yellow stems dominate the red and grey volcanic rock formations. Swallows swoop above, either alone or in pairs animating the scene and announcing natures annual rebirth of Spring.<br />
<br />
The Spring fresco has an opulent use of colours and a lively movement bu the lilies swaying in the wind as well as the swallows at play. Room D2 Complex D.
  • The Spring fresco Minoan Wall painting from Akrotiri, National archaeological Musuem Athens Minoan artefact. 17th-16th cent BC.<br />
<br />
The Minoan 'Spring Fresco' is the only fresco found in situ at Akritiri covering three walls. It depicts the rocky Theran lanscape of Santorini before the volcanic eruption: clusetrs of red lilies with yellow stems dominate the red and grey volcanic rock formations. Swallows swoop above, either alone or in pairs animating the scene and announcing natures annual rebirth of Spring.<br />
<br />
The Spring fresco has an opulent use of colours and a lively movement bu the lilies swaying in the wind as well as the swallows at play. Room D2 Complex D.
  • The Spring fresco Minoan Wall painting from Akrotiri, National archaeological Musuem Athens Minoan artefact. 17th-16th cent BC.<br />
<br />
The Minoan 'Spring Fresco' is the only fresco found in situ at Akritiri covering three walls. It depicts the rocky Theran lanscape of Santorini before the volcanic eruption: clusetrs of red lilies with yellow stems dominate the red and grey volcanic rock formations. Swallows swoop above, either alone or in pairs animating the scene and announcing natures annual rebirth of Spring.<br />
<br />
The Spring fresco has an opulent use of colours and a lively movement bu the lilies swaying in the wind as well as the swallows at play. Room D2 Complex D.
  • The Spring fresco Minoan Wall painting from Akrotiri, National archaeological Musuem Athens Minoan artefact. 17th-16th cent BC.<br />
<br />
The Minoan 'Spring Fresco' is the only fresco found in situ at Akritiri covering three walls. It depicts the rocky Theran lanscape of Santorini before the volcanic eruption: clusetrs of red lilies with yellow stems dominate the red and grey volcanic rock formations. Swallows swoop above, either alone or in pairs animating the scene and announcing natures annual rebirth of Spring.<br />
<br />
The Spring fresco has an opulent use of colours and a lively movement bu the lilies swaying in the wind as well as the swallows at play. Room D2 Complex D.
  • The Church of San Vigilio in Pinzolo and its fresco paintings “Dance of Death” painted by Simone Baschenis of Averaria in1539, Pinzolo, Trentino, Italy.<br />
<br />
The mural continues for another 21 meters with a long procession with 40 figures. The Mural opens on its left with a skeleton on the throne, bearing a sceptre and the crown and playing a bagpipe. These skeletons are playing the music which is the backdrop to “Dance of Death” ( Danza macabra ) and suggests that they are playing with our fate on earth.
  • Tombstone of a miner,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  S?pân?a, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan P?tra? (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a carpenter, The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  S?pân?a, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan P?tra? (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a shepherd , The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  S?pân?a, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan P?tra? (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone showing a logger chopping trees, The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone showing a fiddler and man in traditional clothes, The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone showing an shepherd with his sythe,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone showing a man doing a traditional dance,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a thresher showing a couple threshing wheat,   The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone showing a couple threshing wheat, The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a mother showing her with her sons in a kitchen,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a mother showing her with her sons,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone showing a man on his horse, The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a Husband showing him drinking with his wife, The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a soldier, The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a lorry owner and lorry,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone showing a man in traditional clothes, The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a farmer on his tractor,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a school master,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a disabled man,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a drinker in the pub,   The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a lorry owner,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a washer women,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a forestery forman,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a timber mill worker,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstones in  The Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • The Spring fresco Minoan Wall painting from Akrotiri, National archaeological Musuem Athens Minoan artefact. 17th-16th cent BC.<br />
<br />
The Minoan 'Spring Fresco' is the only fresco found in situ at Akritiri covering three walls. It depicts the rocky Theran lanscape of Santorini before the volcanic eruption: clusetrs of red lilies with yellow stems dominate the red and grey volcanic rock formations. Swallows swoop above, either alone or in pairs animating the scene and announcing natures annual rebirth of Spring.<br />
<br />
The Spring fresco has an opulent use of colours and a lively movement bu the lilies swaying in the wind as well as the swallows at play. Room D2 Complex D.
  • The Spring fresco Minoan Wall painting from Akrotiri, National archaeological Musuem Athens Minoan artefact. 17th-16th cent BC.<br />
<br />
The Minoan 'Spring Fresco' is the only fresco found in situ at Akritiri covering three walls. It depicts the rocky Theran lanscape of Santorini before the volcanic eruption: clusetrs of red lilies with yellow stems dominate the red and grey volcanic rock formations. Swallows swoop above, either alone or in pairs animating the scene and announcing natures annual rebirth of Spring.<br />
<br />
The Spring fresco has an opulent use of colours and a lively movement bu the lilies swaying in the wind as well as the swallows at play. Room D2 Complex D.
  • The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  S?pân?a, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan P?tra? (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone showing a miner in a mine, The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone showing a miller bagging corn, The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone showing an aold women sitting at her table,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone showing a fiddler and a man dancing in traditional clothes,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone showing a fiddler and a man doing a traditional dance,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone showing a man painting the tombstones,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a farmer on the way to cut hay, The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a weaver,   The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a farmer picking fruit,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a shepherd in the fields,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a lumberjack,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a house wife sitting at her table,   The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of an army  tank driver,   The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a Colonel,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a house wife, The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a man being killed by a logging accident ,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a man in traditional hat,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a forestery worker,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • Tombstone of a fruit farmer,  The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • The  Merry Cemetery ( Cimitirul Vesel ),  Săpânţa, Maramares, Northern Transylvania, Romania.  The naive folk art style of the tombstones created by woodcarver  Stan Ioan Pătraş (1909 - 1977) who created in his lifetime over 700 colourfully painted wooden tombstones with small relief portrait carvings of the deceased or with scenes depicting them at work or play or surprisingly showing the violent accident that killed them. Each tombstone has an inscription about the person, sometimes a light hearted  limerick in Romanian.
  • "By The Sea" a series of fine art photography photos showing people at play. By art photographer Paul Williams.
  • Marble Roman Statue of the Muse of Music ( Euterpe ) playing the lyre. , 2nd cent. AD, from Miletus (Balat, Soke ). Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv 2002 T.  Cat. Mendel 116
  • Marble Roman Statue of the Muse of Music ( Euterpe ) playing the lyre. , 2nd cent. AD, from Miletus (Balat, Soke ). Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv 2002 T.  Cat. Mendel 116
  • Marble Roman Statue of the Muse of Music ( Euterpe ) playing the lyre. , 2nd cent. AD, from Miletus (Balat, Soke ). Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv 2002 T.  Cat. Mendel 116
  • The God Apollo playing the Cithara ( Apollo Citharaodos) a 2nd century marble Roman sculpture from Miletus (Balat, Soke) Turkey. Istanbul Archaeology Museum, Inv 2000T Cat. Mendel 114.
  • The God Apollo playing the Cithara ( Apollo Citharaodos) a 2nd century marble Roman sculpture from Miletus (Balat, Soke) Turkey. Istanbul Archaeology Museum, Inv 2000T Cat. Mendel 114.
  • The God Apollo playing the Cithara ( Apollo Citharaodos) a 2nd century marble Roman sculpture from Miletus (Balat, Soke) Turkey. Istanbul Archaeology Museum, Inv 2000T Cat. Mendel 114.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panel depicting striding lions from Babylon (Iraq). Neo-Babylonian Period, reign of Nebuchadnezzar II 604-562 BC. This panel belonged to the tiled decorated walls either side of the Processional Way in Babylon which was 3280 ft (1km) long. It led from the temple of Marduk, through the Ishtar Gate to the temple of Akitu. The lion is the is associated with the Babylonian goddess Ishtar. T processional Way played a key role in the  New Year festival which was held in the spring equinox. Babylonian Gods were believed to leave their temples on this day and visit the god Marduk in his temple in Babylon. Kings like Nebuchanezzar would have played an important role in this procession and they aside their regal regalia for the procession and recited “negative confessions” as they preceded down the Processional way. Inv Ao 21118, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panel depicting striding lions from Babylon (Iraq). Neo-Babylonian Period, reign of Nebuchadnezzar II 604-562 BC. This panel belonged to the tiled decorated walls either side of the Processional Way in Babylon which was 3280 ft (1km) long. It led from the temple of Marduk, through the Ishtar Gate to the temple of Akitu. The lion is the is associated with the Babylonian goddess Ishtar. T processional Way played a key role in the  New Year festival which was held in the spring equinox. Babylonian Gods were believed to leave their temples on this day and visit the god Marduk in his temple in Babylon. Kings like Nebuchanezzar would have played an important role in this procession and they aside their regal regalia for the procession and recited “negative confessions” as they preceded down the Processional way. Inv Ao 21118, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panel depicting striding lions from Babylon (Iraq). Neo-Babylonian Period, reign of Nebuchadnezzar II 604-562 BC. This panel belonged to the tiled decorated walls either side of the Processional Way in Babylon which was 3280 ft (1km) long. It led from the temple of Marduk, through the Ishtar Gate to the temple of Akitu. The lion is the is associated with the Babylonian goddess Ishtar. T processional Way played a key role in the  New Year festival which was held in the spring equinox. Babylonian Gods were believed to leave their temples on this day and visit the god Marduk in his temple in Babylon. Kings like Nebuchanezzar would have played an important role in this procession and they aside their regal regalia for the procession and recited “negative confessions” as they preceded down the Processional way. Inv Ao 21118, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panel depicting striding lions from Babylon (Iraq). Neo-Babylonian Period, reign of Nebuchadnezzar II 604-562 BC. This panel belonged to the tiled decorated walls either side of the Processional Way in Babylon which was 3280 ft (1km) long. It led from the temple of Marduk, through the Ishtar Gate to the temple of Akitu. The lion is the is associated with the Babylonian goddess Ishtar. T processional Way played a key role in the  New Year festival which was held in the spring equinox. Babylonian Gods were believed to leave their temples on this day and visit the god Marduk in his temple in Babylon. Kings like Nebuchanezzar would have played an important role in this procession and they aside their regal regalia for the procession and recited “negative confessions” as they preceded down the Processional way. Inv Ao 21118, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Coloured glazed terracotta brick panel depicting striding lions from Babylon (Iraq). Neo-Babylonian Period, reign of Nebuchadnezzar II 604-562 BC. This panel belonged to the tiled decorated walls either side of the Processional Way in Babylon which was 3280 ft (1km) long. It led from the temple of Marduk, through the Ishtar Gate to the temple of Akitu. The lion is the is associated with the Babylonian goddess Ishtar. T processional Way played a key role in the  New Year festival which was held in the spring equinox. Babylonian Gods were believed to leave their temples on this day and visit the god Marduk in his temple in Babylon. Kings like Nebuchanezzar would have played an important role in this procession and they aside their regal regalia for the procession and recited “negative confessions” as they preceded down the Processional way. Inv Ao 21118, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman mosaic of a Young boy playing with snakes, possibly an early Christian mosaic. Syria or Lebanon, 5th century AD. Cubes of marble and limestone. Dressed in a long tunic, the child playing with two snakes could be illustrating a passage from the Book of Isai (11.6 to 8). This fragmented mosaic panel once continued in upper part, as indicated by the animal hoofs, and to the right of the mosaic are remains of a Greek inscription. inv 5094. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Reconstruction of  the inside of the Greek Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. The rear panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables.  The men on the couches are playing the song of Eros the liar and the flute to distract the deceased from worldly thoughts so he can enter the next world. The fresco on the lid of the tomb and shows a  diving from a column into water. The column represents the border of thye known world and therefore the limit of man's knowledge.  The dive represents the passage form this world to the next. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Reconstruction of  the inside of the Greek Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. The rear panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables.  The men on the couches are playing the song of Eros the liar and the flute to distract the deceased from worldly thoughts so he can enter the next world. The fresco on the lid of the tomb and shows a  diving from a column into water. The column represents the border of thye known world and therefore the limit of man's knowledge.  The dive represents the passage form this world to the next. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Reconstruction of  the inside of the Greek Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. The rear panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables.  The men on the couches are playing the song of Eros the liar and the flute to distract the deceased from worldly thoughts so he can enter the next world. The fresco on the lid of the tomb and shows a  diving from a column into water. The column represents the border of thye known world and therefore the limit of man's knowledge.  The dive represents the passage form this world to the next. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • "Umberellas" a series of fine art photography photos showing people at play. By art photographer Paul Williams.
  • "Umberellas" a series of fine art photography photos showing people at play. By art photographer Paul Williams.
  • "Umberellas" a series of fine art photography photos showing people at play. By art photographer Paul Williams.
  • "Umberellas" a series of fine art photography photos showing people at play. By art photographer Paul Williams.
  • "Umberellas" a series of fine art photography photos showing people at play. By art photographer Paul Williams.
  • "Umberellas" a series of fine art photography photos showing people at play. By art photographer Paul Williams.
  • "Umberellas" a series of fine art photography photos showing people at play. By art photographer Paul Williams.
  • "Umberellas" a series of fine art photography photos showing people at play. By art photographer Paul Williams.
  • "Umberellas" a series of fine art photography photos showing people at play. By art photographer Paul Williams.
  • "Umberellas" a series of fine art photography photos showing people at play. By art photographer Paul Williams.
  • "Umberellas" a series of fine art photography photos showing people at play. By art photographer Paul Williams.
  • "Umberellas" a series of fine art photography photos showing people at play. By art photographer Paul Williams.
  • "By The Sea" a series of fine art photography photos showing people at play. By art photographer Paul Williams.
  • "By The Sea" a series of fine art photography photos showing people at play. By art photographer Paul Williams.
  • "By The Sea" a series of fine art photography photos showing people at play. By art photographer Paul Williams.
  • "By The Sea" a series of fine art photography photos showing people at play. By art photographer Paul Williams.
  • "By The Sea" a series of fine art photography photos showing people at play. By art photographer Paul Williams.
  • "By The Sea" a series of fine art photography photos showing people at play. By art photographer Paul Williams.
  • "By The Sea" a series of fine art photography photos showing people at play. By art photographer Paul Williams.
  • "By The Sea" a series of fine art photography photos showing people at play. By art photographer Paul Williams.
  • "By The Sea" a series of fine art photography photos showing people at play. By art photographer Paul Williams.
  • "By The Sea" a series of fine art photography photos showing people at play. By art photographer Paul Williams.
  • "By The Sea" a series of fine art photography photos showing people at play. By art photographer Paul Williams.
  • "By The Sea" a series of fine art photography photos showing people at play. By art photographer Paul Williams.
  • "By The Sea" a series of fine art photography photos showing people at play. By art photographer Paul Williams.
  • "By The Sea" a series of fine art photography photos showing people at play. By art photographer Paul Williams.
  • "By The Sea" a series of fine art photography photos showing people at play. By art photographer Paul Williams.
  • "Umberellas" a series of fine art photography photos showing people at play. By art photographer Paul Williams.
  • "By The Sea" a series of fine art photography photos showing people at play. By art photographer Paul Williams.
  • "By The Sea" a series of fine art photography photos showing people at play. By art photographer Paul Williams.
  • Minoan clay model shrine depicting a priestess playing the part of a goddess in a small single roomed house, Galatas 1700-1650 BC; Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, black background.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting scenes from mythology, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus House in Jilani Guirat area. End of 2nd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against an art background<br />
<br />
Detail from a mosaic which depicts Polyphene playing a lyre to charm Galate ; Dionysus drunk ; Alpheus attacking the nymph Arethusa
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Orpheus, god of music, playing his lyre,  from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus, Bir Zid area. 2nd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Picture & image of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This panels scene showing 8 out of 10 children of the King, the hieroglyphs reads as follows: "Malitispas, Astitarhunzas, Tamitispas,Isikaritispas, Sikaras, Halpawaris, Ya hilatispas". Above, there are three figures holding knucklebones (astragalus) and one figure walking by leaning on a stick; below are two each figures playing the knucklebones and turning whirligigs.  <br />
<br />
Against a gray background.
  • Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 BC. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The figure playing a musical instrument similar to a guitar is followed by another figure carrying an animal. The stem of the musical instrument is fringed. The left side of the Orthostat is uncompleted. <br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Pictures & images of the North Gate Hittite sculpture stele depicting musicians playing instruments. 8the century BC.  Karatepe Aslantas Open-Air Museum (Karatepe-Aslantaş Açık Hava Müzesi), Osmaniye Province, Turkey. Against grey background
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • Gothic painted Panel Virgin of the Angels by Pere Serra. Tempera and gold leaf on wood. Circa 1385. 195.8 x 131 x 11 cm. Comes from Tortosa cathedral (Baix Ebre). <br />
This splendid central panel and the two sections of the predella with saints (which must once have flanked a tabernacle) are all that remains of an altarpiece. It was dedicated to the Virgin Mary and was painted for one of the chapels in the ambulatory of Tortosa cathedral, probably towards the 1380s. The compartment with the Virgin and Child surrounded by angels playing music is a very graceful and refined version of an iconographic type that was extremely popular at the time. Pere Serra, author of the altarpiece, came from a family of painters who grew to head the Catalan painting of the second half of the fourteenth century. National Museum of Catalan Art, Barcelona, Spain, inv no: 003950-000
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. Commodus was one of Rome’s bad crazy Emperors being sadistic and debauched with a harem of 300 concubines to choose from. His favourite role playing character was that of Hercules and Commodus ordered many statues to be made showing him dressed as Hercules with a lion's hide and a club. He thought of himself as the reincarnation of Hercules, frequently emulating the legendary hero's feats by appearing in the arena to fight a variety of wild animals. Commodus raised the ire of many military officials in Rome for his Hercules persona in the arena. Often, wounded soldiers and amputees would be placed in the arena for Commodus to slay with a sword. Commodus's eccentric behaviour would not stop there. Citizens of Rome missing their feet through accident or illness were taken to the arena, where they were tethered together for Commodus to club to death while pretending they were giants.[17] These acts may have contributed to his assassination. Such ruthless antics probably led to the violent death of Commodus when a wrestler assassinated him by strangling him to death. MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. Commodus was one of Rome’s bad crazy Emperors being sadistic and debauched with a harem of 300 concubines to choose from. His favourite role playing character was that of Hercules and Commodus ordered many statues to be made showing him dressed as Hercules with a lion's hide and a club. He thought of himself as the reincarnation of Hercules, frequently emulating the legendary hero's feats by appearing in the arena to fight a variety of wild animals. Commodus raised the ire of many military officials in Rome for his Hercules persona in the arena. Often, wounded soldiers and amputees would be placed in the arena for Commodus to slay with a sword. Commodus's eccentric behaviour would not stop there. Citizens of Rome missing their feet through accident or illness were taken to the arena, where they were tethered together for Commodus to club to death while pretending they were giants.[17] These acts may have contributed to his assassination. Such ruthless antics probably led to the violent death of Commodus when a wrestler assassinated him by strangling him to death.. MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble bust of Commodus as Hercules. Circa191-192 AD found in an underground chamber in the Horti Lamiani area of Rome. The son of Marcus Aurelus is shown with the features of Hercules and is characterised by Greek hero’s attributes: the lion’s skin, the club, the apples of Hesperides. The character is accompanied by fantastic sea creatures in a composition symbolising his apotheosis. The work can be dated to the final period of the life of Commodus, between 191-192 AD. Commodus was one of Rome’s bad crazy Emperors being sadistic and debauched with a harem of 300 concubines to choose from. His favourite role playing character was that of Hercules and Commodus ordered many statues to be made showing him dressed as Hercules with a lion's hide and a club. He thought of himself as the reincarnation of Hercules, frequently emulating the legendary hero's feats by appearing in the arena to fight a variety of wild animals. Commodus raised the ire of many military officials in Rome for his Hercules persona in the arena. Often, wounded soldiers and amputees would be placed in the arena for Commodus to slay with a sword. Commodus's eccentric behaviour would not stop there. Citizens of Rome missing their feet through accident or illness were taken to the arena, where they were tethered together for Commodus to club to death while pretending they were giants.[17] These acts may have contributed to his assassination. Such ruthless antics probably led to the violent death of Commodus when a wrestler assassinated him by strangling him to death.. MC.1120 Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Minoan clay model shrine depicting a priestess playing the part of a goddess in a small single roomed house, Galatas 1700-1650 BC; Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, white background.
  • Minoan clay model shrine depicting a priestess playing the part of a goddess in a small single roomed house, Galatas 1700-1650 BC; Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, grey background.
  • Minoan clay model shrine depicting a priestess playing the part of a goddess in a small single roomed house, Galatas 1700-1650 BC; Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, grey background.
  • Minoan clay model shrine depicting a priestess playing the part of a goddess in a small single roomed house, Galatas 1700-1650 BC; Heraklion Archaeological  Museum.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Apollo and a Muse Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
On the left stood Apollo, one foot raised on a rock, playing his lyre which rests on top of the omphalos (the earth’s navel stone, tied down at Delphi(. On the right stands a muse holding one arm of Apollos lyre.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Apollo and a Muse Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
On the left stood Apollo, one foot raised on a rock, playing his lyre which rests on top of the omphalos (the earth’s navel stone, tied down at Delphi(. On the right stands a muse holding one arm of Apollos lyre.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Apollo and a Muse Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
On the left stood Apollo, one foot raised on a rock, playing his lyre which rests on top of the omphalos (the earth’s navel stone, tied down at Delphi(. On the right stands a muse holding one arm of Apollos lyre.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting scenes from mythology, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus House in Jilani Guirat area. End of 2nd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.<br />
<br />
Detail from a mosaic which depicts Polyphene playing a lyre to charm Galate ; Dionysus drunk ; Alpheus attacking the nymph Arethusa
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting scenes from mythology, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus House in Jilani Guirat area. End of 2nd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against a black background<br />
<br />
Detail from a mosaic which depicts Polyphene playing a lyre to charm Galate ; Dionysus drunk ; Alpheus attacking the nymph Arethusa
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting scenes from mythology, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus House in Jilani Guirat area. End of 2nd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.<br />
<br />
Detail from a mosaic which depicts Polyphene playing a lyre to charm Galate ; Dionysus drunk ; Alpheus attacking the nymph Arethusa
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting scenes from mythology, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus House in Jilani Guirat area. End of 2nd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.<br />
<br />
Detail from a mosaic which depicts Polyphene playing a lyre to charm Galate ; Dionysus drunk ; Alpheus attacking the nymph Arethusa
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting scenes from mythology, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus House in Jilani Guirat area. End of 2nd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against a grey background<br />
<br />
Detail from a mosaic which depicts Polyphene playing a lyre to charm Galate ; Dionysus drunk ; Alpheus attacking the nymph Arethusa
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Orpheus, god of music, playing his lyre,  from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus, Bir Zid area. 2nd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting  a bird charmed by  music being played by Orpheus, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus, Bir Zid area. 2nd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting  a bird charmed by  music being played by Orpheus, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus, Bir Zid area. 2nd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting  animals charmed by  music being played by Orpheus, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus, Bir Zid area. 2nd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Orpheus, god of music, playing his lyre,  from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus, Bir Zid area. 2nd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against a white background
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting  animals charmed by  music being played by Orpheus, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus, Bir Zid area. 2nd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Orpheus, god of music, playing his lyre,  from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus, Bir Zid area. 2nd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against a black background
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Orpheus, god of music, playing his lyre surrounded by animals charmed by his music, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus, Bir Zid area. 2nd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Orpheus, god of music, playing his lyre,  from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus, Bir Zid area. 2nd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against an art background
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Orpheus, god of music, playing his lyre,  from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus, Bir Zid area. 2nd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against a grey background
  • Picture of a satyr wearing a panther skin playing a flute from a Roman mosaic depicting Dionysus Riding a Panther, from Abdel Jelil. 2nd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Close up of the Inandik Hittite relief decorated cult libation vase decorated with a women and man relief figures coloured in cream, red and black playing instruments, in the register below is a cult altar, mid to late 16th century BC - İnandıktepe, Turkey. Against a white background
  • Close up of the Inandik Hittite relief decorated cult libation vase decorated with a women and man relief figures coloured in cream, red and black playing instruments, in the register below is a cult altar, mid to late 16th century BC - İnandıktepe, Turkey. Against a black background
  • Close up of the Inandik Hittite relief decorated cult libation vase decorated with a women and man relief figures coloured in cream, red and black playing instruments, in the register below is a cult altar, mid to late 16th century BC - İnandıktepe, Turkey. Against a warm art background
  • Close up of the Inandik Hittite relief decorated cult libation vase decorated with women relief figures coloured in cream, red and black playing instruments, mid to late 16th century BC - İnandıktepe, Turkey. Against a white background
  • Close up of the Inandik Hittite relief decorated cult libation vase decorated with women relief figures coloured in cream, red and black playing instruments, mid to late 16th century BC - İnandıktepe, Turkey . Against a grey background
  • Close up of the Inandik Hittite relief decorated cult libation vase decorated with women relief figures coloured in cream, red and black playing instruments, mid to late 16th century BC - İnandıktepe, Turkey
  • Close up of the Inandik Hittite relief decorated cult libation vase decorated with women relief figures coloured in cream, red and black playing instruments, mid to late 16th century BC - İnandıktepe, Turkey. Against a warm art background
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Hieroglyph panel1 (left) - Discourse of Yariris. Yariris presents his predecessor, the eldest son Kamanis, to his people. <br />
Second From left panel 2  -  King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings.) held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".  <br />
<br />
Panel 3 - This panels scene showing 8 out of 10 children of the King, the hieroglyphs reads as follows: "Malitispas, Astitarhunzas, Tamitispas,Isikaritispas, Sikaras, Halpawaris, Ya hilatispas". Above, there are three figures holding knucklebones (astragalus) and one figure walking by leaning on a stick; below are two each figures playing the knucklebones and turning whirligigs.<br />
 <br />
Panel 4 - The queen carries her youngest son. The hieroglyphs located above read; "and this is Tuwarsais; the prince desired by the ruler, whose exclusiveness has been exposed". While the queen carries her son in her lap, she holds the rope of the colt coming behind with her other hand. The muscles of the colt are schematic. <br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Hieroglyph panel1 (left) - Discourse of Yariris. Yariris presents his predecessor, the eldest son Kamanis, to his people. <br />
Second From left panel 2  -  King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings.) held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".  <br />
<br />
Panel 3 - This panels scene showing 8 out of 10 children of the King, the hieroglyphs reads as follows: "Malitispas, Astitarhunzas, Tamitispas,Isikaritispas, Sikaras, Halpawaris, Ya hilatispas". Above, there are three figures holding knucklebones (astragalus) and one figure walking by leaning on a stick; below are two each figures playing the knucklebones and turning whirligigs.<br />
 <br />
Panel 4 - The queen carries her youngest son. The hieroglyphs located above read; "and this is Tuwarsais; the prince desired by the ruler, whose exclusiveness has been exposed". While the queen carries her son in her lap, she holds the rope of the colt coming behind with her other hand. The muscles of the colt are schematic. <br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This panels scene showing 8 out of 10 children of the King, the hieroglyphs reads as follows: "Malitispas, Astitarhunzas, Tamitispas,Isikaritispas, Sikaras, Halpawaris, Ya hilatispas". Above, there are three figures holding knucklebones (astragalus) and one figure walking by leaning on a stick; below are two each figures playing the knucklebones and turning whirligigs.  <br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This panels scene showing 8 out of 10 children of the King, the hieroglyphs reads as follows: "Malitispas, Astitarhunzas, Tamitispas,Isikaritispas, Sikaras, Halpawaris, Ya hilatispas". Above, there are three figures holding knucklebones (astragalus) and one figure walking by leaning on a stick; below are two each figures playing the knucklebones and turning whirligigs.  <br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Photo of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This panels scene showing 8 out of 10 children of the King, the hieroglyphs reads as follows: "Malitispas, Astitarhunzas, Tamitispas,Isikaritispas, Sikaras, Halpawaris, Ya hilatispas". Above, there are three figures holding knucklebones (astragalus) and one figure walking by leaning on a stick; below are two each figures playing the knucklebones and turning whirligigs.  <br />
<br />
Against a brown art background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This panels scene showing 8 out of 10 children of the King, the hieroglyphs reads as follows: "Malitispas, Astitarhunzas, Tamitispas,Isikaritispas, Sikaras, Halpawaris, Ya hilatispas". Above, there are three figures holding knucklebones (astragalus) and one figure walking by leaning on a stick; below are two each figures playing the knucklebones and turning whirligigs.  <br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 BC. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The figure playing a musical instrument similar to a guitar is followed by another figure carrying an animal. The stem of the musical instrument is fringed. The left side of the Orthostat is uncompleted.<br />
<br />
Against a brown gray background.
  • Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 BC. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The figure playing a musical instrument similar to a guitar is followed by another figure carrying an animal. The stem of the musical instrument is fringed. The left side of the Orthostat is uncompleted.  <br />
<br />
Against a black background.

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