• Grindelwald First Lake- Picnic- Bernese Alps - Switzerland
  • Runswick Bay - North Yorkshire - England - man and baby
  • Runswick Bay - North Yorkshire - England - family making sand castles
  • Grindelwald First Lake-  Bernese Alps - Switzerland
  • Grindelwald First Lake- Picnic- Bernese Alps - Switzerland
  • Grindelwald First- Walkers - Bernese Alps - Switzerland
  • Runswick Bay - North Yorkshire - England - man and baby
  • Runswick Bay - North Yorkshire - England - family making sand castles
  • Runswick Bay - North Yorkshire - England - family making sand castles
  • Grindelwald First Lake- Picnic- Bernese Alps - Switzerland
  • Three handled Mycenaean  Palace Style amphora with large palm trees symmetrically placed on the sides and smaller palm trees with floral motifs in between. This Mycenaean  vase is distinguished by the high quality of clay and paint, and by the naturalistic rendering of the decoration. From the Mycenaean cemetery at Argive Deiras, Greece. 15th Century BC. Cat No 6725 Athens Archaeological Museum.
  • Three handled Mycenaean  Palace Style amphora with large palm trees symmetrically placed on the sides and smaller palm trees with floral motifs in between. This Mycenaean  vase is distinguished by the high quality of clay and paint, and by the naturalistic rendering of the decoration. From the Mycenaean cemetery at Argive Deiras, Greece. 15th Century BC. Cat No 6725 Athens Archaeological Museum.
  • Statue of Venus Marina (Greek Goddess of love), 1st century Roma copy found near Florence. This high quality statue of Venus of Aphrodite This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. In this aviation there is evidence that Venus leaned on a pillar with a dolphin which was a pointer to her having been born in the sea. Altes Museum Berlin
  • Three handled Mycenaean  Palace Style amphora with large palm trees symmetrically placed on the sides and smaller palm trees with floral motifs in between. This Mycenaean  vase is distinguished by the high quality of clay and paint, and by the naturalistic rendering of the decoration. From the Mycenaean cemetery at Argive Deiras, Greece. 15th Century BC. Cat No 6725 Athens Archaeological Museum.
  • Three handled Mycenaean  Palace Style amphora with large palm trees symmetrically placed on the sides and smaller palm trees with floral motifs in between. This Mycenaean  vase is distinguished by the high quality of clay and paint, and by the naturalistic rendering of the decoration. From the Mycenaean cemetery at Argive Deiras, Greece. 15th Century BC. Cat No 6725 Athens Archaeological Museum.
  • Three handled Mycenaean  Palace Style amphora with large palm trees symmetrically placed on the sides and smaller palm trees with floral motifs in between. This Mycenaean  vase is distinguished by the high quality of clay and paint, and by the naturalistic rendering of the decoration. From the Mycenaean cemetery at Argive Deiras, Greece. 15th Century BC. Cat No 6725 Athens Archaeological Museum.
  • Statue of Venus Marina (Greek Goddess of love), 1st century Roma copy found near Florence. This high quality statue of Venus of Aphrodite This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. In this aviation there is evidence that Venus leaned on a pillar with a dolphin which was a pointer to her having been born in the sea. Altes Museum Berlin
  • Statue of Venus Marina (Greek Goddess of love), 1st century Roma copy found near Florence. This high quality statue of Venus of Aphrodite This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. In this aviation there is evidence that Venus leaned on a pillar with a dolphin which was a pointer to her having been born in the sea. Altes Museum Berlin
  • Statue of Venus Marina (Greek Goddess of love), 1st century Roma copy found near Florence. This high quality statue of Venus of Aphrodite This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. In this aviation there is evidence that Venus leaned on a pillar with a dolphin which was a pointer to her having been born in the sea. Altes Museum Berlin
  • Roman relief panel showing a Barbarian, circa 98-117 AD from the Palace of Montecitorio, Rome. This  relief panel is part of a larger work. It represents a battle and the figure can be identified as a barbarian by his eastern style tunic and thick beard. Judging by the quality of the execution, the relief must have belonged to an important public monument situated in the area of the Campus Martius .  Inv 39163, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman relief panel showing a Barbarian, circa 98-117 AD from the Palace of Montecitorio, Rome. This  relief panel is part of a larger work. It represents a battle and the figure can be identified as a barbarian by his eastern style tunic and thick beard. Judging by the quality of the execution, the relief must have belonged to an important public monument situated in the area of the Campus Martius .  Inv 39163, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Bellerophon, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Bellerophon was a Lykian hero who was claimed to be the founder of Aphrodisias. He holds the winged horse Pegasos. The quality of the carving is poor indicating an apprentice piece.
  • Three handled Mycenaean  Palace Style amphora with large palm trees symmetrically placed on the sides and smaller palm trees with floral motifs in between. This Mycenaean  vase is distinguished by the high quality of clay and paint, and by the naturalistic rendering of the decoration. From the Mycenaean cemetery at Argive Deiras, Greece. 15th Century BC. Cat No 6725 Athens Archaeological Museum.
  • Three handled Mycenaean  Palace Style amphora with large palm trees symmetrically placed on the sides and smaller palm trees with floral motifs in between. This Mycenaean  vase is distinguished by the high quality of clay and paint, and by the naturalistic rendering of the decoration. From the Mycenaean cemetery at Argive Deiras, Greece. 15th Century BC. Cat No 6725 Athens Archaeological Museum.
  • Ager Apostles: James and Thaddeus<br />
<br />
Late XI - XII century<br />
Fresco transferred to canvas from the Church of St. Peter Anger, Noguera, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1958. MNAC 65467<br />
<br />
Romanesque fresco ascribed to the so-called Pedret Painters of Ager.  Typical of this school is the composition or refinement in the modeling of faces with characteristic forehead, cheeks and neck, which show the quality of Painters. San Ager was one of the main centers of religious and political centres in the south of Urgell.
  • Ager Apostles: James and Thaddeus<br />
<br />
Late XI - XII century<br />
Fresco transferred to canvas from the Church of St. Peter Anger, Noguera, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1958. MNAC 65467<br />
<br />
Romanesque fresco ascribed to the so-called Pedret Painters of Ager.  Typical of this school is the composition or refinement in the modeling of faces with characteristic forehead, cheeks and neck, which show the quality of Painters. San Ager was one of the main centers of religious and political centres in the south of Urgell.
  • Ager Apostles: James and Thaddeus<br />
<br />
Late XI - XII century<br />
Fresco transferred to canvas from the Church of St. Peter Anger, Noguera, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1958. MNAC 65467<br />
<br />
Romanesque fresco ascribed to the so-called Pedret Painters of Ager.  Typical of this school is the composition or refinement in the modeling of faces with characteristic forehead, cheeks and neck, which show the quality of Painters. San Ager was one of the main centers of religious and political centres in the south of Urgell.
  • Ager Apostles: James and Thaddeus<br />
<br />
Late XI - XII century<br />
Fresco transferred to canvas from the Church of St. Peter Anger, Noguera, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1958. MNAC 65467<br />
<br />
Romanesque fresco ascribed to the so-called Pedret Painters of Ager.  Typical of this school is the composition or refinement in the modeling of faces with characteristic forehead, cheeks and neck, which show the quality of Painters. San Ager was one of the main centers of religious and political centres in the south of Urgell.
  • Altar of St. Maria de Taull<br />
<br />
1200s repainted in 1579. Tempera on wood with carvings from the church of Santa Maria in Snowshoe, Vall de Boi, High Ribagorca, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3904<br />
<br />
Thirteenth century Romanesque carved and painted altar front with Christ Pantocrator in a Mandorla flanked by the 12 Apostles.  Carved altar frontals were not rare in Romanesque. Generally the characters were sculpted separately and then added to the front surface. The high quality of carving indicates the presence of a sculptures hand. The sharpness of forms to make stereotypical costumes seem versed in the work of stone sculpture.
  • Altar of St. Maria de Taull<br />
<br />
1200s repainted in 1579. Tempera on wood with carvings from the church of Santa Maria in Snowshoe, Vall de Boi, High Ribagorca, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3904<br />
<br />
Thirteenth century Romanesque carved and painted altar front with Christ Pantocrator in a Mandorla flanked by the 12 Apostles.  Carved altar frontals were not rare in Romanesque. Generally the characters were sculpted separately and then added to the front surface. The high quality of carving indicates the presence of a sculptures hand. The sharpness of forms to make stereotypical costumes seem versed in the work of stone sculpture.
  • Altar of St. Maria de Taull<br />
<br />
1200s repainted in 1579. Tempera on wood with carvings from the church of Santa Maria in Snowshoe, Vall de Boi, High Ribagorca, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3904<br />
<br />
Thirteenth century Romanesque carved and painted altar front with Christ Pantocrator in a Mandorla flanked by the 12 Apostles.  Carved altar frontals were not rare in Romanesque. Generally the characters were sculpted separately and then added to the front surface. The high quality of carving indicates the presence of a sculptures hand. The sharpness of forms to make stereotypical costumes seem versed in the work of stone sculpture.
  • Altar of St. Maria de Taull<br />
<br />
1200s repainted in 1579. Tempera on wood with carvings from the church of Santa Maria in Snowshoe, Vall de Boi, High Ribagorca, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3904<br />
<br />
Thirteenth century Romanesque carved and painted altar front with Christ Pantocrator in a Mandorla flanked by the 12 Apostles.  Carved altar frontals were not rare in Romanesque. Generally the characters were sculpted separately and then added to the front surface. The high quality of carving indicates the presence of a sculptures hand. The sharpness of forms to make stereotypical costumes seem versed in the work of stone sculpture.
  • Roman relief panel showing a Barbarian, circa 98-117 AD from the Palace of Montecitorio, Rome. This  relief panel is part of a larger work. It represents a battle and the figure can be identified as a barbarian by his eastern style tunic and thick beard. Judging by the quality of the execution, the relief must have belonged to an important public monument situated in the area of the Campus Martius .  Inv 39163, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Altar of St. Maria de Taull<br />
<br />
1200s repainted in 1579. Tempera on wood with carvings from the church of Santa Maria in Snowshoe, Vall de Boi, High Ribagorca, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3904<br />
<br />
Thirteenth century Romanesque carved and painted altar front with Christ Pantocrator in a Mandorla flanked by the 12 Apostles.  Carved altar frontals were not rare in Romanesque. Generally the characters were sculpted separately and then added to the front surface. The high quality of carving indicates the presence of a sculptures hand. The sharpness of forms to make stereotypical costumes seem versed in the work of stone sculpture.
  • Altar of St. Maria de Taull<br />
<br />
1200s repainted in 1579. Tempera on wood with carvings from the church of Santa Maria in Snowshoe, Vall de Boi, High Ribagorca, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3904<br />
<br />
Thirteenth century Romanesque carved and painted altar front with Christ Pantocrator in a Mandorla flanked by the 12 Apostles.  Carved altar frontals were not rare in Romanesque. Generally the characters were sculpted separately and then added to the front surface. The high quality of carving indicates the presence of a sculptures hand. The sharpness of forms to make stereotypical costumes seem versed in the work of stone sculpture.
  • Altar of St. Maria de Taull<br />
<br />
1200s repainted in 1579. Tempera on wood with carvings from the church of Santa Maria in Snowshoe, Vall de Boi, High Ribagorca, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3904<br />
<br />
Thirteenth century Romanesque carved and painted altar front with Christ Pantocrator in a Mandorla flanked by the 12 Apostles.  Carved altar frontals were not rare in Romanesque. Generally the characters were sculpted separately and then added to the front surface. The high quality of carving indicates the presence of a sculptures hand. The sharpness of forms to make stereotypical costumes seem versed in the work of stone sculpture.
  • Ager Apostles: James and Thaddeus<br />
<br />
Late XI - XII century<br />
Fresco transferred to canvas from the Church of St. Peter Anger, Noguera, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1958. MNAC 65467<br />
<br />
Romanesque fresco ascribed to the so-called Pedret Painters of Ager.  Typical of this school is the composition or refinement in the modeling of faces with characteristic forehead, cheeks and neck, which show the quality of Painters. San Ager was one of the main centers of religious and political centres in the south of Urgell.
  • Ager Apostles: James and Thaddeus<br />
<br />
Late XI - XII century<br />
Fresco transferred to canvas from the Church of St. Peter Anger, Noguera, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1958. MNAC 65467<br />
<br />
Romanesque fresco ascribed to the so-called Pedret Painters of Ager.  Typical of this school is the composition or refinement in the modeling of faces with characteristic forehead, cheeks and neck, which show the quality of Painters. San Ager was one of the main centers of religious and political centres in the south of Urgell.
  • Altar of St. Maria de Taull<br />
<br />
1200s repainted in 1579. Tempera on wood with carvings from the church of Santa Maria in Snowshoe, Vall de Boi, High Ribagorca, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3904<br />
<br />
Thirteenth century Romanesque carved and painted altar front with Christ Pantocrator in a Mandorla flanked by the 12 Apostles.  Carved altar frontals were not rare in Romanesque. Generally the characters were sculpted separately and then added to the front surface. The high quality of carving indicates the presence of a sculptures hand. The sharpness of forms to make stereotypical costumes seem versed in the work of stone sculpture.
  • Roman mosaics - The Wedding of Dionysus mosaic. Dionysus Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd  century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
<br />
The Wedding of Dionysus and Ariadne Mosaic, which belongs to the House of Dionysus, is one of the most special mosaics around the world. In the scene, Dionysus and Ariadne are sitting on a sofa. There are three maenads, musician, the wedding god and two sirens around them. <br />
<br />
The mosaic gives the impression of a painting due to the rich variety of colors and luminous/shadow effects used. The fact that there are many figures within the mosaic and their high pictorial quality, on the other hand, makes the mosaic much more special. <br />
<br />
The House of Dionysus is the villa where a rescue excavation was conducted in 1992 upon the received intelligence telling that traffickers had been digging the area. After the excavations, the mosaic now you behold was unearthed along with some geometric mosaics. In terms of the exactness in the anatomy of the figures, the perspective, and the rich variety of colors it is among the most precious and important mosaic around the world. <br />
<br />
<br />
The Museum had conducted activities in order to display the mosaic where it belongs and in a natural manner. However, such a big portion of the mosaic as two thirds was stolen by the historical artefact traffickers in 1998 from the place of display. The parts of the mosaic are not found yet. After the robbery, the remaining parts were transported to Gaziantep Museum and displayed after restoration. The stolen part of the mosaic was left blank. The searches continue in order to find the missing parts through the Interpol.
  • Roman mosaics - Close up of The Wedding of Dionysus mosaic. Dionysus Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd  century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
<br />
The Wedding of Dionysus and Ariadne Mosaic, which belongs to the House of Dionysus, is one of the most special mosaics around the world. In the scene, Dionysus and Ariadne are sitting on a sofa. There are three maenads, musician, the wedding god and two sirens around them. <br />
<br />
The mosaic gives the impression of a painting due to the rich variety of colors and luminous/shadow effects used. The fact that there are many figures within the mosaic and their high pictorial quality, on the other hand, makes the mosaic much more special. <br />
<br />
The House of Dionysus is the villa where a rescue excavation was conducted in 1992 upon the received intelligence telling that traffickers had been digging the area. After the excavations, the mosaic now you behold was unearthed along with some geometric mosaics. In terms of the exactness in the anatomy of the figures, the perspective, and the rich variety of colors it is among the most precious and important mosaic around the world. <br />
<br />
<br />
The Museum had conducted activities in order to display the mosaic where it belongs and in a natural manner. However, such a big portion of the mosaic as two thirds was stolen by the historical artefact traffickers in 1998 from the place of display. The parts of the mosaic are not found yet. After the robbery, the remaining parts were transported to Gaziantep Museum and displayed after restoration. The stolen part of the mosaic was left blank. The searches continue in order to find the missing parts through the Interpol.
  • Roman relief panel showing a Barbarian, circa 98-117 AD from the Palace of Montecitorio, Rome. This  relief panel is part of a larger work. It represents a battle and the figure can be identified as a barbarian by his eastern style tunic and thick beard. Judging by the quality of the execution, the relief must have belonged to an important public monument situated in the area of the Campus Martius .  Inv 39163, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman relief panel showing a Barbarian, circa 98-117 AD from the Palace of Montecitorio, Rome. This  relief panel is part of a larger work. It represents a battle and the figure can be identified as a barbarian by his eastern style tunic and thick beard. Judging by the quality of the execution, the relief must have belonged to an important public monument situated in the area of the Campus Martius .  Inv 39163, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman relief panel showing a Barbarian, circa 98-117 AD from the Palace of Montecitorio, Rome. This  relief panel is part of a larger work. It represents a battle and the figure can be identified as a barbarian by his eastern style tunic and thick beard. Judging by the quality of the execution, the relief must have belonged to an important public monument situated in the area of the Campus Martius .  Inv 39163, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Bellerophon, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Bellerophon was a Lykian hero who was claimed to be the founder of Aphrodisias. He holds the winged horse Pegasos. The quality of the carving is poor indicating an apprentice piece.
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Bellerophon, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Bellerophon was a Lykian hero who was claimed to be the founder of Aphrodisias. He holds the winged horse Pegasos. The quality of the carving is poor indicating an apprentice piece.
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Bellerophon, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Bellerophon was a Lykian hero who was claimed to be the founder of Aphrodisias. He holds the winged horse Pegasos. The quality of the carving is poor indicating an apprentice piece.
  • Three handled Mycenaean  Palace Style amphora with large palm trees symmetrically placed on the sides and smaller palm trees with floral motifs in between. This Mycenaean  vase is distinguished by the high quality of clay and paint, and by the naturalistic rendering of the decoration. From the Mycenaean cemetery at Argive Deiras, Greece. 15th Century BC. Cat No 6725 Athens Archaeological Museum.
  • Three handled Mycenaean  Palace Style amphora with large palm trees symmetrically placed on the sides and smaller palm trees with floral motifs in between. This Mycenaean  vase is distinguished by the high quality of clay and paint, and by the naturalistic rendering of the decoration. From the Mycenaean cemetery at Argive Deiras, Greece. 15th Century BC. Cat No 6725 Athens Archaeological Museum.
  • Ager Apostles: James and Thaddeus<br />
<br />
Late XI - XII century<br />
Fresco transferred to canvas from the Church of St. Peter Anger, Noguera, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1958. MNAC 65467<br />
<br />
Romanesque fresco ascribed to the so-called Pedret Painters of Ager.  Typical of this school is the composition or refinement in the modeling of faces with characteristic forehead, cheeks and neck, which show the quality of Painters. San Ager was one of the main centers of religious and political centres in the south of Urgell.
  • Altar of St. Maria de Taull<br />
<br />
1200s repainted in 1579. Tempera on wood with carvings from the church of Santa Maria in Snowshoe, Vall de Boi, High Ribagorca, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3904<br />
<br />
Thirteenth century Romanesque carved and painted altar front with Christ Pantocrator in a Mandorla flanked by the 12 Apostles.  Carved altar frontals were not rare in Romanesque. Generally the characters were sculpted separately and then added to the front surface. The high quality of carving indicates the presence of a sculptures hand. The sharpness of forms to make stereotypical costumes seem versed in the work of stone sculpture.
  • Roman relief panel showing a Barbarian, circa 98-117 AD from the Palace of Montecitorio, Rome. This  relief panel is part of a larger work. It represents a battle and the figure can be identified as a barbarian by his eastern style tunic and thick beard. Judging by the quality of the execution, the relief must have belonged to an important public monument situated in the area of the Campus Martius .  Inv 39163, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman relief panel showing a Barbarian, circa 98-117 AD from the Palace of Montecitorio, Rome. This  relief panel is part of a larger work. It represents a battle and the figure can be identified as a barbarian by his eastern style tunic and thick beard. Judging by the quality of the execution, the relief must have belonged to an important public monument situated in the area of the Campus Martius .  Inv 39163, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman relief panel showing a Barbarian, circa 98-117 AD from the Palace of Montecitorio, Rome. This  relief panel is part of a larger work. It represents a battle and the figure can be identified as a barbarian by his eastern style tunic and thick beard. Judging by the quality of the execution, the relief must have belonged to an important public monument situated in the area of the Campus Martius .  Inv 39163, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman relief panel showing a Barbarian, circa 98-117 AD from the Palace of Montecitorio, Rome. This  relief panel is part of a larger work. It represents a battle and the figure can be identified as a barbarian by his eastern style tunic and thick beard. Judging by the quality of the execution, the relief must have belonged to an important public monument situated in the area of the Campus Martius .  Inv 39163, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • The Roman Sculpture Venus of Italica or Diosa Venus, found in 1940 near the theatre.  A famous Roman statue,  the "Venus of Itálica", dates from the time of Hadrian (117-138 A.D.). Unlike the other Venus statues of the Era the Venus of Itálica does not try to hide her nudity but rather displays it. The state has rounded proportions with clearly defined anatomical features thanks to the exquisitely skilled carving, and the excellent quality of the marble. She is shown accompanied by a dolphin, and has a colocasia leaf in her left hand. <br />
Archaeological Museum, Seville, Spain<br />
<br />
Against a Grey background
  • Altar of St. Maria de Taull<br />
<br />
1200s repainted in 1579. Tempera on wood with carvings from the church of Santa Maria in Snowshoe, Vall de Boi, High Ribagorca, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3904<br />
<br />
Thirteenth century Romanesque carved and painted altar front with Christ Pantocrator in a Mandorla flanked by the 12 Apostles.  Carved altar frontals were not rare in Romanesque. Generally the characters were sculpted separately and then added to the front surface. The high quality of carving indicates the presence of a sculptures hand. The sharpness of forms to make stereotypical costumes seem versed in the work of stone sculpture.
  • Altar of St. Maria de Taull<br />
<br />
1200s repainted in 1579. Tempera on wood with carvings from the church of Santa Maria in Snowshoe, Vall de Boi, High Ribagorca, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3904<br />
<br />
Thirteenth century Romanesque carved and painted altar front with Christ Pantocrator in a Mandorla flanked by the 12 Apostles.  Carved altar frontals were not rare in Romanesque. Generally the characters were sculpted separately and then added to the front surface. The high quality of carving indicates the presence of a sculptures hand. The sharpness of forms to make stereotypical costumes seem versed in the work of stone sculpture.
  • Ager Apostles: James and Thaddeus<br />
<br />
Late XI - XII century<br />
Fresco transferred to canvas from the Church of St. Peter Anger, Noguera, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1958. MNAC 65467<br />
<br />
Romanesque fresco ascribed to the so-called Pedret Painters of Ager.  Typical of this school is the composition or refinement in the modeling of faces with characteristic forehead, cheeks and neck, which show the quality of Painters. San Ager was one of the main centers of religious and political centres in the south of Urgell.
  • Ager Apostles: James and Thaddeus<br />
<br />
Late XI - XII century<br />
Fresco transferred to canvas from the Church of St. Peter Anger, Noguera, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1958. MNAC 65467<br />
<br />
Romanesque fresco ascribed to the so-called Pedret Painters of Ager.  Typical of this school is the composition or refinement in the modeling of faces with characteristic forehead, cheeks and neck, which show the quality of Painters. San Ager was one of the main centers of religious and political centres in the south of Urgell.
  • Ager Apostles: James and Thaddeus<br />
<br />
Late XI - XII century<br />
Fresco transferred to canvas from the Church of St. Peter Anger, Noguera, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1958. MNAC 65467<br />
<br />
Romanesque fresco ascribed to the so-called Pedret Painters of Ager.  Typical of this school is the composition or refinement in the modeling of faces with characteristic forehead, cheeks and neck, which show the quality of Painters. San Ager was one of the main centers of religious and political centres in the south of Urgell.
  • Altar of St. Maria de Taull<br />
<br />
1200s repainted in 1579. Tempera on wood with carvings from the church of Santa Maria in Snowshoe, Vall de Boi, High Ribagorca, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3904<br />
<br />
Thirteenth century Romanesque carved and painted altar front with Christ Pantocrator in a Mandorla flanked by the 12 Apostles.  Carved altar frontals were not rare in Romanesque. Generally the characters were sculpted separately and then added to the front surface. The high quality of carving indicates the presence of a sculptures hand. The sharpness of forms to make stereotypical costumes seem versed in the work of stone sculpture.
  • Altar of St. Maria de Taull<br />
<br />
1200s repainted in 1579. Tempera on wood with carvings from the church of Santa Maria in Snowshoe, Vall de Boi, High Ribagorca, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3904<br />
<br />
Thirteenth century Romanesque carved and painted altar front with Christ Pantocrator in a Mandorla flanked by the 12 Apostles.  Carved altar frontals were not rare in Romanesque. Generally the characters were sculpted separately and then added to the front surface. The high quality of carving indicates the presence of a sculptures hand. The sharpness of forms to make stereotypical costumes seem versed in the work of stone sculpture.
  • Altar of St. Maria de Taull<br />
<br />
1200s repainted in 1579. Tempera on wood with carvings from the church of Santa Maria in Snowshoe, Vall de Boi, High Ribagorca, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3904<br />
<br />
Thirteenth century Romanesque carved and painted altar front with Christ Pantocrator in a Mandorla flanked by the 12 Apostles.  Carved altar frontals were not rare in Romanesque. Generally the characters were sculpted separately and then added to the front surface. The high quality of carving indicates the presence of a sculptures hand. The sharpness of forms to make stereotypical costumes seem versed in the work of stone sculpture.
  • Altar of St. Maria de Taull<br />
<br />
1200s repainted in 1579. Tempera on wood with carvings from the church of Santa Maria in Snowshoe, Vall de Boi, High Ribagorca, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1932. MNAC 3904<br />
<br />
Thirteenth century Romanesque carved and painted altar front with Christ Pantocrator in a Mandorla flanked by the 12 Apostles.  Carved altar frontals were not rare in Romanesque. Generally the characters were sculpted separately and then added to the front surface. The high quality of carving indicates the presence of a sculptures hand. The sharpness of forms to make stereotypical costumes seem versed in the work of stone sculpture.
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Bellerophon, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Bellerophon was a Lykian hero who was claimed to be the founder of Aphrodisias. He holds the winged horse Pegasos. The quality of the carving is poor indicating an apprentice piece.
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Bellerophon, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Bellerophon was a Lykian hero who was claimed to be the founder of Aphrodisias. He holds the winged horse Pegasos. The quality of the carving is poor indicating an apprentice piece.
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Bellerophon, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Bellerophon was a Lykian hero who was claimed to be the founder of Aphrodisias. He holds the winged horse Pegasos. The quality of the carving is poor indicating an apprentice piece.
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Bellerophon, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Bellerophon was a Lykian hero who was claimed to be the founder of Aphrodisias. He holds the winged horse Pegasos. The quality of the carving is poor indicating an apprentice piece.
  • Three handled Mycenaean  Palace Style amphora with large palm trees symmetrically placed on the sides and smaller palm trees with floral motifs in between. This Mycenaean  vase is distinguished by the high quality of clay and paint, and by the naturalistic rendering of the decoration. From the Mycenaean cemetery at Argive Deiras, Greece. 15th Century BC. Cat No 6725 Athens Archaeological Museum.
  • Three handled Mycenaean  Palace Style amphora with large palm trees symmetrically placed on the sides and smaller palm trees with floral motifs in between. This Mycenaean  vase is distinguished by the high quality of clay and paint, and by the naturalistic rendering of the decoration. From the Mycenaean cemetery at Argive Deiras, Greece. 15th Century BC. Cat No 6725 Athens Archaeological Museum.

FunkyStock Picture Library Resource

Picture The Past

ABOUT

FunkyStock Picture Library free resource for professional editorial picture editors, picture researchers, historical scholars and students and enthusiasts who want to browse some of the best pictures and images of historic countries, historical places, archaeological sites and the very best museum antiquities and artefacts exhibits in Europe and the Middle East.

Pictures and Images can be downloaded or bought as stock photos or photo art prints.

COUNTRIES

Browse travel pictures and images of historic places and archaeological sites of countries in Europe and the Middle East.

VIEW COUNTRIES INDEX....

HISTORICAL

Explore the past through pictures and images of its historic places. See the great palaces, castles and cities of antiquity as well as the great archaeological sites where our ancestors made history.

EXPLORE HISTORICAL PLACES...

MUSEUMS

Browse pictures & images the treasured artefacts and antiquities exhibits from the great Museum of Europe and the Middle East. See the art and objects made by our ancestors.

SEE MUESEUM ANTIQUITIES....