• selection of natural hand made scented soap bars piled on an aluminium dish.
  • Bars of  coloured hand made scented soaps piled in a modern metal soap dish.
  • 4 bars of scented hand made soap piled on an aluminium soap dish with water droplets
  • Bars of  coloured hand made scented soaps piled in a a soap dish.
  • 4 bars of scented hand made soaps piled on an aluminium background with water droplets
  • Bars of  coloured hand made scented soaps piled in a a soap dish.
  • Bars of  coloured hand made scented soaps piled in a a soap dish.
  • Bars of  coloured hand made scented soaps piled in a a soap dish.
  • 3 bars of scented soap piled on a white face towel
  • Sailing boats in harbour with Italian style buildings & church. Piran , Slovenia
  • Sailing boats in harbour with Italian style buildings & church. Piran , Slovenia
  • Harour entance with people relaxing and fishing off the harbour wall. Pirates ship.  Piran , Slovenia
  • Harour entance with people relaxing and swimming off the harbour wall. Piran , Slovenia
  • Harour entance with people relaxing and fishing off the harbour wall with a sailing boat. Piran , Slovenia
  • Painted colour verion of end of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Naples  Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of end of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, black background
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, grey background
  • Statue of Narcissus known as The Marazin Hermaphrodite or The Genie at Eternal Rest - a 3rd century AD Roman marble statue. The restoration combines an ancient  funeral head with another ancient Roman statue. The Mazarin Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Narcissus known as The Marazin Hermaphrodite or The Genie at Eternal Rest - a 3rd century AD Roman marble statue. The restoration combines an ancient  funeral head with another ancient Roman statue. The Mazarin Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of a dead women lying at rest in a realistic style. The Pignone Avanzini tomb sculpted by G Benetti 1867. Section D no 4, the monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of end of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of end of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of end of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of end of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of end of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of end of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of end of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of end of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomba del Cacciatore A single chamber with double sloping ceiling decorated with a painted chequered design, the rest of the tomb is decorated like a hunting tent with hanging wild ducks and hats. 510-500 BC. Excavated 1962, Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomba del Cacciatore A single chamber with double sloping ceiling decorated with a painted chequered design, the rest of the tomb is decorated like a hunting tent with hanging wild ducks and hats. 510-500 BC. Excavated 1962, Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, white background
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, grey background
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, black background
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, white background
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, grey art background
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, black background
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, grey background
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, grey art background
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, white background
  • Full length view of end of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Full length view of end of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, grey art background
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • End of 2nd century beginning of 3rd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Hercules at rest copied from the second half of the 4th century BC Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6001, Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Statue of Narcissus known as The Marazin Hermaphrodite or The Genie at Eternal Rest - a 3rd century AD Roman marble statue. The restoration combines an ancient  funeral head with another ancient Roman statue. The Mazarin Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Narcissus known as The Marazin Hermaphrodite or The Genie at Eternal Rest - a 3rd century AD Roman marble statue. The restoration combines an ancient  funeral head with another ancient Roman statue. The Mazarin Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Narcissus known as The Marazin Hermaphrodite or The Genie at Eternal Rest - a 3rd century AD Roman marble statue. The restoration combines an ancient  funeral head with another ancient Roman statue. The Mazarin Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Narcissus known as The Marazin Hermaphrodite or The Genie at Eternal Rest - a 3rd century AD Roman marble statue. The restoration combines an ancient  funeral head with another ancient Roman statue. The Mazarin Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Narcissus known as The Marazin Hermaphrodite or The Genie at Eternal Rest - a 3rd century AD Roman marble statue. The restoration combines an ancient  funeral head with another ancient Roman statue. The Mazarin Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Narcissus known as The Marazin Hermaphrodite or The Genie at Eternal Rest - a 3rd century AD Roman marble statue. The restoration combines an ancient  funeral head with another ancient Roman statue. The Mazarin Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Narcissus known as The Marazin Hermaphrodite or The Genie at Eternal Rest - a 3rd century AD Roman marble statue. The restoration combines an ancient  funeral head with another ancient Roman statue. The Mazarin Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Narcissus known as The Marazin Hermaphrodite or The Genie at Eternal Rest - a 3rd century AD Roman marble statue. The restoration combines an ancient  funeral head with another ancient Roman statue. The Mazarin Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Narcissus known as The Marazin Hermaphrodite or The Genie at Eternal Rest - a 3rd century AD Roman marble statue. The restoration combines an ancient  funeral head with another ancient Roman statue. The Mazarin Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Narcissus known as The Marazin Hermaphrodite or The Genie at Eternal Rest - a 3rd century AD Roman marble statue. The restoration combines an ancient  funeral head with another ancient Roman statue. The Mazarin Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Narcissus known as The Marazin Hermaphrodite or The Genie at Eternal Rest - a 3rd century AD Roman marble statue. The restoration combines an ancient  funeral head with another ancient Roman statue. The Mazarin Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Narcissus known as The Marazin Hermaphrodite or The Genie at Eternal Rest - a 3rd century AD Roman marble statue. The restoration combines an ancient  funeral head with another ancient Roman statue. The Mazarin Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Narcissus known as The Marazin Hermaphrodite or The Genie at Eternal Rest - a 3rd century AD Roman marble statue. The restoration combines an ancient  funeral head with another ancient Roman statue. The Mazarin Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Narcissus known as The Marazin Hermaphrodite or The Genie at Eternal Rest - a 3rd century AD Roman marble statue. The restoration combines an ancient  funeral head with another ancient Roman statue. The Mazarin Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Sculpture depicting  Kassite or 3rd Dynasty of Babylon King Meli-Shipak II commemorating a donation of land to his daughter-Hannubat Nannaya. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. The king dressed in a long robe with his right hand raised in a gesture of greeting. With his left hand he grasps the wrist of his daughter. The princess carries in her left hand a nine-stringed harp. Both face an enthroned goddess Nanya, a deity worshipped especially at Uruk[, who is dressed in a flounced or segmented garment and donning a feathered mitre and sits on the far side of a cultic censer on a stand. Above them are the symbols of three divinities astral: the star of Ishtar, the sun god Shamash and Sin of the crescent moon are in the sky. The rest of the stele has been entirely defaced, possibly by an Elamite king intending to have his own inscription engraved. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Sculpture depicting  Kassite or 3rd Dynasty of Babylon King Meli-Shipak II commemorating a donation of land to his daughter-Hannubat Nannaya. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. The king dressed in a long robe with his right hand raised in a gesture of greeting. With his left hand he grasps the wrist of his daughter. The princess carries in her left hand a nine-stringed harp. Both face an enthroned goddess Nanya, a deity worshipped especially at Uruk[, who is dressed in a flounced or segmented garment and donning a feathered mitre and sits on the far side of a cultic censer on a stand. Above them are the symbols of three divinities astral: the star of Ishtar, the sun god Shamash and Sin of the crescent moon are in the sky. The rest of the stele has been entirely defaced, possibly by an Elamite king intending to have his own inscription engraved. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Statue of Narcissus known as The Marazin Hermaphrodite or The Genie at Eternal Rest - a 3rd century AD Roman marble statue. The restoration combines an ancient  funeral head with another ancient Roman statue. The Mazarin Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman statue of Hercules from the mid 2nd cent. AD excavated from the Via Appia. Hercules is portrayed as a mature man at rest, his naked body wrapped in a lion skin; he probably geld his club in his left hand. His style of dress was typical of that used in the Roman theatre. The statue of Hercules is a reworking of a Greek original dating from around the 2nd or 3rd cent. BC .  Inv  115165, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Statue of Narcissus known as The Marazin Hermaphrodite or The Genie at Eternal Rest - a 3rd century AD Roman marble statue. The restoration combines an ancient  funeral head with another ancient Roman statue. The Mazarin Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Altar of Esquius - Painted wooden panel<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the twelfth century<br />
<br />
Probably comes from the ancient Chapel of Santa Maria of Besora Castle <br />
<br />
Aquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1958. Ref: 65502 MNAC.<br />
<br />
<br />
The use of valuable pigments (lapis lazuli, orpiment, cinabri) on the Altar panel, suggests that this front was painted in an important monastery scriptorium like Ripoll. The poetic inscription that runs around the mandorla surrounding Christ is very characteristic of the intellectual environment of Ripoll "This is the God of Alfa and Omega. Come, O merciful with Your mercy, and remove the chains of missery. Amen." This is flanked by Tetramorph showing the four evangelical symbols - St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle. The rest of the panel depicts the 12 apostles.
  • Altar of Esquius - Painted wooden panel<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the twelfth century<br />
<br />
Probably comes from the ancient Chapel of Santa Maria of Besora Castle <br />
<br />
Aquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1958. Ref: 65502 MNAC.<br />
<br />
<br />
The use of valuable pigments (lapis lazuli, orpiment, cinabri) on the Altar panel, suggests that this front was painted in an important monastery scriptorium like Ripoll. The poetic inscription that runs around the mandorla surrounding Christ is very characteristic of the intellectual environment of Ripoll "This is the God of Alfa and Omega. Come, O merciful with Your mercy, and remove the chains of missery. Amen." This is flanked by Tetramorph showing the four evangelical symbols - St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle. The rest of the panel depicts the 12 apostles.
  • Picture of  A18 of the Tomb North Necropolis. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.<br />
<br />
Tomb A 18 ( 1st century AD) <br />
<br />
The building, one of the most representative and best conserved of the North Necropolis, has the shape of a small temple, built to a square plan with regular walls. The facade is framed by projecting pilasters; the roofing slabs rest on the, two frontons and the lateral cornices.- Beneath the base is a subterranean chamber partially carved into of the rock. The two chambers have sepulchral beds along the walls.
  • Picture of  A18 of the Tomb North Necropolis. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.<br />
<br />
Tomb A 18 ( 1st century AD) <br />
<br />
The building, one of the most representative and best conserved of the North Necropolis, has the shape of a small temple, built to a square plan with regular walls. The facade is framed by projecting pilasters; the roofing slabs rest on the, two frontons and the lateral cornices.- Beneath the base is a subterranean chamber partially carved into of the rock. The two chambers have sepulchral beds along the walls.
  • Fifth century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian funerary mosaic dedicated to Leontia.  The Constantinian monogram depicting the Christian Chi-Rho symbol used by the Roman emperor Constantine I as part of his military standard (vexillum).  The inscription in the cartouche reads " Leontia in peace and harmony with God, entered into eternal life on the Sixth Ides of October". Two birds and cut Roses occupy the rest of the mosaic. <br />
<br />
Excavated from Demna Parish Church ruins between the 4th and 5th columns of the right aisle. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • Fifth century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian funerary mosaic dedicated to Leontia.  The Constantinian monogram depicting the Christian Chi-Rho symbol used by the Roman emperor Constantine I as part of his military standard (vexillum).  The inscription in the cartouche reads " Leontia in peace and harmony with God, entered into eternal life on the Sixth Ides of October". Two birds and cut Roses occupy the rest of the mosaic. <br />
<br />
Excavated from Demna Parish Church ruins between the 4th and 5th columns of the right aisle. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • Fifth century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian funerary mosaic dedicated to Leontia.  The Constantinian monogram depicting the Christian Chi-Rho symbol used by the Roman emperor Constantine I as part of his military standard (vexillum).  The inscription in the cartouche reads " Leontia in peace and harmony with God, entered into eternal life on the Sixth Ides of October". Two birds and cut Roses occupy the rest of the mosaic. <br />
<br />
Excavated from Demna Parish Church ruins between the 4th and 5th columns of the right aisle. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Fifth century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian funerary mosaic dedicated to Leontia.  The Constantinian monogram depicting the Christian Chi-Rho symbol used by the Roman emperor Constantine I as part of his military standard (vexillum).  The inscription in the cartouche reads " Leontia in peace and harmony with God, entered into eternal life on the Sixth Ides of October". Two birds and cut Roses occupy the rest of the mosaic. <br />
<br />
Excavated from Demna Parish Church ruins between the 4th and 5th columns of the right aisle. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Fifth century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian funerary mosaic dedicated to Leontia.  The Constantinian monogram depicting the Christian Chi-Rho symbol used by the Roman emperor Constantine I as part of his military standard (vexillum).  The inscription in the cartouche reads " Leontia in peace and harmony with God, entered into eternal life on the Sixth Ides of October". Two birds and cut Roses occupy the rest of the mosaic. <br />
<br />
Excavated from Demna Parish Church ruins between the 4th and 5th columns of the right aisle. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • Stone Sculpture depicting  Kassite or 3rd Dynasty of Babylon King Meli-Shipak II commemorating a donation of land to his daughter-Hannubat Nannaya. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. The king dressed in a long robe with his right hand raised in a gesture of greeting. With his left hand he grasps the wrist of his daughter. The princess carries in her left hand a nine-stringed harp. Both face an enthroned goddess Nanya, a deity worshipped especially at Uruk[, who is dressed in a flounced or segmented garment and donning a feathered mitre and sits on the far side of a cultic censer on a stand. Above them are the symbols of three divinities astral: the star of Ishtar, the sun god Shamash and Sin of the crescent moon are in the sky. The rest of the stele has been entirely defaced, possibly by an Elamite king intending to have his own inscription engraved. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Sculpture depicting  Kassite or 3rd Dynasty of Babylon King Meli-Shipak II commemorating a donation of land to his daughter-Hannubat Nannaya. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. The king dressed in a long robe with his right hand raised in a gesture of greeting. With his left hand he grasps the wrist of his daughter. The princess carries in her left hand a nine-stringed harp. Both face an enthroned goddess Nanya, a deity worshipped especially at Uruk[, who is dressed in a flounced or segmented garment and donning a feathered mitre and sits on the far side of a cultic censer on a stand. Above them are the symbols of three divinities astral: the star of Ishtar, the sun god Shamash and Sin of the crescent moon are in the sky. The rest of the stele has been entirely defaced, possibly by an Elamite king intending to have his own inscription engraved. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Sculpture depicting  Kassite or 3rd Dynasty of Babylon King Meli-Shipak II commemorating a donation of land to his daughter-Hannubat Nannaya. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. The king dressed in a long robe with his right hand raised in a gesture of greeting. With his left hand he grasps the wrist of his daughter. The princess carries in her left hand a nine-stringed harp. Both face an enthroned goddess Nanya, a deity worshipped especially at Uruk[, who is dressed in a flounced or segmented garment and donning a feathered mitre and sits on the far side of a cultic censer on a stand. Above them are the symbols of three divinities astral: the star of Ishtar, the sun god Shamash and Sin of the crescent moon are in the sky. The rest of the stele has been entirely defaced, possibly by an Elamite king intending to have his own inscription engraved. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Stone Sculpture depicting  Kassite or 3rd Dynasty of Babylon King Meli-Shipak II commemorating a donation of land to his daughter-Hannubat Nannaya. Circa 1186-1172 BC excavated from Susa where it had been taken as a spoil of war. The king dressed in a long robe with his right hand raised in a gesture of greeting. With his left hand he grasps the wrist of his daughter. The princess carries in her left hand a nine-stringed harp. Both face an enthroned goddess Nanya, a deity worshipped especially at Uruk[, who is dressed in a flounced or segmented garment and donning a feathered mitre and sits on the far side of a cultic censer on a stand. Above them are the symbols of three divinities astral: the star of Ishtar, the sun god Shamash and Sin of the crescent moon are in the sky. The rest of the stele has been entirely defaced, possibly by an Elamite king intending to have his own inscription engraved. The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman statue of Hercules from the mid 2nd cent. AD excavated from the Via Appia. Hercules is portrayed as a mature man at rest, his naked body wrapped in a lion skin; he probably geld his club in his left hand. His style of dress was typical of that used in the Roman theatre. The statue of Hercules is a reworking of a Greek original dating from around the 2nd or 3rd cent. BC .  Inv  115165, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Hercules from the mid 2nd cent. AD excavated from the Via Appia. Hercules is portrayed as a mature man at rest, his naked body wrapped in a lion skin; he probably geld his club in his left hand. His style of dress was typical of that used in the Roman theatre. The statue of Hercules is a reworking of a Greek original dating from around the 2nd or 3rd cent. BC .  Inv  115165, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Hercules from the mid 2nd cent. AD excavated from the Via Appia. Hercules is portrayed as a mature man at rest, his naked body wrapped in a lion skin; he probably geld his club in his left hand. His style of dress was typical of that used in the Roman theatre. The statue of Hercules is a reworking of a Greek original dating from around the 2nd or 3rd cent. BC .  Inv  115165, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Hercules from the mid 2nd cent. AD excavated from the Via Appia. Hercules is portrayed as a mature man at rest, his naked body wrapped in a lion skin; he probably geld his club in his left hand. His style of dress was typical of that used in the Roman theatre. The statue of Hercules is a reworking of a Greek original dating from around the 2nd or 3rd cent. BC .  Inv  115165, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Hercules from the mid 2nd cent. AD excavated from the Via Appia. Hercules is portrayed as a mature man at rest, his naked body wrapped in a lion skin; he probably geld his club in his left hand. His style of dress was typical of that used in the Roman theatre. The statue of Hercules is a reworking of a Greek original dating from around the 2nd or 3rd cent. BC .  Inv  115165, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Altar of Esquius - Painted wooden panel<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the twelfth century<br />
<br />
Probably comes from the ancient Chapel of Santa Maria of Besora Castle <br />
<br />
Aquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1958. Ref: 65502 MNAC.<br />
<br />
<br />
The use of valuable pigments (lapis lazuli, orpiment, cinabri) on the Altar panel, suggests that this front was painted in an important monastery scriptorium like Ripoll. The poetic inscription that runs around the mandorla surrounding Christ is very characteristic of the intellectual environment of Ripoll "This is the God of Alfa and Omega. Come, O merciful with Your mercy, and remove the chains of missery. Amen." This is flanked by Tetramorph showing the four evangelical symbols - St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle. The rest of the panel depicts the 12 apostles.
  • Altar of Esquius - Painted wooden panel<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the twelfth century<br />
<br />
Probably comes from the ancient Chapel of Santa Maria of Besora Castle <br />
<br />
Aquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1958. Ref: 65502 MNAC.<br />
<br />
<br />
The use of valuable pigments (lapis lazuli, orpiment, cinabri) on the Altar panel, suggests that this front was painted in an important monastery scriptorium like Ripoll. The poetic inscription that runs around the mandorla surrounding Christ is very characteristic of the intellectual environment of Ripoll "This is the God of Alfa and Omega. Come, O merciful with Your mercy, and remove the chains of missery. Amen." This is flanked by Tetramorph showing the four evangelical symbols - St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle. The rest of the panel depicts the 12 apostles.
  • Altar of Esquius - Painted wooden panel<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the twelfth century<br />
<br />
Probably comes from the ancient Chapel of Santa Maria of Besora Castle <br />
<br />
Aquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1958. Ref: 65502 MNAC.<br />
<br />
<br />
The use of valuable pigments (lapis lazuli, orpiment, cinabri) on the Altar panel, suggests that this front was painted in an important monastery scriptorium like Ripoll. The poetic inscription that runs around the mandorla surrounding Christ is very characteristic of the intellectual environment of Ripoll "This is the God of Alfa and Omega. Come, O merciful with Your mercy, and remove the chains of missery. Amen." This is flanked by Tetramorph showing the four evangelical symbols - St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle. The rest of the panel depicts the 12 apostles.
  • Altar of Esquius - Painted wooden panel<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the twelfth century<br />
<br />
Probably comes from the ancient Chapel of Santa Maria of Besora Castle <br />
<br />
Aquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1958. Ref: 65502 MNAC.<br />
<br />
<br />
The use of valuable pigments (lapis lazuli, orpiment, cinabri) on the Altar panel, suggests that this front was painted in an important monastery scriptorium like Ripoll. The poetic inscription that runs around the mandorla surrounding Christ is very characteristic of the intellectual environment of Ripoll "This is the God of Alfa and Omega. Come, O merciful with Your mercy, and remove the chains of missery. Amen." This is flanked by Tetramorph showing the four evangelical symbols - St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle. The rest of the panel depicts the 12 apostles.
  • Altar of Esquius - Painted wooden panel<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the twelfth century<br />
<br />
Probably comes from the ancient Chapel of Santa Maria of Besora Castle <br />
<br />
Aquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1958. Ref: 65502 MNAC.<br />
<br />
<br />
The use of valuable pigments (lapis lazuli, orpiment, cinabri) on the Altar panel, suggests that this front was painted in an important monastery scriptorium like Ripoll. The poetic inscription that runs around the mandorla surrounding Christ is very characteristic of the intellectual environment of Ripoll "This is the God of Alfa and Omega. Come, O merciful with Your mercy, and remove the chains of missery. Amen." This is flanked by Tetramorph showing the four evangelical symbols - St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle. The rest of the panel depicts the 12 apostles.
  • Statue of Narcissus known as The Marazin Hermaphrodite or The Genie at Eternal Rest - a 3rd century AD Roman marble statue. The restoration combines an ancient  funeral head with another ancient Roman statue. The Mazarin Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman statue of Hercules from the mid 2nd cent. AD excavated from the Via Appia. Hercules is portrayed as a mature man at rest, his naked body wrapped in a lion skin; he probably geld his club in his left hand. His style of dress was typical of that used in the Roman theatre. The statue of Hercules is a reworking of a Greek original dating from around the 2nd or 3rd cent. BC .  Inv  115165, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Hercules from the mid 2nd cent. AD excavated from the Via Appia. Hercules is portrayed as a mature man at rest, his naked body wrapped in a lion skin; he probably geld his club in his left hand. His style of dress was typical of that used in the Roman theatre. The statue of Hercules is a reworking of a Greek original dating from around the 2nd or 3rd cent. BC .  Inv  115165, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Hercules from the mid 2nd cent. AD excavated from the Via Appia. Hercules is portrayed as a mature man at rest, his naked body wrapped in a lion skin; he probably geld his club in his left hand. His style of dress was typical of that used in the Roman theatre. The statue of Hercules is a reworking of a Greek original dating from around the 2nd or 3rd cent. BC .  Inv  115165, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Hercules from the mid 2nd cent. AD excavated from the Via Appia. Hercules is portrayed as a mature man at rest, his naked body wrapped in a lion skin; he probably geld his club in his left hand. His style of dress was typical of that used in the Roman theatre. The statue of Hercules is a reworking of a Greek original dating from around the 2nd or 3rd cent. BC .  Inv  115165, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Statue of Narcissus known as The Marazin Hermaphrodite or The Genie at Eternal Rest - a 3rd century AD Roman marble statue. The restoration combines an ancient  funeral head with another ancient Roman statue. The Mazarin Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Altar of Esquius - Painted wooden panel<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the twelfth century<br />
<br />
Probably comes from the ancient Chapel of Santa Maria of Besora Castle <br />
<br />
Aquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1958. Ref: 65502 MNAC.<br />
<br />
<br />
The use of valuable pigments (lapis lazuli, orpiment, cinabri) on the Altar panel, suggests that this front was painted in an important monastery scriptorium like Ripoll. The poetic inscription that runs around the mandorla surrounding Christ is very characteristic of the intellectual environment of Ripoll "This is the God of Alfa and Omega. Come, O merciful with Your mercy, and remove the chains of missery. Amen." This is flanked by Tetramorph showing the four evangelical symbols - St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle. The rest of the panel depicts the 12 apostles.
  • Altar of Esquius - Painted wooden panel<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the twelfth century<br />
<br />
Probably comes from the ancient Chapel of Santa Maria of Besora Castle <br />
<br />
Aquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1958. Ref: 65502 MNAC.<br />
<br />
<br />
The use of valuable pigments (lapis lazuli, orpiment, cinabri) on the Altar panel, suggests that this front was painted in an important monastery scriptorium like Ripoll. The poetic inscription that runs around the mandorla surrounding Christ is very characteristic of the intellectual environment of Ripoll "This is the God of Alfa and Omega. Come, O merciful with Your mercy, and remove the chains of missery. Amen." This is flanked by Tetramorph showing the four evangelical symbols - St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle. The rest of the panel depicts the 12 apostles.
  • Altar of Esquius - Painted wooden panel<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the twelfth century<br />
<br />
Probably comes from the ancient Chapel of Santa Maria of Besora Castle <br />
<br />
Aquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1958. Ref: 65502 MNAC.<br />
<br />
<br />
The use of valuable pigments (lapis lazuli, orpiment, cinabri) on the Altar panel, suggests that this front was painted in an important monastery scriptorium like Ripoll. The poetic inscription that runs around the mandorla surrounding Christ is very characteristic of the intellectual environment of Ripoll "This is the God of Alfa and Omega. Come, O merciful with Your mercy, and remove the chains of missery. Amen." This is flanked by Tetramorph showing the four evangelical symbols - St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle. The rest of the panel depicts the 12 apostles.
  • Altar of Esquius - Painted wooden panel<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the twelfth century<br />
<br />
Probably comes from the ancient Chapel of Santa Maria of Besora Castle <br />
<br />
Aquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1958. Ref: 65502 MNAC.<br />
<br />
<br />
The use of valuable pigments (lapis lazuli, orpiment, cinabri) on the Altar panel, suggests that this front was painted in an important monastery scriptorium like Ripoll. The poetic inscription that runs around the mandorla surrounding Christ is very characteristic of the intellectual environment of Ripoll "This is the God of Alfa and Omega. Come, O merciful with Your mercy, and remove the chains of missery. Amen." This is flanked by Tetramorph showing the four evangelical symbols - St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle. The rest of the panel depicts the 12 apostles.
  • Altar of Esquius - Painted wooden panel<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the twelfth century<br />
<br />
Probably comes from the ancient Chapel of Santa Maria of Besora Castle <br />
<br />
Aquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1958. Ref: 65502 MNAC.<br />
<br />
<br />
The use of valuable pigments (lapis lazuli, orpiment, cinabri) on the Altar panel, suggests that this front was painted in an important monastery scriptorium like Ripoll. The poetic inscription that runs around the mandorla surrounding Christ is very characteristic of the intellectual environment of Ripoll "This is the God of Alfa and Omega. Come, O merciful with Your mercy, and remove the chains of missery. Amen." This is flanked by Tetramorph showing the four evangelical symbols - St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle. The rest of the panel depicts the 12 apostles.
  • Altar of Esquius - Painted wooden panel<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the twelfth century<br />
<br />
Probably comes from the ancient Chapel of Santa Maria of Besora Castle <br />
<br />
Aquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1958. Ref: 65502 MNAC.<br />
<br />
<br />
The use of valuable pigments (lapis lazuli, orpiment, cinabri) on the Altar panel, suggests that this front was painted in an important monastery scriptorium like Ripoll. The poetic inscription that runs around the mandorla surrounding Christ is very characteristic of the intellectual environment of Ripoll "This is the God of Alfa and Omega. Come, O merciful with Your mercy, and remove the chains of missery. Amen." This is flanked by Tetramorph showing the four evangelical symbols - St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle. The rest of the panel depicts the 12 apostles.
  • Altar of Esquius - Painted wooden panel<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the twelfth century<br />
<br />
Probably comes from the ancient Chapel of Santa Maria of Besora Castle <br />
<br />
Aquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1958. Ref: 65502 MNAC.<br />
<br />
<br />
The use of valuable pigments (lapis lazuli, orpiment, cinabri) on the Altar panel, suggests that this front was painted in an important monastery scriptorium like Ripoll. The poetic inscription that runs around the mandorla surrounding Christ is very characteristic of the intellectual environment of Ripoll "This is the God of Alfa and Omega. Come, O merciful with Your mercy, and remove the chains of missery. Amen." This is flanked by Tetramorph showing the four evangelical symbols - St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle. The rest of the panel depicts the 12 apostles.
  • Altar of Esquius - Painted wooden panel<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the twelfth century<br />
<br />
Probably comes from the ancient Chapel of Santa Maria of Besora Castle <br />
<br />
Aquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1958. Ref: 65502 MNAC.<br />
<br />
<br />
The use of valuable pigments (lapis lazuli, orpiment, cinabri) on the Altar panel, suggests that this front was painted in an important monastery scriptorium like Ripoll. The poetic inscription that runs around the mandorla surrounding Christ is very characteristic of the intellectual environment of Ripoll "This is the God of Alfa and Omega. Come, O merciful with Your mercy, and remove the chains of missery. Amen." This is flanked by Tetramorph showing the four evangelical symbols - St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle. The rest of the panel depicts the 12 apostles.
  • South Porch, Right Portal, Left Jambs. Cathedral of Chartres, France. Gothic statue of the four ?Confessors? important intellectual and spiritual leaders, most of whom lived during the early centuries of the Church. They stand on historiated socles- there are canopies offer their heads with architectural motifs. From left to right they are .1) Laumer (also called Lomer or Laudomarus), a local saint who was founder and Abbot of the nearby monastery of Corbion in the 6th century..2) Pope Leo I, an influential early Pope.3) a figure that is either Ambrose or Thomas Becket .4) Nicholas, bishop of Myra (two of his miracles appear in the tympanum).The figure of Laumer was added after the rest of the portal was created. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • South Porch, Right Portal, Left Jambs. Cathedral of Chartres, France. Gothic statue of the four ?Confessors? important intellectual and spiritual leaders, most of whom lived during the early centuries of the Church. They stand on historiated socles- there are canopies offer their heads with architectural motifs. From left to right they are .1) Laumer (also called Lomer or Laudomarus), a local saint who was founder and Abbot of the nearby monastery of Corbion in the 6th century..2) Pope Leo I, an influential early Pope.3) a figure that is either Ambrose or Thomas Becket .4) Nicholas, bishop of Myra (two of his miracles appear in the tympanum).The figure of Laumer was added after the rest of the portal was created. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • South Porch, Right Portal, Left Jambs. Cathedral of Chartres, France. Gothic statue of the four ?Confessors? important intellectual and spiritual leaders, most of whom lived during the early centuries of the Church. They stand on historiated socles- there are canopies offer their heads with architectural motifs. From left to right they are .1) Laumer (also called Lomer or Laudomarus), a local saint who was founder and Abbot of the nearby monastery of Corbion in the 6th century..2) Pope Leo I, an influential early Pope.3) a figure that is either Ambrose or Thomas Becket .4) Nicholas, bishop of Myra (two of his miracles appear in the tympanum).The figure of Laumer was added after the rest of the portal was created. . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval Rose Window of the North Transept of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France- Circa 1235. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. The 10.5m rose window is dedicated to the Virgin Mary . The central oculus shows the Virgin and Child and is surrounded by 12 small petal-shaped windows, 4 with doves (the 'Four Gifts of the Spirit'), the rest with adoring angels carrying candlesticks. Beyond this is a ring of 12 diamond-shaped openings containing the Old Testament Kings of Judah, another ring of smaller lozenges containing the arms of France and Castille, and finally a ring of semicircles containing Old Testament Prophets holding scrolls. The presence of the arms of the French king (yellow fleurs-de-lis on a blue background) and of his mother, Blanche of Castile (yellow castles on a red background) are taken as a sign of royal patronage for this window. Beneath the rose itself are five tall lancet windows (7.5 m high) showing, in the centre, the Virgin as an infant held by her mother, St Anne - the same subject as the trumeau in the portal beneath it. Flanking this lancet are four more containing Old Testament figures. Each of these standing figures is shown symbolically triumphing over an enemy depicted in the base of the lancet beneath them - David over Saul, Aaron over Pharaoh, St Anne over Synagoga, etc
  • Medieval Rose Window of the North Transept of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France- Circa 1235. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. The 10.5m rose window is dedicated to the Virgin Mary . The central oculus shows the Virgin and Child and is surrounded by 12 small petal-shaped windows, 4 with doves (the 'Four Gifts of the Spirit'), the rest with adoring angels carrying candlesticks. Beyond this is a ring of 12 diamond-shaped openings containing the Old Testament Kings of Judah, another ring of smaller lozenges containing the arms of France and Castille, and finally a ring of semicircles containing Old Testament Prophets holding scrolls. The presence of the arms of the French king (yellow fleurs-de-lis on a blue background) and of his mother, Blanche of Castile (yellow castles on a red background) are taken as a sign of royal patronage for this window. Beneath the rose itself are five tall lancet windows (7.5 m high) showing, in the centre, the Virgin as an infant held by her mother, St Anne - the same subject as the trumeau in the portal beneath it. Flanking this lancet are four more containing Old Testament figures. Each of these standing figures is shown symbolically triumphing over an enemy depicted in the base of the lancet beneath them - David over Saul, Aaron over Pharaoh, St Anne over Synagoga, etc
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Apollo and a Muse Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
On the left stood Apollo, one foot raised on a rock, playing his lyre which rests on top of the omphalos (the earth’s navel stone, tied down at Delphi(. On the right stands a muse holding one arm of Apollos lyre.
  • The Christian memorial funerary mosaic of Matziceus, a Libyan, with the inscription reading: ‘the faithful Matziceus lived in peace for 42 years, rested (died) on the fifteenth of the calends of June’.<br />
<br />
The panel is decorated with vines which grow out of a cantharus, a Greek style drinking cup, which represents the fountain of life.<br />
<br />
5th century Eastern Byzantine Roman mosaic from the Parish church of Demna, left AisleBardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. White background
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Apollo and a Muse Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
<br />
On the left stood Apollo, one foot raised on a rock, playing his lyre which rests on top of the omphalos (the earth’s navel stone, tied down at Delphi(. On the right stands a muse holding one arm of Apollos lyre.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Apollo and a Muse Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
On the left stood Apollo, one foot raised on a rock, playing his lyre which rests on top of the omphalos (the earth’s navel stone, tied down at Delphi(. On the right stands a muse holding one arm of Apollos lyre.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Apollo and a Muse Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
On the left stood Apollo, one foot raised on a rock, playing his lyre which rests on top of the omphalos (the earth’s navel stone, tied down at Delphi(. On the right stands a muse holding one arm of Apollos lyre.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Apollo and a Muse Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
On the left stood Apollo, one foot raised on a rock, playing his lyre which rests on top of the omphalos (the earth’s navel stone, tied down at Delphi(. On the right stands a muse holding one arm of Apollos lyre.
  • Picture of Tomb Tomb 114 "tomb of curses" of the North Necropolis. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.<br />
<br />
TOMB 114 (Second half of the 2nd century AD) <br />
<br />
The tomb lies on the left hand side of the road and is enclosed by a perimeter wall; it rests on a base withifiree steps, with a bench piked(1 front of it. Inside are three beds and the ossuary. On the roof, a sarcophagus, broken as result of an <br />
earthquake, bears an inscription mentioning the occupant Aelios Apollinarios and his wife Neratia Apollonis. On the facade is an inscription of great interest which refers to the punishment inflicted on those who violate the sepulchre: as well as the usual fines, it invokes diseases, misfortunes and punishments in the next world. This inscription has led to the building being named the Tomb of the Curses.
  • Aslantepe Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Lion Men. Limestone, 1399-1301 BC. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
There are two lion-men with a sword at their waists on both sides of the tree of life. The figure on the right holds a sickle in his left hand resting on his shoulder and a symbol his right hand. The figure on the left carries a double-faced ax in his right hand. <br />
<br />
Against a gray background.
  • Aslantepe Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Lion Men. Limestone, 1399-1301 BC. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
There are two lion-men with a sword at their waists on both sides of the tree of life. The figure on the right holds a sickle in his left hand resting on his shoulder and a symbol his right hand. The figure on the left carries a double-faced ax in his right hand.
  • Aslantepe Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Lion Men. Limestone, 1399-1301 BC. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
There are two lion-men with a sword at their waists on both sides of the tree of life. The figure on the right holds a sickle in his left hand resting on his shoulder and a symbol his right hand. The figure on the left carries a double-faced ax in his right hand.
  • Aslantepe Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Lion Men. Limestone, 1399-1301 BC. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
There are two lion-men with a sword at their waists on both sides of the tree of life. The figure on the right holds a sickle in his left hand resting on his shoulder and a symbol his right hand. The figure on the left carries a double-faced ax in his right hand. <br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Aslantepe Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Lion Men. Limestone, 1399-1301 BC. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
There are two lion-men with a sword at their waists on both sides of the tree of life. The figure on the right holds a sickle in his left hand resting on his shoulder and a symbol his right hand. The figure on the left carries a double-faced ax in his right hand. <br />
<br />
Against a brown art background.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of cryptoporticus A  of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
The paintings in the long corridor, which got light only from small high-placed windows, are on a white background. The illusionistic decoration shows a row of columns on a high socle decorated with "grottesche". In the background, pictures alternating theatrical scenes, scenes of worship, and landscapes seem to hang on a wall divided by pilasters. Some of the scenes are probably later restorations of the originals. <br />
In the upper part a loggia holding sphinxes and statues of divinities rests on caryatids (architectural supports in the form of female figures). <br />
Because there was limited time for excavation, only the more important decorative elements were removed from the walls. A drawing on the modern base on which the fragments are inserted gives an idea of the effect of the whole, which is known to us from a watercolor done at the time.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of cryptoporticus A  of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
The paintings in the long corridor, which got light only from small high-placed windows, are on a white background. The illusionistic decoration shows a row of columns on a high socle decorated with "grottesche". In the background, pictures alternating theatrical scenes, scenes of worship, and landscapes seem to hang on a wall divided by pilasters. Some of the scenes are probably later restorations of the originals. <br />
In the upper part a loggia holding sphinxes and statues of divinities rests on caryatids (architectural supports in the form of female figures). <br />
Because there was limited time for excavation, only the more important decorative elements were removed from the walls. A drawing on the modern base on which the fragments are inserted gives an idea of the effect of the whole, which is known to us from a watercolor done at the time.
  • Detail of the Roman fresco wall painting of a young man resting from the  triclinium,  a formal dining room, of the Villa Arianna (Adriana), Stabiae (Stabia) near Pompeii , inv 9093, Naples National Archaeological Museum, white background
  • Detail of the Roman fresco wall painting of a young man resting from the  triclinium,  a formal dining room, of the Villa Arianna (Adriana), Stabiae (Stabia) near Pompeii , inv 9093, Naples National Archaeological Museum, grey background
  • Detail of the Roman fresco wall painting of a young man resting from the  triclinium,  a formal dining room, of the Villa Arianna (Adriana), Stabiae (Stabia) near Pompeii , inv 9093, Naples National Archaeological Museum, black background
  • Detail of the Roman fresco wall painting of a young man resting from the  triclinium,  a formal dining room, of the Villa Arianna (Adriana), Stabiae (Stabia) near Pompeii , inv 9093, Naples National Archaeological Museum,  art background
  • Detail of the Roman fresco wall painting of a young man resting from the  triclinium,  a formal dining room, of the Villa Arriana (Adriana), Stabiae (Stabia) near Pompeii , inv 9093, Naples National Archaeological Museum, grey art background
  • The Christian memorial funerary mosaic for Natalica the inscription reading: ‘(our) beloved daughter Natalica lived 10 years 8 months 21 days, rested the 8th Ides of October (23rd) ’.<br />
<br />
The panel is decorated with a crescent laurel leaves against a black background and a cross encircling the head of a depiction of Natalica. She is wearing earnings and is dressed in a dalmatic, a long wide-sleeved tunic, which is decorated with black clavi, stripes, and embroidered sleeves. A belt and buckle with cabochons, shaped and polished gem stones, hold the tunic tight at the waste.  Either side of t Natalica are two lit candles, the symbols of eternity.<br />
<br />
5th century Eastern Byzantine Roman mosaic from the funerary enclosure which is in the Northwest enclosure of the Acholla site, Tunisia. Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. White background
  • The Christian memorial funerary mosaic for Natalica the inscription reading: ‘(our) beloved daughter Natalica lived 10 years 8 months 21 days, rested the 8th Ides of October (23rd) ’.<br />
<br />
The panel is decorated with a crescent laurel leaves against a black background and a cross encircling the head of a depiction of Natalica. She is wearing earnings and is dressed in a dalmatic, a long wide-sleeved tunic, which is decorated with black clavi, stripes, and embroidered sleeves. A belt and buckle with cabochons, shaped and polished gem stones, hold the tunic tight at the waste.  Either side of t Natalica are two lit candles, the symbols of eternity.<br />
<br />
5th century Eastern Byzantine Roman mosaic from the funerary enclosure which is in the Northwest enclosure of the Acholla site, Tunisia. Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia
  • The Christian memorial funerary mosaic for Natalica the inscription reading: ‘(our) beloved daughter Natalica lived 10 years 8 months 21 days, rested the 8th Ides of October (23rd) ’.<br />
<br />
The panel is decorated with a crescent laurel leaves against a black background and a cross encircling the head of a depiction of Natalica. She is wearing earnings and is dressed in a dalmatic, a long wide-sleeved tunic, which is decorated with black clavi, stripes, and embroidered sleeves. A belt and buckle with cabochons, shaped and polished gem stones, hold the tunic tight at the waste.  Either side of t Natalica are two lit candles, the symbols of eternity.<br />
<br />
5th century Eastern Byzantine Roman mosaic from the funerary enclosure which is in the Northwest enclosure of the Acholla site, Tunisia. Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Grey background
  • The Christian memorial funerary mosaic for Natalica the inscription reading: ‘(our) beloved daughter Natalica lived 10 years 8 months 21 days, rested the 8th Ides of October (23rd) ’.<br />
<br />
The panel is decorated with a crescent laurel leaves against a black background and a cross encircling the head of a depiction of Natalica. She is wearing earnings and is dressed in a dalmatic, a long wide-sleeved tunic, which is decorated with black clavi, stripes, and embroidered sleeves. A belt and buckle with cabochons, shaped and polished gem stones, hold the tunic tight at the waste.  Either side of t Natalica are two lit candles, the symbols of eternity.<br />
<br />
5th century Eastern Byzantine Roman mosaic from the funerary enclosure which is in the Northwest enclosure of the Acholla site, Tunisia. Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Black background
  • The Christian memorial funerary mosaic of Matziceus, a Libyan, with the inscription reading: ‘the faithful Matziceus lived in peace for 42 years, rested (died) on the fifteenth of the calends of June’.<br />
<br />
The panel is decorated with vines which grow out of a cantharus, a Greek style drinking cup, which represents the fountain of life.<br />
<br />
5th century Eastern Byzantine Roman mosaic from the Parish church of Demna, left AisleBardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Grey background
  • The Christian memorial funerary mosaic of Matziceus, a Libyan, with the inscription reading: ‘the faithful Matziceus lived in peace for 42 years, rested (died) on the fifteenth of the calends of June’.<br />
<br />
The panel is decorated with vines which grow out of a cantharus, a Greek style drinking cup, which represents the fountain of life.<br />
<br />
5th century Eastern Byzantine Roman mosaic from the Parish church of Demna, left AisleBardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia
  • The Christian memorial funerary mosaic of Matziceus, a Libyan, with the inscription reading: ‘the faithful Matziceus lived in peace for 42 years, rested (died) on the fifteenth of the calends of June’.<br />
<br />
The panel is decorated with vines which grow out of a cantharus, a Greek style drinking cup, which represents the fountain of life.<br />
<br />
5th century Eastern Byzantine Roman mosaic from the Parish church of Demna, left AisleBardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Black background
  • Christian funerary Mosaic of Matziceus who was from Libyia and this funerary mosaic reads, ‘ the faithful Matziceus lived in peace for 42 years, rested on the fifteenth of the calends of June’. The mosaic depicts two tendrils of vine thrusting out of a cantharus with peacocks & birds. This early Christian mosaic is from Demna Parish Church, left aisle, 5th century AD. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Christian funerary Mosaic of Matziceus who was from Libyia and this funerary mosaic reads, ‘ the faithful Matziceus lived in peace for 42 years, rested on the fifteenth of the calends of June’. The mosaic depicts two tendrils of vine thrusting out of a cantharus with peacocks & birds. This early Christian mosaic is from Demna Parish Church, left aisle, 5th century AD. Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Picture & image of a Neo-Hittite orthostat with a releif sculpture a libation for the gods from Aslantepe ,  Malatya, Turkey. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. The figure on the far left is beleived to be a king. He is facing a Bearded God wearing a bore tusk helmet. The God is holding a 3 pronged object and has a club resting on his shoulder. The 2 shaven characters on the right are mirror images of the two figures on the right except this time the king is on the far right waering a winged sun disc headress and holding a Lituus. The epigraphs identify the king and the cresent on the beared gods helmet identify him as Pugnus Mili The Sum and Moon God. 2
  • Picture & image of a Neo-Hittite orthostat with a releif sculpture a libation for the gods from Aslantepe ,  Malatya, Turkey. Ancora Archaeological Museum. The figure on the far left is beleived to be a king. He is facing a Bearded God wearing a bore tusk helmet. The God is holding a 3 pronged object and has a club resting on his shoulder. The 2 shaven characters on the right are mirror images of the two figures on the right except this time the king is on the far right waering a winged sun disc headress and holding a Lituus. The epigraphs identify the king and the cresent on the beared gods helmet identify him as Pugnus Mili The Sum and Moon God.
  • Medieval Gothic Whitby Abbey where Draculas coofin rested when he came to England, Whitby, North Yrokshire, England
  • Picture & image of a Neo-Hittite orthostat with a releif sculpture a libation for the gods from Aslantepe ,  Malatya, Turkey.  The figure on the far left is beleived to be a king. He is facing a Bearded God wearing a bore tusk helmet. The God is holding a 3 pronged object and has a club resting on his shoulder. The 2 shaven characters on the right are mirror images of the two figures on the right except this time the king is on the far right waering a winged sun disc headress and holding a Lituus. The epigraphs identify the king and the cresent on the beared gods helmet identify him as Pugnus Mili The Sum and Moon God. An Ankara Museum of Anatolian Civilizations exhibit.

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