• Doric coloums of Delphi Temple of Apollo. and ruins of Delphi archaeological site, Delphi, Greece
  • Doric coloums of Delphi Temple of Apollo. and ruins of Delphi archaeological site, Delphi, Greece
  • Doric coloums of Delphi Temple of Apollo. and ruins of Delphi archaeological site, Delphi, Greece
  • Doric coloums of Delphi Temple of Apollo. and ruins of Delphi archaeological site, Delphi, Greece
  • Picture of the ruins of column bases from the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Doric coloums of Delphi Temple of Apollo. and ruins of Delphi archaeological site, Delphi, Greece
  • Doric coloums of Delphi Temple of Apollo. and ruins of Delphi archaeological site, Delphi, Greece
  • Doric coloums of Delphi Temple of Apollo. and ruins of Delphi archaeological site, Delphi, Greece
  • Doric coloums of Delphi Temple of Apollo. and ruins of Delphi archaeological site, Delphi, Greece
  • Doric coloums of Delphi Temple of Apollo. and ruins of Delphi archaeological site, Delphi, Greece
  • Picture of an architectural relief detail from the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of an architectural relief detail from the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of a Griffin Frieze from the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of a Griffin Frieze from the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of a Medusa relief frieze from the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the freize around a column base of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of a close up of a column base at the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the Ionian columns of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the steps & columns of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Doric coloums of Delphi Temple of Apollo. and ruins of Delphi archaeological site, Delphi, Greece
  • Picture of an architectural relief detail from the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of a  column frieze from the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of an architectural relief detail from the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of an architectural relief detail from the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of an architectural relief detail from the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of an architectural relief detail from the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the Ionian columns of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the steps & columns of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of an architectural relief detail from the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of an architectural relief detail from the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Doric coloums of Delphi Temple of Apollo. and ruins of Delphi archaeological site, Delphi, Greece
  • Doric coloums of Delphi Temple of Apollo. and ruins of Delphi archaeological site, Delphi, Greece
  • Doric coloums of Delphi Temple of Apollo. and ruins of Delphi archaeological site, Delphi, Greece
  • Doric coloums of Delphi Temple of Apollo. and ruins of Delphi archaeological site, Delphi, Greece
  • Doric coloums of Delphi Temple of Apollo. and ruins of Delphi archaeological site, Delphi, Greece
  • Doric coloums of Delphi Temple of Apollo. and ruins of Delphi archaeological site, Delphi, Greece
  • Doric coloums of Delphi Temple of Apollo. and ruins of Delphi archaeological site, Delphi, Greece
  • Doric coloums of Delphi Temple of Apollo. and ruins of Delphi archaeological site, Delphi, Greece
  • The ruins of the 4th century BC Temple of Apollo , a peripteral Doric building.  Delphi, archaeological site, Greece,
  • The ruins of the 4th century BC Temple of Apollo , a peripteral Doric building.  Delphi, archaeological site, Greece,
  • The ruins of the 4th century BC Temple of Apollo , a peripteral Doric building.  Delphi, archaeological site, Greece,
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The ruins of the 4th century BC Temple of Apollo , a peripteral Doric building.  Delphi, archaeological site, Greece,
  • The ruins of the 4th century BC Temple of Apollo , a peripteral Doric building.  Delphi, archaeological site, Greece,
  • Doorway of the ruins of the Temple of Apollo. Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Doorway of the ruins of the Temple of Apollo. Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Doorway of the ruins of the Temple of Apollo. Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • Cellar with romanesque arches at the Hellanistic Ionic Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • Doorway of the ruins of the Temple of Apollo. Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Doorway of the ruins of the Temple of Apollo. Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Doorway of the ruins of the Temple of Apollo. Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Doorway of the ruins of the Temple of Apollo. Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Doorway of the ruins of the Temple of Apollo. Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Doorway of the ruins of the Temple of Apollo. Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Doorway of the ruins of the Temple of Apollo. Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Doorway of the ruins of the Temple of Apollo. Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Doorway of the ruins of the Temple of Apollo. Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Doorway of the ruins of the Temple of Apollo. Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Doorway of the ruins of the Temple of Apollo. Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Doorway of the ruins of the Temple of Apollo. Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • 4th century BC theatre of Delphi & Temple of Apollo , archaeological site, Greece,
  • 4th century BC theatre of Delphi & Temple of Apollo , archaeological site, Greece,
  • The omphalos (center) of the earth. This sacred object was located in the Adyton of the Temple of Apollo, and was viewed only by the priests and priestess who had access to the chamber. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • 4th century BC theatre of Delphi & Temple of Apollo , archaeological site, Greece,
  • The omphalos (center) of the earth. This sacred object was located in the Adyton of the Temple of Apollo, and was viewed only by the priests and priestess who had access to the chamber. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Doric Columns of the Temple of Poseidon The ruins of the Greek city of Delos, the birthplace of the twin gods Apollo and Artemis. Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Doric Columns of the Temple of Poseidon The ruins of the Greek city of Delos, the birthplace of the twin gods Apollo and Artemis. Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Column with phallus at the Stoivadeion in the Temple of Dionysus at the ruins of the Greek city of Delos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Column with phallus at the Stoivadeion in the Temple of Dionysus at the ruins of the Greek city of Delos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Doric coloums of Delphi Temple of Apollo. and ruins of Delphi archaeological site, Delphi, Greece
  • Doric coloums of Delphi Temple of Apollo. and ruins of Delphi archaeological site, Delphi, Greece
  • The Tripod of Plataeans column and the Altar of the Chiots with the columns of the temple of Apollo behind, Delphi Archaeological site, Delphi, Greece
  • The Tripod of Plataeans column and the Altar of the Chiots with the columns of the temple of Apollo behind, Delphi Archaeological site, Delphi, Greece
  • The Tripod of Plataeans column and the Altar of the Chiots with the columns of the temple of Apollo behind, Delphi Archaeological site, Delphi, Greece
  • The Tripod of Plataeans column and the Altar of the Chiots with the columns of the temple of Apollo behind, Delphi Archaeological site, Delphi, Greece
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • The Hellanistic Ionic columns of the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary with Storks nesting ontop, near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • Cellar with romanesque arches at the Hellanistic Ionic Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary near Gulpinar Village Turkey. The Temple of Apollo is dedicated rather bizarrely to Apollo as a Slayer of Mice.
  • Remains of storage pits & pots at the  Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary near Gulpinar Village Turkey.
  • Remains of storage pits & pots at the  Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary near Gulpinar Village Turkey.
  • Remains of storage pits & pots at the  Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary near Gulpinar Village Turkey.
  • Remains of storage pits & pots at the  Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary near Gulpinar Village Turkey.
  • Remains of storage pits & pots at the  Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary near Gulpinar Village Turkey.
  • Byzantine Basilica ruins at the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary near Gulpinar Village Turkey.
  • Byzantine Basilica ruins at the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary near Gulpinar Village Turkey.
  • The omphalos (center) of the earth. This sacred object was located in the Adyton of the Temple of Apollo, and was viewed only by the priests and priestess who had access to the chamber. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • The omphalos (center) of the earth. This sacred object was located in the Adyton of the Temple of Apollo, and was viewed only by the priests and priestess who had access to the chamber. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • The omphalos (center) of the earth. This sacred object was located in the Adyton of the Temple of Apollo, and was viewed only by the priests and priestess who had access to the chamber. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • The omphalos (center) of the earth. This sacred object was located in the Adyton of the Temple of Apollo, and was viewed only by the priests and priestess who had access to the chamber. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • The omphalos (center) of the earth. This sacred object was located in the Adyton of the Temple of Apollo, and was viewed only by the priests and priestess who had access to the chamber. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • The omphalos (center) of the earth. This sacred object was located in the Adyton of the Temple of Apollo, and was viewed only by the priests and priestess who had access to the chamber. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • The Tholos at the sanctuary of Athena Pronaia,  a circular building with Doric columns that was constructed between 380 and 360 BC. Delphi, archaeological site, Greece,
  • The Tholos at the sanctuary of Athena Pronaia,  a circular building with Doric columns that was constructed between 380 and 360 BC. Delphi, archaeological site, Greece,
  • The Tholos at the sanctuary of Athena Pronaia,  a circular building with Doric columns that was constructed between 380 and 360 BC. Delphi, archaeological site, Greece,
  • The Tholos at the sanctuary of Athena Pronaia,  a circular building with Doric columns that was constructed between 380 and 360 BC. Delphi, archaeological site, Greece,
  • The Tholos at the sanctuary of Athena Pronaia,  a circular building with Doric columns that was constructed between 380 and 360 BC. Delphi, archaeological site, Greece,
  • The Tholos at the sanctuary of Athena Pronaia,  a circular building with Doric columns that was constructed between 380 and 360 BC. Delphi, archaeological site, Greece,
  • The Tholos at the sanctuary of Athena Pronaia,  a circular building with Doric columns that was constructed between 380 and 360 BC. Delphi, archaeological site, Greece,
  • The Tholos at the sanctuary of Athena Pronaia,  a circular building with Doric columns that was constructed between 380 and 360 BC. Delphi, archaeological site, Greece,
  • The Tholos at the sanctuary of Athena Pronaia,  a circular building with Doric columns that was constructed between 380 and 360 BC. Delphi, archaeological site, Greece,
  • The Tholos at the sanctuary of Athena Pronaia,  a circular building with Doric columns that was constructed between 380 and 360 BC. Delphi, archaeological site, Greece,
  • The Tholos at the sanctuary of Athena Pronaia,  a circular building with Doric columns that was constructed between 380 and 360 BC. Delphi, archaeological site, Greece,
  • The Tholos at the sanctuary of Athena Pronaia,  a circular building with Doric columns that was constructed between 380 and 360 BC. Delphi, archaeological site, Greece,
  • The Tholos at the sanctuary of Athena Pronaia,  a circular building with Doric columns that was constructed between 380 and 360 BC. Delphi, archaeological site, Greece,
  • The Tholos at the sanctuary of Athena Pronaia,  a circular building with Doric columns that was constructed between 380 and 360 BC. Delphi, archaeological site, Greece,
  • The Tholos at the sanctuary of Athena Pronaia,  a circular building with Doric columns that was constructed between 380 and 360 BC. Delphi, archaeological site, Greece,
  • The Tholos at the sanctuary of Athena Pronaia,  a circular building with Doric columns that was constructed between 380 and 360 BC. Delphi, archaeological site, Greece,
  • The Tholos at the sanctuary of Athena Pronaia,  a circular building with Doric columns that was constructed between 380 and 360 BC. Delphi, archaeological site, Greece,
  • The Tholos at the sanctuary of Athena Pronaia,  a circular building with Doric columns that was constructed between 380 and 360 BC. Delphi, archaeological site, Greece,
  • The Tholos at the sanctuary of Athena Pronaia,  a circular building with Doric columns that was constructed between 380 and 360 BC. Delphi, archaeological site, Greece,
  • Remains of storage pits & pots at the  Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary near Gulpinar Village Turkey.
  • Remains of storage pits & pots at the  Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary near Gulpinar Village Turkey.
  • Remains of storage pits & pots at the  Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary near Gulpinar Village Turkey.
  • Remains of storage pits & pots at the  Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary near Gulpinar Village Turkey.
  • Remains of storage pits & pots at the  Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary near Gulpinar Village Turkey.
  • Byzantine Basilica ruins at the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary near Gulpinar Village Turkey.
  • Byzantine Basilica ruins at the Apollo Smintheion Sanctuary near Gulpinar Village Turkey.
  • Column from the temple of Apollo, the Greek archaeological site of Ancient Aegina, Kolna, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Column from the temple of Apollo, the Greek archaeological site of Ancient Aegina, Kolna, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Column from the temple of Apollo, the Greek archaeological site of Ancient Aegina, Kolna, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Roman Temple of Apollo  Pompeii archaeological site, Italy
  • Column from the temple of Apollo, the Greek archaeological site of Ancient Aegina, Kolna, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Column from the temple of Apollo, the Greek archaeological site of Ancient Aegina, Kolna, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Column from the temple of Apollo, the Greek archaeological site of Ancient Aegina, Kolna, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Roman Temple of Apollo  Pompeii archaeological site, Italy
  • Classical Sphinx attributed to Greek Sculptor Kalamis from the temple of apollo, The Greek archaeological site of Ancient Aegina, Kolna, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The 1st cent B.C Terrace Temple dedicated to Zeus Soteros  and round sanctuary dating back to the 5th cent B.C and dedicated to the god King Basileus Kaunios, the son of Apollo’s son Miletos and the water nymph Kyanee, . Archaeological site of  Kaunos (Caunos), Dalyan Turkey
  • The 1st cent B.C Terrace Temple dedicated to Zeus Soteros  and round sanctuary dating back to the 5th cent B.C and dedicated to the god King Basileus Kaunios, the son of Apollo’s son Miletos and the water nymph Kyanee, . In the background is the silted up harbour.  Archaeological site of  Kaunos (Caunos), Dalyan Turkey
  • The 1st cent B.C Terrace Temple dedicated to Zeus Soteros  and round sanctuary dating back to the 5th cent B.C and dedicated to the god King Basileus Kaunios, the son of Apollo’s son Miletos and the water nymph Kyanee, . In the background is the silted up harbour.  Archaeological site of  Kaunos (Caunos), Dalyan Turkey
  • The 1st cent B.C Terrace Temple dedicated to Zeus Soteros  and round sanctuary dating back to the 5th cent B.C and dedicated to the god King Basileus Kaunios, the son of Apollo’s son Miletos and the water nymph Kyanee, . Archaeological site of  Kaunos (Caunos), Dalyan Turkey
  • Columns of the House of Dionysos in the ruins of the Greek city of Delos, the birthplace of the twin gods Apollo and Artemis.
  • Delphic coloumn capitals of the ruins of the Greek city of Delos, the birthplace of the twin gods Apollo and Artemis. Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • The Minoan Fountain in the ruins of the Greek city of Delos, the birthplace of the twin gods Apollo and Artemis. Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Columns of the House of Dionysos in the ruins of the Greek city of Delos, the birthplace of the twin gods Apollo and Artemis.
  • Delphic coloumn capitals of the ruins of the Greek city of Delos, the birthplace of the twin gods Apollo and Artemis. Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • The ruins of the Greek Villa in the city of Delos, the birthplace of the twin gods Apollo and Artemis. Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • The ruins of the Greek Villa in the city of Delos, the birthplace of the twin gods Apollo and Artemis. Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • The 1st cent B.C Terrace Temple dedicated to Zeus Soteros  and round sanctuary dating back to the 5th cent B.C and dedicated to the god King Basileus Kaunios, the son of Apollo’s son Miletos and the water nymph Kyanee, . In the background is the silted up harbour.  Archaeological site of  Kaunos (Caunos), Dalyan Turkey
  • The 1st cent B.C Terrace Temple dedicated to Zeus Soteros  and round sanctuary dating back to the 5th cent B.C and dedicated to the god King Basileus Kaunios, the son of Apollo’s son Miletos and the water nymph Kyanee, . In the background is the silted up harbour.  Archaeological site of  Kaunos (Caunos), Dalyan Turkey
  • The 1st cent B.C Terrace Temple dedicated to Zeus Soteros  and round sanctuary dating back to the 5th cent B.C and dedicated to the god King Basileus Kaunios, the son of Apollo’s son Miletos and the water nymph Kyanee, . In the background is the silted up harbour.  Archaeological site of  Kaunos (Caunos), Dalyan Turkey
  • The 1st cent B.C Terrace Temple dedicated to Zeus Soteros  and round sanctuary dating back to the 5th cent B.C and dedicated to the god King Basileus Kaunios, the son of Apollo’s son Miletos and the water nymph Kyanee, . In the background is the silted up harbour.  Archaeological site of  Kaunos (Caunos), Dalyan Turkey
  • The 1st cent B.C Terrace Temple dedicated to Zeus Soteros  and round sanctuary dating back to the 5th cent B.C and dedicated to the god King Basileus Kaunios, the son of Apollo’s son Miletos and the water nymph Kyanee, . In the background is the silted up harbour.  Archaeological site of  Kaunos (Caunos), Dalyan Turkey
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Picture of the Nymphaeum Fountain located inside the sacred area in front of the Apollo temple on the main colonnaded road. Dated from the 2nd century AD and repaired in the 5th century during the Byzantine era. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.
  • Picture of the Nymphaeum located inside the sacred area in front of the Apollo temple on the main colonnaded road. Dated from the 2nd century AD and repaired in the 5th century during the Byzantine era. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.

FunkyStock Picture Library Resource

Picture The Past

ABOUT

FunkyStock Picture Library free resource for professional editorial picture editors, picture researchers, historical scholars and students and enthusiasts who want to browse some of the best pictures and images of historic countries, historical places, archaeological sites and the very best museum antiquities and artefacts exhibits in Europe and the Middle East.

Pictures and Images can be downloaded or bought as stock photos or photo art prints.

COUNTRIES

Browse travel pictures and images of historic places and archaeological sites of countries in Europe and the Middle East.

VIEW COUNTRIES INDEX....

HISTORICAL

Explore the past through pictures and images of its historic places. See the great palaces, castles and cities of antiquity as well as the great archaeological sites where our ancestors made history.

EXPLORE HISTORICAL PLACES...

MUSEUMS

Browse pictures & images the treasured artefacts and antiquities exhibits from the great Museum of Europe and the Middle East. See the art and objects made by our ancestors.

SEE MUESEUM ANTIQUITIES....