• Runswick Bay - North Yorkshire - England - man and baby
  • Runswick Bay - North Yorkshire - England - man and baby
  • Religious mural of St Christopher with Christ on his shoulders by Dionislo Baschenis, dated 1493, on the exterior of the Gothic Church of San Antonio Abate,  Pelugo, Province of Trento, Italy
  • Religious mural of St Christopher with Christ on his shoulders by Dionislo Baschenis, dated 1493, on the exterior of the Gothic Church of San Antonio Abate,  Pelugo, Province of Trento, Italy
  • Religious mural of St Christopher with Christ on his shoulders by Dionislo Baschenis, dated 1493, on the exterior of the Gothic Church of San Antonio Abate,  Pelugo, Province of Trento, Italy
  • Religious mural of St Christopher with Christ on his shoulders by Dionislo Baschenis, dated 1493, on the exterior of the Gothic Church of San Antonio Abate,  Pelugo, Province of Trento, Italy
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of a Procession Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C.  Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Young male servants of Kubaba while carrying sacrificial animals on their shoulders. <br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Roman bust of Socrates, 1st cent AD from the construction site of the monument to Vitorio Emanuel II,  Rome, Italy. This portrait of Socrates is similar to the Herm of Socrates from the Naples National Museum. In xenophon’s Symposium socrates is described as ‘Short body with wide shoulders, prominent belly, aquiline nose, thick wide mouth and head almost completely bold. In 399 BC the famous Athenian philosopher was condemned to death for impiety and corruption. Inv 1236, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Medieval Window of the South Transept of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France- Circa 1225-30. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. This window was a donation of the Mauclerc family, the Counts of Dreux-Bretagne, who are depicted with their arms in the bases of the lancets above it shows one of the four evangelists sitting on the shoulders of four Prophets - a rare literal illustration of the theological principle that the New Testament builds upon the Old Testament.
  • Mycenaean fresco wall painting of hunting demons, Mycenae Acropolis, Greece Cat No 2665. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.<br />
<br />
The Mycenaean fresco fragment depicts three animal demons with donkey heads holding a wooden pole over their shoulders from which hangs the prey thay have been hunting. This type of demon originated in Egypt.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ flight from Troy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
Aineas in armour carries his aged farther Anchises on his shoulders and leads his young son Lulus by his hand. They are fleeing from the sack of Troy. The figure floating behind is Aphrodite, Aineas’ mother: she is helping their escape. Old Anchises carries a round box that held images of Troy’s ancestral gods.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ flight from Troy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
Aineas in armour carries his aged farther Anchises on his shoulders and leads his young son Lulus by his hand. They are fleeing from the sack of Troy. The figure floating behind is Aphrodite, Aineas’ mother: she is helping their escape. Old Anchises carries a round box that held images of Troy’s ancestral gods.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ flight from Troy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Aineas in armour carries his aged farther Anchises on his shoulders and leads his young son Lulus by his hand. They are fleeing from the sack of Troy. The figure floating behind is Aphrodite, Aineas’ mother: she is helping their escape. Old Anchises carries a round box that held images of Troy’s ancestral gods.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ flight from Troy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Aineas in armour carries his aged farther Anchises on his shoulders and leads his young son Lulus by his hand. They are fleeing from the sack of Troy. The figure floating behind is Aphrodite, Aineas’ mother: she is helping their escape. Old Anchises carries a round box that held images of Troy’s ancestral gods.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ flight from Troy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Aineas in armour carries his aged farther Anchises on his shoulders and leads his young son Lulus by his hand. They are fleeing from the sack of Troy. The figure floating behind is Aphrodite, Aineas’ mother: she is helping their escape. Old Anchises carries a round box that held images of Troy’s ancestral gods.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ flight from Troy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Aineas in armour carries his aged farther Anchises on his shoulders and leads his young son Lulus by his hand. They are fleeing from the sack of Troy. The figure floating behind is Aphrodite, Aineas’ mother: she is helping their escape. Old Anchises carries a round box that held images of Troy’s ancestral gods.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ arrival in Italy Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Poseidon stands naked over a sea going ship stopped at a short column. SA dolphin jumps between his legs. Aineas, his head veiled in the Roman manner, pours a libation, a thanks offering for his safe arrival in Italy. Behing Poseidon’s shoulders, a separately worked young male head was inserted into the background, maybe a deceased companion of Aineas.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ arrival in Italy Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Poseidon stands naked over a sea going ship stopped at a short column. SA dolphin jumps between his legs. Aineas, his head veiled in the Roman manner, pours a libation, a thanks offering for his safe arrival in Italy. Behing Poseidon’s shoulders, a separately worked young male head was inserted into the background, maybe a deceased companion of Aineas.
  • Picture & image of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of a Procession Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C.  Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Young male servants of Kubaba while carrying sacrificial animals on their shoulders. <br />
<br />
Against a gray background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of a Procession Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C.  Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Young male servants of Kubaba while carrying sacrificial animals on their shoulders. <br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Photo of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of a Procession Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C.  Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Young male servants of Kubaba while carrying sacrificial animals on their shoulders. <br />
<br />
Against a brown art background.
  • Picture & image of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of a Procession Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C.  Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Young male servants of Kubaba while carrying sacrificial animals on their shoulders. <br />
<br />
Against a gray background.
  • Pictures & images of the North Gate Hittite sculpture stele depicting Hittite man with a sheep on his shoulders. 8th century BC. Karatepe Aslantas Open-Air Museum (Karatepe-Aslantaş Açık Hava Müzesi), Osmaniye Province, Turkey. Against art background
  • Pictures & images of the North Gate Hittite sculpture stele depicting Hittite man with a sheep on his shoulders. 8th century BC. Karatepe Aslantas Open-Air Museum (Karatepe-Aslantaş Açık Hava Müzesi), Osmaniye Province, Turkey. Against white background
  • Roman bust of Socrates, 1st cent AD from the construction site of the monument to Vitorio Emanuel II,  Rome, Italy. This portrait of Socrates is similar to the Herm of Socrates from the Naples National Museum. In xenophon’s Symposium socrates is described as ‘Short body with wide shoulders, prominent belly, aquiline nose, thick wide mouth and head almost completely bold. In 399 BC the famous Athenian philosopher was condemned to death for impiety and corruption. Inv 1236, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman bust of Socrates, 1st cent AD from the construction site of the monument to Vitorio Emanuel II,  Rome, Italy. This portrait of Socrates is similar to the Herm of Socrates from the Naples National Museum. In xenophon’s Symposium socrates is described as ‘Short body with wide shoulders, prominent belly, aquiline nose, thick wide mouth and head almost completely bold. In 399 BC the famous Athenian philosopher was condemned to death for impiety and corruption. Inv 1236, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Relief panels orthostat showing a man with a gazelle on the shoulders excavated from the Northern Hall at  Sam'al / Zincirli, Turkey. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin inv no  VA3007
  • Heyl Statue of Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love. 2nd century terracotta from the Heyl collection. This statuette is one of the most beautiful examples of ancient terracotta statues in existence. The close fitting robe or the goddess of love has slipped from her shoulders, her raised left leg perhaps stood on a pillar. The front of the figure, which was shaped in a mould, was carved using a modelling scraper and finally painted. Altes Museum Berlin
  • Heyl Statue of Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love. 2nd century terracotta from the Heyl collection. This statuette is one of the most beautiful examples of ancient terracotta statues in existence. The close fitting robe or the goddess of love has slipped from her shoulders, her raised left leg perhaps stood on a pillar. The front of the figure, which was shaped in a mould, was carved using a modelling scraper and finally painted. Altes Museum Berlin
  • Heyl Statue of Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love. 2nd century terracotta from the Heyl collection. This statuette is one of the most beautiful examples of ancient terracotta statues in existence. The close fitting robe or the goddess of love has slipped from her shoulders, her raised left leg perhaps stood on a pillar. The front of the figure, which was shaped in a mould, was carved using a modelling scraper and finally painted. Altes Museum Berlin
  • Medieval Rose  Window of the South Transept of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France- Circa 1225-30. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. Dedicated to Christ, who is shown in the central oculus, right hand raised in benediction, surrounded by adoring angels. Two outer rings of twelve circles each contain the 24 Elders of the Apocalypse, crowned and carrying phials and musical instruments. The central lancet beneath the rose shows the Virgin carrying the infant Christ. Either side of this are four lancets showing the four evangelists sitting on the shoulders of four Prophets - a rare literal illustration of the theological principle that the New Testament builds upon the Old Testament. This window was a donation of the Mauclerc family, the Counts of Dreux-Bretagne, who are depicted with their arms in the bases of the lancets
  • Mycenaean fresco wall painting of hunting demons, Mycenae Acropolis, Greece Cat No 2665. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. White Background.<br />
<br />
The Mycenaean fresco fragment depicts three animal demons with donkey heads holding a wooden pole over their shoulders from which hangs the prey thay have been hunting. This type of demon originated in Egypt.
  • Mycenaean fresco wall painting of hunting demons, Mycenae Acropolis, Greece Cat No 2665. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Grey Background<br />
<br />
The Mycenaean fresco fragment depicts three animal demons with donkey heads holding a wooden pole over their shoulders from which hangs the prey thay have been hunting. This type of demon originated in Egypt.
  • Mycenaean fresco wall painting of hunting demons, Mycenae Acropolis, Greece Cat No 2665. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Black Background<br />
<br />
The Mycenaean fresco fragment depicts three animal demons with donkey heads holding a wooden pole over their shoulders from which hangs the prey thay have been hunting. This type of demon originated in Egypt.
  • Mycenaean fresco wall painting of hunting demons, Mycenae Acropolis, Greece Cat No 2665. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
The Mycenaean fresco fragment depicts three animal demons with donkey heads holding a wooden pole over their shoulders from which hangs the prey thay have been hunting. This type of demon originated in Egypt.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ flight from Troy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
Aineas in armour carries his aged farther Anchises on his shoulders and leads his young son Lulus by his hand. They are fleeing from the sack of Troy. The figure floating behind is Aphrodite, Aineas’ mother: she is helping their escape. Old Anchises carries a round box that held images of Troy’s ancestral gods.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ flight from Troy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
Aineas in armour carries his aged farther Anchises on his shoulders and leads his young son Lulus by his hand. They are fleeing from the sack of Troy. The figure floating behind is Aphrodite, Aineas’ mother: she is helping their escape. Old Anchises carries a round box that held images of Troy’s ancestral gods.
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ flight from Troy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  <br />
<br />
Aineas in armour carries his aged farther Anchises on his shoulders and leads his young son Lulus by his hand. They are fleeing from the sack of Troy. The figure floating behind is Aphrodite, Aineas’ mother: she is helping their escape. Old Anchises carries a round box that held images of Troy’s ancestral gods.
  • Close up of a RomanSebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ flight from Troy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Aineas in armour carries his aged farther Anchises on his shoulders and leads his young son Lulus by his hand. They are fleeing from the sack of Troy. The figure floating behind is Aphrodite, Aineas’ mother: she is helping their escape. Old Anchises carries a round box that held images of Troy’s ancestral gods.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ flight from Troy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Aineas in armour carries his aged farther Anchises on his shoulders and leads his young son Lulus by his hand. They are fleeing from the sack of Troy. The figure floating behind is Aphrodite, Aineas’ mother: she is helping their escape. Old Anchises carries a round box that held images of Troy’s ancestral gods.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ flight from Troy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Aineas in armour carries his aged farther Anchises on his shoulders and leads his young son Lulus by his hand. They are fleeing from the sack of Troy. The figure floating behind is Aphrodite, Aineas’ mother: she is helping their escape. Old Anchises carries a round box that held images of Troy’s ancestral gods.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ flight from Troy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Aineas in armour carries his aged farther Anchises on his shoulders and leads his young son Lulus by his hand. They are fleeing from the sack of Troy. The figure floating behind is Aphrodite, Aineas’ mother: she is helping their escape. Old Anchises carries a round box that held images of Troy’s ancestral gods.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ flight from Troy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Aineas in armour carries his aged farther Anchises on his shoulders and leads his young son Lulus by his hand. They are fleeing from the sack of Troy. The figure floating behind is Aphrodite, Aineas’ mother: she is helping their escape. Old Anchises carries a round box that held images of Troy’s ancestral gods.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ flight from Troy, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Aineas in armour carries his aged farther Anchises on his shoulders and leads his young son Lulus by his hand. They are fleeing from the sack of Troy. The figure floating behind is Aphrodite, Aineas’ mother: she is helping their escape. Old Anchises carries a round box that held images of Troy’s ancestral gods.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ arrival in Italy Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Poseidon stands naked over a sea going ship stopped at a short column. SA dolphin jumps between his legs. Aineas, his head veiled in the Roman manner, pours a libation, a thanks offering for his safe arrival in Italy. Behing Poseidon’s shoulders, a separately worked young male head was inserted into the background, maybe a deceased companion of Aineas.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ arrival in Italy Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Poseidon stands naked over a sea going ship stopped at a short column. SA dolphin jumps between his legs. Aineas, his head veiled in the Roman manner, pours a libation, a thanks offering for his safe arrival in Italy. Behing Poseidon’s shoulders, a separately worked young male head was inserted into the background, maybe a deceased companion of Aineas.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Aineas’ arrival in Italy Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Poseidon stands naked over a sea going ship stopped at a short column. SA dolphin jumps between his legs. Aineas, his head veiled in the Roman manner, pours a libation, a thanks offering for his safe arrival in Italy. Behing Poseidon’s shoulders, a separately worked young male head was inserted into the background, maybe a deceased companion of Aineas.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of a Procession Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C.  Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Young male servants of Kubaba while carrying sacrificial animals on their shoulders. <br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of a Procession Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C.  Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Young male servants of Kubaba while carrying sacrificial animals on their shoulders. <br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Photo of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of a Procession Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C.  Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Young male servants of Kubaba while carrying sacrificial animals on their shoulders. <br />
<br />
Against a brown art background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of a Procession Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C.  Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Young male servants of Kubaba while carrying sacrificial animals on their shoulders. <br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of a Procession Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C.  Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Young male servants of Kubaba while carrying sacrificial animals on their shoulders. <br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Pictures & images of the North Gate Hittite sculpture stele depicting Hittite man with a sheep on his shoulders. 8th century BC. Karatepe Aslantas Open-Air Museum (Karatepe-Aslantaş Açık Hava Müzesi), Osmaniye Province, Turkey. Against grey background
  • Pictures & images of the North Gate Hittite sculpture stele depicting Hittite man with a sheep on his shoulders. 8th century BC. Karatepe Aslantas Open-Air Museum (Karatepe-Aslantaş Açık Hava Müzesi), Osmaniye Province, Turkey. Against grey art background
  • Pictures & images of the North Gate Hittite sculpture stele depicting Hittite man with a sheep on his shoulders. 8th century BC. Karatepe Aslantas Open-Air Museum (Karatepe-Aslantaş Açık Hava Müzesi), Osmaniye Province, Turkey. Against black background
  • Roman bust of Socrates, 1st cent AD from the construction site of the monument to Vitorio Emanuel II,  Rome, Italy. This portrait of Socrates is similar to the Herm of Socrates from the Naples National Museum. In xenophon’s Symposium socrates is described as ‘Short body with wide shoulders, prominent belly, aquiline nose, thick wide mouth and head almost completely bold. In 399 BC the famous Athenian philosopher was condemned to death for impiety and corruption. Inv 1236, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman bust of Socrates, 1st cent AD from the construction site of the monument to Vitorio Emanuel II,  Rome, Italy. This portrait of Socrates is similar to the Herm of Socrates from the Naples National Museum. In xenophon’s Symposium socrates is described as ‘Short body with wide shoulders, prominent belly, aquiline nose, thick wide mouth and head almost completely bold. In 399 BC the famous Athenian philosopher was condemned to death for impiety and corruption. Inv 1236, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Relief panels orthostat showing a man with a gazelle on the shoulders excavated from the Northern Hall at  Sam'al / Zincirli, Turkey. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin inv no  VA3007
  • Relief panels orthostat showing a man with a gazelle on the shoulders excavated from the Northern Hall at  Sam'al / Zincirli, Turkey. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin inv no  VA3007
  • Relief panels orthostat showing a man with a gazelle on the shoulders excavated from the Northern Hall at  Sam'al / Zincirli, Turkey. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin inv no  VA3007
  • Relief panels orthostat showing a man with a gazelle on the shoulders excavated from the Northern Hall at  Sam'al / Zincirli, Turkey. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin inv no  VA3007
  • Heyl Statue of Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love. 2nd century terracotta from the Heyl collection. This statuette is one of the most beautiful examples of ancient terracotta statues in existence. The close fitting robe or the goddess of love has slipped from her shoulders, her raised left leg perhaps stood on a pillar. The front of the figure, which was shaped in a mould, was carved using a modelling scraper and finally painted. Altes Museum Berlin
  • Heyl Statue of Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love. 2nd century terracotta from the Heyl collection. This statuette is one of the most beautiful examples of ancient terracotta statues in existence. The close fitting robe or the goddess of love has slipped from her shoulders, her raised left leg perhaps stood on a pillar. The front of the figure, which was shaped in a mould, was carved using a modelling scraper and finally painted. Altes Museum Berlin
  • Heyl Statue of Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love. 2nd century terracotta from the Heyl collection. This statuette is one of the most beautiful examples of ancient terracotta statues in existence. The close fitting robe or the goddess of love has slipped from her shoulders, her raised left leg perhaps stood on a pillar. The front of the figure, which was shaped in a mould, was carved using a modelling scraper and finally painted. Altes Museum Berlin
  • Heyl Statue of Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love. 2nd century terracotta from the Heyl collection. This statuette is one of the most beautiful examples of ancient terracotta statues in existence. The close fitting robe or the goddess of love has slipped from her shoulders, her raised left leg perhaps stood on a pillar. The front of the figure, which was shaped in a mould, was carved using a modelling scraper and finally painted. Altes Museum Berlin
  • Heyl Statue of Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love. 2nd century terracotta from the Heyl collection. This statuette is one of the most beautiful examples of ancient terracotta statues in existence. The close fitting robe or the goddess of love has slipped from her shoulders, her raised left leg perhaps stood on a pillar. The front of the figure, which was shaped in a mould, was carved using a modelling scraper and finally painted. Altes Museum Berlin
  • Roman bust of Socrates, 1st cent AD from the construction site of the monument to Vitorio Emanuel II,  Rome, Italy. This portrait of Socrates is similar to the Herm of Socrates from the Naples National Museum. In xenophon’s Symposium socrates is described as ‘Short body with wide shoulders, prominent belly, aquiline nose, thick wide mouth and head almost completely bold. In 399 BC the famous Athenian philosopher was condemned to death for impiety and corruption. Inv 1236, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman bust of Socrates, 1st cent AD from the construction site of the monument to Vitorio Emanuel II,  Rome, Italy. This portrait of Socrates is similar to the Herm of Socrates from the Naples National Museum. In xenophon’s Symposium socrates is described as ‘Short body with wide shoulders, prominent belly, aquiline nose, thick wide mouth and head almost completely bold. In 399 BC the famous Athenian philosopher was condemned to death for impiety and corruption. Inv 1236, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman bust of Socrates, 1st cent AD from the construction site of the monument to Vitorio Emanuel II,  Rome, Italy. This portrait of Socrates is similar to the Herm of Socrates from the Naples National Museum. In xenophon’s Symposium socrates is described as ‘Short body with wide shoulders, prominent belly, aquiline nose, thick wide mouth and head almost completely bold. In 399 BC the famous Athenian philosopher was condemned to death for impiety and corruption. Inv 1236, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman bust of Socrates, 1st cent AD from the construction site of the monument to Vitorio Emanuel II,  Rome, Italy. This portrait of Socrates is similar to the Herm of Socrates from the Naples National Museum. In xenophon’s Symposium socrates is described as ‘Short body with wide shoulders, prominent belly, aquiline nose, thick wide mouth and head almost completely bold. In 399 BC the famous Athenian philosopher was condemned to death for impiety and corruption. Inv 1236, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman bust of Socrates, 1st cent AD from the construction site of the monument to Vitorio Emanuel II,  Rome, Italy. This portrait of Socrates is similar to the Herm of Socrates from the Naples National Museum. In xenophon’s Symposium socrates is described as ‘Short body with wide shoulders, prominent belly, aquiline nose, thick wide mouth and head almost completely bold. In 399 BC the famous Athenian philosopher was condemned to death for impiety and corruption. Inv 1236, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Gothic Bas releif of St Christopher with Christ on his shoulders.  Gothic Cathedral of Notre-Dame, Amiens, France
  • Medieval Window of the South Transept of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France- Circa 1225-30. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. These windows were a donation of the Mauclerc family, the Counts of Dreux-Bretagne, who are depicted with their arms in the bases of the lancets above (centre) is the Virgin Mary & Child and on either side are the four evangelists sitting on the shoulders of four Prophets - a rare literal illustration of the theological principle that the New Testament builds upon the Old Testament.
  • Medieval Window of the South Transept of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France- Circa 1225-30. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. These windows were a donation of the Mauclerc family, the Counts of Dreux-Bretagne, who are depicted with their arms in the bases of the lancets above (right) is the Virgin Mary & Child and (left) is one of the four evangelists sitting on the shoulders of a Prophet - a rare literal illustration of the theological principle that the New Testament builds upon the Old Testament.
  • Medieval Rose  Window of the South Transept of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France- Circa 1225-30. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. Dedicated to Christ, who is shown in the central oculus, right hand raised in benediction, surrounded by adoring angels. Two outer rings of twelve circles each contain the 24 Elders of the Apocalypse, crowned and carrying phials and musical instruments. The central lancet beneath the rose shows the Virgin carrying the infant Christ. Either side of this are four lancets showing the four evangelists sitting on the shoulders of four Prophets - a rare literal illustration of the theological principle that the New Testament builds upon the Old Testament. This window was a donation of the Mauclerc family, the Counts of Dreux-Bretagne, who are depicted with their arms in the bases of the lancets
  • Medieval Rose  Window of the South Transept of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France- Circa 1225-30. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. Dedicated to Christ, who is shown in the central oculus, right hand raised in benediction, surrounded by adoring angels. Two outer rings of twelve circles each contain the 24 Elders of the Apocalypse, crowned and carrying phials and musical instruments. The central lancet beneath the rose shows the Virgin carrying the infant Christ. Either side of this are four lancets showing the four evangelists sitting on the shoulders of four Prophets - a rare literal illustration of the theological principle that the New Testament builds upon the Old Testament. This window was a donation of the Mauclerc family, the Counts of Dreux-Bretagne, who are depicted with their arms in the bases of the lancets
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of Penmernabu, offering a naos with a rams head on top, limestone, New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, (1292-1190 BC, Deir el-Medina. Egyptian Museum, Turin. black background.<br />
<br />
Penmernabu is depicted presenting a rams head ontop of a shrine. The ram is sacred to the god Amon-Re. An image of the god is also carved on the statues's right shoulder, while an image of the goddess Ahmes-Nefretari is carved on his left shoulder. . Drovetti collection. Cat 3032.
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of Penmernabu, offering a naos with a rams head on top, limestone, New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, (1292-1190 BC, Deir el-Medina. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.<br />
<br />
Penmernabu is depicted presenting a rams head ontop of a shrine. The ram is sacred to the god Amon-Re. An image of the god is also carved on the statues's right shoulder, while an image of the goddess Ahmes-Nefretari is carved on his left shoulder. . Drovetti collection. Cat 3032.
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of Penmernabu, offering a naos with a rams head on top, limestone, New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, (1292-1190 BC, Deir el-Medina. Egyptian Museum, Turin.<br />
<br />
Penmernabu is depicted presenting a rams head ontop of a shrine. The ram is sacred to the god Amon-Re. An image of the god is also carved on the statues's right shoulder, while an image of the goddess Ahmes-Nefretari is carved on his left shoulder. . Drovetti collection. Cat 3032.
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of Penmernabu, offering a naos with a rams head on top, limestone, New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, (1292-1190 BC, Deir el-Medina. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.<br />
<br />
Penmernabu is depicted presenting a rams head ontop of a shrine. The ram is sacred to the god Amon-Re. An image of the god is also carved on the statues's right shoulder, while an image of the goddess Ahmes-Nefretari is carved on his left shoulder. . Drovetti collection. Cat 3032.
  • Roman mosaics - Seasons  Mosaic. Telete Villa.  2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Seasons mosaic Telete, was unearthed during the rescue excavations y Gaziantep Museum in 1994 when it was about to be stolen by the traffickers. It is the floor mosaic of a villa terrace located on the western skins of Zeugma hill <br />
<br />
The pane% consists of nine parts. At the central panel, Eros, who Is a mythological character and who has a crown on his head, sits side by side with Telete, the daughter of Dionysus. This representation symbolises the preparation of a young woman who is just about to taste the love and to become mature. There are busts of seasonal gods In the square panels at the corners. The crowned head of the Spring Goddess Ear Is slightly towards right. She wears a floral necklace. Her righr shoulder is naked and the crimps of her cloak are seen on her left shoulder. There is the bust of the river god on the top-right of the Telete panel. A kid lying on the grass and a bucket are pictured in the lower rectangular panel. In the western-side rectangular panel, on the other hand, there are four fish going in and out of a game basket. There is a rabbit figure within the rectangular panel on the right. Mythical narrations and natural life are intertwined in this mosaic.
  • Roman mosaics - Seasons  Mosaic. Telete Villa.  2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Seasons mosaic Telete, was unearthed during the rescue excavations y Gaziantep Museum in 1994 when it was about to be stolen by the traffickers. It is the floor mosaic of a villa terrace located on the western skins of Zeugma hill <br />
<br />
The pane% consists of nine parts. At the central panel, Eros, who Is a mythological character and who has a crown on his head, sits side by side with Telete, the daughter of Dionysus. This representation symbolises the preparation of a young woman who is just about to taste the love and to become mature. There are busts of seasonal gods In the square panels at the corners. The crowned head of the Spring Goddess Ear Is slightly towards right. She wears a floral necklace. Her righr shoulder is naked and the crimps of her cloak are seen on her left shoulder. There is the bust of the river god on the top-right of the Telete panel. A kid lying on the grass and a bucket are pictured in the lower rectangular panel. In the western-side rectangular panel, on the other hand, there are four fish going in and out of a game basket. There is a rabbit figure within the rectangular panel on the right. Mythical narrations and natural life are intertwined in this mosaic.
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of Penmernabu, offering a naos with a rams head on top, limestone, New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, (1292-1190 BC, Deir el-Medina. Egyptian Museum, Turin. white background<br />
<br />
Penmernabu is depicted presenting a rams head ontop of a shrine. The ram is sacred to the god Amon-Re. An image of the god is also carved on the statues's right shoulder, while an image of the goddess Ahmes-Nefretari is carved on his left shoulder. . Drovetti collection. Cat 3032.
  • Roman mosaics - Seasons  Mosaic. Telete Villa.  2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Seasons mosaic Telete, was unearthed during the rescue excavations y Gaziantep Museum in 1994 when it was about to be stolen by the traffickers. It is the floor mosaic of a villa terrace located on the western skins of Zeugma hill <br />
<br />
The pane% consists of nine parts. At the central panel, Eros, who Is a mythological character and who has a crown on his head, sits side by side with Telete, the daughter of Dionysus. This representation symbolises the preparation of a young woman who is just about to taste the love and to become mature. There are busts of seasonal gods In the square panels at the corners. The crowned head of the Spring Goddess Ear Is slightly towards right. She wears a floral necklace. Her righr shoulder is naked and the crimps of her cloak are seen on her left shoulder. There is the bust of the river god on the top-right of the Telete panel. A kid lying on the grass and a bucket are pictured in the lower rectangular panel. In the western-side rectangular panel, on the other hand, there are four fish going in and out of a game basket. There is a rabbit figure within the rectangular panel on the right. Mythical narrations and natural life are intertwined in this mosaic.
  • Roman mosaics - Seasons  Mosaic. Telete Villa.  2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Seasons mosaic Telete, was unearthed during the rescue excavations y Gaziantep Museum in 1994 when it was about to be stolen by the traffickers. It is the floor mosaic of a villa terrace located on the western skins of Zeugma hill <br />
<br />
The pane% consists of nine parts. At the central panel, Eros, who Is a mythological character and who has a crown on his head, sits side by side with Telete, the daughter of Dionysus. This representation symbolises the preparation of a young woman who is just about to taste the love and to become mature. There are busts of seasonal gods In the square panels at the corners. The crowned head of the Spring Goddess Ear Is slightly towards right. She wears a floral necklace. Her righr shoulder is naked and the crimps of her cloak are seen on her left shoulder. There is the bust of the river god on the top-right of the Telete panel. A kid lying on the grass and a bucket are pictured in the lower rectangular panel. In the western-side rectangular panel, on the other hand, there are four fish going in and out of a game basket. There is a rabbit figure within the rectangular panel on the right. Mythical narrations and natural life are intertwined in this mosaic.
  • Roman mosaics - Seasons  Mosaic. Telete Villa.  2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Seasons mosaic Telete, was unearthed during the rescue excavations y Gaziantep Museum in 1994 when it was about to be stolen by the traffickers. It is the floor mosaic of a villa terrace located on the western skins of Zeugma hill <br />
<br />
The pane% consists of nine parts. At the central panel, Eros, who Is a mythological character and who has a crown on his head, sits side by side with Telete, the daughter of Dionysus. This representation symbolises the preparation of a young woman who is just about to taste the love and to become mature. There are busts of seasonal gods In the square panels at the corners. The crowned head of the Spring Goddess Ear Is slightly towards right. She wears a floral necklace. Her righr shoulder is naked and the crimps of her cloak are seen on her left shoulder. There is the bust of the river god on the top-right of the Telete panel. A kid lying on the grass and a bucket are pictured in the lower rectangular panel. In the western-side rectangular panel, on the other hand, there are four fish going in and out of a game basket. There is a rabbit figure within the rectangular panel on the right. Mythical narrations and natural life are intertwined in this mosaic.
  • Roman portrait bust of a young charioteer from the age of Domitian, 81-96AD. This statue of a young charioteer, with Oriental eastern Mediterranean features, is wearing a tunic stopped on the right shoulder by a flattened circular fibula (clasp). The hairstyle, with its ’S’ shaped curls, was made artificially with an iron (calamistrum). This style was inspired by official portrayts of a young Domitian, who emulated Neronian style during the last years of his reign. The bust was rounded to be inserted onto a modern pillar. . Inv 276, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young charioteer from the age of Domitian, 81-96AD. This statue of a young charioteer, with Oriental eastern Mediterranean features, is wearing a tunic stopped on the right shoulder by a flattened circular fibula (clasp). The hairstyle, with its ’S’ shaped curls, was made artificially with an iron (calamistrum). This style was inspired by official portrayts of a young Domitian, who emulated Neronian style during the last years of his reign. The bust was rounded to be inserted onto a modern pillar. . Inv 276, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young charioteer from the age of Domitian, 81-96AD. This statue of a young charioteer, with Oriental eastern Mediterranean features, is wearing a tunic stopped on the right shoulder by a flattened circular fibula (clasp). The hairstyle, with its ’S’ shaped curls, was made artificially with an iron (calamistrum). This style was inspired by official portrayts of a young Domitian, who emulated Neronian style during the last years of his reign. The bust was rounded to be inserted onto a modern pillar. . Inv 276, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young charioteer from the age of Domitian, 81-96AD. This statue of a young charioteer, with Oriental eastern Mediterranean features, is wearing a tunic stopped on the right shoulder by a flattened circular fibula (clasp). The hairstyle, with its ’S’ shaped curls, was made artificially with an iron (calamistrum). This style was inspired by official portrayts of a young Domitian, who emulated Neronian style during the last years of his reign. The bust was rounded to be inserted onto a modern pillar. . Inv 276, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young charioteer from the age of Domitian, 81-96AD. This statue of a young charioteer, with Oriental eastern Mediterranean features, is wearing a tunic stopped on the right shoulder by a flattened circular fibula (clasp). The hairstyle, with its ’S’ shaped curls, was made artificially with an iron (calamistrum). This style was inspired by official portrayts of a young Domitian, who emulated Neronian style during the last years of his reign. The bust was rounded to be inserted onto a modern pillar. . Inv 276, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • The 'Atalante Hermes' Roman marble statue found at Atalante. 2nd Cemt AD copy of the 4th cent BC Lysippean Greek style. Athens Archaeological Museum, cat no 240. Against white, <br />
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Funserary statue of a youth depicted as Hermes. He is shown nude with his chlamys over his shoulder and wound around his right arm. In his left hand he holds a 'caduceus'.
  • The 'Atalante Hermes' Roman marble statue found at Atalante. 2nd Cemt AD copy of the 4th cent BC Lysippean Greek style. Athens Archaeological Museum, cat no 240. Against grey<br />
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Funserary statue of a youth depicted as Hermes. He is shown nude with his chlamys over his shoulder and wound around his right arm. In his left hand he holds a 'caduceus'.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos of the Dacians Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
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The Dacians are shown as a captive Barbarian woman. Her arms are crossed in submission, her thick dress slips off the shoulder slightly partly revealing her breast. The forepart of a small bull stands in profile behind. Dacia (modern Romania) was claimed by Augustus as a conquest in 1BC to 4AD
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos of the Dacians Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against a grey background.<br />
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The Dacians are shown as a captive Barbarian woman. Her arms are crossed in submission, her thick dress slips off the shoulder slightly partly revealing her breast. The forepart of a small bull stands in profile behind. Dacia (modern Romania) was claimed by Augustus as a conquest in 1BC to 4AD
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Meleager and Atalante  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Meleager sits on a rock tying his sandal. Below him lies a fierce hunting dog with a broad collar. On one side a god or another hero wearing a rounded hat was crowning Meleager ( arm missing). On the other side stands the huntress Atalante, Meleager’s lover: she wears a short dress and quiver, and lifts her cloak at the shoulder in a gesture of modesty.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
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Hieroglyph panel1 (left) - Discourse of Yariris. Yariris presents his predecessor, the eldest son Kamanis, to his people. <br />
Second From left panel 2  -  King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings.) held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".  <br />
<br />
Panel 3 - This panels scene showing 8 out of 10 children of the King, the hieroglyphs reads as follows: "Malitispas, Astitarhunzas, Tamitispas,Isikaritispas, Sikaras, Halpawaris, Ya hilatispas". Above, there are three figures holding knucklebones (astragalus) and one figure walking by leaning on a stick; below are two each figures playing the knucklebones and turning whirligigs.<br />
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Panel 4 - The queen carries her youngest son. The hieroglyphs located above read; "and this is Tuwarsais; the prince desired by the ruler, whose exclusiveness has been exposed". While the queen carries her son in her lap, she holds the rope of the colt coming behind with her other hand. The muscles of the colt are schematic. <br />
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Against a black background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
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King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
<br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings. I held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".  <br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
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Hieroglyph panel (left) - Discourse of Yariris. Yariris presents his predecessor, the eldest son Kamanis, to his people. <br />
Right Panel - King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
<br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings.) held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".  <br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Picture & image of Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Long Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
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Goddess Kubaba. Goddess is depicted from the profile. She holds a pomegranate in her hands on her chest. She carries a one-horned headdress on her head. Her braided hair hangs down to her shoulder . <br />
<br />
On a gray background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Long Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
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Goddess Kubaba. Goddess is depicted from the profile. She holds a pomegranate in her hands on her chest. She carries a one-horned headdress on her head. Her braided hair hangs down to her shoulder . <br />
<br />
On a grey art background.
  • Photo of Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Long Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
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Goddess Kubaba. Goddess is depicted from the profile. The part below the chest of the relief is broken. She holds a pomegranate in her hands on her chest. She carries a one-horned headdress on her head. Her braided hair hangs down to her shoulder. The text in the hieroglyphics is not understood. The lower part of the relief has been restored. <br />
<br />
On a brown art background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Long Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
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Goddess Kubaba. Goddess is depicted from the profile. The part below the chest of the relief is broken. She holds a pomegranate in her hands on her chest. She carries a one-horned headdress on her head. Her braided hair hangs down to her shoulder. The text in the hieroglyphics is not understood. The lower part of the relief has been restored. <br />
<br />
On a grey art background.
  • Photo of Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Long Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
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Goddess Kubaba. Goddess is depicted from the profile. The part below the chest of the relief is broken. She holds a pomegranate in her hands on her chest. She carries a one-horned headdress on her head. Her braided hair hangs down to her shoulder. The text in the hieroglyphics is not understood. The lower part of the relief has been restored. <br />
<br />
On a brown art background.
  • Aslantepe Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Limestone, Aslantepe, Malatya, 1200-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
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Scene of king's offering drink and sacrifice to the god. The god is on the deer, with the bow attached to his shoulder and with a triple bundle of lightning in his hand. The king looks at the god, and makes the libation to the god while carrying a scepter with a curled end - lituus. Behind the king is a servant holding a goat for sacrifice to the god. Hieroglyphs read; "God Parata, Strong King... ". <br />
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Against a brown art background.
  • Aslantepe Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Lion Men. Limestone, 1399-1301 BC. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
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There are two lion-men with a sword at their waists on both sides of the tree of life. The figure on the right holds a sickle in his left hand resting on his shoulder and a symbol his right hand. The figure on the left carries a double-faced ax in his right hand. <br />
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Against a brown art background.
  • Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite. Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
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Left Panel - Sitting in a chair without a backrest, the head and the face of the figure are completely destroyed. She has a long veil on her head, a long dress hanging down to her ankles, and the shoes with the curved ends. The stool under her feet indicates that she is an important person. She drinks something from the vessel in her right hand and she keeps the handled goblet in her hand a little higher.  <br />
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Right Panel - Three figures with short skirts have their right arms positioned ahead. They each carry a sceptre in their left hand, which they lean against their shoulder. <br />
<br />
Against a brown gray background.
  • Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite. Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
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Left Panel - Sitting in a chair without a backrest, the head and the face of the figure are completely destroyed. She has a long veil on her head, a long dress hanging down to her ankles, and the shoes with the curved ends. The stool under her feet indicates that she is an important person. She drinks something from the vessel in her right hand and she keeps the handled goblet in her hand a little higher.  <br />
<br />
Right Panel - Three figures with short skirts have their right arms positioned ahead. They each carry a sceptre in their left hand, which they lean against their shoulder. <br />
<br />
Against a brown art background.
  • Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite. Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Left Panel - Sitting in a chair without a backrest, the head and the face of the figure are completely destroyed. She has a long veil on her head, a long dress hanging down to her ankles, and the shoes with the curved ends. The stool under her feet indicates that she is an important person. She drinks something from the vessel in her right hand and she keeps the handled goblet in her hand a little higher.  <br />
<br />
Right Panel - Three figures with short skirts have their right arms positioned ahead. They each carry a sceptre in their left hand, which they lean against their shoulder. <br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Picture and image of the Neo Gothic Erba stone tomb sculpture of a female figure, with her eyes closed and some poppy seeds in her hands, which are a pagan symbol with a funeral meaning because of their narcotic properties. The garment, stretching along her arm, leaves one shoulder undressed, thus giving the sleeper a touch of sensuality that did not fail to arouse some controversy among the contemporaries. By Sculptor Sculptor S. Saccomanno 1883.  Section A, no 50, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
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This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Roman statue of a young Satyr from the Hadranic period circa 117-138 AD excavated from an area near the via XX Settembre and Via Firenza, Rome, Italy. A young Satyr, wearing a panther’s skin tied on the right shoulder, plays the tibia oblique (flute) whist reclining next to a tree trunk. The statue is based on a Greek prototype from the school of Greek sculptor Praxiteles created around 300 BC.  Inv 551, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of a young Satyr from the Hadranic period circa 117-138 AD excavated from an area near the via XX Settembre and Via Firenza, Rome, Italy. A young Satyr, wearing a panther’s skin tied on the right shoulder, plays the tibia oblique (flute) whist reclining next to a tree trunk. The statue is based on a Greek prototype from the school of Greek sculptor Praxiteles created around 300 BC.  Inv 551, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of a young Satyr from the Hadranic period circa 117-138 AD excavated from an area near the via XX Settembre and Via Firenza, Rome, Italy. A young Satyr, wearing a panther’s skin tied on the right shoulder, plays the tibia oblique (flute) whist reclining next to a tree trunk. The statue is based on a Greek prototype from the school of Greek sculptor Praxiteles created around 300 BC.  Inv 551, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 371 
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. The sculpture here changes the pattern by raising the right arm to the neck, rather than making her arm cross her chest, this flattens the composition.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 371 
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. The sculpture here changes the pattern by raising the right arm to the neck, rather than making her arm cross her chest, this flattens the composition.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 371 
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. The sculpture here changes the pattern by raising the right arm to the neck, rather than making her arm cross her chest, this flattens the composition.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from the reign of Nero, 54-68 AD. This portrait can be dated to the reign of Nero due to the facial features and hair style, with short locks and long fringe over the forehead. The young man is wearing a tunic, stopped with a small fibula (clasp) on the left shoulder. Inv 281, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from the reign of Nero, 54-68 AD. This portrait can be dated to the reign of Nero due to the facial features and hair style, with short locks and long fringe over the forehead. The young man is wearing a tunic, stopped with a small fibula (clasp) on the left shoulder. Inv 281, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from the reign of Nero, 54-68 AD. This portrait can be dated to the reign of Nero due to the facial features and hair style, with short locks and long fringe over the forehead. The young man is wearing a tunic, stopped with a small fibula (clasp) on the left shoulder. Inv 281, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young man from the reign of Nero, 54-68 AD. This portrait can be dated to the reign of Nero due to the facial features and hair style, with short locks and long fringe over the forehead. The young man is wearing a tunic, stopped with a small fibula (clasp) on the left shoulder. Inv 281, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite, Roman Venus, of Vienne Goddess of Love. This 1st to 2nd century Roman marble copy of a lost Greek original attributed to attibuee Doidalsas Bithynia around 250BC, is of the crouching Venus style. Excavated from the Palace of Mirrors in Saint Romain en Gal (Isere France). The Crouching Venus is a Hellenistic model of Venus surprised at her bath. Venus crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. Louvre Museum, Inv No MNB 1292 ( Usual No Ma 2240)
  • Aphrodite, Roman Venus, of Vienne Goddess of Love. This 1st to 2nd century Roman marble copy of a lost Greek original attributed to attibuee Doidalsas Bithynia around 250BC, is of the crouching Venus style. Excavated from the Palace of Mirrors in Saint Romain en Gal (Isere France). The Crouching Venus is a Hellenistic model of Venus surprised at her bath. Venus crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. Louvre Museum, Inv No MNB 1292 ( Usual No Ma 2240)
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 371 
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. The sculpture here changes the pattern by raising the right arm to the neck, rather than making her arm cross her chest, this flattens the composition.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Abstract Cycladic figurine , Louris type, from Naxos, 2800-2500 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against white.<br />
<br />
The figurine has no facial features and is of no determinable sex. The figureine is of the Louros typle, named after a site in Naxos and with stuby arms is considered to be an abstract development of the Plastiras type, of which it retains such traits and naturalistically separated legs and horizontal feet. The arms have been reduced to two protuberances at shoulder level and all anitomical features have virtually disappeared.
  • Abstract Cycladic figurine , Louris type, from Naxos, 2800-2500 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,   Against black<br />
<br />
The figurine has no facial features and is of no determinable sex. The figureine is of the Louros typle, named after a site in Naxos and with stuby arms is considered to be an abstract development of the Plastiras type, of which it retains such traits and naturalistically separated legs and horizontal feet. The arms have been reduced to two protuberances at shoulder level and all anitomical features have virtually disappeared.
  • Abstract Cycladic figurine , Louris type, from Naxos, 2800-2500 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against Grey Background. <br />
<br />
The figurine has no facial features and is of no determinable sex. The figureine is of the Louros typle, named after a site in Naxos and with stuby arms is considered to be an abstract development of the Plastiras type, of which it retains such traits and naturalistically separated legs and horizontal feet. The arms have been reduced to two protuberances at shoulder level and all anitomical features have virtually disappeared.
  • Abstract Cycladic figurine , Louris type, from Naxos, 2800-2500 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, <br />
<br />
The figurine has no facial features and is of no determinable sex. The figureine is of the Louros typle, named after a site in Naxos and with stuby arms is considered to be an abstract development of the Plastiras type, of which it retains such traits and naturalistically separated legs and horizontal feet. The arms have been reduced to two protuberances at shoulder level and all anitomical features have virtually disappeared.
  • Abstract Cycladic figurine , Louris type, from Naxos, 2800-2500 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against Grey Background. <br />
<br />
The figurine has no facial features and is of no determinable sex. The figureine is of the Louros typle, named after a site in Naxos and with stuby arms is considered to be an abstract development of the Plastiras type, of which it retains such traits and naturalistically separated legs and horizontal feet. The arms have been reduced to two protuberances at shoulder level and all anitomical features have virtually disappeared.
  • The 'Atalante Hermes' Roman marble statue found at Atalante. 2nd Cemt AD copy of the 4th cent BC Lysippean Greek style. Athens Archaeological Museum, cat no 240. Against black<br />
<br />
Funserary statue of a youth depicted as Hermes. He is shown nude with his chlamys over his shoulder and wound around his right arm. In his left hand he holds a 'caduceus'.
  • The 'Atalante Hermes' Roman marble statue found at Atalante. 2nd Cemt AD copy of the 4th cent BC Lysippean Greek style. Athens Archaeological Museum, cat no 240.<br />
<br />
Funserary statue of a youth depicted as Hermes. He is shown nude with his chlamys over his shoulder and wound around his right arm. In his left hand he holds a 'caduceus'.
  • The 'Atalante Hermes' Roman marble statue found at Atalante. 2nd Cemt AD copy of the 4th cent BC Lysippean Greek style. Athens Archaeological Museum, cat no 240. Against grey<br />
<br />
Funserary statue of a youth depicted as Hermes. He is shown nude with his chlamys over his shoulder and wound around his right arm. In his left hand he holds a 'caduceus'.
  • Close up of Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Meleager and Atalante  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    <br />
<br />
Meleager sits on a rock tying his sandal. Below him lies a fierce hunting dog with a broad collar. On one side a god or another hero wearing a rounded hat was crowning Meleager ( arm missing). On the other side stands the huntress Atalante, Meleager’s lover: she wears a short dress and quiver, and lifts her cloak at the shoulder in a gesture of modesty.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos of the Dacians Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The Dacians are shown as a captive Barbarian woman. Her arms are crossed in submission, her thick dress slips off the shoulder slightly partly revealing her breast. The forepart of a small bull stands in profile behind. Dacia (modern Romania) was claimed by Augustus as a conquest in 1BC to 4AD
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos of the Dacians Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The Dacians are shown as a captive Barbarian woman. Her arms are crossed in submission, her thick dress slips off the shoulder slightly partly revealing her breast. The forepart of a small bull stands in profile behind. Dacia (modern Romania) was claimed by Augustus as a conquest in 1BC to 4AD
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos of the Dacians Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Dacians are shown as a captive Barbarian woman. Her arms are crossed in submission, her thick dress slips off the shoulder slightly partly revealing her breast. The forepart of a small bull stands in profile behind. Dacia (modern Romania) was claimed by Augustus as a conquest in 1BC to 4AD
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos with belted peplos, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The matronly figure wears a belted classical dress (peplos) and held her long cloak up behind. The square hole above her shoulder with a corresponding hole in the back, was for lifting the finished relief into the ancient building by crane.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos with belted peplos, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The matronly figure wears a belted classical dress (peplos) and held her long cloak up behind. The square hole above her shoulder with a corresponding hole in the back, was for lifting the finished relief into the ancient building by crane.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos with belted peplos, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The matronly figure wears a belted classical dress (peplos) and held her long cloak up behind. The square hole above her shoulder with a corresponding hole in the back, was for lifting the finished relief into the ancient building by crane.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos with belted peplos, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The matronly figure wears a belted classical dress (peplos) and held her long cloak up behind. The square hole above her shoulder with a corresponding hole in the back, was for lifting the finished relief into the ancient building by crane.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos with belted peplos, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The matronly figure wears a belted classical dress (peplos) and held her long cloak up behind. The square hole above her shoulder with a corresponding hole in the back, was for lifting the finished relief into the ancient building by crane.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Victory of the Emperors, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The inscription identifies the subject of the relief panel as the “Victory of the Emperors” (Neike Sebaston), and refers to the conquest of Armenia and Britannica in its adjacent relief panels. A half naked Victory flies diagonally across the panel, carrying a military trophy over her shoulder. A small winged Eros, now damaged was clinging to the end of the trophy pole. Victory was a key imperial attribute
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Victory of the Emperors, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The inscription identifies the subject of the relief panel as the “Victory of the Emperors” (Neike Sebaston), and refers to the conquest of Armenia and Britannica in its adjacent relief panels. A half naked Victory flies diagonally across the panel, carrying a military trophy over her shoulder. A small winged Eros, now damaged was clinging to the end of the trophy pole. Victory was a key imperial attribute
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Victory of the Emperors, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The inscription identifies the subject of the relief panel as the “Victory of the Emperors” (Neike Sebaston), and refers to the conquest of Armenia and Britannica in its adjacent relief panels. A half naked Victory flies diagonally across the panel, carrying a military trophy over her shoulder. A small winged Eros, now damaged was clinging to the end of the trophy pole. Victory was a key imperial attribute
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Victory of the Emperors, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The inscription identifies the subject of the relief panel as the “Victory of the Emperors” (Neike Sebaston), and refers to the conquest of Armenia and Britannica in its adjacent relief panels. A half naked Victory flies diagonally across the panel, carrying a military trophy over her shoulder. A small winged Eros, now damaged was clinging to the end of the trophy pole. Victory was a key imperial attribute
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Victory of the Emperors, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The inscription identifies the subject of the relief panel as the “Victory of the Emperors” (Neike Sebaston), and refers to the conquest of Armenia and Britannica in its adjacent relief panels. A half naked Victory flies diagonally across the panel, carrying a military trophy over her shoulder. A small winged Eros, now damaged was clinging to the end of the trophy pole. Victory was a key imperial attribute
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Meleager and Atalante  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Meleager sits on a rock tying his sandal. Below him lies a fierce hunting dog with a broad collar. On one side a god or another hero wearing a rounded hat was crowning Meleager ( arm missing). On the other side stands the huntress Atalante, Meleager’s lover: she wears a short dress and quiver, and lifts her cloak at the shoulder in a gesture of modesty.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Meleager and Atalante  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Meleager sits on a rock tying his sandal. Below him lies a fierce hunting dog with a broad collar. On one side a god or another hero wearing a rounded hat was crowning Meleager ( arm missing). On the other side stands the huntress Atalante, Meleager’s lover: she wears a short dress and quiver, and lifts her cloak at the shoulder in a gesture of modesty.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Meleager and Atalante  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Meleager sits on a rock tying his sandal. Below him lies a fierce hunting dog with a broad collar. On one side a god or another hero wearing a rounded hat was crowning Meleager ( arm missing). On the other side stands the huntress Atalante, Meleager’s lover: she wears a short dress and quiver, and lifts her cloak at the shoulder in a gesture of modesty.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Meleager and Atalante  Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Meleager sits on a rock tying his sandal. Below him lies a fierce hunting dog with a broad collar. On one side a god or another hero wearing a rounded hat was crowning Meleager ( arm missing). On the other side stands the huntress Atalante, Meleager’s lover: she wears a short dress and quiver, and lifts her cloak at the shoulder in a gesture of modesty.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Hieroglyph panel1 (left) - Discourse of Yariris. Yariris presents his predecessor, the eldest son Kamanis, to his people. <br />
Second From left panel 2  -  King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings.) held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".  <br />
<br />
Panel 3 - This panels scene showing 8 out of 10 children of the King, the hieroglyphs reads as follows: "Malitispas, Astitarhunzas, Tamitispas,Isikaritispas, Sikaras, Halpawaris, Ya hilatispas". Above, there are three figures holding knucklebones (astragalus) and one figure walking by leaning on a stick; below are two each figures playing the knucklebones and turning whirligigs.<br />
 <br />
Panel 4 - The queen carries her youngest son. The hieroglyphs located above read; "and this is Tuwarsais; the prince desired by the ruler, whose exclusiveness has been exposed". While the queen carries her son in her lap, she holds the rope of the colt coming behind with her other hand. The muscles of the colt are schematic. <br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Photo of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Hieroglyph panel1 (left) - Discourse of Yariris. Yariris presents his predecessor, the eldest son Kamanis, to his people. <br />
Second From left panel 2  -  King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings.) held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".  <br />
<br />
Panel 3 - This panels scene showing 8 out of 10 children of the King, the hieroglyphs reads as follows: "Malitispas, Astitarhunzas, Tamitispas,Isikaritispas, Sikaras, Halpawaris, Ya hilatispas". Above, there are three figures holding knucklebones (astragalus) and one figure walking by leaning on a stick; below are two each figures playing the knucklebones and turning whirligigs.<br />
 <br />
Panel 4 - The queen carries her youngest son. The hieroglyphs located above read; "and this is Tuwarsais; the prince desired by the ruler, whose exclusiveness has been exposed". While the queen carries her son in her lap, she holds the rope of the colt coming behind with her other hand. The muscles of the colt are schematic. <br />
<br />
Against a brown art background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Hieroglyph panel1 (left) - Discourse of Yariris. Yariris presents his predecessor, the eldest son Kamanis, to his people. <br />
Second From left panel 2  -  King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings.) held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".  <br />
<br />
Panel 3 - This panels scene showing 8 out of 10 children of the King, the hieroglyphs reads as follows: "Malitispas, Astitarhunzas, Tamitispas,Isikaritispas, Sikaras, Halpawaris, Ya hilatispas". Above, there are three figures holding knucklebones (astragalus) and one figure walking by leaning on a stick; below are two each figures playing the knucklebones and turning whirligigs.<br />
 <br />
Panel 4 - The queen carries her youngest son. The hieroglyphs located above read; "and this is Tuwarsais; the prince desired by the ruler, whose exclusiveness has been exposed". While the queen carries her son in her lap, she holds the rope of the colt coming behind with her other hand. The muscles of the colt are schematic. <br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
<br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings. I held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".  <br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Picture & image of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
<br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings. I held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".  <br />
<br />
Against a gray background.
  • Photo of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
<br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings. I held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".  <br />
<br />
Against a brown art background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
<br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings.) held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".  <br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Hieroglyph panel (left) - Discourse of Yariris. Yariris presents his predecessor, the eldest son Kamanis, to his people. <br />
Right Panel - King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
<br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings.) held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".  <br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Photo of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Hieroglyph panel (left) - Discourse of Yariris. Yariris presents his predecessor, the eldest son Kamanis, to his people. <br />
Right Panel - King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
<br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings.) held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".  <br />
<br />
Against a brown art background.
  • Picture & image of Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Hieroglyph panel (left) - Discourse of Yariris. Yariris presents his predecessor, the eldest son Kamanis, to his people. <br />
Right Panel - King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
<br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings.) held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".<br />
<br />
Against a gray background.
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Hieroglyph panel (left) - Discourse of Yariris. Yariris presents his predecessor, the eldest son Kamanis, to his people. <br />
Right Panel - King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
<br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings. held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".  <br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Long Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
Goddess Kubaba. Goddess is depicted from the profile. She holds a pomegranate in her hands on her chest. She carries a one-horned headdress on her head. Her braided hair hangs down to her shoulder . <br />
<br />
On a White Background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Long Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
Goddess Kubaba. Goddess is depicted from the profile. She holds a pomegranate in her hands on her chest. She carries a one-horned headdress on her head. Her braided hair hangs down to her shoulder . <br />
<br />
On a black background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Long Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Goddess Kubaba. Goddess is depicted from the profile. The part below the chest of the relief is broken. She holds a pomegranate in her hands on her chest. She carries a one-horned headdress on her head. Her braided hair hangs down to her shoulder. The text in the hieroglyphics is not understood. The lower part of the relief has been restored. <br />
<br />
On a grey art background.
  • Photo of Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Long Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
Goddess Kubaba. Goddess is depicted from the profile. She holds a pomegranate in her hands on her chest. She carries a one-horned headdress on her head. Her braided hair hangs down to her shoulder . <br />
<br />
On a brown art background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Long Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Goddess Kubaba. Goddess is depicted from the profile. The part below the chest of the relief is broken. She holds a pomegranate in her hands on her chest. She carries a one-horned headdress on her head. Her braided hair hangs down to her shoulder. The text in the hieroglyphics is not understood. The lower part of the relief has been restored. <br />
<br />
On a White Background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Long Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Goddess Kubaba. Goddess is depicted from the profile. The part below the chest of the relief is broken. She holds a pomegranate in her hands on her chest. She carries a one-horned headdress on her head. Her braided hair hangs down to her shoulder. The text in the hieroglyphics is not understood. The lower part of the relief has been restored. <br />
<br />
On a black background.
  • Picture & image of Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Long Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Goddess Kubaba. Goddess is depicted from the profile. The part below the chest of the relief is broken. She holds a pomegranate in her hands on her chest. She carries a one-horned headdress on her head. Her braided hair hangs down to her shoulder. The text in the hieroglyphics is not understood. The lower part of the relief has been restored. <br />
<br />
On a gray background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Long Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Goddess Kubaba. Goddess is depicted from the profile. The part below the chest of the relief is broken. She holds a pomegranate in her hands on her chest. She carries a one-horned headdress on her head. Her braided hair hangs down to her shoulder. The text in the hieroglyphics is not understood. The lower part of the relief has been restored. <br />
<br />
On a White Background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Long Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Goddess Kubaba. Goddess is depicted from the profile. The part below the chest of the relief is broken. She holds a pomegranate in her hands on her chest. She carries a one-horned headdress on her head. Her braided hair hangs down to her shoulder. The text in the hieroglyphics is not understood. The lower part of the relief has been restored. <br />
<br />
On a black background.
  • Picture & image of Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Long Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Goddess Kubaba. Goddess is depicted from the profile. The part below the chest of the relief is broken. She holds a pomegranate in her hands on her chest. She carries a one-horned headdress on her head. Her braided hair hangs down to her shoulder. The text in the hieroglyphics is not understood. The lower part of the relief has been restored. <br />
<br />
On a gray background.
  • Aslantepe Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Limestone, Aslantepe, Malatya, 1200-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Scene of king's offering drink and sacrifice to the god. The god is on the deer, with the bow attached to his shoulder and with a triple bundle of lightning in his hand. The king looks at the god, and makes the libation to the god while carrying a scepter with a curled end - lituus. Behind the king is a servant holding a goat for sacrifice to the god. Hieroglyphs read; "God Parata, Strong King... ". <br />
<br />
Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey
  • Aslantepe Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Limestone, Aslantepe, Malatya, 1200-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Scene of king's offering drink and sacrifice to the god. The god is on the deer, with the bow attached to his shoulder and with a triple bundle of lightning in his hand. The king looks at the god, and makes the libation to the god while carrying a scepter with a curled end - lituus. Behind the king is a servant holding a goat for sacrifice to the god. Hieroglyphs read; "God Parata, Strong King... ". <br />
<br />
Against a gray background.
  • Aslantepe Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Limestone, Aslantepe, Malatya, 1200-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Scene of king's offering drink and sacrifice to the god. The god is on the deer, with the bow attached to his shoulder and with a triple bundle of lightning in his hand. The king looks at the god, and makes the libation to the god while carrying a scepter with a curled end - lituus. Behind the king is a servant holding a goat for sacrifice to the god. Hieroglyphs read; "God Parata, Strong King... ". <br />
<br />
Against a black background.
  • Aslantepe Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Limestone, Aslantepe, Malatya, 1200-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Scene of king's offering drink and sacrifice to the god. The god is on the deer, with the bow attached to his shoulder and with a triple bundle of lightning in his hand. The king looks at the god, and makes the libation to the god while carrying a scepter with a curled end - lituus. Behind the king is a servant holding a goat for sacrifice to the god. Hieroglyphs read; "God Parata, Strong King... ". <br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Aslantepe Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Lion Men. Limestone, 1399-1301 BC. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
There are two lion-men with a sword at their waists on both sides of the tree of life. The figure on the right holds a sickle in his left hand resting on his shoulder and a symbol his right hand. The figure on the left carries a double-faced ax in his right hand. <br />
<br />
Against a gray background.
  • Aslantepe Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Lion Men. Limestone, 1399-1301 BC. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
There are two lion-men with a sword at their waists on both sides of the tree of life. The figure on the right holds a sickle in his left hand resting on his shoulder and a symbol his right hand. The figure on the left carries a double-faced ax in his right hand.
  • Aslantepe Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Lion Men. Limestone, 1399-1301 BC. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
There are two lion-men with a sword at their waists on both sides of the tree of life. The figure on the right holds a sickle in his left hand resting on his shoulder and a symbol his right hand. The figure on the left carries a double-faced ax in his right hand.
  • Aslantepe Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Lion Men. Limestone, 1399-1301 BC. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
There are two lion-men with a sword at their waists on both sides of the tree of life. The figure on the right holds a sickle in his left hand resting on his shoulder and a symbol his right hand. The figure on the left carries a double-faced ax in his right hand. <br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite. Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Left Panel - Sitting in a chair without a backrest, the head and the face of the figure are completely destroyed. She has a long veil on her head, a long dress hanging down to her ankles, and the shoes with the curved ends. The stool under her feet indicates that she is an important person. She drinks something from the vessel in her right hand and she keeps the handled goblet in her hand a little higher.  <br />
<br />
Right Panel - Three figures with short skirts have their right arms positioned ahead. They each carry a sceptre in their left hand, which they lean against their shoulder. <br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite. Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Left Panel - Sitting in a chair without a backrest, the head and the face of the figure are completely destroyed. She has a long veil on her head, a long dress hanging down to her ankles, and the shoes with the curved ends. The stool under her feet indicates that she is an important person. She drinks something from the vessel in her right hand and she keeps the handled goblet in her hand a little higher.  <br />
<br />
Right Panel - Three figures with short skirts have their right arms positioned ahead. They each carry a sceptre in their left hand, which they lean against their shoulder. <br />
<br />
Against a grey art background.
  • Picture and image of the Neo Gothic Erba stone tomb sculpture of a female figure, with her eyes closed and some poppy seeds in her hands, which are a pagan symbol with a funeral meaning because of their narcotic properties. The garment, stretching along her arm, leaves one shoulder undressed, thus giving the sleeper a touch of sensuality that did not fail to arouse some controversy among the contemporaries. By Sculptor Sculptor S. Saccomanno 1883.  Section A, no 50, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the Neo Gothic Erba stone tomb sculpture of a female figure, with her eyes closed and some poppy seeds in her hands, which are a pagan symbol with a funeral meaning because of their narcotic properties. The garment, stretching along her arm, leaves one shoulder undressed, thus giving the sleeper a touch of sensuality that did not fail to arouse some controversy among the contemporaries. By Sculptor Sculptor S. Saccomanno 1883.  Section A, no 50, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. In this variant of the style she is accompanied by Eros, traces of whose feet and hand survive, and a swan. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. In this variant of the style she is accompanied by Eros, traces of whose feet and hand survive, and a swan. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. In this variant of the style she is accompanied by Eros, traces of whose feet and hand survive, and a swan. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. In this variant of the style she is accompanied by Eros, traces of whose feet and hand survive, and a swan. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman statue of a young Satyr from the Hadranic period circa 117-138 AD excavated from an area near the via XX Settembre and Via Firenza, Rome, Italy. A young Satyr, wearing a panther’s skin tied on the right shoulder, plays the tibia oblique (flute) whist reclining next to a tree trunk. The statue is based on a Greek prototype from the school of Greek sculptor Praxiteles created around 300 BC.  Inv 551, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of a young Satyr from the Hadranic period circa 117-138 AD excavated from an area near the via XX Settembre and Via Firenza, Rome, Italy. A young Satyr, wearing a panther’s skin tied on the right shoulder, plays the tibia oblique (flute) whist reclining next to a tree trunk. The statue is based on a Greek prototype from the school of Greek sculptor Praxiteles created around 300 BC.  Inv 551, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of a young charioteer from the age of Domitian, 81-96AD. This statue of a young charioteer, with Oriental eastern Mediterranean features, is wearing a tunic stopped on the right shoulder by a flattened circular fibula (clasp). The hairstyle, with its ’S’ shaped curls, was made artificially with an iron (calamistrum). This style was inspired by official portrayts of a young Domitian, who emulated Neronian style during the last years of his reign. The bust was rounded to be inserted onto a modern pillar. . Inv 276, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Aphrodite, Roman Venus, of Vienne Goddess of Love. This 1st to 2nd century Roman marble copy of a lost Greek original attributed to attibuee Doidalsas Bithynia around 250BC, is of the crouching Venus style. Excavated from the Palace of Mirrors in Saint Romain en Gal (Isere France). The Crouching Venus is a Hellenistic model of Venus surprised at her bath. Venus crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. Louvre Museum, Inv No MNB 1292 ( Usual No Ma 2240)
  • Aphrodite, Roman Venus, of Vienne Goddess of Love. This 1st to 2nd century Roman marble copy of a lost Greek original attributed to attibuee Doidalsas Bithynia around 250BC, is of the crouching Venus style. Excavated from the Palace of Mirrors in Saint Romain en Gal (Isere France). The Crouching Venus is a Hellenistic model of Venus surprised at her bath. Venus crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. Louvre Museum, Inv No MNB 1292 ( Usual No Ma 2240)
  • Aphrodite, Roman Venus, of Vienne Goddess of Love. This 1st to 2nd century Roman marble copy of a lost Greek original attributed to attibuee Doidalsas Bithynia around 250BC, is of the crouching Venus style. Excavated from the Palace of Mirrors in Saint Romain en Gal (Isere France). The Crouching Venus is a Hellenistic model of Venus surprised at her bath. Venus crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. Louvre Museum, Inv No MNB 1292 ( Usual No Ma 2240)
  • Aphrodite, Roman Venus, of Vienne Goddess of Love. This 1st to 2nd century Roman marble copy of a lost Greek original attributed to attibuee Doidalsas Bithynia around 250BC, is of the crouching Venus style. Excavated from the Palace of Mirrors in Saint Romain en Gal (Isere France). The Crouching Venus is a Hellenistic model of Venus surprised at her bath. Venus crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. Louvre Museum, Inv No MNB 1292 ( Usual No Ma 2240)
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 371 
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. The sculpture here changes the pattern by raising the right arm to the neck, rather than making her arm cross her chest, this flattens the composition.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Roman statue of a young Satyr from the Hadranic period circa 117-138 AD excavated from an area near the via XX Settembre and Via Firenza, Rome, Italy. A young Satyr, wearing a panther’s skin tied on the right shoulder, plays the tibia oblique (flute) whist reclining next to a tree trunk. The statue is based on a Greek prototype from the school of Greek sculptor Praxiteles created around 300 BC.  Inv 551, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy

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