• The interior of the Gulag,  Sighet prison which housed high ranking political & religious prisoners held by the Romanian communist regime. Now the  Sighet Memorial Museum in memory of the victims of communism.  Sighetu Marmaţiei, Maramureş
  • The interior of the Gulag,  Sighet prison which housed high ranking political & religious prisoners held by the Romanian communist regime. Now the  Sighet Memorial Museum in memory of the victims of communism.  Sighetu Marmaţiei, Maramureş
  • The interior of the Gulag,  Sighet prison which housed high ranking political & religious prisoners held by the Romanian communist regime. Now the  Sighet Memorial Museum in memory of the victims of communism.  Sighetu Marmaţiei, Maramureş
  • Sculpture group "Parade of the Sacrificied" by Aurel Vlad,  at the Gulag Sighet prison which housed high ranking political & religious prisoners held by the Romanian communist regime. Now the  Sighet Memorial Museum in memory of the victims of communism.  Sighetu Marmaţiei, Maramureş
  • Sculpture group "Parade of the Sacrificied" by Aurel Vlad,  at the Gulag Sighet prison which housed high ranking political & religious prisoners held by the Romanian communist regime. Now the  Sighet Memorial Museum in memory of the victims of communism.  Sighetu Marmaţiei, Maramureş
  • Sculpture group "Parade of the Sacrificied" by Aurel Vlad,  at the Gulag Sighet prison which housed high ranking political & religious prisoners held by the Romanian communist regime. Now the  Sighet Memorial Museum in memory of the victims of communism.  Sighetu Marmaţiei, Maramureş
  • Watch tower & Sculpture group "Parade of the Sacrificied" by Aurel Vlad,  at the Gulag Sighet prison which housed high ranking political & religious prisoners held by the Romanian communist regime. Now the  Sighet Memorial Museum in memory of the victims of communism.  Sighetu Marmaţiei, Maramureş
  • Watch tower & names on the MEMORIAL of the Victims of Communism at the Gulag Sighet prison which housed high ranking political & religious prisoners held by the Romanian communist regime. Now the  Sighet Memorial Museum in memory of the victims of communism.  Sighetu Marmaţiei, Maramureş
  • Names on the MEMORIAL of the Victims of Communism at the Gulag Sighet prison which housed high ranking political & religious prisoners held by the Romanian communist regime. Now the  Sighet Memorial Museum in memory of the victims of communism.  Sighetu Marmaţiei, Maramureşb
  • Names on the MEMORIAL of the Victims of Communism at the Gulag Sighet prison which housed high ranking political & religious prisoners held by the Romanian communist regime. Now the  Sighet Memorial Museum in memory of the victims of communism.  Sighetu Marmaţiei, Maramureşb
  • Sculpture group "Parade of the Sacrificied" by Aurel Vlad,  at the Gulag Sighet prison which housed high ranking political & religious prisoners held by the Romanian communist regime. Now the  Sighet Memorial Museum in memory of the victims of communism.  Sighetu Marmaţiei, Maramureş
  • The interior of the Gulag,  Sighet prison which housed high ranking political & religious prisoners held by the Romanian communist regime. Now the  Sighet Memorial Museum in memory of the victims of communism.  Sighetu Marmaţiei, Maramureş
  • Sculpture group "Parade of the Sacrificied" by Aurel Vlad,  at the Gulag Sighet prison which housed high ranking political & religious prisoners held by the Romanian communist regime. Now the  Sighet Memorial Museum in memory of the victims of communism.  Sighetu Marmaţiei, Maramureş
  • Sculpture group "Parade of the Sacrificied" by Aurel Vlad,  at the Gulag Sighet prison which housed high ranking political & religious prisoners held by the Romanian communist regime. Now the  Sighet Memorial Museum in memory of the victims of communism.  Sighetu Marmaţiei, Maramureş
  • Sculpture group "Parade of the Sacrificied" by Aurel Vlad,  at the Gulag Sighet prison which housed high ranking political & religious prisoners held by the Romanian communist regime. Now the  Sighet Memorial Museum in memory of the victims of communism.  Sighetu Marmaţiei, Maramureş
  • Sculpture group "Parade of the Sacrificied" by Aurel Vlad,  at the Gulag Sighet prison which housed high ranking political & religious prisoners held by the Romanian communist regime. Now the  Sighet Memorial Museum in memory of the victims of communism.  Sighetu Marmaţiei, Maramureş
  • Sculpture group "Parade of the Sacrificied" by Aurel Vlad,  at the Gulag Sighet prison which housed high ranking political & religious prisoners held by the Romanian communist regime. Now the  Sighet Memorial Museum in memory of the victims of communism.  Sighetu Marmaţiei, Maramureş
  • The interior of the Gulag,  Sighet prison which housed high ranking political & religious prisoners held by the Romanian communist regime. Now the  Sighet Memorial Museum in memory of the victims of communism.  Sighetu Marmaţiei, Maramureş
  • Paris - France - National Assembly - French Flag
  • Paris - France - National Assembly - French Flag
  • Paris - France - National Assembly - French Flag
  • Paris - France - National Assembly
  • Paris - France - National Assembly
  • Houses of Parliament, Westminster, London
  • Houses of Parliament, Westminster, London
  • Houses of Parliament, Westminster, London
  • Houses of Parliament, Westminster, London
  • Houses of Parliament, Westminster, London
  • Houses of Parliament, Westminster, London
  • Houses of Parliament, Westminster, London
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Ager Apostles: James and Thaddeus<br />
<br />
Late XI - XII century<br />
Fresco transferred to canvas from the Church of St. Peter Anger, Noguera, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1958. MNAC 65467<br />
<br />
Romanesque fresco ascribed to the so-called Pedret Painters of Ager.  Typical of this school is the composition or refinement in the modeling of faces with characteristic forehead, cheeks and neck, which show the quality of Painters. San Ager was one of the main centers of religious and political centres in the south of Urgell.
  • Ager Apostles: James and Thaddeus<br />
<br />
Late XI - XII century<br />
Fresco transferred to canvas from the Church of St. Peter Anger, Noguera, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1958. MNAC 65467<br />
<br />
Romanesque fresco ascribed to the so-called Pedret Painters of Ager.  Typical of this school is the composition or refinement in the modeling of faces with characteristic forehead, cheeks and neck, which show the quality of Painters. San Ager was one of the main centers of religious and political centres in the south of Urgell.
  • Ager Apostles: James and Thaddeus<br />
<br />
Late XI - XII century<br />
Fresco transferred to canvas from the Church of St. Peter Anger, Noguera, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1958. MNAC 65467<br />
<br />
Romanesque fresco ascribed to the so-called Pedret Painters of Ager.  Typical of this school is the composition or refinement in the modeling of faces with characteristic forehead, cheeks and neck, which show the quality of Painters. San Ager was one of the main centers of religious and political centres in the south of Urgell.
  • Ager Apostles: James and Thaddeus<br />
<br />
Late XI - XII century<br />
Fresco transferred to canvas from the Church of St. Peter Anger, Noguera, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1958. MNAC 65467<br />
<br />
Romanesque fresco ascribed to the so-called Pedret Painters of Ager.  Typical of this school is the composition or refinement in the modeling of faces with characteristic forehead, cheeks and neck, which show the quality of Painters. San Ager was one of the main centers of religious and political centres in the south of Urgell.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Ager Apostles: James and Thaddeus<br />
<br />
Late XI - XII century<br />
Fresco transferred to canvas from the Church of St. Peter Anger, Noguera, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1958. MNAC 65467<br />
<br />
Romanesque fresco ascribed to the so-called Pedret Painters of Ager.  Typical of this school is the composition or refinement in the modeling of faces with characteristic forehead, cheeks and neck, which show the quality of Painters. San Ager was one of the main centers of religious and political centres in the south of Urgell.
  • Ager Apostles: James and Thaddeus<br />
<br />
Late XI - XII century<br />
Fresco transferred to canvas from the Church of St. Peter Anger, Noguera, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1958. MNAC 65467<br />
<br />
Romanesque fresco ascribed to the so-called Pedret Painters of Ager.  Typical of this school is the composition or refinement in the modeling of faces with characteristic forehead, cheeks and neck, which show the quality of Painters. San Ager was one of the main centers of religious and political centres in the south of Urgell.
  • Ager Apostles: James and Thaddeus<br />
<br />
Late XI - XII century<br />
Fresco transferred to canvas from the Church of St. Peter Anger, Noguera, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1958. MNAC 65467<br />
<br />
Romanesque fresco ascribed to the so-called Pedret Painters of Ager.  Typical of this school is the composition or refinement in the modeling of faces with characteristic forehead, cheeks and neck, which show the quality of Painters. San Ager was one of the main centers of religious and political centres in the south of Urgell.
  • Ager Apostles: James and Thaddeus<br />
<br />
Late XI - XII century<br />
Fresco transferred to canvas from the Church of St. Peter Anger, Noguera, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1958. MNAC 65467<br />
<br />
Romanesque fresco ascribed to the so-called Pedret Painters of Ager.  Typical of this school is the composition or refinement in the modeling of faces with characteristic forehead, cheeks and neck, which show the quality of Painters. San Ager was one of the main centers of religious and political centres in the south of Urgell.
  • Ager Apostles: James and Thaddeus<br />
<br />
Late XI - XII century<br />
Fresco transferred to canvas from the Church of St. Peter Anger, Noguera, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1958. MNAC 65467<br />
<br />
Romanesque fresco ascribed to the so-called Pedret Painters of Ager.  Typical of this school is the composition or refinement in the modeling of faces with characteristic forehead, cheeks and neck, which show the quality of Painters. San Ager was one of the main centers of religious and political centres in the south of Urgell.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Ager Apostles: James and Thaddeus<br />
<br />
Late XI - XII century<br />
Fresco transferred to canvas from the Church of St. Peter Anger, Noguera, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1958. MNAC 65467<br />
<br />
Romanesque fresco ascribed to the so-called Pedret Painters of Ager.  Typical of this school is the composition or refinement in the modeling of faces with characteristic forehead, cheeks and neck, which show the quality of Painters. San Ager was one of the main centers of religious and political centres in the south of Urgell.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.

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