• The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • Close up of the inscription dedicated to King Midas on the Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • Close up of the inscription dedicated to King Midas on the Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Unfinished rock monument of Midas, 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This rock facade was planned but never finished and so little is known about the unfinished Monument. It is also known locally as the Kucuk Yazilikaya ( “little written rock”), since it appears to have been planned as a smaller version of the Midas Monument, also called Yazilikaya. It measures 7m x 10m and faces west, unlike the other monument at Midas whose facades face east. Since it was never completed, it was gives some idea of the construction techniques : first the rock was flattened and then the facade was carved from the top down. The architectural frame and the ornament were carved at the same time. About  2m below the monument are a smaller facade, to the left and a small cut altar to the right.
  • The Unfinished rock monument of Midas, 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This rock facade was planned but never finished and so little is known about the unfinished Monument. It is also known locally as the Kucuk Yazilikaya ( “little written rock”), since it appears to have been planned as a smaller version of the Midas Monument, also called Yazilikaya. It measures 7m x 10m and faces west, unlike the other monument at Midas whose facades face east. Since it was never completed, it was gives some idea of the construction techniques : first the rock was flattened and then the facade was carved from the top down. The architectural frame and the ornament were carved at the same time. About  2m below the monument are a smaller facade, to the left and a small cut altar to the right.
  • The Unfinished rock monument of Midas, 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This rock facade was planned but never finished and so little is known about the unfinished Monument. It is also known locally as the Kucuk Yazilikaya ( “little written rock”), since it appears to have been planned as a smaller version of the Midas Monument, also called Yazilikaya. It measures 7m x 10m and faces west, unlike the other monument at Midas whose facades face east. Since it was never completed, it was gives some idea of the construction techniques : first the rock was flattened and then the facade was carved from the top down. The architectural frame and the ornament were carved at the same time. About  2m below the monument are a smaller facade, to the left and a small cut altar to the right.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • steps amd paths leading to the Phrygian water cistern of Midas city cut deep into the underground rock. 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.
  • steps amd paths leading to the Phrygian water cistern of Midas city cut deep into the underground rock. 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.
  • steps amd paths leading to the Phrygian water cistern of Midas city cut deep into the underground rock. 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff rock at Goreme Park, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff rock at Goreme Park, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff rock at Goreme Park, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff volcanic rock of Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff rock at Goreme Park, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff rock at Goreme Park, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff rock at Goreme Park, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff rock at Goreme Park, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff rock at Goreme Park, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff rock at Goreme Park, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff volcanic rock of Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock at Uchisar, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock at Uchisar, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock at Uchisar, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Early Christian frescoes in the rock cave churches in the tuff rock at Goreme Park, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff rock at Goreme Park, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff volcanic rock of Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff volcanic rock of Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock at Uchisar, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock at Uchisar, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock at Uchisar, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock at Uchisar, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock at Uchisar, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock at Uchisar, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock at Uchisar, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock at Uchisar, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock at Uchisar, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock at Uchisar, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock at Uchisar, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock at Uchisar, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock, Cappadocia at Uchisar, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Traditional decorations outside the rock houses of Uchisar, Cappadocia Turkey
  • The sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • The sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • Two warriors clasing shields on a freeze from the Large Podium of the sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • The sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff rock at Zelve, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff volcanic rock of Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff rock at Zelve, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff rock at Zelve, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff volcanic rock of Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff rock at Zelve, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff rock at Zelve, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff rock at Zelve, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff volcanic rock of Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff volcanic rock of Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff volcanic rock of Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff rock at Goreme Park, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff rock at Zelve, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff rock at Zelve, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff volcanic rock of Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff volcanic rock of Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff rock at Zelve, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff volcanic rock of Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff volcanic rock of Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff rock at Zelve, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock at Uchisar, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock at Uchisar, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Early Christian rock cave churches in the tuff volcanic rock of Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock at Uchisar, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock at Uchisar, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock at Uchisar, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock at Uchisar, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock at Uchisar, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock at Uchisar, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock at Uchisar, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock at Uchisar, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock at Uchisar, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Pictures & images of the fairy chimney rock formations and rock pillars of “Pasaba Valley” near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Pictures & images of the fairy chimney rock formations and rock pillars of “Pasaba Valley” near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Pictures & images of the fairy chimney rock formations and rock pillars of “Pasaba Valley” near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Pictures & images of the fairy chimney rock formations and rock pillars of “Pasaba Valley” near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Pictures & images of the fairy chimney rock formations and rock pillars of “Pasaba Valley” near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Pictures & images of the fairy chimney rock formations and rock pillars of “Pasaba Valley” near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Pictures & images of the fairy chimney rock formations and rock pillars of “Pasaba Valley” near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Pictures & images of the fairy chimney rock formations and rock pillars of “Pasaba Valley” near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Pictures & images of the fairy chimney rock formations and rock pillars of “Pasaba Valley” near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Pictures & images of the fairy chimney rock formations and rock pillars of “Pasaba Valley” near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Pictures & images of the fairy chimney rock formations and rock pillars of “Pasaba Valley” near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Pictures & images of the fairy chimney rock formations and rock pillars of “Pasaba Valley” near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Pictures & images of the fairy chimney rock formations and rock pillars of “Pasaba Valley” near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Pictures & images of the fairy chimney rock formations and rock pillars of “Pasaba Valley” near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Pictures & images of the fairy chimney rock formations and rock pillars of “Pasaba Valley” near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Pictures & images of the fairy chimney rock formations and rock pillars of “Pasaba Valley” near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Pictures & images of the fairy chimney rock formations and rock pillars of “Pasaba Valley” near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Pictures & images of the fairy chimney rock formations and rock pillars of “Pasaba Valley” near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Pictures & images of the fairy chimney rock formations and rock pillars of “Pasaba Valley” near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Pictures & images of the fairy chimney rock formations and rock pillars of “Pasaba Valley” near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Pictures & images of the fairy chimney rock formations and rock pillars of “Pasaba Valley” near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Pictures & images of the fairy chimney rock formations and rock pillars of “Pasaba Valley” near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Pictures & images of the fairy chimney rock formations and rock pillars of “Pasaba Valley” near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Pictures & images of the fairy chimney rock formations and rock pillars of “Pasaba Valley” near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Pictures & images of the fairy chimney rock formations and rock pillars of “Pasaba Valley” near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Pictures & images of the fairy chimney rock formations and rock pillars of “Pasaba Valley” near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Pictures & images of the fairy chimney rock formations and rock pillars of “Pasaba Valley” near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of  Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of  Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of  Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of  Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of  Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of  Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of  Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of  Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of  Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of  Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of Love Valley, Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of Love Valley, Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of Love Valley, Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of Love Valley, Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of Love Valley, Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of Love Valley, Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of Love Valley, Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of Love Valley, Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of Love Valley, Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of Love Valley, Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of Love Valley, Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Pictures & images of the fairy a chimney rock Police Station at “Pasaba Valley” near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Pictures & images of the fairy a chimney rock Police Station at “Pasaba Valley” near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of  Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of  Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of  Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of  Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of  Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of  Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of  Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of Love Valley, Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of Love Valley, Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of Love Valley, Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of Love Valley, Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of Love Valley, Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of Love Valley, Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of Love Valley, Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of Love Valley, Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Fairy chimney tuff rock pillars formations of Love Valley, Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  • Photo of the Hittite Fasillar Monument, finished replica of 13th century BC original. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The original is an unfinished monumental stele that is situated fiat on the back on a slope at the immediate vicinity of the village Fasillar within the Konya province, Beysehir. This is an exact replica of the original that was made of trachyte igneous rock. This represents the origin& that was cast into the mould of the same dimensions and colour. <br />
<br />
The height from the toes to the top of the lions is 7,40 meters. There is also a socket that is 80 cm. Long inserted into the basement. The Hittite monument dates from the end of 13th century BC There appears the great God higher than 4 meters stepping on the smaller mountain God that is accompanied by the lions on.
  • The Hittite Fasillar Monument, finished replica of 13th century BC original. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Against a gray background.<br />
<br />
The original is an unfinished monumental stele that is situated fiat on the back on a slope at the immediate vicinity of the village Fasillar within the Konya province, Beysehir. This is an exact replica of the original that was made of trachyte igneous rock. This represents the origin& that was cast into the mould of the same dimensions and colour. <br />
<br />
The height from the toes to the top of the lions is 7,40 meters. There is also a socket that is 80 cm. Long inserted into the basement. The Hittite monument dates from the end of 13th century BC There appears the great God higher than 4 meters stepping on the smaller mountain God that is accompanied by the lions on.
  • Image of the Hittite Fasillar Monument, finished replica of 13th century BC original. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The original is an unfinished monumental stele that is situated fiat on the back on a slope at the immediate vicinity of the village Fasillar within the Konya province, Beysehir. This is an exact replica of the original that was made of trachyte igneous rock. This represents the origin& that was cast into the mould of the same dimensions and colour. <br />
<br />
The height from the toes to the top of the lions is 7,40 meters. There is also a socket that is 80 cm. Long inserted into the basement. The Hittite monument dates from the end of 13th century BC There appears the great God higher than 4 meters stepping on the smaller mountain God that is accompanied by the lions on.
  • Picture of the Hittite Hittite Fasillar Monument, finished replica of 13th century BC original. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Against a grey art background.<br />
<br />
The original is an unfinished monumental stele that is situated fiat on the back on a slope at the immediate vicinity of the village Fasillar within the Konya province, Beysehir. This is an exact replica of the original that was made of trachyte igneous rock. This represents the origin& that was cast into the mould of the same dimensions and colour. <br />
<br />
The height from the toes to the top of the lions is 7,40 meters. There is also a socket that is 80 cm. Long inserted into the basement. The Hittite monument dates from the end of 13th century BC There appears the great God higher than 4 meters stepping on the smaller mountain God that is accompanied by the lions on.
  • The Hittite Fasillar Monument, finished replica of 13th century BC original. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Against a brown art background.<br />
<br />
The original is an unfinished monumental stele that is situated fiat on the back on a slope at the immediate vicinity of the village Fasillar within the Konya province, Beysehir. This is an exact replica of the original that was made of trachyte igneous rock. This represents the origin& that was cast into the mould of the same dimensions and colour. <br />
<br />
The height from the toes to the top of the lions is 7,40 meters. There is also a socket that is 80 cm. Long inserted into the basement. The Hittite monument dates from the end of 13th century BC There appears the great God higher than 4 meters stepping on the smaller mountain God that is accompanied by the lions on.
  • Close up of the Hittite Fasillar Monument, finished replica of 13th century BC original. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
The original is an unfinished monumental stele that is situated fiat on the back on a slope at the immediate vicinity of the village Fasillar within the Konya province, Beysehir. This is an exact replica of the original that was made of trachyte igneous rock. This represents the origin& that was cast into the mould of the same dimensions and colour. <br />
<br />
The height from the toes to the top of the lions is 7,40 meters. There is also a socket that is 80 cm. Long inserted into the basement. The Hittite monument dates from the end of 13th century BC There appears the great God higher than 4 meters stepping on the smaller mountain God that is accompanied by the lions on.
  • The Hittite Fasillar Monument, finished replica of 13th century BC original. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
The original is an unfinished monumental stele that is situated fiat on the back on a slope at the immediate vicinity of the village Fasillar within the Konya province, Beysehir. This is an exact replica of the original that was made of trachyte igneous rock. This represents the origin& that was cast into the mould of the same dimensions and colour. <br />
<br />
The height from the toes to the top of the lions is 7,40 meters. There is also a socket that is 80 cm. Long inserted into the basement. The Hittite monument dates from the end of 13th century BC There appears the great God higher than 4 meters stepping on the smaller mountain God that is accompanied by the lions on.
  • Pictures & images of the fairy chimney cave churches of “Pasaba Valley” near Goreme National Park, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Pictures & images of the fairy chimney cave churches of “Pasaba Valley” near Goreme National Park, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Pictures & images of the fairy chimney cave churches of “Pasaba Valley” near Goreme National Park, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Pictures & images of the fairy chimney cave churches of “Pasaba Valley” near Goreme National Park, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Cappadocia Turkey
  • Cappadocia Turkey
  • Cappadocia Turkey
  • Cappadocia Turkey
  • Picture of the Ivriz Hittite rock relief sculpture monument  dedicated to King Warpalawas in which he talks to Tarhundas the God of Thunder. The king is positioned in the opposite of god, smaller and in a praying position. Warpalawas is saying "1 am Warpalawas the king of Tuwana, the ruler and a hero. I planted these grapes while I was a young prince in the palace. Let the god Tarhundas give plenitude and fertility.” Ivriz, Turkey
  • Picture of the Ivriz Hittite rock relief sculpture monument  dedicated to King Warpalawas in which he talks to Tarhundas the God of Thunder. The king is positioned in the opposite of god, smaller and in a praying position. Warpalawas is saying "1 am Warpalawas the king of Tuwana, the ruler and a hero. I planted these grapes while I was a young prince in the palace. Let the god Tarhundas give plenitude and fertility.” Ivriz, Turkey
  • Picture of the Ivriz Hittite rock relief sculpture monument  dedicated to King Warpalawas in which he talks to Tarhundas the God of Thunder. The king is positioned in the opposite of god, smaller and in a praying position. Warpalawas is saying "1 am Warpalawas the king of Tuwana, the ruler and a hero. I planted these grapes while I was a young prince in the palace. Let the god Tarhundas give plenitude and fertility.” Ivriz, Turkey
  • Picture of the Ivriz Hittite rock relief sculpture monument  dedicated to King Warpalawas in which he talks to Tarhundas the God of Thunder. The king is positioned in the opposite of god, smaller and in a praying position. Warpalawas is saying "1 am Warpalawas the king of Tuwana, the ruler and a hero. I planted these grapes while I was a young prince in the palace. Let the god Tarhundas give plenitude and fertility.” Ivriz, Turkey
  • Close up picture of Tarhundas the God of Thunder talking to king Warpalawas. Ivriz Hittite rock relief sculpture monument dedicated to King Warpalawas. Ivriz, Turkey
  • Picture of the Ivriz Hittite rock relief sculpture monument  dedicated to King Warpalawas in which he talks to Tarhundas the God of Thunder. The king is positioned in the opposite of god, smaller and in a praying position. Warpalawas is saying "1 am Warpalawas the king of Tuwana, the ruler and a hero. I planted these grapes while I was a young prince in the palace. Let the god Tarhundas give plenitude and fertility.” Ivriz, Turkey
  • Hieroglyphics on rock face, Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Hieroglyphics on rock face, Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Hieroglyphics on rock face, Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval relief carved architectural panels from the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition Georgian inscription over door, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave interior of the city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave interior of the city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave city and monastery, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Pictures & images of Komurlu Church interior fresco of a Maltese Cross,  9th century, the Vadisi Monastery Valley, "Manastır Vadisi”,  of the Ihlara Valley, Guzelyurt , Aksaray Province, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Kalburlu (St. Epthemios) church dates back to the 9th or 10th century. It is carved out of a single rock massive with rock columns holding up the roof of its church . The arches of Kalburlu (St. Epthemios) church have rich architectural decorated relif sculptures. The naves are connected by rounded arches & there is a baptismal font to the east of the main entrance.
  • Pictures & images of Komurlu Church interior,  9th century, the Vadisi Monastery Valley, "Manastır Vadisi”,  of the Ihlara Valley, Guzelyurt , Aksaray Province, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Kalburlu (St. Epthemios) church dates back to the 9th or 10th century. It is carved out of a single rock massive with rock columns holding up the roof of its church . The arches of Kalburlu (St. Epthemios) church have rich architectural decorated relif sculptures. The naves are connected by rounded arches & there is a baptismal font to the east of the main entrance.
  • Pictures & images of Komurlu Church interior,  9th century, the Vadisi Monastery Valley, "Manastır Vadisi”,  of the Ihlara Valley, Guzelyurt , Aksaray Province, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Kalburlu (St. Epthemios) church dates back to the 9th or 10th century. It is carved out of a single rock massive with rock columns holding up the roof of its church . The arches of Kalburlu (St. Epthemios) church have rich architectural decorated relif sculptures. The naves are connected by rounded arches & there is a baptismal font to the east of the main entrance.
  • Pictures & images of Komurlu Church interior,  9th century, the Vadisi Monastery Valley, "Manastır Vadisi”,  of the Ihlara Valley, Guzelyurt , Aksaray Province, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Kalburlu (St. Epthemios) church dates back to the 9th or 10th century. It is carved out of a single rock massive with rock columns holding up the roof of its church . The arches of Kalburlu (St. Epthemios) church have rich architectural decorated relif sculptures. The naves are connected by rounded arches & there is a baptismal font to the east of the main entrance.
  • Pictures & images of Kalburlu (St. Epthemios) church interior, 9th century, the Vadisi Monastery Valley, "Manastır Vadisi”,  of the Ihlara Valley, Guzelyurt , Aksaray Province, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Kalburlu (St. Epthemios) church dates back to the 9th or 10th century. It is carved out of a single rock massive with rock columns holding up the roof of its church . The arches of Kalburlu (St. Epthemios) church have rich architectural decorated relif sculptures. The naves are connected by rounded arches & there is a baptismal font to the east of the main entrance.
  • Pictures & images of Kalburlu (St. Epthemios) church interior, 9th century, the Vadisi Monastery Valley, "Manastır Vadisi”,  of the Ihlara Valley, Guzelyurt , Aksaray Province, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Kalburlu (St. Epthemios) church dates back to the 9th or 10th century. It is carved out of a single rock massive with rock columns holding up the roof of its church . The arches of Kalburlu (St. Epthemios) church have rich architectural decorated relif sculptures. The naves are connected by rounded arches & there is a baptismal font to the east of the main entrance.
  • Pictures & images of Kalburlu (St. Epthemios) church decorative sculptures, 9th century, the Vadisi Monastery Valley, "Manastır Vadisi”,  of the Ihlara Valley, Guzelyurt , Aksaray Province, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Kalburlu (St. Epthemios) church dates back to the 9th or 10th century. It is carved out of a single rock massive with rock columns holding up the roof of its church . The arches of Kalburlu (St. Epthemios) church have rich architectural decorated relif sculptures. The naves are connected by rounded arches & there is a baptismal font to the east of the main entrance.
  • Pictures & images of Kalburlu (St. Epthemios) church decorative sculptures, 9th century, the Vadisi Monastery Valley, "Manastır Vadisi”,  of the Ihlara Valley, Guzelyurt , Aksaray Province, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Kalburlu (St. Epthemios) church dates back to the 9th or 10th century. It is carved out of a single rock massive with rock columns holding up the roof of its church . The arches of Kalburlu (St. Epthemios) church have rich architectural decorated relif sculptures. The naves are connected by rounded arches & there is a baptismal font to the east of the main entrance.
  • Pictures & images of Kalburlu (St. Epthemios) church decorative sculptures, 9th century, the Vadisi Monastery Valley, "Manastır Vadisi”,  of the Ihlara Valley, Guzelyurt , Aksaray Province, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Kalburlu (St. Epthemios) church dates back to the 9th or 10th century. It is carved out of a single rock massive with rock columns holding up the roof of its church . The arches of Kalburlu (St. Epthemios) church have rich architectural decorated relif sculptures. The naves are connected by rounded arches & there is a baptismal font to the east of the main entrance.
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval relief carved architectural panels from the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval relief carved architectural panels from the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval relief carved architectural panels from the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval relief carved architectural panels from the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave tomb of the Church of the Dormition cave cemetery, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings of the Dormition of the Virgin, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings of the Dormition of the Virgin, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings of Queen Tamar & Giorgi III, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes
  • Picture & image of Vardzia medieval cave Church of the Dormition interior secco paintings of Queen Tamar & Giorgi III, part of the cave city and monastery of Vardzia, Erusheti Mountain, southern Georgia (country)<br />
<br />
Inhabited from the 5th century BC, the first identifiable phase of building took place at  Vardzia in the reign of Giorgi III (1156-1184) to be continued by his successor, Queen Tamar 1186, when the Church of the Dormition was carved out of the rock and decorated with frescoes

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