• The Rostra with the arch of Septmius Severus behind (203) The Forum, Rome
  • The Temple of Saturn, The forum, Rome
  • The Arch of Septmius Severus ( AD203) The Forum, Rome
  • The Arch of Septmius Severus ( AD203) The Forum, Rome
  • The forum Rome
  • Columns in the Forum Rome
  • The Forum Rome
  • The Forum Rome
  • Columns in the Forum Rome
  • Doric & Corinthian columns of the Roman colonade in the Forum of Pompeii.
  • The temple of Antonius and Faustina. The Forum Rome ; The Forum Rome
  • The temple of Antonius and Faustina. The Forum Rome ; The Forum Rome
  • The Temple of Castor and Pollux, The Forum Rome
  • The Temple of Castor and Pollux, The Forum Rome
  • fallen columns looking towards the Arch of Septimius Severus, The Forum Rome
  • The Temple of Castor and Pollux, The Forum Rome
  • The Temple of Castor and Pollux, The Forum Rome
  • The Temple of Castor and Pollux, The Forum Rome
  • The temple of Antonius and Faustina. The Forum Rome
  • View of the Forum with Temple of Antonius and Faustina ( left) and Temple of Venus and Roma (right).  Rome
  • View of the Forum with Temple of Antonius and Faustina ( left) and Temple of Venus and Roma (right).  Rome
  • Arch Of Titus, The Forum Rome
  • Arch Of Titus, The Forum Rome
  • Temple of Vesta, The Forum Rome
  • Temple of Vesta, The Forum Rome
  • The Roman Corinthian Porticus, columns & tables of the money changers at the entrance of the Macellum in the Forum of Pompeii archaeological site, Italy.
  • Columns of Emperors Trajan's Forum and Trajans Column . Rome
  • Doric & Corinthian columns of the Roman colonade in the Forum of Pompeii.
  • Doric & Corinthian columns of the Roman colonade in the Forum of Pompeii.
  • Doric & Corinthian columns of the Roman colonade in the Forum of Pompeii.
  • Doric & Corinthian columns of the Roman colonade in the Forum of Pompeii.
  • Doric & Corinthian columns of the Roman colonade in the Forum of Pompeii.
  • Doric & Corinthian columns of the Roman colonade in the Forum of Pompeii.
  • Doric & Corinthian columns of the Roman colonade in the Forum of Pompeii.
  • Doric & Corinthian columns of the Roman colonade in the Forum of Pompeii.
  • Doric & Corinthian columns of the Roman colonade in the Forum of Pompeii.
  • Doric & Corinthian columns of the Roman colonade in the Forum of Pompeii.
  • Roman marble sculptured relief with cupids about to sacrifice bulls, from the Temple of Venus Genetrix in the Forum of Caesar Rome 30 AD , inv 6718 Farnese Collection, Naples Archaeological Museum
  • Roman marble sculptured relief with cupids about to sacrifice bulls, from the Temple of Venus Genetrix in the Forum of Caesar Rome 30 AD , inv 6718 Farnese Collection, Naples Archaeological Museum
  • Roman marble sculptured relief with cupids about to sacrifice bulls, from the Temple of Venus Genetrix in the Forum of Caesar Rome 30 AD , inv 6718 Farnese Collection, Naples Archaeological Museum
  • Roman marble sculptured relief with cupids about to sacrifice bulls, from the Temple of Venus Genetrix in the Forum of Caesar Rome 30 AD , inv 6718 Farnese Collection, Naples Archaeological Museum
  • Roman marble sculptured relief with cupids about to sacrifice bulls, from the Temple of Venus Genetrix in the Forum of Caesar Rome 30 AD , inv 6718 Farnese Collection, Naples Archaeological Museum
  • The Roman Corinthian Porticus, columns & tables of the money changers at the entrance of the Macellum in the Forum of Pompeii archaeological site, Italy.
  • The Roman Corinthian Porticus, columns & tables of the money changers at the entrance of the Macellum in the Forum of Pompeii archaeological site, Italy.
  • The Roman Corinthian Porticus, columns & tables of the money changers at the entrance of the Macellum in the Forum of Pompeii archaeological site, Italy.
  • The Roman Corinthian Porticus, columns & tables of the money changers at the entrance of the Macellum in the Forum of Pompeii archaeological site, Italy.
  • Doric & Corinthian columns of the Roman colonade in the Forum of Pompeii.
  • The Temple of Castor and Pollux, The Forum Rome
  • Paris - France - the Forum Church of St Magdelaine - close up of freeze
  • Paris - France - the Forum Church of St Magdelaine
  • Satatue known as the Sitting captive - a Roman sculpture of the 1st or 2nd century SAD made out of  Green Breche stone from the Wadi Hammamat, Egypt. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The body can be dated  to the 1st century AD and is probably from the near east. The recomposed statue , named the defeated barbarian king, was the centre piece of a room in the Villa Albani (1692-1779) in Rome.  The Albani Collection, Inv No. LL 17 or Ma 1383, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Satatue known as the Sitting captive - a Roman sculpture of the 1st or 2nd century SAD made out of  Green Breche stone from the Wadi Hammamat, Egypt. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The body can be dated  to the 1st century AD and is probably from the near east. The recomposed statue , named the defeated barbarian king, was the centre piece of a room in the Villa Albani (1692-1779) in Rome.  The Albani Collection, Inv No. LL 17 or Ma 1383, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Satatue known as the Sitting captive - a Roman sculpture of the 1st or 2nd century SAD made out of  Green Breche stone from the Wadi Hammamat, Egypt. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The body can be dated  to the 1st century AD and is probably from the near east. The recomposed statue , named the defeated barbarian king, was the centre piece of a room in the Villa Albani (1692-1779) in Rome.  The Albani Collection, Inv No. LL 17 or Ma 1383, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Satatue known as the Sitting captive - a Roman sculpture of the 1st or 2nd century SAD made out of  Green Breche stone from the Wadi Hammamat, Egypt. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The body can be dated  to the 1st century AD and is probably from the near east. The recomposed statue , named the defeated barbarian king, was the centre piece of a room in the Villa Albani (1692-1779) in Rome.  The Albani Collection, Inv No. LL 17 or Ma 1383, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Satatue known as the Sitting captive - a Roman sculpture of the 1st or 2nd century SAD made out of  Green Breche stone from the Wadi Hammamat, Egypt. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The body can be dated  to the 1st century AD and is probably from the near east. The recomposed statue , named the defeated barbarian king, was the centre piece of a room in the Villa Albani (1692-1779) in Rome.  The Albani Collection, Inv No. LL 17 or Ma 1383, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Satatue known as the Sitting captive - a Roman sculpture of the 1st or 2nd century SAD made out of  Green Breche stone from the Wadi Hammamat, Egypt. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The body can be dated  to the 1st century AD and is probably from the near east. The recomposed statue , named the defeated barbarian king, was the centre piece of a room in the Villa Albani (1692-1779) in Rome.  The Albani Collection, Inv No. LL 17 or Ma 1383, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Satatue known as the Sitting captive - a Roman sculpture of the 1st or 2nd century SAD made out of  Green Breche stone from the Wadi Hammamat, Egypt. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The body can be dated  to the 1st century AD and is probably from the near east. The recomposed statue , named the defeated barbarian king, was the centre piece of a room in the Villa Albani (1692-1779) in Rome.  The Albani Collection, Inv No. LL 17 or Ma 1383, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Satatue known as the Sitting captive - a Roman sculpture of the 1st or 2nd century SAD made out of  Green Breche stone from the Wadi Hammamat, Egypt. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The body can be dated  to the 1st century AD and is probably from the near east. The recomposed statue , named the defeated barbarian king, was the centre piece of a room in the Villa Albani (1692-1779) in Rome.  The Albani Collection, Inv No. LL 17 or Ma 1383, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Satatue known as the Sitting captive - a Roman sculpture of the 1st or 2nd century SAD made out of  Green Breche stone from the Wadi Hammamat, Egypt. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The body can be dated  to the 1st century AD and is probably from the near east. The recomposed statue , named the defeated barbarian king, was the centre piece of a room in the Villa Albani (1692-1779) in Rome.  The Albani Collection, Inv No. LL 17 or Ma 1383, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Satatue known as the Sitting captive - a Roman sculpture of the 1st or 2nd century SAD made out of  Green Breche stone from the Wadi Hammamat, Egypt. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The body can be dated  to the 1st century AD and is probably from the near east. The recomposed statue , named the defeated barbarian king, was the centre piece of a room in the Villa Albani (1692-1779) in Rome.  The Albani Collection, Inv No. LL 17 or Ma 1383, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman mosaic in the House of the Athlete or Desultor, located near the forum, contains a humorous mosaic of an athlete or acrobat riding a donkey back to front while holding a cup in his outstretched hand. It may possibly represent Silenus also known as the wine God Dionysus or Bacchus. Volubilis Archaeological Site, near Meknes, Morocco
  • The Arch of Tiberius at the entrance to the Forum of Pompeii.
  • The Arch of Tiberius at the entrance to the Forum of Pompeii.
  • The Arch of Tiberius at the entrance to the Forum of Pompeii.
  • The Forum Rome
  • Modern sculpture by Jmenez Deredia in the Forum . Rome
  • Modern sculpture by Jmenez Deredia in the Forum . Rome
  • Modern sculpture by Jmenez Deredia in the Forum . Rome
  • Modern sculpture by Jmenez Deredia in the Forum . Rome
  • Modern sculpture by Jmenez Deredia in the Forum . Rome
  • Modern sculpture by Jmenez Deredia in the Forum . Rome
  • Modern sculpture by Jmenez Deredia in the Forum . Rome
  • 10th century Romanesque San Michele in Foro is a Roman Catholic basilica church in the old Roman Forum of Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • 10th century Romanesque San Michele in Foro is a Roman Catholic basilica church in the old Roman Forum of Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Roman stones left in the old forum and used in the foundations of  the Byzantine St Donat's Church
  • Roman stones left in the old forum and used in the foundations of  the Byzantine St Donat's Church
  • Base of a Roman Temple ( 200 BC) in  Paestum dedicated to the Capitoline Triad, Jupiter, Juno and Minerva, in the Roman Forum. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • Base of a Roman Temple ( 200 BC) in  Paestrum dedicated to the Capitoline Triad, Jupiter, Juno and Minerva, in the Roman Forum. Paestrum archaeological site, Italy.
  • House on the Palatine hill,  Rome

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