• Memorial plaques at the Shrine to the Virgin Mary in The Stone Gate entrance Kamenita Vrata) to Zagreb's Gornji Grad, Croatia
  • Memorial plaques at the Shrine to the Virgin Mary in The Stone Gate entrance Kamenita Vrata) to Zagreb's Gornji Grad, Croatia
  • Shrine to the Virgin Mary in The Stone Gate entrance Kamenita Vrata) to Zagreb's Gornji Grad, Croatia
  • Shrine to the Virgin Mary in The Stone Gate entrance Kamenita Vrata) to Zagreb's Gornji Grad, Croatia
  • religious monument to the virgin Mary shrine, Palermo, Sicily
  • Bell tower of the Greek Orthodox Church of St. Spyridon, the patron Saint of Corfu . Greek Ionian Islands
  • Bell tower of the Greek Orthodox Church of St. Spyridon, the patron Saint of Corfu . Greek Ionian Islands
  • Bell tower of the Greek Orthodox Church of St. Spyridon, the patron Saint of Corfu . Greek Ionian Islands
  • Bell tower of the Greek Orthodox Church of St. Spyridon, the patron Saint of Corfu . Greek Ionian Islands
  • Bell tower of the Greek Orthodox Church of St. Spyridon, the patron Saint of Corfu . Greek Ionian Islands
  • Bell tower of the Greek Orthodox Church of St. Spyridon, the patron Saint of Corfu . Greek Ionian Islands
  • Monastery of Ayios (Saint) Nektarios where he died in 1921 and in buried. Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Monastery of Ayios (Saint) Nektarios where he died in 1921 and in buried. Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Monastery of Ayios (Saint) Nektarios where he died in 1921 and in buried. Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Monastery of Ayios (Saint) Nektarios where he died in 1921 and in buried. Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Monastery of Ayios (Saint) Nektarios where he died in 1921 and in buried. Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Monastery of Ayios (Saint) Nektarios where he died in 1921 and in buried. Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Monastery of Ayios (Saint) Nektarios where he died in 1921 and in buried. Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Monastery of Ayios (Saint) Nektarios where he died in 1921 and in buried. Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Monastery of Ayios (Saint) Nektarios where he died in 1921 and in buried. Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Monastery of Ayios (Saint) Nektarios where he died in 1921 and in buried. Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Monastery of Ayios (Saint) Nektarios where he died in 1921 and in buried. Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Monastery of Ayios (Saint) Nektarios where he died in 1921 and in buried. Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Monastery of Ayios (Saint) Nektarios where he died in 1921 and in buried. Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Monastery of Ayios (Saint) Nektarios where he died in 1921 and in buried. Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Memorial to Ayios (Saint) Nektarios who died on Aegina in 1921. Greek Saronic Islands
  • Memorial to Ayios (Saint) Nektarios who died on Aegina in 1921. Greek Saronic Islands
  • Memorial to Ayios (Saint) Nektarios who died on Aegina in 1921. Greek Saronic Islands
  • St George Island Kotor Bay, Perast Montenegro
  • St George Island Kotor Bay, Perast Montenegro
  • St George Island Kotor Bay, Perast Montenegro
  • St George Island Kotor Bay, Perast Montenegro
  • St George Island Kotor Bay, Perast Montenegro
  • St George Island Kotor Bay, Perast Montenegro
  • St George Island Kotor Bay, Perast Montenegro
  • St George Island Kotor Bay, Perast Montenegro
  • St George Island Kotor Bay, Perast Montenegro
  • St George Island Kotor Bay, Perast Montenegro
  • St George Island Kotor Bay, Perast Montenegro
  • St George Island Kotor Bay, Perast Montenegro
  • St George Island Kotor Bay, Perast Montenegro
  • St George Island Kotor Bay, Perast Montenegro
  • St George Island Kotor Bay, Perast Montenegro
  • St George Island Kotor Bay, Perast Montenegro
  • St George Island Kotor Bay, Perast Montenegro
  • St George Island Kotor Bay, Perast Montenegro
  • St George Island Kotor Bay, Perast Montenegro
  • St George Island Kotor Bay, Perast Montenegro
  • St George Island Kotor Bay, Perast Montenegro
  • St George Island Kotor Bay, Perast Montenegro
  • St George Island Kotor Bay, Perast Montenegro
  • St George Island Kotor Bay, Perast Montenegro
  • St George Island Kotor Bay, Perast Montenegro
  • St George Island Kotor Bay, Perast Montenegro
  • Roman sculptural decorations  on  The Arch Of Constantine built to celebrate victory over Maxentius . Rome. Rome
  • Procession of Chariot & Horsemen freeze  from the Heros Shrine of the Acropolis of Xanthos, thought to be the shrines of legendary warriors of the trojan wars built by King Kuprlli (480 - 440 B.C). Xanthos was under Persian rule at the time & the freeze has the static style of persian sculpture with a Greek style.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-16-20.17-19 (sculptures B311-313).
  • Procession of Chariot & Horsemen freeze  from the Heros Shrine of the Acropolis of Xanthos, thought to be the shrines of legendary warriors of the trojan wars built by King Kuprlli (480 - 440 B.C). Xanthos was under Persian rule at the time & the freeze has the static style of persian sculpture with a Greek style.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-16-20.17-19 (sculptures B311-313).
  • Procession of Chariot & Horsemen freeze  from the Heros Shrine of the Acropolis of Xanthos, thought to be the shrines of legendary warriors of the trojan wars built by King Kuprlli (480 - 440 B.C). Xanthos was under Persian rule at the time & the freeze has the static style of persian sculpture with a Greek style.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-16-20.17-19 (sculptures B311-313).
  • Procession of Chariot & Horsemen freeze  from the Heros Shrine of the Acropolis of Xanthos, thought to be the shrines of legendary warriors of the trojan wars built by King Kuprlli (480 - 440 B.C). Xanthos was under Persian rule at the time & the freeze has the static style of persian sculpture with a Greek style.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-16-20.17-19 (sculptures B311-313).
  • Procession of Chariot & Horsemen freeze  from the Heros Shrine of the Acropolis of Xanthos, thought to be the shrines of legendary warriors of the trojan wars built by King Kuprlli (480 - 440 B.C). Xanthos was under Persian rule at the time & the freeze has the static style of persian sculpture with a Greek style.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-16-20.17-19 (sculptures B311-313).
  • Procession of Chariot & Horsemen freeze  from the Heros Shrine of the Acropolis of Xanthos, thought to be the shrines of legendary warriors of the trojan wars built by King Kuprlli (480 - 440 B.C). Xanthos was under Persian rule at the time & the freeze has the static style of persian sculpture with a Greek style.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-16-20.17-19 (sculptures B311-313).
  • Procession of Chariot & Horsemen freeze  from the Heros Shrine of the Acropolis of Xanthos, thought to be the shrines of legendary warriors of the trojan wars built by King Kuprlli (480 - 440 B.C). Xanthos was under Persian rule at the time & the freeze has the static style of persian sculpture with a Greek style.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-16-20.17-19 (sculptures B311-313).
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Tree Graces from the South Building, Second storey, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Apollo sits on his raised platform with his tripod at his oracular shrine. He is approached by 2 figures one with the flat diadem of a king who have come to consult him. Cut Out
  • Bottom corners, left shows a belt seller, right a merchant. Centre panel, bottom shows a merchant with scales, left birth of St Nicholas, left the miracles of the first bath of St Nicholas, top The infant St Nicholas refuses his mother's milk except on mondays and fridays..Medieval Windows  of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France, dedicated to the life an miracles of St Nicholas. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .Bottom centre panel,  bottom shows The young St Nicholas does well at school, left Nicholas secretly gives gold to an old man to save his daughters , right The old man tries to thank Nicholas, who humbly flees from him, top .Nicholas is chosen to be the new Bishop ..Top centre panel, bottom shows The miracle of the boiling baby, saved by the intervention of St Nicholas, left An old couple's only son falls overboard en-route to the Saint's shrine, right The child lost at sea is found safe and well at the Saint's shrine, top Installation of Nicholas as Bishop of Myra
  • Bottom corners, left shows a belt seller, right a merchant. Centre panel, bottom shows a merchant with scales, left birth of St Nicholas, left the miracles of the first bath of St Nicholas, top The infant St Nicholas refuses his mother's milk except on mondays and fridays..Medieval Windows  of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France, dedicated to the life an miracles of St Nicholas. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .Bottom centre panel,  bottom shows The young St Nicholas does well at school, left Nicholas secretly gives gold to an old man to save his daughters , right The old man tries to thank Nicholas, who humbly flees from him, top .Nicholas is chosen to be the new Bishop ..Top centre panel, bottom shows The miracle of the boiling baby, saved by the intervention of St Nicholas, left An old couple's only son falls overboard en-route to the Saint's shrine, right The child lost at sea is found safe and well at the Saint's shrine, top Installation of Nicholas as Bishop of Myra
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Tree Graces from the South Building, Second storey, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Apollo sits on his raised platform with his tripod at his oracular shrine. He is approached by 2 figures one with the flat diadem of a king who have come to consult him. Cut Out
  • Pictures & images of the 14th-century copy of the aedicule shrine of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. The Eastern Orthodox Georgian Svetitskhoveli Cathedral (Cathedral of the Living Pillar) , Mtskheta, Georgia (country). A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
Currently the second largest church building in Georgia, Svetitskhoveli Cathedral is a masterpiece of Early Medieval architecture completed in 1029 by Georgian architect Arsukisdze on an earlier site dating back toi the 4th century.
  • Pictures & images of the 14th-century copy of the aedicule shrine of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. The Eastern Orthodox Georgian Svetitskhoveli Cathedral (Cathedral of the Living Pillar) , Mtskheta, Georgia (country). A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
Currently the second largest church building in Georgia, Svetitskhoveli Cathedral is a masterpiece of Early Medieval architecture completed in 1029 by Georgian architect Arsukisdze on an earlier site dating back toi the 4th century.
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Tree Graces from the South Building, Second storey, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Apollo sits on his raised platform with his tripod at his oracular shrine. He is approached by 2 figures one with the flat diadem of a king who have come to consult him. Cut Out
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Tree Graces from the South Building, Second storey, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Apollo sits on his raised platform with his tripod at his oracular shrine. He is approached by 2 figures one with the flat diadem of a king who have come to consult him. Cut Out
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Tree Graces from the South Building, Second storey, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Apollo sits on his raised platform with his tripod at his oracular shrine. He is approached by 2 figures one with the flat diadem of a king who have come to consult him. Cut Out
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Tree Graces from the South Building, Second storey, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Apollo sits on his raised platform with his tripod at his oracular shrine. He is approached by 2 figures one with the flat diadem of a king who have come to consult him. Cut Out
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   <br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   <br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   <br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   <br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   <br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Apollo and Royal Hero Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Apollo sits on a raised platform with his tripod at his oracular shrine. He is approached by two figures. A women greets  the god with a raised hand. With her is a hero wearing a travelling cloak and the flat headband or diadem of a king. He has come to consult Apollo, probably about a city foundation.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Apollo and Royal Hero Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
Apollo sits on a raised platform with his tripod at his oracular shrine. He is approached by two figures. A women greets  the god with a raised hand. With her is a hero wearing a travelling cloak and the flat headband or diadem of a king. He has come to consult Apollo, probably about a city foundation.
  • Roman SSebasteion  relief  sculpture of Apollo and Royal Hero Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Apollo sits on a raised platform with his tripod at his oracular shrine. He is approached by two figures. A women greets  the god with a raised hand. With her is a hero wearing a travelling cloak and the flat headband or diadem of a king. He has come to consult Apollo, probably about a city foundation.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Apollo and Royal Hero Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Apollo sits on a raised platform with his tripod at his oracular shrine. He is approached by two figures. A women greets  the god with a raised hand. With her is a hero wearing a travelling cloak and the flat headband or diadem of a king. He has come to consult Apollo, probably about a city foundation.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Apollo and Royal Hero Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Apollo sits on a raised platform with his tripod at his oracular shrine. He is approached by two figures. A women greets  the god with a raised hand. With her is a hero wearing a travelling cloak and the flat headband or diadem of a king. He has come to consult Apollo, probably about a city foundation.
  • RomanSebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Bedroom D  of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
This bedroom has a decoration very similar to that of cubiculum B in its arrangement and the use of cinnabar red. At the rear of the alcove three women perform a sacrificial ceremony in a rustic shrine. The walls of the antechamber have scenes of lovers, and most of the other pictures have to do with female life. Here carefully rendered details (attendants, handmaidens, furniture, glass and silver vessels) provide invaluable information on domestic life. There are also Egyptianizing elements, lotus flowers, sphinxes, and exotic landscapes. On the second column of the right wall is the inscription, in Greek, Seleukos made this, presumably the name of a Greek who was one of the artisans. The vaulted ceiling, in pure white stucco, has reliefs of initiation rites into the mysteries, idyllic landscapes with sacred elements, and combats between fantastic animals. The decorative scheme of the two bedrooms owes its inspiration to the deities Aphrodite and Dionysos. A fragment of geometric mosaic in black and white can be attributed to bedroom D on the basis of a contemporary watercolor.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Bedroom D  of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
This bedroom has a decoration very similar to that of cubiculum B in its arrangement and the use of cinnabar red. At the rear of the alcove three women perform a sacrificial ceremony in a rustic shrine. The walls of the antechamber have scenes of lovers, and most of the other pictures have to do with female life. Here carefully rendered details (attendants, handmaidens, furniture, glass and silver vessels) provide invaluable information on domestic life. There are also Egyptianizing elements, lotus flowers, sphinxes, and exotic landscapes. On the second column of the right wall is the inscription, in Greek, Seleukos made this, presumably the name of a Greek who was one of the artisans. The vaulted ceiling, in pure white stucco, has reliefs of initiation rites into the mysteries, idyllic landscapes with sacred elements, and combats between fantastic animals. The decorative scheme of the two bedrooms owes its inspiration to the deities Aphrodite and Dionysos. A fragment of geometric mosaic in black and white can be attributed to bedroom D on the basis of a contemporary watercolor.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Bedroom D  of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
This bedroom has a decoration very similar to that of cubiculum B in its arrangement and the use of cinnabar red. At the rear of the alcove three women perform a sacrificial ceremony in a rustic shrine. The walls of the antechamber have scenes of lovers, and most of the other pictures have to do with female life. Here carefully rendered details (attendants, handmaidens, furniture, glass and silver vessels) provide invaluable information on domestic life. There are also Egyptianizing elements, lotus flowers, sphinxes, and exotic landscapes. On the second column of the right wall is the inscription, in Greek, Seleukos made this, presumably the name of a Greek who was one of the artisans. The vaulted ceiling, in pure white stucco, has reliefs of initiation rites into the mysteries, idyllic landscapes with sacred elements, and combats between fantastic animals. The decorative scheme of the two bedrooms owes its inspiration to the deities Aphrodite and Dionysos. A fragment of geometric mosaic in black and white can be attributed to bedroom D on the basis of a contemporary watercolor.
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Tree Graces from the South Building, Second storey, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Apollo sits on his raised platform with his tripod at his oracular shrine. He is approached by 2 figures one with the flat diadem of a king who have come to consult him. Cut Out
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Profits shrine in the he Glaoui Kasbah of Tamedaght in the Ounilla valley set surrounded by the hammada (stoney) desert in the foothills of the Altas mountains, Tamedaght, Morroco.
  • Profits shrine in the he Glaoui Kasbah of Tamedaght in the Ounilla valley set surrounded by the hammada (stoney) desert in the foothills of the Altas mountains, Tamedaght, Morroco.
  • Profits shrine in the he Glaoui Kasbah of Tamedaght in the Ounilla valley set surrounded by the hammada (stoney) desert in the foothills of the Altas mountains, Tamedaght, Morroco.
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Tree Graces from the South Building, Second storey, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Apollo sits on his raised platform with his tripod at his oracular shrine. He is approached by 2 figures one with the flat diadem of a king who have come to consult him. Cut Out
  • The shrine and complete and incorrupted relics of  St. Gerasimos of Cephalonia [ 1509 ] in the old Byzantine nunery of Omala. Kefalonia, Ionian Islands, Greece.
  • Bell Tower and gateway of the Othodox Nunery of Omala, the shrine of  St. Gerasimos of Cephalonia [ 1509 ]. Kefalonia, Ionian Islands, Greece.
  • Bell Tower and gateway of the Othodox Nunery of Omala, the shrine of  St. Gerasimos of Cephalonia [ 1509 ]. Kefalonia, Ionian Islands, Greece.
  • Bell Tower and gateway of the Othodox Nunery of Omala, the shrine of  St. Gerasimos of Cephalonia [ 1509 ]. Kefalonia, Ionian Islands, Greece.
  • Religious shrine near  Lake Bled Slovenia.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Corridor F-G  of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The corridor was a covered passageway that connected the two wings of the villa, partly straight and partly curved, following the shape of the central esedra. The elements that remain are from the inner walkway. The wall is divided by slender columns. Their capitals support female figures whose architectural function is in turn to support the columns of the superstructure. The female figures hold floral garlands that link them to one another. They may be meant to represent Caryatids, the women of Caria sold into slavery, who gave the name to female figures used as supports instead of columns. The most important part of the decoration is the small pictures in the upper zone: still lifes with masks from the theater alternate with imaginary landscapes, shrines, statues of divinities, little aedicula, and altars, the whole populated by figures of peasants, fishermen, and shepherds. The scene depicting a naval battle on the curved part may well refer to the battle of Actium that led to Rome's conquest of Egypt.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Corridor F-G  of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The corridor was a covered passageway that connected the two wings of the villa, partly straight and partly curved, following the shape of the central esedra. The elements that remain are from the inner walkway. The wall is divided by slender columns. Their capitals support female figures whose architectural function is in turn to support the columns of the superstructure. The female figures hold floral garlands that link them to one another. They may be meant to represent Caryatids, the women of Caria sold into slavery, who gave the name to female figures used as supports instead of columns. The most important part of the decoration is the small pictures in the upper zone: still lifes with masks from the theater alternate with imaginary landscapes, shrines, statues of divinities, little aedicula, and altars, the whole populated by figures of peasants, fishermen, and shepherds. The scene depicting a naval battle on the curved part may well refer to the battle of Actium that led to Rome's conquest of Egypt.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Corridor F-G  of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The corridor was a covered passageway that connected the two wings of the villa, partly straight and partly curved, following the shape of the central esedra. The elements that remain are from the inner walkway. The wall is divided by slender columns. Their capitals support female figures whose architectural function is in turn to support the columns of the superstructure. The female figures hold floral garlands that link them to one another. They may be meant to represent Caryatids, the women of Caria sold into slavery, who gave the name to female figures used as supports instead of columns. The most important part of the decoration is the small pictures in the upper zone: still lifes with masks from the theater alternate with imaginary landscapes, shrines, statues of divinities, little aedicula, and altars, the whole populated by figures of peasants, fishermen, and shepherds. The scene depicting a naval battle on the curved part may well refer to the battle of Actium that led to Rome's conquest of Egypt.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Corridor F-G  of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
The corridor was a covered passageway that connected the two wings of the villa, partly straight and partly curved, following the shape of the central esedra. The elements that remain are from the inner walkway. The wall is divided by slender columns. Their capitals support female figures whose architectural function is in turn to support the columns of the superstructure. The female figures hold floral garlands that link them to one another. They may be meant to represent Caryatids, the women of Caria sold into slavery, who gave the name to female figures used as supports instead of columns. The most important part of the decoration is the small pictures in the upper zone: still lifes with masks from the theater alternate with imaginary landscapes, shrines, statues of divinities, little aedicula, and altars, the whole populated by figures of peasants, fishermen, and shepherds. The scene depicting a naval battle on the curved part may well refer to the battle of Actium that led to Rome's conquest of Egypt.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Corridor F-G  of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The corridor was a covered passageway that connected the two wings of the villa, partly straight and partly curved, following the shape of the central esedra. The elements that remain are from the inner walkway. The wall is divided by slender columns. Their capitals support female figures whose architectural function is in turn to support the columns of the superstructure. The female figures hold floral garlands that link them to one another. They may be meant to represent Caryatids, the women of Caria sold into slavery, who gave the name to female figures used as supports instead of columns. The most important part of the decoration is the small pictures in the upper zone: still lifes with masks from the theater alternate with imaginary landscapes, shrines, statues of divinities, little aedicula, and altars, the whole populated by figures of peasants, fishermen, and shepherds. The scene depicting a naval battle on the curved part may well refer to the battle of Actium that led to Rome's conquest of Egypt.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Corridor F-G  of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
The corridor was a covered passageway that connected the two wings of the villa, partly straight and partly curved, following the shape of the central esedra. The elements that remain are from the inner walkway. The wall is divided by slender columns. Their capitals support female figures whose architectural function is in turn to support the columns of the superstructure. The female figures hold floral garlands that link them to one another. They may be meant to represent Caryatids, the women of Caria sold into slavery, who gave the name to female figures used as supports instead of columns. The most important part of the decoration is the small pictures in the upper zone: still lifes with masks from the theater alternate with imaginary landscapes, shrines, statues of divinities, little aedicula, and altars, the whole populated by figures of peasants, fishermen, and shepherds. The scene depicting a naval battle on the curved part may well refer to the battle of Actium that led to Rome's conquest of Egypt.

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