• Bayeux Tapestry scene 54: Bishop Odo, holding club, urges Norman cavalry against the Saon soldiers on a hill at the Battle of Hastings.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 51b: The Norman cavalry charge the Saxon foot solders.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 50:  A saxon watchman warns of the approaching Norman army.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 34:  Messengers sail from England to tell Duke William of Harold's corination.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 8 : Guy de Ponthieu, holding falcon, escorts his prisoner, Harold, to Beaurain.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 4: Harold boards his ship to sail across the Channel to Normandy.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 55:  Duke William raises his visor to show that a rumour he was killed is un-true.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 9:  Guy de Ponthieu, on throne, discussed his with Harold his ransom demands.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 1 : Edward The confessor send Harold to inform William he will succeed to English Throne.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 1 : Edward The confessor send Harold to inform William he will succeed to English Throne.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 51b: The Norman cavalry charge the Saxon foot solders.  BYX51b
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 38:  Duke Williams invasion fleet  ships cross the channel to England. BYX38
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 27-28 :  A dying Edward the Confessor makes his last requests' BYX27 BYX 28
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 14: Harold arives at Duke William of Normandy Castle. BYX14
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 3 - 4: Harold stops on way to Normandy to recieve blessing at Bosham church and then feasts.  BYX3
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 56: Norman caalry breaks through Saxon lines and Harolds army is slaughtered.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 58 :  Duke William wins the Battle of Hastings and is proclaimed King of England.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 57: King Harold is killed by an arrow in his eye as he looses the Battle of Hastings.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 55:  Duke William raises his visor to show that a rumour he was killed is un-true.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 51c:  The Norman cavalry charge the Saxon foot solders.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 53a : Fierce fighting between Norman and Saxon soldiers at The Battle of Hastings.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 53b: Norman cavalry attack Saxon soldiers ontop of a hill at the Battle of Hastings.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 52:  Harpld brother, Duke of Lewine and Byrd is killed in the Battle of Hastings.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 51a : Duke William talks to his soldiers ordering them into battle.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 38:  Duke Williams invasion fleet  ships cross the channel to England.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 48 :  Duke Williams Norman cavalry advance on Harols Saxons.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 49:  As he advances Duke William is told where the Saxon army is.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 45:  Norman soldiers train and built a fortified camp.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 47:  A house is burnt to clear the way for Williams Army and Duke William gets ready from battle.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 43 - 44:  Duke William, his barons and Bishop Odo hold a banquet to celebrate their safe arrival in England.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 41 - 42:  Cooks are supervised by Wadar, one of Williams servants.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 40:  Norman soldiers ride to Hastings to make camp.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 39:  Horses are disembarked in England from Duke Williams invasion fleet.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 37:  weapons, wine and horses are loaded on Duke Williams's invasion fleet.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 36: The Normans launch an invasion fleet
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 27-28 :  A dying Edward the Confessor makes
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 35:  Duke William reacts to Harold's Corination by ordering an invasion fleet to be built.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 31-32-33 : Astrologers see a comet in the sky and predict an evil omen for Harold.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 29 - 30: Harold is proclaimed King then crowned.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 26 :  Edward The Confessor's Corpes is carried to St Peters Church.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 23 : Having sworn fealty to Duke William Harold sails back to England.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 25: Harold reports to Edward thr Confessor about his mission to see Williams in Normandy.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 20: Conan Duke of Britany surrender Dinan, city keys on end of his lance, to Duke William.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 19 :  Duke Willam and his army attack Dinan in Britany.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 15:  Dule William of Normandy hold discussions with Harold and, right, Williams daughter Aelgyve is detroved to him.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 12 : William gives orders to his messengers for Harolds release,
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 13 :  Guy de Ponthieu, left,  hands Harold over to William the Conqueror, right.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 14: Harold arives at Duke William of Normandy Castle.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 11 :  Two messengers rush from William to Guy de Ponthieu with orders fro Harolds release.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 9:  Guy de Ponthieu, on throne, discussed his with Harold his ransom demands.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 5 : Strong winds blow Harold ships off course to the lands of Guy de Ponthieu.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene  6 - 7:  Harold is areested by Guy de Ponthieu for landing without permission.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 46:  Duke William id told of Harolds army arrival and a house is burnt to clear the way.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 57: King Harold is killed by an arrow in his eye as he looses the Battle of Hastings.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 57: King Harold is killed by an arrow in his eye as he looses the Battle of Hastings.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 55:  Duke William raises his visor to show that a rumour he was killed is un-true.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 51b: The Norman cavalry charge the Saxon foot solders.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 48 :  Duke Williams Norman cavalry advance on Harols Saxons.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 48 :  Duke Williams Norman cavalry advance on Harols Saxons.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 51b: The Norman cavalry charge the Saxon foot solders.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 51b: The Norman cavalry charge the Saxon foot solders.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 48 :  Duke Williams Norman cavalry advance on Harols Saxons.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 46:  Duke William id told of Harolds army arrival and a house is burnt to clear the way.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 48 :  Duke Williams Norman cavalry advance on Harols Saxons.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 46:  Duke William id told of Harolds army arrival and a house is burnt to clear the way.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 57: King Harold is killed by an arrow in his eye as he looses the Battle of Hastings.  BYX57
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 1 : Edward The confessor send Harold to inform William he will succeed to English Throne.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 58 :  Duke William wins the Battle of Hastings and is proclaimed King of England. BYX58
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 56: Norman caalry breaks through Saxon lines and Harolds army is slaughtered. BYX56
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 55:  Duke William raises his visor to show that a rumour he was killed is un-true. BYX55
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 54: Bishop Odo, holding club, urges Norman cavalry against the Saon soldiers on a hill at the Battle of Hastings. BYX54
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 51c:  The Norman cavalry charge the Saxon foot solders. BYX51c
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 53a : Fierce fighting between Norman and Saxon soldiers at The Battle of Hastings.  BYX53a
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 53b: Norman cavalry attack Saxon soldiers ontop of a hill at the Battle of Hastings.   BYX53b
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 52:  Harpld brother, Duke of Lewine and Byrd is killed in the Battle of Hastings. BYX52
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 51a : Duke William talks to his soldiers ordering them into battle.  BYX51a
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 47:  A house is burnt to clear the way for Williams Army and Duke William gets ready from battle. BYX47
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 50:  A saxon watchman warns of the approaching Norman army. BYX50
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 49:  As he advances Duke William is told where the Saxon army is. BYX49
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 48 :  Duke Williams Norman cavalry advance on Harols Saxons. BYX48
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 46:  Duke William id told of Harolds army arrival and a house is burnt to clear the way. BYX46
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 45:  Norman soldiers train and built a fortified camp. BYX45
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 41 - 42:  Cooks are supervised by Wadar, one of Williams servants. BYX41 - 42
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 43 - 44:  Duke William, his barons and Bishop Odo hold a banquet to celebrate their safe arrival in England. BYX43 BYX44
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 40:  Norman soldiers ride to Hastings to make camp. BYX40
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 39:  Horses are disembarked in England from Duke Williams invasion fleet. BYX39
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 37:  weapons, wine and horses are loaded on Duke Williams's invasion fleet. BYX37
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 36: The Normans launch an invasion fleet BYX36
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 31-32-33 : Astrologers see a comet in the sky and predict an evil omen for Harold. BYX31
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 35:  Duke William reacts to Harold's Corination by ordering an invasion fleet to be built. BYX35
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 34:  Messengers sail from England to tell Duke William of Harold's corination. BYX34
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 29 - 30: Harold is proclaimed King then crowned.  BYX29 & BYX30
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 23 : Having sworn fealty to Duke William Harold sails back to England. BYX23
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 26 :  Edward The Confessor's Corpes is carried to St Peters Church. BYX26
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 25: Harold reports to Edward thr Confessor about his mission to see Williams in Normandy. BYX25
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 20: Conan Duke of Britany surrender Dinan, city keys on end of his lance, to Duke William. BYX20
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 19 :  Duke Willam and his army attack Dinan in Britany. BYX19
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 18: The Norman army of Duke Willam enters Dol and the Rennes, Duke Conan of Brittany flees.   BYX18
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 15:  Dule William of Normandy hold discussions with Harold and, right, Williams daughter Aelgyve is detroved to him. BYX15
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 16: Harold rides with Duke William to fight Conan, Duke of Britany.  BYX16
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 13 :  Guy de Ponthieu, left,  hands Harold over to William the Conqueror, right. BYX13
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 8 : Guy de Ponthieu, holding falcon, escorts his prisoner, Harold, to Beaurain. BYX8
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 12 : William gives orders to his messengers for Harolds release, BYX12
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 11 :  Two messengers rush from William to Guy de Ponthieu with orders fro Harolds release.  BYX11
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene  6 - 7:  Harold is areested by Guy de Ponthieu for landing without permission. BYX6 BYX7
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 5 : Strong winds blow Harold ships off course to the lands of Guy de Ponthieu. BYX5
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 1 : Edward The confessor send Harold to inform William he will succeed to English Throne.  BYX1
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 4: Harold boards his ship to sail across the Channel to Normandy.  BYX4
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 2 : Harlod leaves for Normandy to inform William he will eucceed to English Throne.  BYX2
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 16: Harold rides with Duke William to fight Conan, Duke of Britany.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 18: The Norman army of Duke Willam enters Dol and the Rennes, Duke Conan of Brittany flees.   BYX18
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 48 :  Duke Williams Norman cavalry advance on Harols Saxons.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 9:  Guy de Ponthieu, on throne, discussed his with Harold his ransom demands. BYX9
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 22:  Duke William and Harold ride to Bayeux after defeating Duke of Britany.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 23 :  In front of Duke William, Harold touches 2 reliqueries and swears fealty to Duke William.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 21 : Duke William knights Harold for fighting against Duke of Britany. BYX21
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 17 : Crossing the Couesnon River near Mont St Michele, Duke Williams Soldiers sink in quicksand. BYX17
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 21 : Duke William knights Harold for fighting against Duke of Britany.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 23 :  In front of Duke William, Harold touches 2 reliqueries and swears fealty to Duke William.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 17 : Crossing the Couesnon River near Mont St Michele, Duke Williams Soldiers sink in quicksand.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 10:  William sends messengers to Guy de Ponthieu ordering Harolds release.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 2 : Harlod leaves for Normandy to inform William he will eucceed to English Throne.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 3 - 4: Harold stops on way to Normandy to recieve blessing at Bosham church and then feasts.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 1 : Edward The confessor send Harold to inform William he will succeed to English Throne.
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 23 :  In front of Duke William, Harold touches 2 reliqueries and swears fealty to Duke William. BYX23
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 22:  Duke William and Harold ride to Bayeux after defeating Duke of Britany. BYX22
  • Bayeux Tapestry scene 10:  William sends messengers to Guy de Ponthieu ordering Harolds release. BYX10
  • Ancient Egyptian Gebelein cloth depicting a Nile boat scene, the oldest know painted fabric artefact, Predynastic Egypt, Circa 3600BC. Egyptian Museum, Turin. <br />
<br />
There are at least 4 boats depicted on this linen cloth : two small carft following behind two larger vessels. The two small boats are equipped trains with 8 to 10 oars. The bottom boat has 4 rowers with their oars but other oars hanging below the hull . The helmsman has a steering oar larger (left). Two cabins occupy the central space. Between them a person is sitting in the same position as rowers and a black line behind it may be an indication of an other oar. The upper large boat does not have rowers but a helmsman at the back. The curved stern rises high and ends with a decoration. Red and black horizontal lines appear to indicate the presence of a cabin with a flat roof. Front of the cabin a character is sitting on a kind of throne. It seems to wear something on his head while the rowers are bareheaded.
  • Panoramic of Jungfraujoch train at Kleiner Scheidegg in winter snow with The Eiger (left) then The Monch Mountains. Swiss Alps Switzerland
  • Panoramic of Jungfraujoch train at Kleiner Scheidegg in winter snow with The Eiger (left) then The Monch Mountains. Swiss Alps Switzerland
  • Calanais Standing Stones  central stone circle erected between 2900-2600BC measuring 11 metres wide. At the centre of the ring stands a huge monolith stone 4.8 metres high weighing about 7 tonnes, which is perfectly orientated so that its widest sides face due north south. Calanais Neolithic Standing Stone (Tursachan Chalanais) , Isle of Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland.
  • Outer row of stones, 27 metres long,  leading to the central stone circle, circa 2900BC. Calanais Neolithic Standing Stone (Tursachan Chalanais) , Isle of Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland.
  • Panorama of Calanais Standing Stones  central stone circle erected between 2900-2600BC measuring 11 metres wide. At the centre of the ring stands a huge monolith stone 4.8 metres high weighing about 7 tonnes, which is perfectly orientated so that its widest sides face due north south. Calanais Neolithic Standing Stone (Tursachan Chalanais) , Isle of Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland.
  • Monolth of Calanais Neolithic Standing Stone (Tursachan Chalanais) , Isle of Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland.
  • Panorama of  the central stone circle, at sunset, erected between 2900-2600BC measuring 11 metres wide. At the centre of the ring stands a huge monolith stone 4.8 metres high weighing about 7 tonnes, which is perfectly orientated so that its widest sides face due north south. Calanais Neolithic Standing Stone (Tursachan Chalanais) , Isle of Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland.
  • Calanais Standing Stones central stone circle erected between 2900-2600BC measuring 11 metres wide. At the centre of the ring stands a huge monolith stone 4.8 metres high weighing about 7 tonnes, which is perfectly orientated so that its widest sides face due north south. Calanais Neolithic Standing Stone (Tursachan Chalanais) , Isle of Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland.
  • Monolithic stone of Calanais Neolithic Standing Stone (Tursachan Chalanais) , Isle of Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland.
  • Calanais Standing Stones central stone circle erected between 2900-2600BC measuring 11 metres wide. At the centre of the ring stands a huge monolith stone 4.8 metres high weighing about 7 tonnes, which is perfectly orientated so that its widest sides face due north south. Calanais Neolithic Standing Stone (Tursachan Chalanais) , Isle of Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland.
  • The Chateau de Chenonceau designed by French Renaissance architect Philibert de l'Orme 1555 by  to span the River Char. Loire Valley. Chenonceaux,  Indre-et-Loire département France.
  • The Chateau de Chenonceau designed by French Renaissance architect Philibert de l'Orme 1555 by  to span the River Char. Loire Valley. Chenonceaux,  Indre-et-Loire département France.
  • The Chateau de Chenonceau designed by French Renaissance architect Philibert de l'Orme 1555 by  to span the River Char. Loire Valley. Chenonceaux,  Indre-et-Loire département France.
  • The Chateau de Chenonceau designed by French Renaissance architect Philibert de l'Orme 1555 by  to span the River Char. Loire Valley. Chenonceaux,  Indre-et-Loire département France.
  • The Chateau de Chenonceau designed by French Renaissance architect Philibert de l'Orme 1555 by  to span the River Char. Loire Valley. Chenonceaux,  Indre-et-Loire département France.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • Avebury Neolithic standing stone Circle the largest in England, Wiltshire, England, Europe
  • Panoramic view of traditional blue domed Greek Orthodox church of Oia, Island of Thira, Santorini, Greece.
  • Sunset over the traditional Greek Orthodox churches of Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Traditional blue domed Greek Orthodox church of Imerovigli, Island of Thira, Santorini, Greece.
  • Panoramic view of Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece
  • Sunset over Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Sunset over Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Sunset over the traditional Greek Orthodox churches of Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Sunset over the traditional Greek Orthodox churches of Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Sunset over the traditional Greek Orthodox churches of Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Sunset over the traditional Greek Orthodox churches of Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Outer row of stones, 27 metres long,  leading to the central stone circle, circa 2900BC. Calanais Neolithic Standing Stone (Tursachan Chalanais) , Isle of Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland.
  • Panorama of Calanais Standing Stones  central stone circle erected between 2900-2600BC measuring 11 metres wide. At the centre of the ring stands a huge monolith stone 4.8 metres high weighing about 7 tonnes, which is perfectly orientated so that its widest sides face due north south. Calanais Neolithic Standing Stone (Tursachan Chalanais) , Isle of Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland.
  • Panorama of Calanais Standing Stones  central stone circle erected between 2900-2600BC measuring 11 metres wide. At the centre of the ring stands a huge monolith stone 4.8 metres high weighing about 7 tonnes, which is perfectly orientated so that its widest sides face due north south. Calanais Neolithic Standing Stone (Tursachan Chalanais) , Isle of Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland.
  • Stonehenge Neolithic ancient standing stone circle monument, Wilshire, England
  • The Sahara desert sand dunes of Erg Oriental near the oasis of Ksar Ghilane, Tunisia, Africa
  • The desert canyon near the Sahara oasis of Mides, Tunisia, North Africa
  • The Sahara desert sand dunes of Erg Oriental near the oasis of Ksar Ghilane, Tunisia, Africa
  • The Sahara desert sand dunes of Erg Oriental near the oasis of Ksar Ghilane, Tunisia, Africa
  • The Sahara desert sand dunes of Erg Oriental near the oasis of Ksar Ghilane, Tunisia, Africa
  • Sahara sand dunes of erg Chebbi, Morocco, Africa
  • Sahara sand dunes of erg Chebbi, Morocco, Africa
  • 4 x4 Landrover Defnder on the Sahara sand dunes of erg Chebbi, Morocco, Africa
  • View of Danby Dale and Botton Village with heather flowering.  North Yorks National Park, North Yorkshire, England
  • Toretta Popoli and the Castello di Vénere [ Venere ] Érice, Erice, Sicily stock photos.
  • Torre de Re Frederico 2nd, Érice Duomo [Erice cathedral], Sicily stock photos.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.

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