• Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Dogerr, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • close up of the facade and relief sculptures of the Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Close up of two sphinxes relief scul[ptures of the Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Close up of two sphinxes relief scul[ptures of the Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • close up of the facade and relief sculptures of the Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Close up of 2 standing lions of the Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • The Unfinished rock monument of Midas, 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This rock facade was planned but never finished and so little is known about the unfinished Monument. It is also known locally as the Kucuk Yazilikaya ( “little written rock”), since it appears to have been planned as a smaller version of the Midas Monument, also called Yazilikaya. It measures 7m x 10m and faces west, unlike the other monument at Midas whose facades face east. Since it was never completed, it was gives some idea of the construction techniques : first the rock was flattened and then the facade was carved from the top down. The architectural frame and the ornament were carved at the same time. About  2m below the monument are a smaller facade, to the left and a small cut altar to the right.
  • The Unfinished rock monument of Midas, 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This rock facade was planned but never finished and so little is known about the unfinished Monument. It is also known locally as the Kucuk Yazilikaya ( “little written rock”), since it appears to have been planned as a smaller version of the Midas Monument, also called Yazilikaya. It measures 7m x 10m and faces west, unlike the other monument at Midas whose facades face east. Since it was never completed, it was gives some idea of the construction techniques : first the rock was flattened and then the facade was carved from the top down. The architectural frame and the ornament were carved at the same time. About  2m below the monument are a smaller facade, to the left and a small cut altar to the right.
  • The Unfinished rock monument of Midas, 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This rock facade was planned but never finished and so little is known about the unfinished Monument. It is also known locally as the Kucuk Yazilikaya ( “little written rock”), since it appears to have been planned as a smaller version of the Midas Monument, also called Yazilikaya. It measures 7m x 10m and faces west, unlike the other monument at Midas whose facades face east. Since it was never completed, it was gives some idea of the construction techniques : first the rock was flattened and then the facade was carved from the top down. The architectural frame and the ornament were carved at the same time. About  2m below the monument are a smaller facade, to the left and a small cut altar to the right.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian tombs cut into rock formations  protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Close up of Phrygian rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • Close up of the inscription dedicated to King Midas on the Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • Close up of the inscription dedicated to King Midas on the Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • steps amd paths leading to the Phrygian water cistern of Midas city cut deep into the underground rock. 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.
  • steps amd paths leading to the Phrygian water cistern of Midas city cut deep into the underground rock. 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.
  • steps amd paths leading to the Phrygian water cistern of Midas city cut deep into the underground rock. 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.
  • Depictions of gods on the end relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Depictions of gods on the end relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Depictions of gods on the end relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Depictions of gods on the end relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Depictions of gods on the end relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Depictions of gods on the end relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Depictions of gods on the end relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Depictions of gods on the end relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Depictions of gods on the end relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Depictions of gods on the end relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Depictions of gods on the end relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Detail of end relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.. Plastercast at the Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • End relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey. Plastercast at the Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • Close up of end relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.. Plastercast at the Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • End relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey . Plastercast at the Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • Procession of male gods in the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Procession of male gods in the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Procession of male gods in the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Sculpture of  god Sharruma and King Tudhaliya from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • God figure from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Sculpture of  god Sharruma and King Tudhaliya from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • God figure from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Figure of a god from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • End relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • End relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • End relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • End relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • End relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Procession of female Gods in the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Procession of female Gods in the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Procession of female Gods in the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Procession of male gods in the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Procession of male gods in the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Procession of male gods in the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Procession of male gods in the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Procession of female Gods in the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Procession of male gods in the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Procession of male gods in the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Procession of male gods in the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • End relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey. Plastercast at the Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • Sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey. Plastercast at the Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • The sword of God from the Sancutary of Yazilikaza, Hattusha, Turkey. Probably the weirdest representation of the rock sanctuary Yazilikaza, shows a sword God. He is waering a high pointed cap, whose ornamented with horns showing he is a divine character. The lower part of his body is formed of two hanging lions that merge into a sword blade . The body of God seems to form the sword handle and the sword being stuck into the ground could indicate that there is a god of the underworld. Cast from the original. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • The sword of God from the Sancutary of Yazilikaza, Hattusha, Turkey. Probably the weirdest representation of the rock sanctuary Yazilikaza, shows a sword God. He is waering a high pointed cap, whose ornamented with horns showing he is a divine character. The lower part of his body is formed of two hanging lions that merge into a sword blade . The body of God seems to form the sword handle and the sword being stuck into the ground could indicate that there is a god of the underworld. Cast from the original. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • The Sword God from the Sancutary of Yazilikaza, Hattusha, Turkey. Probably the weirdest representation of the rock sanctuary Yazilikaza, shows a sword God. He is waering a high pointed cap, whose ornamented with horns showing he is a divine character. The lower part of his body is formed of two hanging lions that merge into a sword blade . The body of God seems to form the sword handle and the sword being stuck into the ground could indicate that there is a god of the underworld. Cast from the original. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Rock Relief From Firaktin near the village of Gümüsören, Turkey.   king Hattusili III is also pouring a libation, a drink offering, to the Storm God god on the far left. 1275BC. A plaster cast from the Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • The sword of God from the Sancutary of Yazilikaza, Hattusha, Turkey. Probably the weirdest representation of the rock sanctuary Yazilikaza, shows a sword God. He is waering a high pointed cap, whose ornamented with horns showing he is a divine character. The lower part of his body is formed of two hanging lions that merge into a sword blade . The body of God seems to form the sword handle and the sword being stuck into the ground could indicate that there is a god of the underworld. Cast from the original. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • The sword of God from the Sancutary of Yazilikaza, Hattusha, Turkey. Probably the weirdest representation of the rock sanctuary Yazilikaza, shows a sword God. He is waering a high pointed cap, whose ornamented with horns showing he is a divine character. The lower part of his body is formed of two hanging lions that merge into a sword blade . The body of God seems to form the sword handle and the sword being stuck into the ground could indicate that there is a god of the underworld. Cast from the original. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Picture of Yazilikaya [ i.e written riock ], Hattusa  The largest known Hittite sanctuary. 13th century BC made in the reign of Tudhaliya 1V .1
  • Hittite relief sculptures of Gods at the Yazilikaya Sancutary [ i.e written riock ], Hattusa, Turkey.  The largest known Hittite sanctuary. 12th - 13th century BC made in the reign of Tudhaliya 1V . Plastercast at the Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • Hittite relief sculptures of Gods at the Yazilikaya Sancutary [ i.e written riock ], Hattusa, Turkey.  The largest known Hittite sanctuary. 12th - 13th century BC made in the reign of Tudhaliya 1V . Plastercast at the Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • Picture of Yazilikaya [ i.e written riock ], Hattusa The largest known Hittite sanctuary. 13th century BC made in the reign of Tudhaliya 1V .1
  • Hittite relief sculptures of Gods at the Yazilikaya Sancutary [ i.e written riock ], Hattusa, Turkey.  The largest known Hittite sanctuary. 12th - 13th century BC made in the reign of Tudhaliya 1V . Plastercast at the Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The 1st cent B.C Terrace Temple dedicated to Zeus Soteros  and round sanctuary dating back to the 5th cent B.C and dedicated to the god King Basileus Kaunios, the son of Apollo’s son Miletos and the water nymph Kyanee, . In the background is the silted up harbour.  Archaeological site of  Kaunos (Caunos), Dalyan Turkey
  • The 1st cent B.C Terrace Temple dedicated to Zeus Soteros  and round sanctuary dating back to the 5th cent B.C and dedicated to the god King Basileus Kaunios, the son of Apollo’s son Miletos and the water nymph Kyanee, . In the background is the silted up harbour.  Archaeological site of  Kaunos (Caunos), Dalyan Turkey
  • The 1st cent B.C Terrace Temple dedicated to Zeus Soteros  and round sanctuary dating back to the 5th cent B.C and dedicated to the god King Basileus Kaunios, the son of Apollo’s son Miletos and the water nymph Kyanee, . Archaeological site of  Kaunos (Caunos), Dalyan Turkey
  • The 1st cent B.C Terrace Temple dedicated to Zeus Soteros  and round sanctuary dating back to the 5th cent B.C and dedicated to the god King Basileus Kaunios, the son of Apollo’s son Miletos and the water nymph Kyanee, . In the background is the silted up harbour.  Archaeological site of  Kaunos (Caunos), Dalyan Turkey
  • Tlos acropolis and Lycian house and temple-type rock-cut tombs. Tlos is where the mythological hero Bellerophon winged flying horse Pegasus lived. Anatolia, Turkey
  • Tlos acropolis and Lycian house and temple-type rock-cut tombs. Tlos is where the mythological hero Bellerophon winged flying horse Pegasus lived. Anatolia, Turkey
  • Tlos acropolis and Lycian house and temple-type rock-cut tombs. Tlos is where the mythological hero Bellerophon winged flying horse Pegasus lived. Anatolia, Turkey
  • Tlos acropolis and Lycian house and temple-type rock-cut tombs. Tlos is where the mythological hero Bellerophon winged flying horse Pegasus lived. Anatolia, Turkey
  • Tlos acropolis and Lycian house and temple-type rock-cut tombs. Tlos is where the mythological hero Bellerophon winged flying horse Pegasus lived. Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The 1st cent B.C Terrace Temple dedicated to Zeus Soteros  and round sanctuary dating back to the 5th cent B.C and dedicated to the god King Basileus Kaunios, the son of Apollo’s son Miletos and the water nymph Kyanee, . In the background is the silted up harbour.  Archaeological site of  Kaunos (Caunos), Dalyan Turkey
  • Tlos acropolis and Lycian house and temple-type rock-cut tombs. Tlos is where the mythological hero Bellerophon winged flying horse Pegasus lived. Anatolia, Turkey
  • Tlos acropolis and Lycian house and temple-type rock-cut tombs. Tlos is where the mythological hero Bellerophon winged flying horse Pegasus lived. Anatolia, Turkey
  • Tlos acropolis and Lycian house and temple-type rock-cut tombs. Tlos is where the mythological hero Bellerophon winged flying horse Pegasus lived. Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • The Hellenistic temple fronted Tombs of Kaunos,  4th - 2nd cent. B.C , just outside the archaeological site of Kounos on the oposite side of the Calbys river from Dalyan, Turkey. Kaunos is on the border of Lycia & Caria and the Kaunos rock tombs differ slightly form Lycian tombs in that the rock surrounding them has been carved away to maje almost free standing temple buildings.
  • Picture of  A18 of the Tomb North Necropolis. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.<br />
<br />
Tomb A 18 ( 1st century AD) <br />
<br />
The building, one of the most representative and best conserved of the North Necropolis, has the shape of a small temple, built to a square plan with regular walls. The facade is framed by projecting pilasters; the roofing slabs rest on the, two frontons and the lateral cornices.- Beneath the base is a subterranean chamber partially carved into of the rock. The two chambers have sepulchral beds along the walls.
  • Picture of  A18 of the Tomb North Necropolis. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.<br />
<br />
Tomb A 18 ( 1st century AD) <br />
<br />
The building, one of the most representative and best conserved of the North Necropolis, has the shape of a small temple, built to a square plan with regular walls. The facade is framed by projecting pilasters; the roofing slabs rest on the, two frontons and the lateral cornices.- Beneath the base is a subterranean chamber partially carved into of the rock. The two chambers have sepulchral beds along the walls.
  • Hunters freeze from the Large Podium of the sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • Two warriors clasing shields on a freeze from the Large Podium of the sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • The sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • The sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • The sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • The 1st cent B.C Terrace Temple dedicated to Zeus Soteros  and round sanctuary dating back to the 5th cent B.C and dedicated to the god King Basileus Kaunios, the son of Apollo’s son Miletos and the water nymph Kyanee, . In the background is the silted up harbour.  Archaeological site of  Kaunos (Caunos), Dalyan Turkey
  • The 1st cent B.C Terrace Temple dedicated to Zeus Soteros  and round sanctuary dating back to the 5th cent B.C and dedicated to the god King Basileus Kaunios, the son of Apollo’s son Miletos and the water nymph Kyanee, . In the background is the silted up harbour.  Archaeological site of  Kaunos (Caunos), Dalyan Turkey

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