• Cycladic violin shaped figurine. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   White background.
  • Cycladic violin shaped figurine. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Grey background.
  • Reflections In Water - Honfleur France
  • Reflections In Water - Honfleur France
  • Reflections In Water - Honfleur France
  • Reflections In Water - Honfleur France
  • " I love you " chocolates stock photos for Valentines or any love message. The perfect "I love you" stock image. Ready to cut out from Funky Stock Photos library.
  • Young nude women.
  • Young nude women.
  • Young nude women standing confidently
  • Young nude women holding an orange towel
  • Young nude feminine women revealing her breasts
  • Young women wearing black top and revealing one nipple
  • Naked female standing.
  • Mycenaean gold necklaces from the Mycenae chamber tombs, Greece. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Grey Background<br />
<br />
From top to bottom: <br />
<br />
Top four  necklaces in the shape of papyrus flowers .<br />
<br />
Fifth necklace down in the shape of Ivy leaves from tomb 91 Cat No 3186<br />
<br />
<br />
Bottom necklace with beads in the shape of hangimng scrolls from tomb 25 Cat No 2478.
  • Mycenaean gold necklaces from the Mycenae chamber tombs, Greece. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Grey Background<br />
<br />
From top to bottom: <br />
<br />
Top four  necklaces in the shape of papyrus flowers .<br />
<br />
Fifth necklace down in the shape of Ivy leaves from tomb 91 Cat No 3186
  • Mycenaean metal rhyhon hammered into the shape of a lions head, Grave IV, Grave Circle A, Mycenae, Greece, Cat no 273, National Archaeological Museum Athens .  White Background.<br />
<br />
Rytha (Rhython singular) were ritual vessels used to drink libations to the gods during religious ceremonies. 16th century BC
  • Mycenaean metal rhyhon hammered into the shape of a lions head, Grave IV, Grave Circle A, Mycenae, Greece, Cat no 273, National Archaeological Museum Athens .  Grey art Background <br />
<br />
Rytha (Rhython singular) were ritual vessels used to drink libations to the gods during religious ceremonies. 16th century BC
  • Phrygian grey ceramic rhython in the shape of a goat from Gordion. Phrygian Collection, 8th-7th century BC - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations Ankara. Turkey.
  • Phrygian pottery vessel in the shape of a goose decorated with geometric deigns from Gordion. Phrygian Collection, 8th century BC - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations Ankara. Turkey.
  • Hittite terra cotta sleremonial libation rhython in the shape of a bull. Hittite Period, 1600 - 1200 BC.  Hattusa Boğazkale. Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey. Against a grey bacground.
  • Hittite terra cotta ceremonial libation rhython in the shape of an anmial . Hittite Empire, Alaca Hoyuk, 1450 - 1200 BC. Alaca Hoyuk. Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey. Against a warm art bacground.
  • Hittite terra cotta ceremonial libation rhython in the shape of an anmial . Hittite Empire, Alaca Hoyuk, 1450 - 1200 BC. Alaca Hoyuk. Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey. Against a grey bacground.
  • Close up of an end of 7th to start of 6th century B.C Etruscan lid in the shape of a head of a Canopo style vase, used to hold funereal ashes from Chiusi, inv 94610, National Archaeological Museum Florence, Italy , black background
  • Close up of an end of 7th to start of 6th century B.C Etruscan lid in the shape of a head of a Canopo style vase, used to hold funereal ashes from Chiusi, inv 94610, National Archaeological Museum Florence, Italy , against grey
  • A 4th century B.C Etruscan Askoi, olive oil or wine jar, in the shape of a duck, terracotta illustrated with black paint, inv 4233, National Archaeological Museum Florence, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from the rule of Trajan 98-117 AD. This bust of a man presents a hairstyle with long curls that are closely cut to the head and cover the forehead with a thick fringe that follows the shape of the face. The style comes from the official portraits of Trajan, 97-117 AD, created for his Decennalia, celebrating the tenth year of his reign. Inv 317, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Mycenaean metal rhyhon hammered into the shape of a lions head, Grave IV, Grave Circle A, Mycenae, Greece, Cat no 273, National Archaeological Museum Athens . <br />
<br />
Rytha (Rhython singular) were ritual vessels used to drink libations to the gods during religious ceremonies. 16th century BC
  • Phrygian grey ceramic rhython in the shape of a goat from Gordion. Phrygian Collection, 8th-7th century BC - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations Ankara. Turkey. Against a black background
  • Hittite terra cotta ceremonial libation vessel in the shape of a mug being held in a hand and an arm. Hittite Period, 1600 - 1200 BC.  Hattusa Boğazkale. Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey. Against a white bacground.
  • Close up of an end of 7th to start of 6th century B.C Etruscan lid in the shape of a head of a Canopo style vase, used to hold funereal ashes from Chiusi, inv 94610, National Archaeological Museum Florence, Italy , grey art background
  • A 4th century B.C Etruscan Askoi, olive oil or wine jar, in the shape of a duck, terracotta illustrated with black paint, inv 4233, National Archaeological Museum Florence, Italy , black background
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from the rule of Trajan 98-117 AD. This bust of a man presents a hairstyle with long curls that are closely cut to the head and cover the forehead with a thick fringe that follows the shape of the face. The style comes from the official portraits of Trajan, 97-117 AD, created for his Decennalia, celebrating the tenth year of his reign. Inv 317, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Hittite terra cotta ritual vessel in the shape of a duck with two heads - 16th century BC - Hattusa ( Bogazkoy ) - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey . Against white background
  • Hittite terra cotta ritual vessel in the shape of a duck with two heads - 16th century BC - Hattusa ( Bogazkoy ) - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey . Against white background
  • Cycladic monachrome polished slip 'sauce boat' from Syros.  Early Cycladic III (2300-2000 BC) , Phylakopi I, Melos. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 55, 5159.  Grey background.<br />
<br />
<br />
These so called 'sauce boats' were a new shape and style that appeared during this period.
  • Mycenaean gold death mask, Grave Cicle A, Mycenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens. White background.<br />
<br />
This death mask is typical of the other Mycenaean gold death masks fround in Grave V. made from a sigle sheet of gold the shape of the face would have been hammered ot against wood. two holes either side of the gold mask allowed it to be held over the dead mans face. As weapons were found in the graves of Grave Circle A at Mycenae, those buried here wer warriors and maybe kings as the grave goods buried with them were of great value. 16th century BC
  • Vapheio type Mycenaean gold cup depicting a wild bull hunt , Vapheio Tholos Tomb, Lakonia, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens.  Grey Background<br />
<br />
<br />
 Two masterpieces of Creto - Mycenaean gold metalwork were excavated from a tholos tomb near Lakonia in Sparta in 1988. Made in the 15th century BC, the gold cups are heavily influenced by the Minoan style that was predominant in the Agean at the time. The bull hunt was popular with  Mycenaean  and Minoan artists and symolised power and fertility. The distinctive shape of the cup is kown as 'Vapheio type'.
  • Vapheio type Mycenaean gold cup depicting a wild bull hunt , Vapheio Tholos Tomb, Lakonia, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens.  White background.<br />
<br />
<br />
 Two masterpieces of Creto - Mycenaean gold metalwork were excavated from a tholos tomb near Lakonia in Sparta in 1988. Made in the 15th century BC, the gold cups are heavily influenced by the Minoan style that was predominant in the Agean at the time. The bull hunt was popular with  Mycenaean  and Minoan artists and symolised power and fertility. The distinctive shape of the cup is kown as 'Vapheio type'.
  • Vapheio type Mycenaean gold cup depicting a wild bull hunt , Vapheio Tholos Tomb, Lakonia, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens.  Black Background<br />
<br />
 Two masterpieces of Creto - Mycenaean gold metalwork were excavated from a tholos tomb near Lakonia in Sparta in 1988. Made in the 15th century BC, the gold cups are heavily influenced by the Minoan style that was predominant in the Agean at the time. The bull hunt was popular with  Mycenaean  and Minoan artists and symolised power and fertility. The distinctive shape of the cup is kown as 'Vapheio type'.
  • Vapheio type Mycenaean gold cup depicting a wild bull hunt , Vapheio Tholos Tomb, Lakonia, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens. <br />
<br />
 Two masterpieces of Creto - Mycenaean gold metalwork were excavated from a tholos tomb near Lakonia in Sparta in 1988. Made in the 15th century BC, the gold cups are heavily influenced by the Minoan style that was predominant in the Agean at the time. The bull hunt was popular with  Mycenaean  and Minoan artists and symolised power and fertility. The distinctive shape of the cup is kown as 'Vapheio type'.
  • Vapheio type Mycenaean gold cup depicting a wild bull hunt , Vapheio Tholos Tomb, Lakonia, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens.   Grey Art Background<br />
<br />
 Two masterpieces of Creto - Mycenaean gold metalwork were excavated from a tholos tomb near Lakonia in Sparta in 1988. Made in the 15th century BC, the gold cups are heavily influenced by the Minoan style that was predominant in the Agean at the time. The bull hunt was popular with  Mycenaean  and Minoan artists and symolised power and fertility. The distinctive shape of the cup is kown as 'Vapheio type'.
  • Mycenaean gold death mask, Grave Cicle A, Mycenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens.  Grey Background<br />
<br />
<br />
This death mask is typical of the other Mycenaean gold death masks fround in Grave V except in this mask the eyes are open. made from a sigle sheet of gold the shape of the face would have been hammered ot against wood. two holes either side of the gold mask allowed it to be held over the dead mans face. As weapons were found in the graves of Grave Circle A at Mycenae, those buried here wer warriors and maybe kings as the grave goods buried with them were of great value. 16th century BC
  • Mycenaean gold death mask, Grave Cicle A, Mycenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens.<br />
<br />
This death mask is typical of the other Mycenaean gold death masks fround in Grave V except in this mask the eyes are open. made from a sigle sheet of gold the shape of the face would have been hammered ot against wood. two holes either side of the gold mask allowed it to be held over the dead mans face. As weapons were found in the graves of Grave Circle A at Mycenae, those buried here wer warriors and maybe kings as the grave goods buried with them were of great value. 16th century BC
  • Picture of the ruins of the Byzantine Martyrion of St Philip church and healing centre. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.<br />
<br />
Martyrion of St Philip. This church with an octagonal core was built at the beginning of the 5th century on the summit of the hill. This is probably where, according to tradition, the Apostlie was martyred. The building has an eight-sided central room surmounted by a wooden cupola. From each of the eight sides of the central space there was access to a rectangular room through three arches supported by marble columns with capitals decorated with acanthus leaves The shape of the central room is a reference to the number eight which symbolists eternity. The church is situated inside a square composed of 28 rooms for housing pilgrims which were accessed from the outside. As in other Byzantine sanctuaries associated with heating powers (eg that of Saints Cosmas and Damian in Constantinople), in these rooms incubation rites were practised: during sleep, the Saint cured the sick and made prophecies concerning the future.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Byzantine Martyrion of St Philip church and healing centre. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.<br />
<br />
Martyrion of St Philip. This church with an octagonal core was built at the beginning of the 5th century on the summit of the hill. This is probably where, according to tradition, the Apostlie was martyred. The building has an eight-sided central room surmounted by a wooden cupola. From each of the eight sides of the central space there was access to a rectangular room through three arches supported by marble columns with capitals decorated with acanthus leaves The shape of the central room is a reference to the number eight which symbolists eternity. The church is situated inside a square composed of 28 rooms for housing pilgrims which were accessed from the outside. As in other Byzantine sanctuaries associated with heating powers (eg that of Saints Cosmas and Damian in Constantinople), in these rooms incubation rites were practised: during sleep, the Saint cured the sick and made prophecies concerning the future.
  • Brown obsidian dagger with a bone handle carved into the shape of a snake. It is believed this may have been a ritual dagger. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. Against a white background
  • Brown obsidian dagger with a bone handle carved into the shape of a snake. It is believed this may have been a ritual dagger. Catalhoyuk Collections. Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Corridor F-G  of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The corridor was a covered passageway that connected the two wings of the villa, partly straight and partly curved, following the shape of the central esedra. The elements that remain are from the inner walkway. The wall is divided by slender columns. Their capitals support female figures whose architectural function is in turn to support the columns of the superstructure. The female figures hold floral garlands that link them to one another. They may be meant to represent Caryatids, the women of Caria sold into slavery, who gave the name to female figures used as supports instead of columns. The most important part of the decoration is the small pictures in the upper zone: still lifes with masks from the theater alternate with imaginary landscapes, shrines, statues of divinities, little aedicula, and altars, the whole populated by figures of peasants, fishermen, and shepherds. The scene depicting a naval battle on the curved part may well refer to the battle of Actium that led to Rome's conquest of Egypt.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Corridor F-G  of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
The corridor was a covered passageway that connected the two wings of the villa, partly straight and partly curved, following the shape of the central esedra. The elements that remain are from the inner walkway. The wall is divided by slender columns. Their capitals support female figures whose architectural function is in turn to support the columns of the superstructure. The female figures hold floral garlands that link them to one another. They may be meant to represent Caryatids, the women of Caria sold into slavery, who gave the name to female figures used as supports instead of columns. The most important part of the decoration is the small pictures in the upper zone: still lifes with masks from the theater alternate with imaginary landscapes, shrines, statues of divinities, little aedicula, and altars, the whole populated by figures of peasants, fishermen, and shepherds. The scene depicting a naval battle on the curved part may well refer to the battle of Actium that led to Rome's conquest of Egypt.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Corridor F-G  of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
The corridor was a covered passageway that connected the two wings of the villa, partly straight and partly curved, following the shape of the central esedra. The elements that remain are from the inner walkway. The wall is divided by slender columns. Their capitals support female figures whose architectural function is in turn to support the columns of the superstructure. The female figures hold floral garlands that link them to one another. They may be meant to represent Caryatids, the women of Caria sold into slavery, who gave the name to female figures used as supports instead of columns. The most important part of the decoration is the small pictures in the upper zone: still lifes with masks from the theater alternate with imaginary landscapes, shrines, statues of divinities, little aedicula, and altars, the whole populated by figures of peasants, fishermen, and shepherds. The scene depicting a naval battle on the curved part may well refer to the battle of Actium that led to Rome's conquest of Egypt.
  • Roman Fresco with a boat decorated for a festival and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .   <br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with a boat decorated for a festival and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .    Against a grey background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a white background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a white background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  <br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a black background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  <br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • The Viking Raiders Stone depicting men holding swords and axes above their heads. The shape of the axes suggest they are Viking raiders. Anglo Saxon probably carved as a memorial of the first Viking Raind on Lindisfarne Island in 793. Lindisfarne Abbey Museum, Northumbria, England
  • The Viking Raiders Stone depicting men holding swords and axes above their heads. The shape of the axes suggest they are Viking raiders. Anglo Saxon probably carved as a memorial of the first Viking Raind on Lindisfarne Island in 793. Lindisfarne Abbey Museum, Northumbria, England
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Picture of the double Tetrapylon Gate, Aphrodisias, Turkey. A tetrapylon (Greek: Τετράπυλον, "four gates") is an ancient type of Roman monument of cubic shape, with a gate on each of the four sides: generally it was built on a crossroads. stock photos & photo art prints. 8
  • Picture of the double Tetrapylon Gate 2, Aphrodisias, Turkey. A tetrapylon (Greek: Τετράπυλον, "four gates") is an ancient type of Roman monument of cubic shape, with a gate on each of the four sides: generally it was built on a crossroads. stock photos & photo art prints.
  • Coffee  beans in a heart shape, I love Coffee photo, picture & image
  • Coffee beans in the shape of a coffee cup. Stock Photo
  • Coffee beans in the shape of a coffee cup. Stock Photo
  • Coffee beans in the shape of a coffee cup. Stock Photo
  • Mycenaean gold death mask, Grave Cicle A, Mycenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens.  Grey Background<br />
<br />
<br />
 This death mask is typical of the other Mycenaean gold death masks fround in Grave V. made from a sigle sheet of gold the shape of the face would have been hammered ot against wood. two holes either side of the gold mask allowed it to be held over the dead mans face. As weapons were found in the graves of Grave Circle A at Mycenae, those buried here wer warriors and maybe kings as the grave goods buried with them were of great value. 16th century BC
  • Vapheio type Mycenaean gold cup depicting a wild bull hunt side D, Vapheio Tholos Tomb, Lakonia, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens. Black Background<br />
<br />
 Two masterpieces of Creto - Mycenaean gold metalwork were excavated from a tholos tomb near Lakonia in Sparta in 1988. Made in the 15th century BC, the gold cups are heavily influenced by the Minoan style that was predominant in the Agean at the time. The bull hunt was popular with  Mycenaean  and Minoan artists and symolised power and fertility. The distinctive shape of the cup is kown as 'Vapheio type'.
  • Vapheio type Mycenaean gold cup depicting a wild bull hunt , Vapheio Tholos Tomb, Lakonia, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens.  Black Background<br />
<br />
 Two masterpieces of Creto - Mycenaean gold metalwork were excavated from a tholos tomb near Lakonia in Sparta in 1988. Made in the 15th century BC, the gold cups are heavily influenced by the Minoan style that was predominant in the Agean at the time. The bull hunt was popular with  Mycenaean  and Minoan artists and symolised power and fertility. The distinctive shape of the cup is kown as 'Vapheio type'.
  • Vapheio type Mycenaean gold cup depicting a wild bull hunt , Vapheio Tholos Tomb, Lakonia, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens. <br />
<br />
 Two masterpieces of Creto - Mycenaean gold metalwork were excavated from a tholos tomb near Lakonia in Sparta in 1988. Made in the 15th century BC, the gold cups are heavily influenced by the Minoan style that was predominant in the Agean at the time. The bull hunt was popular with  Mycenaean  and Minoan artists and symolised power and fertility. The distinctive shape of the cup is kown as 'Vapheio type'.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Picture of the double Tetrapylon Gate, Aphrodisias, Turkey. A tetrapylon (Greek: Τετράπυλον, "four gates") is an ancient type of Roman monument of cubic shape, with a gate on each of the four sides: generally it was built on a crossroads. stock photos & photo art prints. 9
  • Coffee beans in the shape of a coffee cup. Stock Photo
  • Caratids in the shape of Sirens and Winged Victories. The Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Stone Trulo house with beehive shaped conical roof, traditional Turlli houses of Alberobello, Apulia, Italy
  • Elaborate Minoan amphora  of veined stone with double mouth and s shaped handles, Zakros Central Sanctuary  1500-1400 BC; Heraklion Archaeological  Museum.
  • Minoan decorated bull shaped rhython (rhytha) for ritual liquid offerings, Phaistos 1800-1650 BC; Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, grey background.
  • Minoan decorated bull shaped rhython (rhytha) for ritual liquid offerings, Phaistos 1800-1650 BC; Heraklion Archaeological  Museum.
  • Minoan  ritual decorated animal shaped rhython , Phaistos 1800-1700 BC; Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, white background.
  • Minoan  ritual decorated animal shaped rhython , Phaistos 1800-1700 BC; Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, grey background.
  • Minoan  ritual decorated animal shaped rhython , Phaistos 1800-1700 BC; Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, grey background.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess tablet with raised arms, Kannia Sanctuary,  Gortys, 1350-1250 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, white background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess tablet with raised arms, Kannia Sanctuary,  Gortys, 1350-1250 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess tablet with raised arms, Kannia Sanctuary,  Gortys, 1350-1250 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms, Kannia Sanctuary,  Gortys, 1350-1250 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, white background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms and a crown of snakes, Kannia Sanctuary,  Gortys, 1350-1250 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms and a crown of snakes, Kannia Sanctuary,  Gortys, 1350-1250 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, black background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms and horn crown,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms and crown,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, white background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms and crown,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, black background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms and crown,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Minoan Postpalatial terracotta  goddess statue with raised arms and crown,  Karphi Sanctuary 1200-1100 BC, Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background. <br />
<br />
The Goddesses are crowned with symbols of earth and sky in the shapes of snakes and birds, describing attributes of the goddess as protector of nature.
  • Early Cretian Minoan goat shaped clay vessel, 2300-1900 BC,  Heraklion Archaeological  Museum cat no 5114, black background.
  • Early Cretian Minoan goat shaped clay vessel, 2300-1900 BC,  Heraklion Archaeological  Museum cat no 5114, grey background.
  • Fine Minoan translucent limestone lioness head shaped rhython from the  Knossos Palace Repositories 1600-1500 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, grey background.<br />
<br />
This exquitely worked lioness head rhython has a hole in the muzzle for pouring liquid offerings. The nose and eyes were originally inlaid
  • Fine Minoan translucent limestone lioness head shaped rhython from the  Knossos Palace Repositories 1600-1500 BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, black background.<br />
<br />
This exquitely worked lioness head rhython has a hole in the muzzle for pouring liquid offerings. The nose and eyes were originally inlaid
  • Minoan bull shaped rhython libation vessel decorated with a net pattern , Pseira  1500-1400 BC BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, black background.<br />
<br />
The net pattern over the bull and its cut horns signify that it is a wild bull intended for sacrifice.
  • Minoan clay basket shaped vessel with double axes decorations,  Special Palatial Tradition , Pseira  1500-1400 BC BC, Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, grey background.
  • Ancient violin shaped schematic figure from the Pelos phase,  'Kusura type', probably from Asia Minor. Early Cycladic period I 3200-2800 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Cat no 961. Grey Background.
  • Ancient violin shaped schematic figure from the Pelos phase,  'Kusura type', probably from Asia Minor. Early Cycladic period I 3200-2800 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Cat no 961
  • Ancient spade shaped schematic figure from the Pelos phase,   probably from Asia Minor. Early Cycladic period I 3200-2800 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Cat no 333.  Against white.
  • Burnished monochrome Cycladic ring shaped wase with geometric incissions.  Cycladic III (2300-2000 BC) , Phylakopi, Melos. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 5697-8. Black background.<br />
<br />
<br />
Pottery from this Cycladic era was predominatly monochrome and burnished with linear motifs. Flower and bird designs were rare .
  • Cycladic conical rhython with spiral decorations.   Cycladic (1650-1450 BC) , Phylakopi III, Melos. National Archaeological Museum Athens.  Cat no 5791.  White background.<br />
<br />
<br />
Ceramic shapes and painted style are heavily influenced by Minoan styles during this period. Dark floral and spiral patterns are painted over a lighted backgound with wavy bands.
  • Cycladic conical rhython with spiral decorations.   Cycladic (1650-1450 BC) , Phylakopi III, Melos. National Archaeological Museum Athens.  Cat no 5791.  Gray background.<br />
<br />
<br />
Ceramic shapes and painted style are heavily influenced by Minoan styles during this period. Dark floral and spiral patterns are painted over a lighted backgound with wavy bands.
  • Cycladic spouted cup with floral and net pattern.   Cycladic (1650-1450 BC) , Phylakopi III, Melos. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat no 5755.   Gray background.<br />
<br />
<br />
Ceramic shapes and painted style are heavily influenced by Minoan styles during this period. Dark floral and spiral patterns are painted over a lighted backgound with wavy bands.
  • Body shaped Mycenaean gold cut outs from Grave III, 'Grave of a Women', Grave Circle A, Myenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
Cat No 146. 16th century BC.<br />
<br />
A unique gold body covering and face of an infant child mad out of pieces of gold foll<br />
<br />
Shaft Grave III, the so-called 'Grave of the Women,' contained three female and two infant interments. The women were literally covered in gold jewelry and wore massive gold diadems, while the infants were overlaid with gold foil.
  • Mycenaean ring shaped Kernos with painted serpentine bands , Mycenae Acropolis, 12th Cent BC.  National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat no 5437.  Black Background<br />
<br />
This Mycenaean ring shaped Kernos was a ritual vessel with a conical rhtyhon for pouring liquids. A bovine head adorns the base of the rhython while a serpentine band and painted rosettes decorate the body
  • Mycenaean ring shaped Kernos with painted serpentine bands , Mycenae Acropolis, 12th Cent BC.  National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat no 5437.  Grey Background<br />
<br />
This Mycenaean ring shaped Kernos was a ritual vessel with a conical rhtyhon for pouring liquids. A bovine head adorns the base of the rhython while a serpentine band and painted rosettes decorate the body
  • Mycenaean Gold diadems from Grave IV, Grave Circle A, Myenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum Athens. 16th Cent BC. White Background.<br />
<br />
Top: Mycenaean Gold diadem with repousse circles and rosettes Cat No 232<br />
<br />
Bottom: Elegant Mycenaean gold daidem with fastening loops and dotted decoration. Three diamond shaped pendant hung from chains. Cat no 236.
  • Mycenaean Gold diadems from Grave IV, Grave Circle A, Myenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum Athens. 16th Cent BC. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
Top: Mycenaean Gold diadem with repousse circles and rosettes Cat No 232<br />
<br />
Bottom: Elegant Mycenaean gold daidem with fastening loops and dotted decoration. Three diamond shaped pendant hung from chains. Cat no 236.
  • Gold Mycenaean diadem with leaf shaped plates from Grave I, Grave Circle A, Myenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 184, 185. 16th century BC. Black Background
  • Top leaf shapes of a gold diadem from Grave III, 'Grave of a Women', Grave Circle A, Myenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Grey Background<br />
<br />
Shaft Grave III, the so-called 'Grave of the Women,' contained three female and two infant interments. The women were literally covered in gold jewelry and wore massive gold diadems, while the infants were overlaid with gold foil.
  • Mycenaean gold necklace from the Mycenaean cemetery of Midea tholos tomb , Dendra, Greece. National Archaeological Museum Athens. White Background.<br />
<br />
Inside mycenaean necklace has gold ivy leaf beads, Cat No 7354. The outer mycenaean necklace has rosette shaped gold beads, Cat No 7342. 15th-14th century BC.
  • Mycenaean gold necklace with waz lily shaped beads from the Mycenaean cemetery of Midea tomb 10, Dendra, Greece. National Archaeological Museum Athens Cat no 8748. Black Background
  • Phrygian terracotta decorated bull head shaped cult vessel. 8th-7th century BC . Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey
  • Close up picture of the Roman mosaics of the Room with Star Shaped Decorations depicting an octagonal rosette geometric mosaic patterns, room no 22 at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hittite terra cotta fragmants of a defenive wall tower shaped vessel . Hittite Period, 1600 - 1200 BC.  Hattusa Boğazkale. Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey. Against a black bacground.
  • Hittite terra cotta fragmants of a defenive wall tower shaped vessel . Hittite Period, 1600 - 1200 BC.  Hattusa Boğazkale. Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey. Against a warm art bacground.
  • Hittite terra cotta fragmants of a defenive wall tower shaped vessel . Hittite Period, 1600 - 1200 BC.  Hattusa Boğazkale. Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey. Against a white bacground.
  • Hittite terra cotta fragmants of a defenive wall tower shaped vessel . Hittite Period, 1600 - 1200 BC.  Hattusa Boğazkale. Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey
  • Hittite terra cotta fragmants of a defenive wall tower shaped vessel . Hittite Period, 1600 - 1200 BC.  Hattusa Boğazkale. Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey. Against a black bacground.
  • Hittite terra cotta cube shaped libation vessel. Hittite Empire, Alaca Hoyuk, 1450 - 1200 BC. Alaca Hoyuk. Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey
  • Terra cotta Hittite beaker shaped side spouted pitcher with lid - 1700 BC to 1500BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey,  Against a warm art  background
  • Terra cotta Hittite beaker shaped spouted pitcher - 1700 BC to 1500BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey. Against a grey  background
  • Terra cotta Hittite beaker shaped side spouted teapot and three legged stand - 1700 BC to 1500BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey
  • Terra cotta Hittite beaker shaped spouted pitcher - 1700 BC to 1500BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey. Against a black background
  • Terra cotta Hittite beaker shaped spouted pitcher - 1700 BC to 1500BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey. Against a grey  background
  • Terra cotta Hittite beaker shaped spouted pitcher - 1700 BC to 1500BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey. Against a black background
  • Terra cotta Hittite beaker shaped spouted pitcher - 1700 BC to 1500BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey
  • Two decorated terra cotta seashell shaped vessels found in the house of Assyrian trader, Elamma, at the second level of the Karum of Kultepe. - 19th to 17th century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey. Against a white background.
  • Two decorated terra cotta seashell shaped vessels found in the house of Assyrian trader, Elamma, at the second level of the Karum of Kultepe. - 19th to 17th century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey.  Against a warn art background.
  • Two decorated terra cotta seashell shaped vessels found in the house of Assyrian trader, Elamma, at the second level of the Karum of Kultepe. - 19th to 17th century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey.
  • Bronze Age Anatolian two headed disk shaped alabaster Goddess figurine - 19th to 17th century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey. Against a grey background.
  • Bronze Age Anatolian terra cotta duck shaped ritual vessel - 19th to 17th century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey.  Against a warn art background.
  • Bronze Age Anatolian terra cotta antilope shaped ritual vessel- 19th to 17th century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey.  Against a warn art background.
  • Bronze Age Anatolian terra cotta antilope shaped ritual vessel- 19th to 17th century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey.
  • Bronze Age Anatolian terra cotta spouted pitcher with animal shaped handle - 19th to 17th century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey. Against a white background.
  • Bronze Age Anatolian terra cotta basket with handle & a beaker shaped as a bunch of grapes - 19th to 17th century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey.  Against a warn art background.
  • Bronze Age Anatolian terra cotta side spouted pitcher with bill shaped end - 19th to 17th century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey. Against a white background.
  • Bronze Age Anatolian terra cotta side spouted pitcher with bill shaped end - 19th to 17th century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey.
  • Bronze Age Anatolian eagle shaped ritual vessel - 19th to 17th century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey.  Against a black background.
  • Assyrian Trader Colony Bronze Age terracotta sandal shaped ritual vessed. This cult pot is boat shaped with an animal head at the front. Inside the vessel is god. The deities associated with the ritual vessel were associated with trade and transportation in Ancient Mesopotamia and Summerian literature. The vessel signifies a religious river trip.  - 19th  century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey.. Against a white background.
  • Assyrian Trader Colony Bronze Age terracotta sandal shaped ritual vessed. This cult pot is boat shaped with an animal head at the front. Inside the vessel is god. The deities associated with the ritual vessel were associated with trade and transportation in Ancient Mesopotamia and Summerian literature. The vessel signifies a religious river trip.  - 19th  century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey.  Against a black background.
  • Assyrian Trader Colony Bronze Age terracotta sandal shaped ritual vessed. This cult pot is boat shaped with an animal head at the front. Inside the vessel is a model of a temple and goddess. The deities associated with the ritual vessel were associated with trade and transportation in Ancient Mesopotamia and Summerian literature. The vessel signifies a religious river trip.  - 19th  century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey.
  • Bronze Age Anatolian terra cotta wolf shaped ritual vessel - 19th to 17th century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey. Against a grey background.
  • Bronze Age Anatolian terra cotta vtwo headed bull shaped ritual vessel - 19th to 17th century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey. Against a white background.
  • Bronze Age Anatolian terra cotta vtwo headed bull shaped ritual vessel - 19th to 17th century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey. Against a grey background.
  • Hittite Terra cotta lion shaped ritual vessel - 16th century BC - Hattusa ( Bogazkoy ) - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey . Against grey art background
  • Hittite terra cotta tower shaped vessel representing a two storey tower of the city walls complete with merlons - 14th century BC - Hattusa ( Bogazkoy ) - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey . Against black background
  • Hittite terra cotta tower shaped vessel representing a two storey tower of the city walls complete with merlons - 14th century BC - Hattusa ( Bogazkoy ) - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey . Against white background
  • Hittite terra cotta tower shaped vessel representing a two storey tower of the city walls complete with merlons - 14th century BC - Hattusa ( Bogazkoy ) - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey . Against black background
  • Hittite terra cotta ring shaped vessel - 16th century BC - Hattusa ( Bogazkoy ) - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey . Against grey art background
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Hunting carriage. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Two human figures; one handling the carriage, the other throwing arrows. Both figures are wearing a headdress shaped like a skullcap. The dagger at the waist of the figure throwing arrow draws attention. There is an animal between the legs of the horse having an aigrette over its head.  <br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Picture & image of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Hunting carriage.  Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Two human figures; one handling the carriage, the other throwing arrows. Both figures are wearing a headdress shaped like a skullcap. The dagger at the waist of the figure throwing arrow draws attention. There is an animal between the legs of the horse having an aigrette over its head. <br />
<br />
Against a gray background.
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of 2 mourning sisters at the door of their mothers pyramid shaped tomb, The Rossi Tomb sculpted by G Benetti in 1878. Section D, no 24, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of 2 mourning sisters at the door of their mothers pyramid shaped tomb, The Rossi Tomb sculpted by G Benetti in 1878. Section D, no 24, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of 2 mourning sisters at the door of their mothers pyramid shaped tomb, The Rossi Tomb sculpted by G Benetti in 1878. Section D, no 24, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of 2 mourning sisters at the door of their mothers pyramid shaped tomb, The Rossi Tomb sculpted by G Benetti in 1878. Section D, no 24, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of an angel guarding the pyramid shaped tomb with some Egyptian symbols of death which increases the sense of mystery. Tomb Gorlero sculptor E. Sclavi 1892. Section A, no 24, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric triangular shaped magalith ruins of Nuraghe Losa, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC),  Abbasanta, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric triangular shaped magalith ruins of Nuraghe Losa, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC),  Abbasanta, Southern Sardinia.
  • Picture and image of the prehistoric triangular shaped magalith ruins of Nuraghe Losa, archaeological site, Bronze age (14 -9 th century BC),  Abbasanta, Southern Sardinia.
  • Orcichiette Pugleisi pasta being made and shaped  in a rustic setting
  • The Christian memorial funerary mosaic for Natalica the inscription reading: ‘(our) beloved daughter Natalica lived 10 years 8 months 21 days, rested the 8th Ides of October (23rd) ’.<br />
<br />
The panel is decorated with a crescent laurel leaves against a black background and a cross encircling the head of a depiction of Natalica. She is wearing earnings and is dressed in a dalmatic, a long wide-sleeved tunic, which is decorated with black clavi, stripes, and embroidered sleeves. A belt and buckle with cabochons, shaped and polished gem stones, hold the tunic tight at the waste.  Either side of t Natalica are two lit candles, the symbols of eternity.<br />
<br />
5th century Eastern Byzantine Roman mosaic from the funerary enclosure which is in the Northwest enclosure of the Acholla site, Tunisia. Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Grey background
  • The Christian memorial funerary mosaic for Natalica the inscription reading: ‘(our) beloved daughter Natalica lived 10 years 8 months 21 days, rested the 8th Ides of October (23rd) ’.<br />
<br />
The panel is decorated with a crescent laurel leaves against a black background and a cross encircling the head of a depiction of Natalica. She is wearing earnings and is dressed in a dalmatic, a long wide-sleeved tunic, which is decorated with black clavi, stripes, and embroidered sleeves. A belt and buckle with cabochons, shaped and polished gem stones, hold the tunic tight at the waste.  Either side of t Natalica are two lit candles, the symbols of eternity.<br />
<br />
5th century Eastern Byzantine Roman mosaic from the funerary enclosure which is in the Northwest enclosure of the Acholla site, Tunisia. Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Black background
  • Roman relief sculpture panel decorated on both sides with masks from the second half of the 1st cent. AD excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Italy. The panel is sculpted on both sides; the front side depicts the half moon shaped face of a deity wearing a crown.  Inv 112158, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman relief sculpture panel decorated on both sides with masks from the second half of the 1st cent. AD excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Italy. The panel is sculpted on both sides; the front side depicts the half moon shaped face of a deity wearing a crown.  Inv 112158, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • The Tomb of Payava ( 360 B.C), a typical Gothic arch shaped double barrel vaulted pillar tomb. From an inscription on the Tomb Payava was a ruler under Persian rule of Xanthos.  From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • The Tomb of Payava ( 360 B.C), a typical Gothic arch shaped double barrel vaulted pillar tomb. From an inscription on the Tomb Payava was a ruler under Persian rule of Xanthos.  From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Copper statuettes of warriors with a short loincloth which originally held weapons in their hands, as well as representation of a woman. These acquired in the art trade figures were probably made ​​in the mountains of Lebanon. They are characterised by the rigid body shapes and rough running faces, whose eyes were inserted once. 3rd century BC , Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Copper statuettes of warriors with a short loincloth which originally held weapons in their hands, as well as representation of a woman. These acquired in the art trade figures were probably made ​​in the mountains of Lebanon. They are characterised by the rigid body shapes and rough running faces, whose eyes were inserted once. 3rd century BC , Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Copper statuettes of warriors with a short loincloth which originally held weapons in their hands, as well as representation of a woman. These acquired in the art trade figures were probably made ​​in the mountains of Lebanon. They are characterised by the rigid body shapes and rough running faces, whose eyes were inserted once. 3rd century BC , Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Copper statuettes of warriors with a short loincloth which originally held weapons in their hands, as well as representation of a woman. These acquired in the art trade figures were probably made ​​in the mountains of Lebanon. They are characterised by the rigid body shapes and rough running faces, whose eyes were inserted once. 3rd century BC , Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Copper statuettes of warriors with a short loincloth which originally held weapons in their hands, as well as representation of a woman. These acquired in the art trade figures were probably made ​​in the mountains of Lebanon. They are characterised by the rigid body shapes and rough running faces, whose eyes were inserted once. 3rd century BC , Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Copper statuettes of warriors with a short loincloth which originally held weapons in their hands, as well as representation of a woman. These acquired in the art trade figures were probably made ​​in the mountains of Lebanon. They are characterised by the rigid body shapes and rough running faces, whose eyes were inserted once. 3rd century BC , Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Altar of La Seu d'Urgell and the Apostles<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the twelfth century from a church in the diocese of Urgell, the whole poster espicopal of La Seu d'Urgell, Alt Urgell<br />
<br />
Aquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1905. Ref: 15803 MNAC.<br />
<br />
<br />
La Seu d'Urgell was an important center of Romanesque panel painting. This altar front is one of the best examples, and is also one of the oldest preserved painted panels in Catalonia. At its centre is Christ Pantocrator surrounded by a Mandorla. Either side of this are the 12 Apostles arranged in two unusual pyramid shaped groups of six. This altar panel is a fine example from the workshop Urgell and demostrates a high standard of technical ability and creativity.
  • Altar of La Seu d'Urgell and the Apostles<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the twelfth century from a church in the diocese of Urgell, the whole poster espicopal of La Seu d'Urgell, Alt Urgell<br />
<br />
Aquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1905. Ref: 15803 MNAC.<br />
<br />
<br />
La Seu d'Urgell was an important center of Romanesque panel painting. This altar front is one of the best examples, and is also one of the oldest preserved painted panels in Catalonia. At its centre is Christ Pantocrator surrounded by a Mandorla. Either side of this are the 12 Apostles arranged in two unusual pyramid shaped groups of six. This altar panel is a fine example from the workshop Urgell and demostrates a high standard of technical ability and creativity.
  • Altar of La Seu d'Urgell and the Apostles<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the twelfth century from a church in the diocese of Urgell, the whole poster espicopal of La Seu d'Urgell, Alt Urgell<br />
<br />
Aquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1905. Ref: 15803 MNAC.<br />
<br />
<br />
La Seu d'Urgell was an important center of Romanesque panel painting. This altar front is one of the best examples, and is also one of the oldest preserved painted panels in Catalonia. At its centre is Christ Pantocrator surrounded by a Mandorla. Either side of this are the 12 Apostles arranged in two unusual pyramid shaped groups of six. This altar panel is a fine example from the workshop Urgell and demostrates a high standard of technical ability and creativity.
  • Apse of Saint Peter de la Seu d'Urgell<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the twelfth century<br />
Fresco transferred to canvas<br />
From the church of St. Peter currently dedicated to St. Michael and St. Peter Cathedral group of Seu d'Urgell (Alt Urgell)<br />
<br />
Acquisition of the Museum Board Campaign 1919-1923<br />
MNAC 15867<br />
<br />
<br />
The apse is the most important part of the church as it was where the altar was located. The apse of La Seu d'Urgell like most Romanesque apses was decorated with frescoes of a Theophany (referring to images of the Incarnation of Jesus).High up in the semi circular cupola of the apse is a large image of Christ in Majesty, or Christ Pantocrator, in a mandorla, a pointed verticle oval shaped aureola which surrounds the figures of Christ and the Virgin Mary in traditional Christian art.  This is flanked by Tetramorph showing the four evangelical symbols - St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle. In the middle register is are a series of  frescoes of the Apostles and the figure of Mary. The lower register, which has not been preserved, must have been painted curtains that imitated luxury fabrics.
  • Apse of Saint Peter de la Seu d'Urgell<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the twelfth century<br />
Fresco transferred to canvas<br />
From the church of St. Peter currently dedicated to St. Michael and St. Peter Cathedral group of Seu d'Urgell (Alt Urgell)<br />
<br />
Acquisition of the Museum Board Campaign 1919-1923<br />
MNAC 15867<br />
<br />
<br />
The apse is the most important part of the church as it was where the altar was located. The apse of La Seu d'Urgell like most Romanesque apses was decorated with frescoes of a Theophany (referring to images of the Incarnation of Jesus).High up in the semi circular cupola of the apse is a large image of Christ in Majesty, or Christ Pantocrator, in a mandorla, a pointed verticle oval shaped aureola which surrounds the figures of Christ and the Virgin Mary in traditional Christian art.  This is flanked by Tetramorph showing the four evangelical symbols - St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle. In the middle register is are a series of  frescoes of the Apostles and the figure of Mary. The lower register, which has not been preserved, must have been painted curtains that imitated luxury fabrics.
  • Apse of Saint Peter de la Seu d'Urgell<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the twelfth century<br />
Fresco transferred to canvas<br />
From the church of St. Peter currently dedicated to St. Michael and St. Peter Cathedral group of Seu d'Urgell (Alt Urgell)<br />
<br />
Acquisition of the Museum Board Campaign 1919-1923<br />
MNAC 15867<br />
<br />
<br />
The apse is the most important part of the church as it was where the altar was located. The apse of La Seu d'Urgell like most Romanesque apses was decorated with frescoes of a Theophany (referring to images of the Incarnation of Jesus).High up in the semi circular cupola of the apse is a large image of Christ in Majesty, or Christ Pantocrator, in a mandorla, a pointed verticle oval shaped aureola which surrounds the figures of Christ and the Virgin Mary in traditional Christian art.  This is flanked by Tetramorph showing the four evangelical symbols - St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle. In the middle register is are a series of  frescoes of the Apostles and the figure of Mary. The lower register, which has not been preserved, must have been painted curtains that imitated luxury fabrics.
  • Heyl Statue of Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love. 2nd century terracotta from the Heyl collection. This statuette is one of the most beautiful examples of ancient terracotta statues in existence. The close fitting robe or the goddess of love has slipped from her shoulders, her raised left leg perhaps stood on a pillar. The front of the figure, which was shaped in a mould, was carved using a modelling scraper and finally painted. Altes Museum Berlin
  • Heyl Statue of Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love. 2nd century terracotta from the Heyl collection. This statuette is one of the most beautiful examples of ancient terracotta statues in existence. The close fitting robe or the goddess of love has slipped from her shoulders, her raised left leg perhaps stood on a pillar. The front of the figure, which was shaped in a mould, was carved using a modelling scraper and finally painted. Altes Museum Berlin
  • Roman relief sculpture panel decorated on both sides with masks from the second half of the 1st cent. AD excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Italy. The panel is sculpted on both sides; the front side depicts the half moon shaped face of a deity wearing a crown.  Inv 112158, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman relief sculpture panel decorated on both sides with masks from the second half of the 1st cent. AD excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Italy. The panel is sculpted on both sides; the front side depicts the half moon shaped face of a deity wearing a crown.  Inv 112158, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young charioteer from the age of Domitian, 81-96AD. This statue of a young charioteer, with Oriental eastern Mediterranean features, is wearing a tunic stopped on the right shoulder by a flattened circular fibula (clasp). The hairstyle, with its ’S’ shaped curls, was made artificially with an iron (calamistrum). This style was inspired by official portrayts of a young Domitian, who emulated Neronian style during the last years of his reign. The bust was rounded to be inserted onto a modern pillar. . Inv 276, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young charioteer from the age of Domitian, 81-96AD. This statue of a young charioteer, with Oriental eastern Mediterranean features, is wearing a tunic stopped on the right shoulder by a flattened circular fibula (clasp). The hairstyle, with its ’S’ shaped curls, was made artificially with an iron (calamistrum). This style was inspired by official portrayts of a young Domitian, who emulated Neronian style during the last years of his reign. The bust was rounded to be inserted onto a modern pillar. . Inv 276, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young charioteer from the age of Domitian, 81-96AD. This statue of a young charioteer, with Oriental eastern Mediterranean features, is wearing a tunic stopped on the right shoulder by a flattened circular fibula (clasp). The hairstyle, with its ’S’ shaped curls, was made artificially with an iron (calamistrum). This style was inspired by official portrayts of a young Domitian, who emulated Neronian style during the last years of his reign. The bust was rounded to be inserted onto a modern pillar. . Inv 276, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Copper statuettes of warriors with a short loincloth which originally held weapons in their hands, as well as representation of a woman. These acquired in the art trade figures were probably made ​​in the mountains of Lebanon. They are characterised by the rigid body shapes and rough running faces, whose eyes were inserted once. 3rd century BC , Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Altar of La Seu d'Urgell and the Apostles<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the twelfth century from a church in the diocese of Urgell, the whole poster espicopal of La Seu d'Urgell, Alt Urgell<br />
<br />
Aquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1905. Ref: 15803 MNAC.<br />
<br />
<br />
La Seu d'Urgell was an important center of Romanesque panel painting. This altar front is one of the best examples, and is also one of the oldest preserved painted panels in Catalonia. At its centre is Christ Pantocrator surrounded by a Mandorla. Either side of this are the 12 Apostles arranged in two unusual pyramid shaped groups of six. This altar panel is a fine example from the workshop Urgell and demostrates a high standard of technical ability and creativity.
  • Apse of Saint Peter de la Seu d'Urgell<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the twelfth century<br />
Fresco transferred to canvas<br />
From the church of St. Peter currently dedicated to St. Michael and St. Peter Cathedral group of Seu d'Urgell (Alt Urgell)<br />
<br />
Acquisition of the Museum Board Campaign 1919-1923<br />
MNAC 15867<br />
<br />
<br />
The apse is the most important part of the church as it was where the altar was located. The apse of La Seu d'Urgell like most Romanesque apses was decorated with frescoes of a Theophany (referring to images of the Incarnation of Jesus).High up in the semi circular cupola of the apse is a large image of Christ in Majesty, or Christ Pantocrator, in a mandorla, a pointed verticle oval shaped aureola which surrounds the figures of Christ and the Virgin Mary in traditional Christian art.  This is flanked by Tetramorph showing the four evangelical symbols - St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle. In the middle register is are a series of  frescoes of the Apostles and the figure of Mary. The lower register, which has not been preserved, must have been painted curtains that imitated luxury fabrics.
  • Apse of Saint Peter de la Seu d'Urgell<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the twelfth century<br />
Fresco transferred to canvas<br />
From the church of St. Peter currently dedicated to St. Michael and St. Peter Cathedral group of Seu d'Urgell (Alt Urgell)<br />
<br />
Acquisition of the Museum Board Campaign 1919-1923<br />
MNAC 15867<br />
<br />
<br />
The apse is the most important part of the church as it was where the altar was located. The apse of La Seu d'Urgell like most Romanesque apses was decorated with frescoes of a Theophany (referring to images of the Incarnation of Jesus).High up in the semi circular cupola of the apse is a large image of Christ in Majesty, or Christ Pantocrator, in a mandorla, a pointed verticle oval shaped aureola which surrounds the figures of Christ and the Virgin Mary in traditional Christian art.  This is flanked by Tetramorph showing the four evangelical symbols - St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle. In the middle register is are a series of  frescoes of the Apostles and the figure of Mary. The lower register, which has not been preserved, must have been painted curtains that imitated luxury fabrics.
  • Altar of La Seu d'Urgell and the Apostles<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the twelfth century from a church in the diocese of Urgell, the whole poster espicopal of La Seu d'Urgell, Alt Urgell<br />
<br />
Aquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1905. Ref: 15803 MNAC.<br />
<br />
<br />
La Seu d'Urgell was an important center of Romanesque panel painting. This altar front is one of the best examples, and is also one of the oldest preserved painted panels in Catalonia. At its centre is Christ Pantocrator surrounded by a Mandorla. Either side of this are the 12 Apostles arranged in two unusual pyramid shaped groups of six. This altar panel is a fine example from the workshop Urgell and demostrates a high standard of technical ability and creativity.
  • Altar of La Seu d'Urgell and the Apostles<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the twelfth century from a church in the diocese of Urgell, the whole poster espicopal of La Seu d'Urgell, Alt Urgell<br />
<br />
Aquired by the National Art Museum of Catalonia, Barcelona 1905. Ref: 15803 MNAC.<br />
<br />
<br />
La Seu d'Urgell was an important center of Romanesque panel painting. This altar front is one of the best examples, and is also one of the oldest preserved painted panels in Catalonia. At its centre is Christ Pantocrator surrounded by a Mandorla. Either side of this are the 12 Apostles arranged in two unusual pyramid shaped groups of six. This altar panel is a fine example from the workshop Urgell and demostrates a high standard of technical ability and creativity.
  • Apse of Saint Peter de la Seu d'Urgell<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the twelfth century<br />
Fresco transferred to canvas<br />
From the church of St. Peter currently dedicated to St. Michael and St. Peter Cathedral group of Seu d'Urgell (Alt Urgell)<br />
<br />
Acquisition of the Museum Board Campaign 1919-1923<br />
MNAC 15867<br />
<br />
<br />
The apse is the most important part of the church as it was where the altar was located. The apse of La Seu d'Urgell like most Romanesque apses was decorated with frescoes of a Theophany (referring to images of the Incarnation of Jesus).High up in the semi circular cupola of the apse is a large image of Christ in Majesty, or Christ Pantocrator, in a mandorla, a pointed verticle oval shaped aureola which surrounds the figures of Christ and the Virgin Mary in traditional Christian art.  This is flanked by Tetramorph showing the four evangelical symbols - St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle. In the middle register is are a series of  frescoes of the Apostles and the figure of Mary. The lower register, which has not been preserved, must have been painted curtains that imitated luxury fabrics.

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