• Roman Mosaic portrait of a women from Pompei Archaeological Site. Naples Archaeological Museum inv 124666
  • Roman Mosaic portrait of a women from Pompei Archaeological Site. Naples Archaeological Museum inv 124666
  • Roman portrait head of a women wearing a priestess crown. Found in Aphrodisias Theatre. First Century AD. Aphrodisias Archaeology Museum Turkey
  • Roman portrait head of a women wearing a priestess crown. Found in Aphrodisias Theatre. First Century AD. Aphrodisias Archaeology Museum Turkey
  • Ancient Egyptian relief portrait of King Akhenaten from Amarna. 18th Dynasty 1340 BC . Neues Museum Berlin Cat No: AM 14512.
  • Ancient Egyptian relief portrait fragment of King Akhenaten from Amarna. 18th Dynasty 1345 BC . Neues Museum Berlin 1985.328.3: Gift from New York Metropolitan Museum, Norbert Schimmel.
  • Ancient Egyptian relief portrait of King Akhenaten from Amarna. 18th Dynasty 1340 BC . Neues Museum Berlin Cat No: AM 21683.
  • Portrait head sculpture of the Roman emperor Lucius Verus ( AD 161-169). Pentalic marble found in Athens.
  • Portrait head sculpture of the Roman emperor Lucius Verus ( AD 161-169). Pentalic marble found in Athens.
  • Portrait head sculpture of the Roman emperor Lucius Verus ( AD 161-169). Pentalic marble found in Athens.
  • Roman portrait head of a women wearing a priestess crown. Found in Aphrodisias Theatre. First Century AD. Aphrodisias Archaeology Museum Turkey
  • Self Portrait by Paul Williams.Fine Art Black and White Pictures Wall Art Prints Polaroid Photos by photographer Paul Williams,
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from the reign of Nero, 54-68 AD. This portrait can be dated to the reign of Nero due to the facial features and hair style, with short locks and long fringe over the forehead. The young man is wearing a tunic, stopped with a small fibula (clasp) on the left shoulder. Inv 281, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from the reign of Nero, 54-68 AD. This portrait can be dated to the reign of Nero due to the facial features and hair style, with short locks and long fringe over the forehead. The young man is wearing a tunic, stopped with a small fibula (clasp) on the left shoulder. Inv 281, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from the reign of Nero, 54-68 AD. This portrait can be dated to the reign of Nero due to the facial features and hair style, with short locks and long fringe over the forehead. The young man is wearing a tunic, stopped with a small fibula (clasp) on the left shoulder. Inv 281, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from the reign of Nero, 54-68 AD. This portrait can be dated to the reign of Nero due to the facial features and hair style, with short locks and long fringe over the forehead. The young man is wearing a tunic, stopped with a small fibula (clasp) on the left shoulder. Inv 281, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a flavian women possibly Domita, circa 69-96 AD excavated from Terracina. This portrait can be dated from the typical hairstyle made popular by Flavian women. It may be of Domitia Longina who was  wife to the Roman Emperor Domitian. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a flavian women possibly Domita, circa 69-96 AD excavated from Terracina. This portrait can be dated from the typical hairstyle made popular by Flavian women. It may be of Domitia Longina who was  wife to the Roman Emperor Domitian. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a flavian women possibly Domita, circa 69-96 AD excavated from Terracina. This portrait can be dated from the typical hairstyle made popular by Flavian women. It may be of Domitia Longina who was  wife to the Roman Emperor Domitian. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a flavian women possibly Domita, circa 69-96 AD excavated from Terracina. This portrait can be dated from the typical hairstyle made popular by Flavian women. It may be of Domitia Longina who was  wife to the Roman Emperor Domitian. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from 110 AD. In this portrait, the hairstyle and facial features are typical of the Trajan era of portraiture. The hairstyle is characterised by a slight central parting on the forehead . Inv 287, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from 110 AD. In this portrait, the hairstyle and facial features are typical of the Trajan era of portraiture. The hairstyle is characterised by a slight central parting on the forehead . Inv 287, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from 110 AD. In this portrait, the hairstyle and facial features are typical of the Trajan era of portraiture. The hairstyle is characterised by a slight central parting on the forehead . Inv 287, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from 110 AD. In this portrait, the hairstyle and facial features are typical of the Trajan era of portraiture. The hairstyle is characterised by a slight central parting on the forehead . Inv 287, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from 110 AD. In this portrait, the hairstyle and facial features are typical of the Trajan era of portraiture. The hairstyle is characterised by a slight central parting on the forehead . Inv 287, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust from circa 30 BC excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Rome. The appearance of an adult man with an energetic, dominating expression, is artistically and crisply represented in this portrait. The treatment of the eyebrows and hair suggest that this statue is the copy of a bronze original. The head is a fusion of the realistic style from the period of Caesar and the classic works of the Augustan age . Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust from circa 30 BC excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Rome. The appearance of an adult man with an energetic, dominating expression, is artistically and crisply represented in this portrait. The treatment of the eyebrows and hair suggest that this statue is the copy of a bronze original. The head is a fusion of the realistic style from the period of Caesar and the classic works of the Augustan age . Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust from circa 30 BC excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Rome. The appearance of an adult man with an energetic, dominating expression, is artistically and crisply represented in this portrait. The treatment of the eyebrows and hair suggest that this statue is the copy of a bronze original. The head is a fusion of the realistic style from the period of Caesar and the classic works of the Augustan age . Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust from circa 30 BC excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Rome. The appearance of an adult man with an energetic, dominating expression, is artistically and crisply represented in this portrait. The treatment of the eyebrows and hair suggest that this statue is the copy of a bronze original. The head is a fusion of the realistic style from the period of Caesar and the classic works of the Augustan age . Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Matidia circa119 AD from Via Giolitti, Rome. Matidia was Sabina’s mother and Hadrian’s wife. The high level of idealisation of the portrait suggests that it was made after her death. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Matidia circa119 AD from Via Giolitti, Rome. Matidia was Sabina’s mother and Hadrian’s wife. The high level of idealisation of the portrait suggests that it was made after her death. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Matidia circa119 AD from Via Giolitti, Rome. Matidia was Sabina’s mother and Hadrian’s wife. The high level of idealisation of the portrait suggests that it was made after her death. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Matidia circa119 AD from Via Giolitti, Rome. Matidia was Sabina’s mother and Hadrian’s wife. The high level of idealisation of the portrait suggests that it was made after her death. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Matidia circa119 AD from Via Giolitti, Rome. Matidia was Sabina’s mother and Hadrian’s wife. The high level of idealisation of the portrait suggests that it was made after her death. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman portrait bust of a flavian women possibly Domita, circa 69-96 AD excavated from Terracina. This portrait can be dated from the typical hairstyle made popular by Flavian women. It may be of Domitia Longina who was  wife to the Roman Emperor Domitian. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a flavian women possibly Domita, circa 69-96 AD excavated from Terracina. This portrait can be dated from the typical hairstyle made popular by Flavian women. It may be of Domitia Longina who was  wife to the Roman Emperor Domitian. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a flavian women possibly Domita, circa 69-96 AD excavated from Terracina. This portrait can be dated from the typical hairstyle made popular by Flavian women. It may be of Domitia Longina who was  wife to the Roman Emperor Domitian. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a flavian women possibly Domita, circa 69-96 AD excavated from Terracina. This portrait can be dated from the typical hairstyle made popular by Flavian women. It may be of Domitia Longina who was  wife to the Roman Emperor Domitian. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a flavian women possibly Domita, circa 69-96 AD excavated from Terracina. This portrait can be dated from the typical hairstyle made popular by Flavian women. It may be of Domitia Longina who was  wife to the Roman Emperor Domitian. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from 110 AD. In this portrait, the hairstyle and facial features are typical of the Trajan era of portraiture. The hairstyle is characterised by a slight central parting on the forehead . Inv 287, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from 110 AD. In this portrait, the hairstyle and facial features are typical of the Trajan era of portraiture. The hairstyle is characterised by a slight central parting on the forehead . Inv 287, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from 110 AD. In this portrait, the hairstyle and facial features are typical of the Trajan era of portraiture. The hairstyle is characterised by a slight central parting on the forehead . Inv 287, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from 110 AD. In this portrait, the hairstyle and facial features are typical of the Trajan era of portraiture. The hairstyle is characterised by a slight central parting on the forehead . Inv 287, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from 110 AD. In this portrait, the hairstyle and facial features are typical of the Trajan era of portraiture. The hairstyle is characterised by a slight central parting on the forehead . Inv 287, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from 110 AD. In this portrait, the hairstyle and facial features are typical of the Trajan era of portraiture. The hairstyle is characterised by a slight central parting on the forehead . Inv 287, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from the reign of Nero, 54-68 AD. This portrait can be dated to the reign of Nero due to the facial features and hair style, with short locks and long fringe over the forehead. The young man is wearing a tunic, stopped with a small fibula (clasp) on the left shoulder. Inv 281, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from the reign of Nero, 54-68 AD. This portrait can be dated to the reign of Nero due to the facial features and hair style, with short locks and long fringe over the forehead. The young man is wearing a tunic, stopped with a small fibula (clasp) on the left shoulder. Inv 281, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from the reign of Nero, 54-68 AD. This portrait can be dated to the reign of Nero due to the facial features and hair style, with short locks and long fringe over the forehead. The young man is wearing a tunic, stopped with a small fibula (clasp) on the left shoulder. Inv 281, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from the reign of Nero, 54-68 AD. This portrait can be dated to the reign of Nero due to the facial features and hair style, with short locks and long fringe over the forehead. The young man is wearing a tunic, stopped with a small fibula (clasp) on the left shoulder. Inv 281, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from the reign of Nero, 54-68 AD. This portrait can be dated to the reign of Nero due to the facial features and hair style, with short locks and long fringe over the forehead. The young man is wearing a tunic, stopped with a small fibula (clasp) on the left shoulder. Inv 281, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from the reign of Nero, 54-68 AD. This portrait can be dated to the reign of Nero due to the facial features and hair style, with short locks and long fringe over the forehead. The young man is wearing a tunic, stopped with a small fibula (clasp) on the left shoulder. Inv 281, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust from circa 30 BC excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Rome. The appearance of an adult man with an energetic, dominating expression, is artistically and crisply represented in this portrait. The treatment of the eyebrows and hair suggest that this statue is the copy of a braze original. The head is a fusion of the realistic style from the period of Caesar and the classic works of the Augustan age . Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust from circa 30 BC excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Rome. The appearance of an adult man with an energetic, dominating expression, is artistically and crisply represented in this portrait. The treatment of the eyebrows and hair suggest that this statue is the copy of a braze original. The head is a fusion of the realistic style from the period of Caesar and the classic works of the Augustan age . Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust from circa 30 BC excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Rome. The appearance of an adult man with an energetic, dominating expression, is artistically and crisply represented in this portrait. The treatment of the eyebrows and hair suggest that this statue is the copy of a braze original. The head is a fusion of the realistic style from the period of Caesar and the classic works of the Augustan age . Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust from circa 30 BC excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Rome. The appearance of an adult man with an energetic, dominating expression, is artistically and crisply represented in this portrait. The treatment of the eyebrows and hair suggest that this statue is the copy of a braze original. The head is a fusion of the realistic style from the period of Caesar and the classic works of the Augustan age . Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust from circa 30 BC excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Rome. The appearance of an adult man with an energetic, dominating expression, is artistically and crisply represented in this portrait. The treatment of the eyebrows and hair suggest that this statue is the copy of a braze original. The head is a fusion of the realistic style from the period of Caesar and the classic works of the Augustan age . Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  grey  background
  • 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  grey  background
  • Side view of the  2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  art background
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  black background
  • 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  white background
  • Face on three quarter view of the 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  art background
  • 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  grey art background
  • 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  white background
  • 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  black background
  • 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  grey art background
  • Close up of the 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  art background
  • 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  white background
  • 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  black background
  • 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  grey art background
  • 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  grey  background
  • 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  white background
  • Face on view of the  2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  art background
  • 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  grey  background
  • 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  black background
  • 2nd century Roman statue of Venus known as the Venere Felice, inspired by the Hellenistic stsue of Aphrodite of Cnidus made by Greek sculptor Praixiteles in the 4th century BC. Possibly a Venus's face is a portrait of Sallustia who dedicated the statue with Helpidus, and the Eros may be a portrait of her young son. inv 129, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  grey art background
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from the rule of Trajan 98-117 AD. This bust of a man presents a hairstyle with long curls that are closely cut to the head and cover the forehead with a thick fringe that follows the shape of the face. The style comes from the official portraits of Trajan, 97-117 AD, created for his Decennalia, celebrating the tenth year of his reign. Inv 317, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from the rule of Trajan 98-117 AD. This bust of a man presents a hairstyle with long curls that are closely cut to the head and cover the forehead with a thick fringe that follows the shape of the face. The style comes from the official portraits of Trajan, 97-117 AD, created for his Decennalia, celebrating the tenth year of his reign. Inv 317, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from the rule of Trajan 98-117 AD. This bust of a man presents a hairstyle with long curls that are closely cut to the head and cover the forehead with a thick fringe that follows the shape of the face. The style comes from the official portraits of Trajan, 97-117 AD, created for his Decennalia, celebrating the tenth year of his reign. Inv 317, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from the rule of Trajan 98-117 AD. This bust of a man presents a hairstyle with long curls that are closely cut to the head and cover the forehead with a thick fringe that follows the shape of the face. The style comes from the official portraits of Trajan, 97-117 AD, created for his Decennalia, celebrating the tenth year of his reign. Inv 317, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from the rule of Trajan 98-117 AD. This bust of a man presents a hairstyle with long curls that are closely cut to the head and cover the forehead with a thick fringe that follows the shape of the face. The style comes from the official portraits of Trajan, 97-117 AD, created for his Decennalia, celebrating the tenth year of his reign. Inv 317, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Ancient Egyptian relief portrait fragment of King Akhenaten from Amarna. 18th Dynasty 1345 BC . Neues Museum Berlin 1985.328.3: Gift from New York Metropolitan Museum, Norbert Schimmel.
  • Ancient Egyptian relief portrait fragment of King Akhenaten from Amarna. 18th Dynasty 1345 BC . Neues Museum Berlin 1985.328.3: Gift from New York Metropolitan Museum, Norbert Schimmel.
  • Ancient Egyptian relief portrait fragment of King Akhenaten from Amarna. 18th Dynasty 1345 BC . Neues Museum Berlin 1985.328.3: Gift from New York Metropolitan Museum, Norbert Schimmel.
  • Ancient Egyptian relief portrait fragment of King Akhenaten from Amarna. 18th Dynasty 1345 BC . Neues Museum Berlin 1985.328.3: Gift from New York Metropolitan Museum, Norbert Schimmel.
  • Ancient Egyptian relief portrait of King Akhenaten from Amarna. 18th Dynasty 1340 BC . Neues Museum Berlin Cat No: AM 14512.
  • Ancient Egyptian relief portrait of King Akhenaten from Amarna. 18th Dynasty 1340 BC . Neues Museum Berlin Cat No: AM 14512.
  • Ancient Egyptian relief portrait of King Akhenaten from Amarna. 18th Dynasty 1340 BC . Neues Museum Berlin Cat No: AM 14512.
  • Ancient Egyptian relief portrait of King Akhenaten from Amarna. 18th Dynasty 1340 BC . Neues Museum Berlin Cat No: AM 14512.
  • Ancient Egyptian relief portrait of King Akhenaten from Amarna. 18th Dynasty 1340 BC . Neues Museum Berlin Cat No: AM 21683.
  • Ancient Egyptian relief portrait of King Akhenaten from Amarna. 18th Dynasty 1340 BC . Neues Museum Berlin Cat No: AM 21683.
  • Ancient Egyptian relief portrait of King Akhenaten from Amarna. 18th Dynasty 1340 BC . Neues Museum Berlin Cat No: AM 21683.
  • Statue Portrait head of Nefertiti. / Portratkopfe des Konigspaares Nofretete. / Egypt 18. Dynasty  (1340 BC) Berlin Neues Museum Cat No: AM 21348.
  • Statue Portrait head of Nefertiti. / Portratkopfe des Konigspaares Nofretete. / Egypt 18. Dynasty  (1340 BC) Berlin Neues Museum Cat No: AM 21348.
  • Statue Portrait head of Nefertiti. / Portratkopfe des Konigspaares Nofretete. / Egypt 18. Dynasty  (1340 BC) Berlin Neues Museum Cat No: AM 21348.
  • Roman fresco  portrait of a baker, Terentius, and his wife in the pose of intellectuals, Naples National Archaeological Museum , their expressions capture the sense of a real moment that connects with the viewer in a direct realistic way , Pompeii VII 2,6 , inv 9058 ,
  • Roman fresco  portrait of a baker, Terentius, and his wife in the pose of intellectuals, Naples National Archaeological Museum , their expressions capture the sense of a real moment that connects with the viewer in a direct realistic way , Pompeii VII 2,6 , inv 9058 ,
  • Roman fresco  portrait of a baker, Terentius, and his wife in the pose of intellectuals, Naples National Archaeological Museum , their expressions capture the sense of a real moment that connects with the viewer in a direct realistic way , Pompeii VII 2,6 , inv 9058 ,
  • Roman mosaics - Dionysus Portrait Mosaic. Okeanos Villa, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a white background.
  • Roman mosaics - Dionysus Portrait Mosaic. Okeanos Villa, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.
  • Roman mosaics - Dionysus Portrait Mosaic. Okeanos Villa, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.
  • Roman mosaics - Dionysus Portrait Mosaic. Okeanos Villa, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman fresco wall painting portrait of a baker, Terentius, and his wife in the pose of intellectuals, their expressions capture the sense of a real moment that connects with the viewer in a direct realistic way , Pompeii VII 2,6 , inv 9058 , Naples National Archaeological Museum
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Matidia circa119 AD from Via Giolitti, Rome. Matidia was Sabina’s mother and Hadrian’s wife. The high level of idealisation of the portrait suggests that it was made after her death. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Matidia circa119 AD from Via Giolitti, Rome. Matidia was Sabina’s mother and Hadrian’s wife. The high level of idealisation of the portrait suggests that it was made after her death. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Matidia circa119 AD from Via Giolitti, Rome. Matidia was Sabina’s mother and Hadrian’s wife. The high level of idealisation of the portrait suggests that it was made after her death. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 1st century Roman Copy with a portrait head. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 1st century Roman Copy with a portrait head. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 1st century Roman Copy with a portrait head. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Roman bust of Socrates, 1st cent AD from the construction site of the monument to Vitorio Emanuel II,  Rome, Italy. This portrait of Socrates is similar to the Herm of Socrates from the Naples National Museum. In xenophon’s Symposium socrates is described as ‘Short body with wide shoulders, prominent belly, aquiline nose, thick wide mouth and head almost completely bold. In 399 BC the famous Athenian philosopher was condemned to death for impiety and corruption. Inv 1236, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman bust of Socrates, 1st cent AD from the construction site of the monument to Vitorio Emanuel II,  Rome, Italy. This portrait of Socrates is similar to the Herm of Socrates from the Naples National Museum. In xenophon’s Symposium socrates is described as ‘Short body with wide shoulders, prominent belly, aquiline nose, thick wide mouth and head almost completely bold. In 399 BC the famous Athenian philosopher was condemned to death for impiety and corruption. Inv 1236, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman bust of Socrates, 1st cent AD from the construction site of the monument to Vitorio Emanuel II,  Rome, Italy. This portrait of Socrates is similar to the Herm of Socrates from the Naples National Museum. In xenophon’s Symposium socrates is described as ‘Short body with wide shoulders, prominent belly, aquiline nose, thick wide mouth and head almost completely bold. In 399 BC the famous Athenian philosopher was condemned to death for impiety and corruption. Inv 1236, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman bust of Socrates, 1st cent AD from the construction site of the monument to Vitorio Emanuel II,  Rome, Italy. This portrait of Socrates is similar to the Herm of Socrates from the Naples National Museum. In xenophon’s Symposium socrates is described as ‘Short body with wide shoulders, prominent belly, aquiline nose, thick wide mouth and head almost completely bold. In 399 BC the famous Athenian philosopher was condemned to death for impiety and corruption. Inv 1236, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman portrait bust of a flavian women possibly Domita, circa 69-96 AD excavated from Terracina. This portrait can be dated from the typical hairstyle made popular by Flavian women. It may be of Domitia Longina who was  wife to the Roman Emperor Domitian. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from 110 AD. In this portrait, the hairstyle and facial features are typical of the Trajan era of portraiture. The hairstyle is characterised by a slight central parting on the forehead . Inv 287, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust from circa 30 BC excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Rome. The appearance of an adult man with an energetic, dominating expression, is artistically and crisply represented in this portrait. The treatment of the eyebrows and hair suggest that this statue is the copy of a bronze original. The head is a fusion of the realistic style from the period of Caesar and the classic works of the Augustan age . Inv 66177, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Nerva, circa  96 to 98 AD excavated from Tivoli. Marcus Cocceius Nerva Caesar Augustus was Roman Emperor from 96 to 98 AD. On 18 September 96 AD Domitian was assassinated and Nerva became Emperor  at the age of sixty-five after a lifetime of imperial service under Nero and the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Nerva, circa  96 to 98 AD excavated from Tivoli. Marcus Cocceius Nerva Caesar Augustus was Roman Emperor from 96 to 98 AD. On 18 September 96 AD Domitian was assassinated and Nerva became Emperor  at the age of sixty-five after a lifetime of imperial service under Nero and the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Nerva, circa  96 to 98 AD excavated from Tivoli. Marcus Cocceius Nerva Caesar Augustus was Roman Emperor from 96 to 98 AD. On 18 September 96 AD Domitian was assassinated and Nerva became Emperor  at the age of sixty-five after a lifetime of imperial service under Nero and the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Nerva, circa  96 to 98 AD excavated from Tivoli. Marcus Cocceius Nerva Caesar Augustus was Roman Emperor from 96 to 98 AD. On 18 September 96 AD Domitian was assassinated and Nerva became Emperor  at the age of sixty-five after a lifetime of imperial service under Nero and the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Female Portrait (Antioch, Antakya, Turkey), 1st half of 3rd century AD. Marble cubes, limestone and glass. The mosaic bust of a female with a billowing sail that surrounds her head that it could represent the wind. The mosaic decorated the entrance of a dining room and was once flanked it with now lost representations of the marine deities Thalassa and Okeanosinv 3460, Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Female Portrait (Antioch, Antakya, Turkey), 1st half of 3rd century AD. Marble cubes, limestone and glass. The mosaic bust of a female with a billowing sail that surrounds her head that it could represent the wind. The mosaic decorated the entrance of a dining room and was once flanked it with now lost representations of the marine deities Thalassa and Okeanosinv 3460, Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Female Portrait (Antioch, Antakya, Turkey), 1st half of 3rd century AD. Marble cubes, limestone and glass. The mosaic bust of a female with a billowing sail that surrounds her head that it could represent the wind. The mosaic decorated the entrance of a dining room and was once flanked it with now lost representations of the marine deities Thalassa and Okeanosinv 3460, Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD found in the Horti Tauriani, Rome.  The bust portrays an elderly Hadrian with a well worn expression from around 130AD. An enthusiastic builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors.  MC inv 890, Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD found in the Horti Tauriani, Rome.  The bust portrays an elderly Hadrian with a well worn expression from around 130AD. An enthusiastic builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors.  MC inv 890, Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD found in the Horti Tauriani, Rome.  The bust portrays an elderly Hadrian with a well worn expression from around 130AD. An enthusiastic builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors.  MC inv 890, Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD found in the Horti Tauriani, Rome.  The bust portrays an elderly Hadrian with a well worn expression from around 130AD. An enthusiastic builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors.  MC inv 890, Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman bust of Socrates, 1st cent AD from the construction site of the monument to Vitorio Emanuel II,  Rome, Italy. This portrait of Socrates is similar to the Herm of Socrates from the Naples National Museum. In xenophon’s Symposium socrates is described as ‘Short body with wide shoulders, prominent belly, aquiline nose, thick wide mouth and head almost completely bold. In 399 BC the famous Athenian philosopher was condemned to death for impiety and corruption. Inv 1236, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman bust of Socrates, 1st cent AD from the construction site of the monument to Vitorio Emanuel II,  Rome, Italy. This portrait of Socrates is similar to the Herm of Socrates from the Naples National Museum. In xenophon’s Symposium socrates is described as ‘Short body with wide shoulders, prominent belly, aquiline nose, thick wide mouth and head almost completely bold. In 399 BC the famous Athenian philosopher was condemned to death for impiety and corruption. Inv 1236, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman bust of Socrates, 1st cent AD from the construction site of the monument to Vitorio Emanuel II,  Rome, Italy. This portrait of Socrates is similar to the Herm of Socrates from the Naples National Museum. In xenophon’s Symposium socrates is described as ‘Short body with wide shoulders, prominent belly, aquiline nose, thick wide mouth and head almost completely bold. In 399 BC the famous Athenian philosopher was condemned to death for impiety and corruption. Inv 1236, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman bust of Socrates, 1st cent AD from the construction site of the monument to Vitorio Emanuel II,  Rome, Italy. This portrait of Socrates is similar to the Herm of Socrates from the Naples National Museum. In xenophon’s Symposium socrates is described as ‘Short body with wide shoulders, prominent belly, aquiline nose, thick wide mouth and head almost completely bold. In 399 BC the famous Athenian philosopher was condemned to death for impiety and corruption. Inv 1236, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman bust of Socrates, 1st cent AD from the construction site of the monument to Vitorio Emanuel II,  Rome, Italy. This portrait of Socrates is similar to the Herm of Socrates from the Naples National Museum. In xenophon’s Symposium socrates is described as ‘Short body with wide shoulders, prominent belly, aquiline nose, thick wide mouth and head almost completely bold. In 399 BC the famous Athenian philosopher was condemned to death for impiety and corruption. Inv 1236, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Vespasian, circa 69-79 AD excavated from Ostia. Titus Flavius Caesar Vespasianus Augustus was Roman Emperor from AD 69 to AD 79. Vespasian founded the Flavian dynasty that ruled the Empire for twenty seven years.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Vespasian, circa 69-79 AD excavated from Ostia. Titus Flavius Caesar Vespasianus Augustus was Roman Emperor from AD 69 to AD 79. Vespasian founded the Flavian dynasty that ruled the Empire for twenty seven years.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Vespasian, circa 69-79 AD excavated from Ostia. Titus Flavius Caesar Vespasianus Augustus was Roman Emperor from AD 69 to AD 79. Vespasian founded the Flavian dynasty that ruled the Empire for twenty seven years.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Vespasian, circa 69-79 AD excavated from Ostia. Titus Flavius Caesar Vespasianus Augustus was Roman Emperor from AD 69 to AD 79. Vespasian founded the Flavian dynasty that ruled the Empire for twenty seven years.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Sabina, circa 135 AD excavated from the via Appia, Rome. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Sabina, circa 135 AD excavated from the via Appia, Rome. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Sabina, circa 135 AD excavated from the via Appia, Rome. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young charioteer from the age of Domitian, 81-96AD. This statue of a young charioteer, with Oriental eastern Mediterranean features, is wearing a tunic stopped on the right shoulder by a flattened circular fibula (clasp). The hairstyle, with its ’S’ shaped curls, was made artificially with an iron (calamistrum). This style was inspired by official portrayts of a young Domitian, who emulated Neronian style during the last years of his reign. The bust was rounded to be inserted onto a modern pillar. . Inv 276, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young charioteer from the age of Domitian, 81-96AD. This statue of a young charioteer, with Oriental eastern Mediterranean features, is wearing a tunic stopped on the right shoulder by a flattened circular fibula (clasp). The hairstyle, with its ’S’ shaped curls, was made artificially with an iron (calamistrum). This style was inspired by official portrayts of a young Domitian, who emulated Neronian style during the last years of his reign. The bust was rounded to be inserted onto a modern pillar. . Inv 276, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young charioteer from the age of Domitian, 81-96AD. This statue of a young charioteer, with Oriental eastern Mediterranean features, is wearing a tunic stopped on the right shoulder by a flattened circular fibula (clasp). The hairstyle, with its ’S’ shaped curls, was made artificially with an iron (calamistrum). This style was inspired by official portrayts of a young Domitian, who emulated Neronian style during the last years of his reign. The bust was rounded to be inserted onto a modern pillar. . Inv 276, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Nerva, circa  96 to 98 AD excavated from Tivoli. Marcus Cocceius Nerva Caesar Augustus was Roman Emperor from 96 to 98 AD. On 18 September 96 AD Domitian was assassinated and Nerva became Emperor  at the age of sixty-five after a lifetime of imperial service under Nero and the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Nerva, circa  96 to 98 AD excavated from Tivoli. Marcus Cocceius Nerva Caesar Augustus was Roman Emperor from 96 to 98 AD. On 18 September 96 AD Domitian was assassinated and Nerva became Emperor  at the age of sixty-five after a lifetime of imperial service under Nero and the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Vespasian, circa  69 to 79 AD excavated from Minturno. Vespasian was Roman Emperor from AD 69 to AD 79. Vespasian founded the Flavian dynasty that ruled the Empire for twenty seven years. Vespasian was from an equestrian family that rose into the senatorial rank under the Julio–Claudian emperors. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Vespasian, circa  69 to 79 AD excavated from Minturno. Vespasian was Roman Emperor from AD 69 to AD 79. Vespasian founded the Flavian dynasty that ruled the Empire for twenty seven years. Vespasian was from an equestrian family that rose into the senatorial rank under the Julio–Claudian emperors. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Vespasian, circa  69 to 79 AD excavated from Minturno. Vespasian was Roman Emperor from AD 69 to AD 79. Vespasian founded the Flavian dynasty that ruled the Empire for twenty seven years. Vespasian was from an equestrian family that rose into the senatorial rank under the Julio–Claudian emperors. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Vespasian, circa  69 to 79 AD excavated from Minturno. Vespasian was Roman Emperor from AD 69 to AD 79. Vespasian founded the Flavian dynasty that ruled the Empire for twenty seven years. Vespasian was from an equestrian family that rose into the senatorial rank under the Julio–Claudian emperors. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Commodus, circa 180 AD excavated from the ancient market, Rome. Roman Emperor from 180 to 192 AD. Commodus also ruled as co-emperor with his father Marcus Aurelius from 177 until his father's death in 180 AD.. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Commodus, circa 180 AD excavated from the ancient market, Rome. Roman Emperor from 180 to 192 AD. Commodus also ruled as co-emperor with his father Marcus Aurelius from 177 until his father's death in 180 AD.. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Commodus, circa 180 AD excavated from the ancient market, Rome. Roman Emperor from 180 to 192 AD. Commodus also ruled as co-emperor with his father Marcus Aurelius from 177 until his father's death in 180 AD.. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Commodus, circa 180 AD excavated from the ancient market, Rome. Roman Emperor from 180 to 192 AD. Commodus also ruled as co-emperor with his father Marcus Aurelius from 177 until his father's death in 180 AD.. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Commodus, circa 180 AD excavated from Albano Laziale. Roman Emperor from 180 to 192 AD. Commodus also ruled as co-emperor with his father Marcus Aurelius from 177 until his father's death in 180 AD.. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Commodus, circa 180 AD excavated from Albano Laziale. Roman Emperor from 180 to 192 AD. Commodus also ruled as co-emperor with his father Marcus Aurelius from 177 until his father's death in 180 AD.. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 1st century Roman Copy with a portrait head. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 1st century Roman Copy with a portrait head. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Ancient Egyptian relief portrait fragment of King Akhenaten from Amarna. 18th Dynasty 1345 BC . Neues Museum Berlin 1985.328.3: Gift from New York Metropolitan Museum, Norbert Schimmel.
  • Ancient Egyptian relief portrait of King Akhenaten from Amarna. 18th Dynasty 1340 BC . Neues Museum Berlin Cat No: AM 14512.
  • Ancient Egyptian relief portrait of King Akhenaten from Amarna. 18th Dynasty 1340 BC . Neues Museum Berlin Cat No: AM 21683.
  • Ancient Egyptian relief portrait of King Akhenaten from Amarna. 18th Dynasty 1340 BC . Neues Museum Berlin Cat No: AM 21683.
  • Statue Portrait head of Nefertiti. / Portratkopfe des Konigspaares Nofretete. / Egypt 18. Dynasty  (1340 BC) Berlin Neues Museum Cat No: AM 21348.
  • Statue Portrait head of Nefertiti. / Portratkopfe des Konigspaares Nofretete. / Egypt 18. Dynasty  (1340 BC) Berlin Neues Museum Cat No: AM 21348.
  • Roman fresco  portrait of a baker, Terentius, and his wife in the pose of intellectuals, Naples National Archaeological Museum , their expressions capture the sense of a real moment that connects with the viewer in a direct realistic way , Pompeii VII 2,6 , inv 9058 ,
  • Roman mosaics - Dionysus Portrait Mosaic. Okeanos Villa, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Dionysus Portrait Mosaic. Okeanos Villa, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a grey background.
  • Roman fresco wall painting portrait of a baker, Terentius, and his wife in the pose of intellectuals, their expressions capture the sense of a real moment that connects with the viewer in a direct realistic way , Pompeii VII 2,6 , inv 9058 , Naples National Archaeological Museum
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Matidia circa119 AD from Via Giolitti, Rome. Matidia was Sabina’s mother and Hadrian’s wife. The high level of idealisation of the portrait suggests that it was made after her death. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Matidia circa119 AD from Via Giolitti, Rome. Matidia was Sabina’s mother and Hadrian’s wife. The high level of idealisation of the portrait suggests that it was made after her death. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Nerva, circa  96 to 98 AD excavated from Tivoli. Marcus Cocceius Nerva Caesar Augustus was Roman Emperor from 96 to 98 AD. On 18 September 96 AD Domitian was assassinated and Nerva became Emperor  at the age of sixty-five after a lifetime of imperial service under Nero and the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Female Portrait (Antioch, Antakya, Turkey), 1st half of 3rd century AD. Marble cubes, limestone and glass. The mosaic bust of a female with a billowing sail that surrounds her head that it could represent the wind. The mosaic decorated the entrance of a dining room and was once flanked it with now lost representations of the marine deities Thalassa and Okeanosinv 3460, Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD found in the Horti Tauriani, Rome.  The bust portrays an elderly Hadrian with a well worn expression from around 130AD. An enthusiastic builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors.  MC inv 890, Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Vespasian, circa 69-79 AD excavated from Ostia. Titus Flavius Caesar Vespasianus Augustus was Roman Emperor from AD 69 to AD 79. Vespasian founded the Flavian dynasty that ruled the Empire for twenty seven years.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Sabina, circa 135 AD excavated from the via Appia, Rome. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Sabina, circa 135 AD excavated from the via Appia, Rome. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young charioteer from the age of Domitian, 81-96AD. This statue of a young charioteer, with Oriental eastern Mediterranean features, is wearing a tunic stopped on the right shoulder by a flattened circular fibula (clasp). The hairstyle, with its ’S’ shaped curls, was made artificially with an iron (calamistrum). This style was inspired by official portrayts of a young Domitian, who emulated Neronian style during the last years of his reign. The bust was rounded to be inserted onto a modern pillar. . Inv 276, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young charioteer from the age of Domitian, 81-96AD. This statue of a young charioteer, with Oriental eastern Mediterranean features, is wearing a tunic stopped on the right shoulder by a flattened circular fibula (clasp). The hairstyle, with its ’S’ shaped curls, was made artificially with an iron (calamistrum). This style was inspired by official portrayts of a young Domitian, who emulated Neronian style during the last years of his reign. The bust was rounded to be inserted onto a modern pillar. . Inv 276, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Nerva, circa  96 to 98 AD excavated from Tivoli. Marcus Cocceius Nerva Caesar Augustus was Roman Emperor from 96 to 98 AD. On 18 September 96 AD Domitian was assassinated and Nerva became Emperor  at the age of sixty-five after a lifetime of imperial service under Nero and the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Nerva, circa  96 to 98 AD excavated from Tivoli. Marcus Cocceius Nerva Caesar Augustus was Roman Emperor from 96 to 98 AD. On 18 September 96 AD Domitian was assassinated and Nerva became Emperor  at the age of sixty-five after a lifetime of imperial service under Nero and the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Nerva, circa  96 to 98 AD excavated from Tivoli. Marcus Cocceius Nerva Caesar Augustus was Roman Emperor from 96 to 98 AD. On 18 September 96 AD Domitian was assassinated and Nerva became Emperor  at the age of sixty-five after a lifetime of imperial service under Nero and the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Vespasian, circa  69 to 79 AD excavated from Minturno. Vespasian was Roman Emperor from AD 69 to AD 79. Vespasian founded the Flavian dynasty that ruled the Empire for twenty seven years. Vespasian was from an equestrian family that rose into the senatorial rank under the Julio–Claudian emperors. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Commodus, circa 180 AD excavated from the ancient market, Rome. Roman Emperor from 180 to 192 AD. Commodus also ruled as co-emperor with his father Marcus Aurelius from 177 until his father's death in 180 AD.. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Commodus, circa 180 AD excavated from Albano Laziale. Roman Emperor from 180 to 192 AD. Commodus also ruled as co-emperor with his father Marcus Aurelius from 177 until his father's death in 180 AD.. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Commodus, circa 180 AD excavated from Albano Laziale. Roman Emperor from 180 to 192 AD. Commodus also ruled as co-emperor with his father Marcus Aurelius from 177 until his father's death in 180 AD.. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Commodus, circa 180 AD excavated from Albano Laziale. Roman Emperor from 180 to 192 AD. Commodus also ruled as co-emperor with his father Marcus Aurelius from 177 until his father's death in 180 AD.. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a white background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a white background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Fifth century AD Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian  funerary mosaic of of a little girl The fragmentary inscription is at the top: (name of the deceased) who lived 4 years 11 months, 3 days 7 hours. The deceased is featured in a praying attitude, wearing an embroidered dalmatic. A monogrammed cross and a lit candle accompany the funerary idealised portrait. <br />
Christian necropolis of the Mezghani mounds in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis  (present day Sfax, Tunisia) Fifth c. A.D. <br />
<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • Detail of a fifth century AD Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian  funerary mosaic of of a little girl The fragmentary inscription is at the top: (name of the deceased) who lived 4 years 11 months, 3 days 7 hours. The deceased is featured in a praying attitude, wearing an embroidered dalmatic. A monogrammed cross and a lit candle accompany the funerary idealised portrait. <br />
Christian necropolis of the Mezghani mounds in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis  (present day Sfax, Tunisia) Fifth c. A.D. <br />
<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • Fifth century AD Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian  funerary mosaic of of a little girl The fragmentary inscription is at the top: (name of the deceased) who lived 4 years 11 months, 3 days 7 hours. The deceased is featured in a praying attitude, wearing an embroidered dalmatic. A monogrammed cross and a lit candle accompany the funerary idealised portrait. <br />
Christian necropolis of the Mezghani mounds in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis  (present day Sfax, Tunisia) Fifth c. A.D. <br />
<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • Fifth century AD Roman Christian  funerary mosaic of of a little girl The fragmentary inscription is at the top: (name of the deceased) who lived 4 years 11 months, 3 days 7 hours. The deceased is featured in a praying attitude, wearing an embroidered dalmatic. A monogrammed cross and a lit candle accompany the funerary idealised portrait. <br />
Christian necropolis of the Mezghani mounds in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis  (present day Sfax, Tunisia) Fifth c. A.D. <br />
<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • Fifth century AD Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian  funerary mosaic of of a little girl The fragmentary inscription is at the top: (name of the deceased) who lived 4 years 11 months, 3 days 7 hours. The deceased is featured in a praying attitude, wearing an embroidered dalmatic. A monogrammed cross and a lit candle accompany the funerary idealised portrait. <br />
Christian necropolis of the Mezghani mounds in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis  (present day Sfax, Tunisia) Fifth c. A.D. <br />
<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • Fifth century AD Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian  funerary mosaic of of a little girl The fragmentary inscription is at the top: (name of the deceased) who lived 4 years 11 months, 3 days 7 hours. The deceased is featured in a praying attitude, wearing an embroidered dalmatic. A monogrammed cross and a lit candle accompany the funerary idealised portrait. <br />
Christian necropolis of the Mezghani mounds in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis  (present day Sfax, Tunisia) Fifth c. A.D. <br />
<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 5th century AD Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian  funerary mosaic of Crescentia from Tharbarka western Necropolis in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis, present day Tunisia. The funerary portrait depicts a young girl, Crescentia, dressed in a dalmatic tunic with vertical stripes, pulled in at the waist by a belt , with a necklace around her neck. Today the dalmatic is a long wide-sleeved tunic, which still serves as a liturgical vestment in the Roman Catholic church. To the right side of Crescentia is a lit candle which symbolises eternal faith. <br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • The Christian Eastern Roman Byzantine memorial funerary mosaic for Crescentia. <br />
Above the funerary portrait of Crescentia are the words: ‘Crescentia, innocent and in Peace’. Crescentia is dressed in a dalmatic, a long wide-sleeved tunic, with a belt around the waiste and a neclace around her neck. Lit candles represent eternal life. 5th century AD from the western necropolis of Thabraca, Tabarka, Tunisia, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia
  • The Christian Eastern Roman Byzantine memorial funerary mosaic for Crescentia. <br />
Above the funerary portrait of Crescentia are the words: ‘Crescentia, innocent and in Peace’. Crescentia is dressed in a dalmatic, a long wide-sleeved tunic, with a belt around the waiste and a neclace around her neck. Lit candles represent eternal life. 5th century AD from the western necropolis of Thabraca, Tabarka, Tunisia, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. White background
  • The Christian Eastern Roman Byzantine memorial funerary mosaic for Crescentia. <br />
Above the funerary portrait of Crescentia are the words: ‘Crescentia, innocent and in Peace’. Crescentia is dressed in a dalmatic, a long wide-sleeved tunic, with a belt around the waiste and a neclace around her neck. Lit candles represent eternal life. 5th century AD from the western necropolis of Thabraca, Tabarka, Tunisia, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Grey background
  • The Christian Eastern Roman Byzantine memorial funerary mosaic for Crescentia. <br />
Above the funerary portrait of Crescentia are the words: ‘Crescentia, innocent and in Peace’. Crescentia is dressed in a dalmatic, a long wide-sleeved tunic, with a belt around the waiste and a neclace around her neck. Lit candles represent eternal life. 5th century AD from the western necropolis of Thabraca, Tabarka, Tunisia, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Black background
  • Believed to be a portrait of Emperor Maximinianus. Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed  in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Believed to be a portrait of Emperor Maximinianus. Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed  in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD found in the Horti Tauriani, Rome.  The bust portrays an elderly Hadrian with a well worn expression from around 130AD. An enthusiastic builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors.  MC inv 890, Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD found in the Horti Tauriani, Rome.  The bust portrays an elderly Hadrian with a well worn expression from around 130AD. An enthusiastic builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors.  MC inv 890, Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD found in the Horti Tauriani, Rome.  The bust portrays an elderly Hadrian with a well worn expression from around 130AD. An enthusiastic builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors.  MC inv 890, Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD found in the Horti Tauriani, Rome.  The bust portrays an elderly Hadrian with a well worn expression from around 130AD. An enthusiastic builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors.  MC inv 890, Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD found in the Horti Tauriani, Rome.  The bust portrays an elderly Hadrian with a well worn expression from around 130AD. An enthusiastic builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors.  MC inv 890, Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman bust of Socrates, 1st cent AD from the construction site of the monument to Vitorio Emanuel II,  Rome, Italy. This portrait of Socrates is similar to the Herm of Socrates from the Naples National Museum. In xenophon’s Symposium socrates is described as ‘Short body with wide shoulders, prominent belly, aquiline nose, thick wide mouth and head almost completely bold. In 399 BC the famous Athenian philosopher was condemned to death for impiety and corruption. Inv 1236, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy

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