• Close up picture of Tarhundas the God of Thunder talking to king Warpalawas. Ivriz Hittite rock relief sculpture monument dedicated to King Warpalawas. Ivriz, Turkey
  • Picture of the Ivriz Hittite rock relief sculpture monument  dedicated to King Warpalawas in which he talks to Tarhundas the God of Thunder. The king is positioned in the opposite of god, smaller and in a praying position. Warpalawas is saying "1 am Warpalawas the king of Tuwana, the ruler and a hero. I planted these grapes while I was a young prince in the palace. Let the god Tarhundas give plenitude and fertility.” Ivriz, Turkey
  • Picture of the Ivriz Hittite rock relief sculpture monument  dedicated to King Warpalawas in which he talks to Tarhundas the God of Thunder. The king is positioned in the opposite of god, smaller and in a praying position. Warpalawas is saying "1 am Warpalawas the king of Tuwana, the ruler and a hero. I planted these grapes while I was a young prince in the palace. Let the god Tarhundas give plenitude and fertility.” Ivriz, Turkey
  • Picture of the Ivriz Hittite rock relief sculpture monument  dedicated to King Warpalawas in which he talks to Tarhundas the God of Thunder. The king is positioned in the opposite of god, smaller and in a praying position. Warpalawas is saying "1 am Warpalawas the king of Tuwana, the ruler and a hero. I planted these grapes while I was a young prince in the palace. Let the god Tarhundas give plenitude and fertility.” Ivriz, Turkey
  • Picture of the Ivriz Hittite rock relief sculpture monument  dedicated to King Warpalawas in which he talks to Tarhundas the God of Thunder. The king is positioned in the opposite of god, smaller and in a praying position. Warpalawas is saying "1 am Warpalawas the king of Tuwana, the ruler and a hero. I planted these grapes while I was a young prince in the palace. Let the god Tarhundas give plenitude and fertility.” Ivriz, Turkey
  • Picture of the Ivriz Hittite rock relief sculpture monument  dedicated to King Warpalawas in which he talks to Tarhundas the God of Thunder. The king is positioned in the opposite of god, smaller and in a praying position. Warpalawas is saying "1 am Warpalawas the king of Tuwana, the ruler and a hero. I planted these grapes while I was a young prince in the palace. Let the god Tarhundas give plenitude and fertility.” Ivriz, Turkey
  • Pictures & images of the ancient Lycian rock cut tomb of a Gladiator whose rock relief sculpture can be seen with his family ,  Myra, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Moulding of 8th Cent. BC late Hittite rock relief . Warpalas, King of Tyana land, praying in front of a plant & storm god Tarhunza. From Ivriz (Konya, Ergeli) Turkey. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. No 7869.
  • Moulding of 8th Cent. BC late Hittite rock relief . Warpalas, King of Tyana land, praying in front of a plant & storm god Tarhunza. From Ivriz (Konya, Ergeli) Turkey. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. No 7869.
  • Moulding of 8th Cent. BC late Hittite rock relief . Warpalas, King of Tyana land, praying in front of a plant & storm god Tarhunza. From Ivriz (Konya, Ergeli) Turkey. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. No 7869.
  • Moulding of 8th Cent. BC late Hittite rock relief . Warpalas, King of Tyana land, praying in front of a plant & storm god Tarhunza. From Ivriz (Konya, Ergeli) Turkey. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. No 7869.
  • Relief sculpture freeze from the Roman theatre of Myra, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Depictions of gods on the end relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Depictions of gods on the end relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Depictions of gods on the end relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Depictions of gods on the end relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Depictions of gods on the end relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Depictions of gods on the end relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Depictions of gods on the end relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Depictions of gods on the end relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Detail of end relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.. Plastercast at the Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • End relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey. Plastercast at the Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • End relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey . Plastercast at the Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • Depictions of gods on the end relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Depictions of gods on the end relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Depictions of gods on the end relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Close up of end relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.. Plastercast at the Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • Procession of male gods in the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Procession of male gods in the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Procession of male gods in the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Pictures & images of the ancient Lycian rock cut tomb of a Gladiator whose rock relief sculpture can be seen with his family ,  Myra, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Meleager sits on a rock tying his sandal. Below him lies a fierce hunting dog with a wide collar. On one side a god or another hero wearing a rounded hat  crowning Meleager ( arm missing). On the other side stands the huntress Atalante, Meleager's lover: she wears a short dress and quiver,
  • Pictures & images of the ancient Lycian rock cut tomb of a Gladiator whose rock relief sculpture can be seen with his family ,  Myra, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Pictures & images of the ancient Lycian rock cut tomb of a Gladiator whose rock relief sculpture can be seen with his family ,  Myra, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Pictures & images of the ancient Lycian rock cut tomb of a Gladiator whose rock relief sculpture can be seen with his family ,  Myra, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Three Heroes and a Dog Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Two heroes stand in front of a third hero who ia seated on a rock and pats the head of a bitch hound. They are hunters and the relief is partnered by the reliefs of Melager and Atalante and Meleaner and boar
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Three Heroes and a Dog Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Two heroes stand in front of a third hero who ia seated on a rock and pats the head of a bitch hound. They are hunters and the relief is partnered by the reliefs of Melager and Atalante and Meleaner and boar
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Three Heroes and a Dog Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Two heroes stand in front of a third hero who ia seated on a rock and pats the head of a bitch hound. They are hunters and the relief is partnered by the reliefs of Melager and Atalante and Meleaner and boar
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Three Heroes and a Dog Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Two heroes stand in front of a third hero who ia seated on a rock and pats the head of a bitch hound. They are hunters and the relief is partnered by the reliefs of Melager and Atalante and Meleaner and boar
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of  Three Heroes and a Dog Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Two heroes stand in front of a third hero who ia seated on a rock and pats the head of a bitch hound. They are hunters and the relief is partnered by the reliefs of Melager and Atalante and Meleaner and boar
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Polyphemos and Galatea Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Another mythological love story affirms the power of Aphrodite. The sea nymph Galatea resists the lustful advances of the beastly cycolps Polyphemas in his cave. Polyphemos sits on a rock and tries to pull Galatea between his legs. His right arm is round her back: note the huge hand on her backside.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Apollo and a Muse Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
On the left stood Apollo, one foot raised on a rock, playing his lyre which rests on top of the omphalos (the earth’s navel stone, tied down at Delphi(. On the right stands a muse holding one arm of Apollos lyre.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Meleager and Atalante  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Meleager sits on a rock tying his sandal. Below him lies a fierce hunting dog with a broad collar. On one side a god or another hero wearing a rounded hat was crowning Meleager ( arm missing). On the other side stands the huntress Atalante, Meleager’s lover: she wears a short dress and quiver, and lifts her cloak at the shoulder in a gesture of modesty.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Polyphemos and Galatea Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Another mythological love story affirms the power of Aphrodite. The sea nymph Galatea resists the lustful advances of the beastly cycolps Polyphemas in his cave. Polyphemos sits on a rock and tries to pull Galatea between his legs. His right arm is round her back: note the huge hand on her backside.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Polyphemos and Galatea Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Another mythological love story affirms the power of Aphrodite. The sea nymph Galatea resists the lustful advances of the beastly cycolps Polyphemas in his cave. Polyphemos sits on a rock and tries to pull Galatea between his legs. His right arm is round her back: note the huge hand on her backside.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Polyphemos and Galatea Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Another mythological love story affirms the power of Aphrodite. The sea nymph Galatea resists the lustful advances of the beastly cycolps Polyphemas in his cave. Polyphemos sits on a rock and tries to pull Galatea between his legs. His right arm is round her back: note the huge hand on her backside.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Apollo and a Muse Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
<br />
On the left stood Apollo, one foot raised on a rock, playing his lyre which rests on top of the omphalos (the earth’s navel stone, tied down at Delphi(. On the right stands a muse holding one arm of Apollos lyre.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Apollo and a Muse Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
On the left stood Apollo, one foot raised on a rock, playing his lyre which rests on top of the omphalos (the earth’s navel stone, tied down at Delphi(. On the right stands a muse holding one arm of Apollos lyre.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Apollo and a Muse Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
On the left stood Apollo, one foot raised on a rock, playing his lyre which rests on top of the omphalos (the earth’s navel stone, tied down at Delphi(. On the right stands a muse holding one arm of Apollos lyre.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of an Heroic Couple Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
<br />
A heroine sits on a rock with one breast bare. In the front of her stands a young hero. Between them a small statue of Aphrodite stands on a support. The subject is a love encounter, but it is not clear which of many possible heroic couple was intended.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of an Heroic Couple Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
A heroine sits on a rock with one breast bare. In the front of her stands a young hero. Between them a small statue of Aphrodite stands on a support. The subject is a love encounter, but it is not clear which of many possible heroic couple was intended.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of an Heroic Couple Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
A heroine sits on a rock with one breast bare. In the front of her stands a young hero. Between them a small statue of Aphrodite stands on a support. The subject is a love encounter, but it is not clear which of many possible heroic couple was intended.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of an Heroic Couple Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
A heroine sits on a rock with one breast bare. In the front of her stands a young hero. Between them a small statue of Aphrodite stands on a support. The subject is a love encounter, but it is not clear which of many possible heroic couple was intended.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Meleager and Atalante  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Meleager sits on a rock tying his sandal. Below him lies a fierce hunting dog with a broad collar. On one side a god or another hero wearing a rounded hat was crowning Meleager ( arm missing). On the other side stands the huntress Atalante, Meleager’s lover: she wears a short dress and quiver, and lifts her cloak at the shoulder in a gesture of modesty.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Meleager and Atalante  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Meleager sits on a rock tying his sandal. Below him lies a fierce hunting dog with a broad collar. On one side a god or another hero wearing a rounded hat was crowning Meleager ( arm missing). On the other side stands the huntress Atalante, Meleager’s lover: she wears a short dress and quiver, and lifts her cloak at the shoulder in a gesture of modesty.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Meleager and Atalante  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Meleager sits on a rock tying his sandal. Below him lies a fierce hunting dog with a broad collar. On one side a god or another hero wearing a rounded hat was crowning Meleager ( arm missing). On the other side stands the huntress Atalante, Meleager’s lover: she wears a short dress and quiver, and lifts her cloak at the shoulder in a gesture of modesty.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Polyphemos and Galatea Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Another mythological love story affirms the power of Aphrodite. The sea nymph Galatea resists the lustful advances of the beastly cycolps Polyphemas in his cave. Polyphemos sits on a rock and tries to pull Galatea between his legs. His right arm is round her back: note the huge hand on her backside.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Apollo and a Muse Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
On the left stood Apollo, one foot raised on a rock, playing his lyre which rests on top of the omphalos (the earth’s navel stone, tied down at Delphi(. On the right stands a muse holding one arm of Apollos lyre.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of an Heroic Couple Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
A heroine sits on a rock with one breast bare. In the front of her stands a young hero. Between them a small statue of Aphrodite stands on a support. The subject is a love encounter, but it is not clear which of many possible heroic couple was intended.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Meleager and Atalante  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Meleager sits on a rock tying his sandal. Below him lies a fierce hunting dog with a broad collar. On one side a god or another hero wearing a rounded hat was crowning Meleager ( arm missing). On the other side stands the huntress Atalante, Meleager’s lover: she wears a short dress and quiver, and lifts her cloak at the shoulder in a gesture of modesty.
  • Close up of Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Meleager and Atalante  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    <br />
<br />
Meleager sits on a rock tying his sandal. Below him lies a fierce hunting dog with a broad collar. On one side a god or another hero wearing a rounded hat was crowning Meleager ( arm missing). On the other side stands the huntress Atalante, Meleager’s lover: she wears a short dress and quiver, and lifts her cloak at the shoulder in a gesture of modesty.
  • Hittite relief sculptures of Gods at the Yazilikaya Sancutary [ i.e written riock ], Hattusa, Turkey.  The largest known Hittite sanctuary. 12th - 13th century BC made in the reign of Tudhaliya 1V . Plastercast at the Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • Hittite relief sculptures of Gods at the Yazilikaya Sancutary [ i.e written riock ], Hattusa, Turkey.  The largest known Hittite sanctuary. 12th - 13th century BC made in the reign of Tudhaliya 1V . Plastercast at the Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Meleager sits on a rock tying his sandal. Below him lies a fierce hunting dog with a wide collar. On one side a god or another hero wearing a rounded hat  crowning Meleager ( arm missing). On the other side stands the huntress Atalante, Meleager's lover: she wears a short dress and quiver,
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Meleager sits on a rock tying his sandal. Below him lies a fierce hunting dog with a wide collar. On one side a god or another hero wearing a rounded hat  crowning Meleager ( arm missing). On the other side stands the huntress Atalante, Meleager's lover: she wears a short dress and quiver,
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Meleager sits on a rock tying his sandal. Below him lies a fierce hunting dog with a wide collar. On one side a god or another hero wearing a rounded hat  crowning Meleager ( arm missing). On the other side stands the huntress Atalante, Meleager's lover: she wears a short dress and quiver,
  • Hittite relief sculptures of Gods at the Yazilikaya Sancutary [ i.e written riock ], Hattusa, Turkey.  The largest known Hittite sanctuary. 12th - 13th century BC made in the reign of Tudhaliya 1V . Plastercast at the Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Meleager sits on a rock tying his sandal. Below him lies a fierce hunting dog with a wide collar. On one side a god or another hero wearing a rounded hat  crowning Meleager ( arm missing). On the other side stands the huntress Atalante, Meleager's lover: she wears a short dress and quiver,
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Meleager sits on a rock tying his sandal. Below him lies a fierce hunting dog with a wide collar. On one side a god or another hero wearing a rounded hat  crowning Meleager ( arm missing). On the other side stands the huntress Atalante, Meleager's lover: she wears a short dress and quiver,
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Meleager sits on a rock tying his sandal. Below him lies a fierce hunting dog with a wide collar. On one side a god or another hero wearing a rounded hat  crowning Meleager ( arm missing). On the other side stands the huntress Atalante, Meleager's lover: she wears a short dress and quiver,
  • Rock Relief From Firaktin near the village of Gümüsören, Turkey.   king Hattusili III is also pouring a libation, a drink offering, to the Storm God god on the far left. 1275BC. A plaster cast from the Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Relief sculpture freeze from the Roman theatre of Myra, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Meleager sits on a rock tying his sandal. Below him lies a fierce hunting dog with a wide collar. On one side a god or another hero wearing a rounded hat  crowning Meleager ( arm missing). On the other side stands the huntress Atalante, Meleager's lover: she wears a short dress and quiver,
  • Relief sculpture freeze from the Roman theatre of Myra, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Relief sculpture freeze from the Roman theatre of Myra, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Relief sculpture freeze from the Roman theatre of Myra, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Relief sculpture freeze from the Roman theatre of Myra, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Sculpture of  god Sharruma and King Tudhaliya from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Sculpture of  god Sharruma and King Tudhaliya from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey. Plastercast at the Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • End relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • End relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • End relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • End relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • End relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • End relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey. Plastercast at the Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • Procession of female Gods in the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Procession of female Gods in the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • God figure from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • God figure from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Figure of a god from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Procession of female Gods in the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Procession of female Gods in the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Procession of male gods in the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Procession of male gods in the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Procession of male gods in the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Procession of male gods in the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Procession of male gods in the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Procession of male gods in the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Procession of male gods in the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • The sword of God from the Sancutary of Yazilikaza, Hattusha, Turkey. Probably the weirdest representation of the rock sanctuary Yazilikaza, shows a sword God. He is waering a high pointed cap, whose ornamented with horns showing he is a divine character. The lower part of his body is formed of two hanging lions that merge into a sword blade . The body of God seems to form the sword handle and the sword being stuck into the ground could indicate that there is a god of the underworld. Cast from the original. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • The sword of God from the Sancutary of Yazilikaza, Hattusha, Turkey. Probably the weirdest representation of the rock sanctuary Yazilikaza, shows a sword God. He is waering a high pointed cap, whose ornamented with horns showing he is a divine character. The lower part of his body is formed of two hanging lions that merge into a sword blade . The body of God seems to form the sword handle and the sword being stuck into the ground could indicate that there is a god of the underworld. Cast from the original. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • The Sword God from the Sancutary of Yazilikaza, Hattusha, Turkey. Probably the weirdest representation of the rock sanctuary Yazilikaza, shows a sword God. He is waering a high pointed cap, whose ornamented with horns showing he is a divine character. The lower part of his body is formed of two hanging lions that merge into a sword blade . The body of God seems to form the sword handle and the sword being stuck into the ground could indicate that there is a god of the underworld. Cast from the original. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • The sword of God from the Sancutary of Yazilikaza, Hattusha, Turkey. Probably the weirdest representation of the rock sanctuary Yazilikaza, shows a sword God. He is waering a high pointed cap, whose ornamented with horns showing he is a divine character. The lower part of his body is formed of two hanging lions that merge into a sword blade . The body of God seems to form the sword handle and the sword being stuck into the ground could indicate that there is a god of the underworld. Cast from the original. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • The sword of God from the Sancutary of Yazilikaza, Hattusha, Turkey. Probably the weirdest representation of the rock sanctuary Yazilikaza, shows a sword God. He is waering a high pointed cap, whose ornamented with horns showing he is a divine character. The lower part of his body is formed of two hanging lions that merge into a sword blade . The body of God seems to form the sword handle and the sword being stuck into the ground could indicate that there is a god of the underworld. Cast from the original. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Photo of the Hittite Fasillar Monument, finished replica of 13th century BC original. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The original is an unfinished monumental stele that is situated fiat on the back on a slope at the immediate vicinity of the village Fasillar within the Konya province, Beysehir. This is an exact replica of the original that was made of trachyte igneous rock. This represents the origin& that was cast into the mould of the same dimensions and colour. <br />
<br />
The height from the toes to the top of the lions is 7,40 meters. There is also a socket that is 80 cm. Long inserted into the basement. The Hittite monument dates from the end of 13th century BC There appears the great God higher than 4 meters stepping on the smaller mountain God that is accompanied by the lions on.
  • Image of the Hittite Fasillar Monument, finished replica of 13th century BC original. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The original is an unfinished monumental stele that is situated fiat on the back on a slope at the immediate vicinity of the village Fasillar within the Konya province, Beysehir. This is an exact replica of the original that was made of trachyte igneous rock. This represents the origin& that was cast into the mould of the same dimensions and colour. <br />
<br />
The height from the toes to the top of the lions is 7,40 meters. There is also a socket that is 80 cm. Long inserted into the basement. The Hittite monument dates from the end of 13th century BC There appears the great God higher than 4 meters stepping on the smaller mountain God that is accompanied by the lions on.
  • The Hittite Fasillar Monument, finished replica of 13th century BC original. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Against a gray background.<br />
<br />
The original is an unfinished monumental stele that is situated fiat on the back on a slope at the immediate vicinity of the village Fasillar within the Konya province, Beysehir. This is an exact replica of the original that was made of trachyte igneous rock. This represents the origin& that was cast into the mould of the same dimensions and colour. <br />
<br />
The height from the toes to the top of the lions is 7,40 meters. There is also a socket that is 80 cm. Long inserted into the basement. The Hittite monument dates from the end of 13th century BC There appears the great God higher than 4 meters stepping on the smaller mountain God that is accompanied by the lions on.
  • Picture of the Hittite Hittite Fasillar Monument, finished replica of 13th century BC original. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Against a grey art background.<br />
<br />
The original is an unfinished monumental stele that is situated fiat on the back on a slope at the immediate vicinity of the village Fasillar within the Konya province, Beysehir. This is an exact replica of the original that was made of trachyte igneous rock. This represents the origin& that was cast into the mould of the same dimensions and colour. <br />
<br />
The height from the toes to the top of the lions is 7,40 meters. There is also a socket that is 80 cm. Long inserted into the basement. The Hittite monument dates from the end of 13th century BC There appears the great God higher than 4 meters stepping on the smaller mountain God that is accompanied by the lions on.
  • Close up of the Hittite Fasillar Monument, finished replica of 13th century BC original. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
The original is an unfinished monumental stele that is situated fiat on the back on a slope at the immediate vicinity of the village Fasillar within the Konya province, Beysehir. This is an exact replica of the original that was made of trachyte igneous rock. This represents the origin& that was cast into the mould of the same dimensions and colour. <br />
<br />
The height from the toes to the top of the lions is 7,40 meters. There is also a socket that is 80 cm. Long inserted into the basement. The Hittite monument dates from the end of 13th century BC There appears the great God higher than 4 meters stepping on the smaller mountain God that is accompanied by the lions on.
  • The Hittite Fasillar Monument, finished replica of 13th century BC original. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
The original is an unfinished monumental stele that is situated fiat on the back on a slope at the immediate vicinity of the village Fasillar within the Konya province, Beysehir. This is an exact replica of the original that was made of trachyte igneous rock. This represents the origin& that was cast into the mould of the same dimensions and colour. <br />
<br />
The height from the toes to the top of the lions is 7,40 meters. There is also a socket that is 80 cm. Long inserted into the basement. The Hittite monument dates from the end of 13th century BC There appears the great God higher than 4 meters stepping on the smaller mountain God that is accompanied by the lions on.
  • The Hittite Fasillar Monument, finished replica of 13th century BC original. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Against a brown art background.<br />
<br />
The original is an unfinished monumental stele that is situated fiat on the back on a slope at the immediate vicinity of the village Fasillar within the Konya province, Beysehir. This is an exact replica of the original that was made of trachyte igneous rock. This represents the origin& that was cast into the mould of the same dimensions and colour. <br />
<br />
The height from the toes to the top of the lions is 7,40 meters. There is also a socket that is 80 cm. Long inserted into the basement. The Hittite monument dates from the end of 13th century BC There appears the great God higher than 4 meters stepping on the smaller mountain God that is accompanied by the lions on.
  • close up of the facade and relief sculptures of the Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • close up of the facade and relief sculptures of the Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • steps amd paths leading to the Phrygian water cistern of Midas city cut deep into the underground rock. 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.
  • steps amd paths leading to the Phrygian water cistern of Midas city cut deep into the underground rock. 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.
  • steps amd paths leading to the Phrygian water cistern of Midas city cut deep into the underground rock. 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • The Unfinished rock monument of Midas, 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This rock facade was planned but never finished and so little is known about the unfinished Monument. It is also known locally as the Kucuk Yazilikaya ( “little written rock”), since it appears to have been planned as a smaller version of the Midas Monument, also called Yazilikaya. It measures 7m x 10m and faces west, unlike the other monument at Midas whose facades face east. Since it was never completed, it was gives some idea of the construction techniques : first the rock was flattened and then the facade was carved from the top down. The architectural frame and the ornament were carved at the same time. About  2m below the monument are a smaller facade, to the left and a small cut altar to the right.
  • The Unfinished rock monument of Midas, 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This rock facade was planned but never finished and so little is known about the unfinished Monument. It is also known locally as the Kucuk Yazilikaya ( “little written rock”), since it appears to have been planned as a smaller version of the Midas Monument, also called Yazilikaya. It measures 7m x 10m and faces west, unlike the other monument at Midas whose facades face east. Since it was never completed, it was gives some idea of the construction techniques : first the rock was flattened and then the facade was carved from the top down. The architectural frame and the ornament were carved at the same time. About  2m below the monument are a smaller facade, to the left and a small cut altar to the right.
  • The Unfinished rock monument of Midas, 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This rock facade was planned but never finished and so little is known about the unfinished Monument. It is also known locally as the Kucuk Yazilikaya ( “little written rock”), since it appears to have been planned as a smaller version of the Midas Monument, also called Yazilikaya. It measures 7m x 10m and faces west, unlike the other monument at Midas whose facades face east. Since it was never completed, it was gives some idea of the construction techniques : first the rock was flattened and then the facade was carved from the top down. The architectural frame and the ornament were carved at the same time. About  2m below the monument are a smaller facade, to the left and a small cut altar to the right.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • Close up of the inscription dedicated to King Midas on the Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • Close up of the inscription dedicated to King Midas on the Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Dogerr, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Close up of two sphinxes relief scul[ptures of the Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Close up of two sphinxes relief scul[ptures of the Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Close up of 2 standing lions of the Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Picture of Yazilikaya [ i.e written riock ], Hattusa  The largest known Hittite sanctuary. 13th century BC made in the reign of Tudhaliya 1V .1
  • Picture of Yazilikaya [ i.e written riock ], Hattusa The largest known Hittite sanctuary. 13th century BC made in the reign of Tudhaliya 1V .1
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    <br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebastian relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.      Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background. <br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    <br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    <br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    <br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    <br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Anchises and Aphrodite Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The Trojan shepherd Anchises gazes at the seated Aphrodite, his lover for one night on mount Ida. She hold a small Eros on her lap: this is an erotic encounter. The head of Selene (Moon) appears above the mountain rocks: she indicates night time. It was from this union that Aineas was born
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.      Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background. <br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.      Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.

FunkyStock Picture Library Resource

Picture The Past

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FunkyStock Picture Library free resource for professional editorial picture editors, picture researchers, historical scholars and students and enthusiasts who want to browse some of the best pictures and images of historic countries, historical places, archaeological sites and the very best museum antiquities and artefacts exhibits in Europe and the Middle East.

Pictures and Images can be downloaded or bought as stock photos or photo art prints.

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Browse travel pictures and images of historic places and archaeological sites of countries in Europe and the Middle East.

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Browse pictures & images the treasured artefacts and antiquities exhibits from the great Museum of Europe and the Middle East. See the art and objects made by our ancestors.

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