• Grimsel Pass resevoirs - Swiss Alps - Switzerland
  • Grimsel Pass resevoirs - Swiss Alps - Switzerland
  • Grimsel Pass resevoirs - Swiss Alps - Switzerland
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Polyphemos and Galatea Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Another mythological love story affirms the power of Aphrodite. The sea nymph Galatea resists the lustful advances of the beastly cycolps Polyphemas in his cave. Polyphemos sits on a rock and tries to pull Galatea between his legs. His right arm is round her back: note the huge hand on her backside.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Polyphemos and Galatea Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Another mythological love story affirms the power of Aphrodite. The sea nymph Galatea resists the lustful advances of the beastly cycolps Polyphemas in his cave. Polyphemos sits on a rock and tries to pull Galatea between his legs. His right arm is round her back: note the huge hand on her backside.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Polyphemos and Galatea Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Another mythological love story affirms the power of Aphrodite. The sea nymph Galatea resists the lustful advances of the beastly cycolps Polyphemas in his cave. Polyphemos sits on a rock and tries to pull Galatea between his legs. His right arm is round her back: note the huge hand on her backside.
  • Painted colour verion of  “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • Painted colour verion of  “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • Full length view of the Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. statue A was probably sculpted by Myron. The style of the Riace statues straddles the archaic period and heralds the start of the classical period. Both statues depict strong young naked warriors who stand calmly but exuding great power. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Torso face on view of the Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. statue A was probably sculpted by Myron. The style of the Riace statues straddles the archaic period and heralds the start of the classical period. Both statues depict strong young naked warriors who stand calmly but exuding great power. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Torso three quarter of the Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. statue A was probably sculpted by Myron. The style of the Riace statues straddles the archaic period and heralds the start of the classical period. Both statues depict strong young naked warriors who stand calmly but exuding great power. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Torso of the Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. statue A was probably sculpted by Myron. The style of the Riace statues straddles the archaic period and heralds the start of the classical period. Both statues depict strong young naked warriors who stand calmly but exuding great power. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • statue of a tortoise, a symbol of the feminine power of the waters and their godess Aphrodite or Venus, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Sculture of an elephant with a castle on its back a popular Renaissance icon of power recalling Hanibals victories, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Sculture of an elephant with a castle on its back a popular Renaissance icon of power recalling Hanibals victories, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit with an eagles Head from Nimrud, Iraq.  The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water from the bucket it is holding. The rosette bracelet worn around the wrist symbolises divine power. 865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room I. ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 118921
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of a protective spirits holding a bucket of holy water wearing a rosette bracelet which symbolises divine power. From Nimrud, Iraq.  865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room S, door c.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit  ref WA 118803
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit with an eagles Head from Nimrud, Iraq.  The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water from the bucket it is holding. The rosette bracelet worn around the wrist symbolises divine power. 865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room I. ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 118921
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit with an eagles Head from Nimrud, Iraq.  The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water from the bucket it is holding. The rosette bracelet worn around the wrist symbolises divine power. 865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room I. ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 118921
  • “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • "The Throne Room"  is nearly 40 meters long and was completed in 1845. On the back wall is placed a portable guilder throne. The decorations symbolise absolute power. The architrave in the room is decorated with portraits of the sovereigns of Naples stating with Roger the  Norman ending with Ferdinand II of Bourbon.   The Bourbon Kings of Naples Royal Palace of Caserta, Italy.
  • "The Throne Room"  is nearly 40 meters long and was completed in 1845. On the back wall is placed a portable guilder throne. The decorations symbolise absolute power. The architrave in the room is decorated with portraits of the sovereigns of Naples stating with Roger the  Norman ending with Ferdinand II of Bourbon.   The Bourbon Kings of Naples Royal Palace of Caserta, Italy.
  • "The Throne Room"  is nearly 40 meters long and was completed in 1845. On the back wall is placed a portable guilder throne. The decorations symbolise absolute power. The architrave in the room is decorated with portraits of the sovereigns of Naples stating with Roger the  Norman ending with Ferdinand II of Bourbon.   The Bourbon Kings of Naples Royal Palace of Caserta, Italy.
  • "The Throne Room"  is nearly 40 meters long and was completed in 1845. On the back wall is placed a portable guilder throne. The decorations symbolise absolute power. The architrave in the room is decorated with portraits of the sovereigns of Naples stating with Roger the  Norman ending with Ferdinand II of Bourbon.   The Bourbon Kings of Naples Royal Palace of Caserta, Italy.
  • "The Throne Room"  is nearly 40 meters long and was completed in 1845. On the back wall is placed a portable guilder throne. The decorations symbolise absolute power. The architrave in the room is decorated with portraits of the sovereigns of Naples stating with Roger the  Norman ending with Ferdinand II of Bourbon.   The Bourbon Kings of Naples Royal Palace of Caserta, Italy.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Polyphemos and Galatea Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Another mythological love story affirms the power of Aphrodite. The sea nymph Galatea resists the lustful advances of the beastly cycolps Polyphemas in his cave. Polyphemos sits on a rock and tries to pull Galatea between his legs. His right arm is round her back: note the huge hand on her backside.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Polyphemos and Galatea Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Another mythological love story affirms the power of Aphrodite. The sea nymph Galatea resists the lustful advances of the beastly cycolps Polyphemas in his cave. Polyphemos sits on a rock and tries to pull Galatea between his legs. His right arm is round her back: note the huge hand on her backside.
  • Painted colour verion of  “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • Painted colour verion of  “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • Painted colour verion of  “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • Painted colour verion of  “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • Painted colour verion of  “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • Painted colour verion of  “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • Painted colour verion of  “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • Painted colour verion of  “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • low full length view of the  Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. statue A was probably sculpted by Myron. The style of the Riace statues straddles the archaic period and heralds the start of the classical period. Both statues depict strong young naked warriors who stand calmly but exuding great power. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Sculture of an elephant with a castle on its back a popular Renaissance icon of power recalling Hanibals victories, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • statue of a tortoise, a symbol of the feminine power of the waters and their godess Aphrodite or Venus, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • statue of a tortoise, a symbol of the feminine power of the waters and their godess Aphrodite or Venus, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of a protective spirits holding a bucket of holy water wearing a rosette bracelet which symbolises divine power. From Nimrud, Iraq.  865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room S, door c.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit  ref WA 118803
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit with an eagles Head from Nimrud, Iraq.  The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water from the bucket it is holding. The rosette bracelet worn around the wrist symbolises divine power. 865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room I. ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 118921
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit with an eagles Head from Nimrud, Iraq.  The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water from the bucket it is holding. The rosette bracelet worn around the wrist symbolises divine power. 865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room G, panelled d1. ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 124576
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of a protective spirits holding a bucket of holy water wearing a rosette bracelet which symbolises divine power. From Nimrud, Iraq.  865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room S, door c.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit  ref WA 118803
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit with an eagles Head from Nimrud, Iraq.  The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water from the bucket it is holding. The rosette bracelet worn around the wrist symbolises divine power. 865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room G, panelled d1. ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 124576
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit with an eagles Head from Nimrud, Iraq.  The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water from the bucket it is holding. The rosette bracelet worn around the wrist symbolises divine power. 865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room G, panelled d1. ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 124576
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel  of a protective spirits holding a bucket of holy water wearing a rosette bracelet which symbolises divine power. From Nimrud, Iraq.  865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room S, door c.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit  ref WA 118803
  • Assyrian relief sculpture panel of a protective spirit with an eagles Head from Nimrud, Iraq.  The spirit is holding a symbolic fir cone and is sprinkling holy water from the bucket it is holding. The rosette bracelet worn around the wrist symbolises divine power. 865-860 B.C North West Palace, Room G, panelled d1. ref: British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit WA 124576
  • “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • "The Throne Room"  is nearly 40 meters long and was completed in 1845. On the back wall is placed a portable guilder throne. The decorations symbolise absolute power. The architrave in the room is decorated with portraits of the sovereigns of Naples stating with Roger the  Norman ending with Ferdinand II of Bourbon.   The Bourbon Kings of Naples Royal Palace of Caserta, Italy.
  • "The Throne Room"  is nearly 40 meters long and was completed in 1845. On the back wall is placed a portable guilder throne. The decorations symbolise absolute power. The architrave in the room is decorated with portraits of the sovereigns of Naples stating with Roger the  Norman ending with Ferdinand II of Bourbon.   The Bourbon Kings of Naples Royal Palace of Caserta, Italy.
  • "The Throne Room"  is nearly 40 meters long and was completed in 1845. On the back wall is placed a portable guilder throne. The decorations symbolise absolute power. The architrave in the room is decorated with portraits of the sovereigns of Naples stating with Roger the  Norman ending with Ferdinand II of Bourbon.   The Bourbon Kings of Naples Royal Palace of Caserta, Italy.
  • "The Throne Room"  is nearly 40 meters long and was completed in 1845. On the back wall is placed a portable guilder throne. The decorations symbolise absolute power. The architrave in the room is decorated with portraits of the sovereigns of Naples stating with Roger the  Norman ending with Ferdinand II of Bourbon.   The Bourbon Kings of Naples Royal Palace of Caserta, Italy.
  • "The Throne Room"  is nearly 40 meters long and was completed in 1845. On the back wall is placed a portable guilder throne. The decorations symbolise absolute power. The architrave in the room is decorated with portraits of the sovereigns of Naples stating with Roger the  Norman ending with Ferdinand II of Bourbon.   The Bourbon Kings of Naples Royal Palace of Caserta, Italy.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Io and Argos Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
<br />
A powerful hero is folding a sword gazing closely at a half naked and dishevelled young heroine who sits on a chest like stool. Between, on a pillar base stood a small, separately added statue of a goddess ( now missing). The scene follows a scheme used in the relief panels “Io guarded by Argos”. Io was one of Zeus’s lovers, and Argos was a watchful giant sent to guard her by Hera, Zeus’s wife.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Io and Argos Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
A powerful hero is folding a sword gazing closely at a half naked and dishevelled young heroine who sits on a chest like stool. Between, on a pillar base stood a small, separately added statue of a goddess ( now missing). The scene follows a scheme used in the relief panels “Io guarded by Argos”. Io was one of Zeus’s lovers, and Argos was a watchful giant sent to guard her by Hera, Zeus’s wife.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Io and Argos Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
A powerful hero is folding a sword gazing closely at a half naked and dishevelled young heroine who sits on a chest like stool. Between, on a pillar base stood a small, separately added statue of a goddess ( now missing). The scene follows a scheme used in the relief panels “Io guarded by Argos”. Io was one of Zeus’s lovers, and Argos was a watchful giant sent to guard her by Hera, Zeus’s wife.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Io and Argos Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
A powerful hero is folding a sword gazing closely at a half naked and dishevelled young heroine who sits on a chest like stool. Between, on a pillar base stood a small, separately added statue of a goddess ( now missing). The scene follows a scheme used in the relief panels “Io guarded by Argos”. Io was one of Zeus’s lovers, and Argos was a watchful giant sent to guard her by Hera, Zeus’s wife.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Io and Argos Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
A powerful hero is folding a sword gazing closely at a half naked and dishevelled young heroine who sits on a chest like stool. Between, on a pillar base stood a small, separately added statue of a goddess ( now missing). The scene follows a scheme used in the relief panels “Io guarded by Argos”. Io was one of Zeus’s lovers, and Argos was a watchful giant sent to guard her by Hera, Zeus’s wife.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Io and Argos Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
A powerful hero is folding a sword gazing closely at a half naked and dishevelled young heroine who sits on a chest like stool. Between, on a pillar base stood a small, separately added statue of a goddess ( now missing). The scene follows a scheme used in the relief panels “Io guarded by Argos”. Io was one of Zeus’s lovers, and Argos was a watchful giant sent to guard her by Hera, Zeus’s wife.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Io and Argos Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
<br />
A powerful hero is folding a sword gazing closely at a half naked and dishevelled young heroine who sits on a chest like stool. Between, on a pillar base stood a small, separately added statue of a goddess ( now missing). The scene follows a scheme used in the relief panels “Io guarded by Argos”. Io was one of Zeus’s lovers, and Argos was a watchful giant sent to guard her by Hera, Zeus’s wife.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Io and Argos Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
A powerful hero is folding a sword gazing closely at a half naked and dishevelled young heroine who sits on a chest like stool. Between, on a pillar base stood a small, separately added statue of a goddess ( now missing). The scene follows a scheme used in the relief panels “Io guarded by Argos”. Io was one of Zeus’s lovers, and Argos was a watchful giant sent to guard her by Hera, Zeus’s wife.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Io and Argos Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against an art background.<br />
<br />
A powerful hero is folding a sword gazing closely at a half naked and dishevelled young heroine who sits on a chest like stool. Between, on a pillar base stood a small, separately added statue of a goddess ( now missing). The scene follows a scheme used in the relief panels “Io guarded by Argos”. Io was one of Zeus’s lovers, and Argos was a watchful giant sent to guard her by Hera, Zeus’s wife.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Io and Argos Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
A powerful hero is folding a sword gazing closely at a half naked and dishevelled young heroine who sits on a chest like stool. Between, on a pillar base stood a small, separately added statue of a goddess ( now missing). The scene follows a scheme used in the relief panels “Io guarded by Argos”. Io was one of Zeus’s lovers, and Argos was a watchful giant sent to guard her by Hera, Zeus’s wife.
  • Pictures of a geometric Roman doorstep mosaics depicting five fishes surrounded by bars and a medallion, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD The Small Baths in the M'barek Rhaiem area. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against a white background<br />
<br />
The mosaic depicts the emblem of the Pentasii, a powerful Nortyh African Roman association that organised and  maintained the wild animals and hired animal killers to carry on the games in ampitheatres.
  • Pictures of a geometric Roman doorstep mosaics depicting five fishes surrounded by bars and a medallion, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD The Small Baths in the M'barek Rhaiem area. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against a black background<br />
<br />
The mosaic depicts the emblem of the Pentasii, a powerful Nortyh African Roman association that organised and  maintained the wild animals and hired animal killers to carry on the games in ampitheatres.
  • Pictures of a geometric Roman doorstep mosaics depicting five fishes surrounded by bars and a medallion, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD The Small Baths in the M'barek Rhaiem area. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.<br />
<br />
The mosaic depicts the emblem of the Pentasii, a powerful Nortyh African Roman association that organised and  maintained the wild animals and hired animal killers to carry on the games in ampitheatres.
  • Pictures of a geometric Roman doorstep mosaics depicting five fishes surrounded by bars and a medallion, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD The Small Baths in the M'barek Rhaiem area. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against an art background<br />
<br />
The mosaic depicts the emblem of the Pentasii, a powerful Nortyh African Roman association that organised and  maintained the wild animals and hired animal killers to carry on the games in ampitheatres.
  • Pictures of a geometric Roman doorstep mosaics depicting five fishes surrounded by bars and a medallion, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD The Small Baths in the M'barek Rhaiem area. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against a grey background<br />
<br />
The mosaic depicts the emblem of the Pentasii, a powerful Nortyh African Roman association that organised and  maintained the wild animals and hired animal killers to carry on the games in ampitheatres.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Byzantine Martyrion of St Philip church and healing centre. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.<br />
<br />
Martyrion of St Philip. This church with an octagonal core was built at the beginning of the 5th century on the summit of the hill. This is probably where, according to tradition, the Apostlie was martyred. The building has an eight-sided central room surmounted by a wooden cupola. From each of the eight sides of the central space there was access to a rectangular room through three arches supported by marble columns with capitals decorated with acanthus leaves The shape of the central room is a reference to the number eight which symbolists eternity. The church is situated inside a square composed of 28 rooms for housing pilgrims which were accessed from the outside. As in other Byzantine sanctuaries associated with heating powers (eg that of Saints Cosmas and Damian in Constantinople), in these rooms incubation rites were practised: during sleep, the Saint cured the sick and made prophecies concerning the future.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Byzantine Martyrion of St Philip church and healing centre. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.<br />
<br />
Martyrion of St Philip. This church with an octagonal core was built at the beginning of the 5th century on the summit of the hill. This is probably where, according to tradition, the Apostlie was martyred. The building has an eight-sided central room surmounted by a wooden cupola. From each of the eight sides of the central space there was access to a rectangular room through three arches supported by marble columns with capitals decorated with acanthus leaves The shape of the central room is a reference to the number eight which symbolists eternity. The church is situated inside a square composed of 28 rooms for housing pilgrims which were accessed from the outside. As in other Byzantine sanctuaries associated with heating powers (eg that of Saints Cosmas and Damian in Constantinople), in these rooms incubation rites were practised: during sleep, the Saint cured the sick and made prophecies concerning the future.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Byzantine Martyrion of St Philip church and healing centre. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.<br />
<br />
Martyrion of St Philip. This church with an octagonal core was built at the beginning of the 5th century on the summit of the hill. This is probably where, according to tradition, the Apostlie was martyred. The building has an eight-sided central room surmounted by a wooden cupola. From each of the eight sides of the central space there was access to a rectangular room through three arches supported by marble columns with capitals decorated with acanthus leaves The shape of the central room is a reference to the number eight which symbolists eternity. The church is situated inside a square composed of 28 rooms for housing pilgrims which were accessed from the outside. As in other Byzantine sanctuaries associated with heating powers (eg that of Saints Cosmas and Damian in Constantinople), in these rooms incubation rites were practised: during sleep, the Saint cured the sick and made prophecies concerning the future.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Byzantine Martyrion of St Philip church and healing centre. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.<br />
<br />
Martyrion of St Philip. This church with an octagonal core was built at the beginning of the 5th century on the summit of the hill. This is probably where, according to tradition, the Apostlie was martyred. The building has an eight-sided central room surmounted by a wooden cupola. From each of the eight sides of the central space there was access to a rectangular room through three arches supported by marble columns with capitals decorated with acanthus leaves The shape of the central room is a reference to the number eight which symbolists eternity. The church is situated inside a square composed of 28 rooms for housing pilgrims which were accessed from the outside. As in other Byzantine sanctuaries associated with heating powers (eg that of Saints Cosmas and Damian in Constantinople), in these rooms incubation rites were practised: during sleep, the Saint cured the sick and made prophecies concerning the future.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Byzantine Martyrion of St Philip church and healing centre. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.<br />
<br />
Martyrion of St Philip. This church with an octagonal core was built at the beginning of the 5th century on the summit of the hill. This is probably where, according to tradition, the Apostlie was martyred. The building has an eight-sided central room surmounted by a wooden cupola. From each of the eight sides of the central space there was access to a rectangular room through three arches supported by marble columns with capitals decorated with acanthus leaves The shape of the central room is a reference to the number eight which symbolists eternity. The church is situated inside a square composed of 28 rooms for housing pilgrims which were accessed from the outside. As in other Byzantine sanctuaries associated with heating powers (eg that of Saints Cosmas and Damian in Constantinople), in these rooms incubation rites were practised: during sleep, the Saint cured the sick and made prophecies concerning the future.
  • Aslantepe Hittite Orthostat. Limestone, Aslantepe, Malatya, 1200-700 BC. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Scene of offering drink and sacrifice. The god, with a symbol of divinity above, is in the chariot while holding a boomerang in his hand and a sword at his waist. The same god holds a lightning bundle in the middle. On the right, the king offers a drink to god. The inscription above reads "Great, powerful King Sulumeli". A servant stands behind holding a bull for sacrifice to the gods. <br />
<br />
Against a gray background.
  • Aslantepe Hittite Orthostat. Limestone, Aslantepe, Malatya, 1200-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Scene of offering drink and sacrifice. The god, with a symbol of divinity above, is in the chariot while holding a boomerang in his hand and a sword at his waist. The same god holds a lightning bundle in the middle. On the right, the king offers a drink to god. The inscription above reads "Great, powerful King Sulumeli". A servant stands behind holding a bull for sacrifice to the gods. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Aslantepe Hittite Orthostat. Limestone, Aslantepe, Malatya, 1200-700 BC. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Scene of offering drink and sacrifice. The god, with a symbol of divinity above, is in the chariot while holding a boomerang in his hand and a sword at his waist. The same god holds a lightning bundle in the middle. On the right, the king offers a drink to god. The inscription above reads "Great, powerful King Sulumeli". A servant stands behind holding a bull for sacrifice to the gods. <br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Aslantepe Hittite Orthostat. Limestone, Aslantepe, Malatya, 1200-700 B.C. <br />
<br />
Scene of offering drink and sacrifice. The god, with a symbol of divinity above, is in the chariot while holding a boomerang in his hand and a sword at his waist. The same god holds a lightning bundle in the middle. On the right, the king offers a drink to god. The inscription above reads "Great, powerful King Sulumeli". A servant stands behind holding a bull for sacrifice to the gods. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Against a brown art background.
  • Aslantepe Hittite Orthostat. Limestone, Aslantepe, Malatya, 1200-700 B.C. <br />
<br />
Scene of offering drink and sacrifice. The god, with a symbol of divinity above, is in the chariot while holding a boomerang in his hand and a sword at his waist. The same god holds a lightning bundle in the middle. On the right, the king offers a drink to god. The inscription above reads "Great, powerful King Sulumeli". A servant stands behind holding a bull for sacrifice to the gods. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Neo-Assyrian basalt statue of King Shalmaneser III (858-824 B.C) . Inscription reads "Shalmaneser, the great king, the mighty king, king of all four region, the powerful and the mighty rival of the princes of the whole earth the great ones, the kings, son of Assur-Nasirapli, King of the universe, King of Assyria, grandson of ~Tukultiu-Ninurta, King of the Universe, King of Assyria". The inscription continues with his campaigns &b deeds in Uratu, Syria, Que & Tabal ending " At the time I rebuilt the walls of my city Ashur from their foundations to their summits. I made an image of my royal self and set it up in the metal gate". From Assur ( Qala't Sharqat) Iraq. Istanbul Archaeological Museum, Inv no. 4650.
  • The Kilamuwa Stela a stele of King Kilamuwa, from the Kingdom of Sam'al. The stele is a 16-line text in Phoenician. King Kilamuwa is shown standing on the upper left and addressing four Canaanite god-insignias with his right arm and finger. His left hand is draped at his left side holding a wilted lotus flower, a symbol of a king's death. He is dressed in king's regalia with hat, and his figure stands at the beginning of the first nine lines of the text.. Basalt  9th-century BC. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin.  The text reads "I am Kilamuwa, the son of King Haya'. King Gabar reigned over Ya'diya-(Sam'al) but achieved nothing.<br />
Then came Bamah, and he achieved nothing.<br />
My own father, Haya', did nothing with his reign.<br />
My brother, Sha'il, also did nothing.<br />
It was I, Kilamuwa...who managed to do what none of my ancestors had.<br />
My father's kingdom was beset by powerful, predatory kings, all holding out their hands, demanding to be fed.<br />
But I raged amongst them like a fire, burning their beards and consuming their outstretched hands.<br />
Only the Danunian kings overmastered me; I had to call on the King of Assyria to assist me...<br />
I, Kilamuwa, the son of Haya', ascended my father's throne.<br />
Under their previous kings, the [people] had howled like dogs.<br />
But I was a father, a mother and a brother to them.<br />
I gave gold, silver and cattle to men who had never so much as seen the face of a sheep before.<br />
Those who had never even seen linen all their lives I clothed in byssus-cloth from head to foot.<br />
I took the [people] by the hand and in their souls they looked to me just as the orphan looks to his mother."<br />
"Whoever of my sons comes after me and interferes with this inscription, may he be dishonoured among the people...<br />
And if anyone should damage this inscription,<br />
Let Gabar's god Ba'al-Samad destroy his head,<br />
And let Bamah's god Ba'al Hamon destroy his head..."<br />
Together with Reχub-ʾEl, the Lord of the Palace
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its Anastasis fresco of the parecclesion chapel. Christ is depicted saving Adam and Eve by reurecting them from their sarcophagi. Endowed between 1315-1321 by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist  Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum  Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its Anastasis fresco of the parecclesion chapel Endowed between 1315-1321 by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist  Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum  Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its Anastasis fresco of the parecclesion chapel. Christ is depicted saving Adam and Eve by reurecting them from their sarcophagi. Endowed between 1315-1321 by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist  Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum  Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its Anastasis fresco of the parecclesion chapel. Christ is depicted saving Adam and Eve by reurecting them from their sarcophagi. Endowed between 1315-1321 by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist  Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum  Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its mosaic of the presentation of the Virgin Mary as a child to the Temple. Endowed between 1315-1321  by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist Theodore Metochites. Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its mosaic of Joseph. Endowed between 1315-1321  by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist Theodore Metochites. Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and a fresco of the Virgin Mary and Jesus in the parecclesion chapel Endowed between 1315-1321 by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist  Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum  Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its mosaic of Saint George. Endowed between 1315-1321  by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist Theodore Metochites. Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its mosaic of Anne and Joachim caressing the little child Mary.  Endowed between 1315-1321  by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist Theodore Metochites. Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its mosaics endowed between 1315-1321  by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist Theodore Metochites. Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its Anastasis fresco of the parecclesion chapel. Christ is depicted saving  Eve by reurecting them from their sarcophagi. Endowed between 1315-1321 by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist  Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum  Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its mosaic of the miracle of Christ turning water into wine.  Endowed between 1315-1321  by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum, Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its mosaic of Michael Palialogos VIII. Endowed between 1315-1321  by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum, Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its mosaic of the Virgin Mary praying. Endowed between 1315-1321  by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum, Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its mosaic of the Khalke Jesus so called because it was inspired by and icon from the Khalke Palace.  Endowed between 1315-1321  by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum, Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its mosaic of Satan trying to deceive Jesus (panel D-8). Endowed between 1315-1321  by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum, Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its mosaic of Theodore Metochites presenting a model of the Chora church to Christ (panel I-48). Endowed between 1315-1321  by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum, Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its mosaic of Satan trying to deceive Jesus (panel D-8). Endowed between 1315-1321  by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum, Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its mosaic of the procession of the Virgins. Endowed between 1315-1321  by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum, Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its mosaic of the procession of the Virgins. Endowed between 1315-1321  by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum, Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its mosaic of the miracle of Christ turning water into wine.  Endowed between 1315-1321  by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum, Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its mosaic of the presentation of the Virgin Mary as a child to the Temple. Endowed between 1315-1321  by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum, Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its mosaic in the inner narthex domw of  Mary holding Juseus surrouned by 15 Kings of the Old testiment. The letters "MP" and "OV" either side of Mary mean "Mother of God". Endowed between 1315-1321  by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum, Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its mosaic of Joseph and Mary and the enrollment for the census for taxation (panelA-2). Endowed between 1315-1321  by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum, Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its mosaic of the giving of the verdant stick with shoots that indicated joseph as Mary's fiance (panel H-43).  Endowed between 1315-1321  by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum, Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its mosaic of Joseph and Mary and the enrollment for the census for taxation (panel A-2). Endowed between 1315-1321  by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum, Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its mosaic of the Three Kings (Magi) in audience with King Herod (panel D-14).  Endowed between 1315-1321  by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum, Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its mosaic of Saint George. Endowed between 1315-1321  by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum, Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its mosaic of an angel breaking the Good news to Mary of he forthcoming Virgin Birth (panel G-39).  Endowed between 1315-1321  by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum, Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its mosaic of Christ Pantocrator over the door leading to the second narex. Endowed between 1315-1321  by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum, Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its mosaic of Christ Pantocrator over the door leading to the second narex. Endowed between 1315-1321  by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum, Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its mosaic of the death of the Virgin Mary (panel 50-a). Endowed between 1315-1321  by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum, Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its mosaic of Christ Pantocrator over the door leading to the second narex. Endowed between 1315-1321  by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum, Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its mosaic of Christ Pantocrator over the door leading to the second narex. Endowed between 1315-1321  by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum, Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and a fresco of a saint in parecclesion chapel Endowed between 1315-1321 by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist  Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum  Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its Anastasis fresco of the parecclesion chapel. Christ is depicted saving Adam and Eve by reurecting them from their sarcophagi. Endowed between 1315-1321 by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist  Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum  Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and the fresco in the dome of the parecclesion of the Virgin Mary and twelve angels .Endowed between 1315-1321 by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist  Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum  Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its Anastasis fresco of Jesus Christ in the parecclesion chapel Endowed between 1315-1321 by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist  Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum  Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and a fresco of an angel in the parecclesion chapel Endowed between 1315-1321 by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist  Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum  Istanbul
  • The 11th century Roman Byzantine Church of the Holy Saviour in Chora and its Anastasis fresco of the parecclesion chapel Endowed between 1315-1321 by the powerful Byzantine statesman and humanist  Theodore Metochites. Kariye Museum  Istanbul

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