• The Tower of Radojkovic, the regional museum in the ancient town of ?krip in Bra? island, Croatia
  • The Tower of Radojkovic, the regional museum in the ancient town of ?krip in Bra? island, Croatia
  • The Tower of Radojkovic, the regional museum in the ancient town of ?krip in Bra? island, Croatia
  • The Tower of Radojkovic, the regional museum in the ancient town of ?krip in Bra? island, Croatia
  • The Tower of Radojkovic, the regional museum in the ancient town of skrip in Brac island, Croatia
  • well at the Tower of Radojkovic, the regional museum in the ancient town of ?krip in Bra? island, Croatia
  • Painted walnut sculpture of the decent from the Cross, circa 1470-1490 possibly from Antwerp or the Brabant region of Belgium.  Inv RF 4696,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Second century Roman Christian funerary stele for 3 dead people from Africa Proconsularis. The stele depicts the deceased:  Fausata who died age 75, a man who died age 70 and a child who died age 2 years 6 months. From the first half of the second century AD from the region of Bou Arada in present day Tunisia. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • Second century Roman Christian funerary stele for 3 dead people from Africa Proconsularis. The stele depicts the deceased:  Fausata who died age 75, a man who died age 70 and a child who died age 2 years 6 months. From the first half of the second century AD from the region of Bou Arada in present day Tunisia. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • Second century Roman Christian funerary stele for 3 dead people from Africa Proconsularis. The stele depicts the deceased:  Fausata who died age 75, a man who died age 70 and a child who died age 2 years 6 months. From the first half of the second century AD from the region of Bou Arada in present day Tunisia. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 5th century Roman mosaic panel of the ceremonial dressing of a lady. The lady was of the landed gentry from inland Carthage. She is sitting on a high backed armchair and is surrounded by two ornatrix, maids, whoa re helping her to apply make up and style her hair. Items related to bathing and grooming are depicted on the background of the mosaic. The maid hold a mirror for the lady in which we see her reflection The scene is an allegory of the myth of ‘Venus at her toilet’.<br />
<br />
From the floor of the changing room of the private baths of the Sidi Ghraib villa, Borj El Amre region, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 5th century Roman mosaic panel of the ceremonial dressing of a lady. The lady was of the landed gentry from inland Carthage. She is sitting on a high backed armchair and is surrounded by two ornatrix, maids, whoa re helping her to apply make up and style her hair. Items related to bathing and grooming are depicted on the background of the mosaic. The maid hold a mirror for the lady in which we see her reflection The scene is an allegory of the myth of ‘Venus at her toilet’.<br />
<br />
From the floor of the changing room of the private baths of the Sidi Ghraib villa, Borj El Amre region, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 5th century Roman mosaic panel of the ceremonial dressing of a lady. The lady was of the landed gentry from inland Carthage. She is sitting on a high backed armchair and is surrounded by two ornatrix, maids, whoa re helping her to apply make up and style her hair. Items related to bathing and grooming are depicted on the background of the mosaic. The maid hold a mirror for the lady in which we see her reflection The scene is an allegory of the myth of ‘Venus at her toilet’.<br />
<br />
From the floor of the changing room of the private baths of the Sidi Ghraib villa, Borj El Amre region, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 5th century Roman mosaic panel of the ceremonial dressing of a lady. The lady was of the landed gentry from inland Carthage. She is sitting on a high backed armchair and is surrounded by two ornatrix, maids, whoa re helping her to apply make up and style her hair. Items related to bathing and grooming are depicted on the background of the mosaic. The maid hold a mirror for the lady in which we see her reflection The scene is an allegory of the myth of ‘Venus at her toilet’.<br />
<br />
From the floor of the changing room of the private baths of the Sidi Ghraib villa, Borj El Amre region, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Black background
  • 5th century Roman mosaic panel of the ceremonial dressing of a lady. The lady was of the landed gentry from inland Carthage. She is sitting on a high backed armchair and is surrounded by two ornatrix, maids, whoa re helping her to apply make up and style her hair. Items related to bathing and grooming are depicted on the background of the mosaic. The maid hold a mirror for the lady in which we see her reflection The scene is an allegory of the myth of ‘Venus at her toilet’.<br />
<br />
From the floor of the changing room of the private baths of the Sidi Ghraib villa, Borj El Amre region, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. White background
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Painted walnut sculpture of the decent from the Cross, circa 1470-1490 possibly from Antwerp or the Brabant region of Belgium.  Inv RF 4696,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted walnut sculpture of the decent from the Cross, circa 1470-1490 possibly from Antwerp or the Brabant region of Belgium.  Inv RF 4696,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted walnut sculpture of the decent from the Cross, circa 1470-1490 possibly from Antwerp or the Brabant region of Belgium.  Inv RF 4696,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted walnut sculpture of the decent from the Cross, circa 1470-1490 possibly from Antwerp or the Brabant region of Belgium.  Inv RF 4696,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Guardian Sphinxes, part lion & part sphinx from the gable end of a vaulted Lycian sarcophagus from the Heros of the Acropolis (Building H Xanthos). The sphinx was linked to death and above each sphinx is a lion, a guardian of the dead.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-24-25 sculpture B 290.
  • Lion from the "Satyr Hunting Wils Animals, freezes, 460 B.C. From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-2-9 (sculpture B 2902- 298).
  • Satyr from the "Satyr Hunting Wils Animals, freezes, 460 B.C. From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-2-9 (sculpture B 2902- 298).
  • Lion killing deer  from the "Satyr Hunting Wils Animals, freezes, 460 B.C.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-2-9 (sculpture B 2902- 298).
  • Wild Foul freeze from the east side of Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb"  (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit B299 - B306, excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Wild Foul freeze from the east side of Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb"  (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit B299 - B306, excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • The sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • The Lycian "Harpy Tomb", a marble pillar tomb from 480-470 B.C. The the Greek Archaic style carvings of four winged female figures, Harpies" that covered the tomb were removed by Charles Fellows and are now in the British Museum.  Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage Archaeological Site, Turkey
  • The Lycian "Harpy Tomb", a marble pillar tomb from 480-470 B.C. The the Greek Archaic style carvings of four winged female figures, Harpies" that covered the tomb were removed by Charles Fellows and are now in the British Museum.  Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage Archaeological Site, Turkey
  • The Lycian "Harpy Tomb", a marble pillar tomb from 480-470 B.C. The the Greek Archaic style carvings of four winged female figures, Harpies" that covered the tomb were removed by Charles Fellows and are now in the British Museum.  Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage Archaeological Site, Turkey
  • Second century Roman Christian funerary stele for 3 dead people from Africa Proconsularis. The stele depicts the deceased:  Fausata who died age 75, a man who died age 70 and a child who died age 2 years 6 months. From the first half of the second century AD from the region of Bou Arada in present day Tunisia. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • Second century Roman Christian funerary stele for 3 dead people from Africa Proconsularis. The stele depicts the deceased:  Fausata who died age 75, a man who died age 70 and a child who died age 2 years 6 months. From the first half of the second century AD from the region of Bou Arada in present day Tunisia. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 5th century Roman mosaic panel of the ceremonial dressing of a lady. The lady was of the landed gentry from inland Carthage. She is sitting on a high backed armchair and is surrounded by two ornatrix, maids, whoa re helping her to apply make up and style her hair. Items related to bathing and grooming are depicted on the background of the mosaic. The maid hold a mirror for the lady in which we see her reflection The scene is an allegory of the myth of ‘Venus at her toilet’.<br />
<br />
From the floor of the changing room of the private baths of the Sidi Ghraib villa, Borj El Amre region, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Painted walnut sculpture of the decent from the Cross, circa 1470-1490 possibly from Antwerp or the Brabant region of Belgium.  Inv RF 4696,  The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • The Tomb of Payava ( 360 B.C), a typical Gothic arch shaped double barrel vaulted pillar tomb. From an inscription on the Tomb Payava was a ruler under Persian rule of Xanthos.  From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Freeze from the Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb" after the female headed birds at the corners (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Wild Foul freeze from the east side of Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb"  (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit B299 - B306, excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Two warriors clasing shields on a freeze from the Large Podium of the sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • Statue of a Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) from the sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid  Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • The Lycian "Harpy Tomb", a marble pillar tomb from 480-470 B.C. The the Greek Archaic style carvings of four winged female figures, Harpies" that covered the tomb were removed by Charles Fellows and are now in the British Museum.  Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage Archaeological Site, Turkey
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Fifth Century Christian Eastern Roman Byzantine  funerary mosaic from Mezghani Christian necropolis mounds in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis , (Tunisian Sfax) dedicated to Priscianus. Above the memorial text is the Constantinian monogram depicting the Christian Chi-Rho symbol used by the Roman emperor Constantine I as part of his military standard (vexillum). The layout of the mosaic is typical of those excavated in the Sfax region from this period.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • Fifth Century Christian Eastern Roman Byzantine  funerary mosaic from Mezghani Christian necropolis mounds in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis , (Tunisian Sfax) dedicated to Priscianus. Above the memorial text is the Constantinian monogram depicting the Christian Chi-Rho symbol used by the Roman emperor Constantine I as part of his military standard (vexillum). The layout of the mosaic is typical of those excavated in the Sfax region from this period.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • Fifth Century Christian Eastern Roman Byzantine  funerary mosaic from Mezghani Christian necropolis mounds in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis , (Tunisian Sfax) dedicated to Priscianus. Above the memorial text is the Constantinian monogram depicting the Christian Chi-Rho symbol used by the Roman emperor Constantine I as part of his military standard (vexillum). The layout of the mosaic is typical of those excavated in the Sfax region from this period.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Fifth Century Christian Eastern Roman Byzantine  funerary mosaic from Mezghani Christian necropolis mounds in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis , (Tunisian Sfax) dedicated to Priscianus. Above the memorial text is the Constantinian monogram depicting the Christian Chi-Rho symbol used by the Roman emperor Constantine I as part of his military standard (vexillum). The layout of the mosaic is typical of those excavated in the Sfax region from this period.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • Fifth Century Christian Eastern Roman Byzantine  funerary mosaic from Mezghani Christian necropolis mounds in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis , (Tunisian Sfax) dedicated to Priscianus. Above the memorial text is the Constantinian monogram depicting the Christian Chi-Rho symbol used by the Roman emperor Constantine I as part of his military standard (vexillum). The layout of the mosaic is typical of those excavated in the Sfax region from this period.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • Fifth century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian funerary mosaic from Leptis Minus-Lemto in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis , (Tunisian Sehel Region) dedicated to Cresconius, depicting the Christian Chi-Rho symbol used by the Roman emperor Constantine I as part of his military standard (vexillum). <br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • Fifth century Roman Christian funerary mosaic from Leptis Minus-Lemto in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis , (Tunisian Sehel Region) dedicated to Cresconius, depicting the Christian Chi-Rho symbol used by the Roman emperor Constantine I as part of his military standard (vexillum). <br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • Fifth century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian funerary mosaic from Leptis Minus-Lemto in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis , (Tunisian Sehel Region) dedicated to Cresconius, depicting the Christian Chi-Rho symbol used by the Roman emperor Constantine I as part of his military standard (vexillum). <br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Fifth century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian funerary mosaic from Leptis Minus-Lemto in the Roman province of Africa Proconsularis , (Tunisian Sehel Region) dedicated to Cresconius, depicting the Christian Chi-Rho symbol used by the Roman emperor Constantine I as part of his military standard (vexillum). <br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 6th century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian mosaic of the mosaic of the Most Holy Sepulchre and the memorial of Golgotha in Jerusalem .<br />
<br />
In the foreground is the dome of Golgotha, erected at the site of the crucifixion ofJesus Christ, from where  the four rivers of Paradise flow: the Geon = Gihon, the Fison = Pishon, the Tigris and Euphrates, symbolically referring to the Word (the four gospels). Sheep, representing the faithfuls, are drinking from the rivers. In the background are depictions of the the Holy Sepulchre with its door ajar, and two other buildings, symbolising Bethlehem and Jerusalem. <br />
<br />
From the threshold of the martyrdom erected in honour of Jesus Christ at the church of Iunca - Younga (in present the day region of Mahres in Tunisia). The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian mosaic of the mosaic of the Most Holy Sepulchre and the memorial of Golgotha in Jerusalem .<br />
<br />
In the foreground is the dome of Golgotha, erected at the site of the crucifixion ofJesus Christ, from where  the four rivers of Paradise flow: the Geon = Gihon, the Fison = Pishon, the Tigris and Euphrates, symbolically referring to the Word (the four gospels). Sheep, representing the faithfuls, are drinking from the rivers. In the background are depictions of the the Holy Sepulchre with its door ajar, and two other buildings, symbolising Bethlehem and Jerusalem. <br />
<br />
From the threshold of the martyrdom erected in honour of Jesus Christ at the church of Iunca - Younga (in present the day region of Mahres in Tunisia). The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian mosaic of the mosaic of the Most Holy Sepulchre and the memorial of Golgotha in Jerusalem .<br />
<br />
In the foreground is the dome of Golgotha, erected at the site of the crucifixion ofJesus Christ, from where  the four rivers of Paradise flow: the Geon = Gihon, the Fison = Pishon, the Tigris and Euphrates, symbolically referring to the Word (the four gospels). Sheep, representing the faithfuls, are drinking from the rivers. In the background are depictions of the the Holy Sepulchre with its door ajar, and two other buildings, symbolising Bethlehem and Jerusalem. <br />
<br />
From the threshold of the martyrdom erected in honour of Jesus Christ at the church of Iunca - Younga (in present the day region of Mahres in Tunisia). The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian mosaic of the mosaic of the Most Holy Sepulchre and the memorial of Golgotha in Jerusalem .<br />
<br />
In the foreground is the dome of Golgotha, erected at the site of the crucifixion ofJesus Christ, from where  the four rivers of Paradise flow: the Geon = Gihon, the Fison = Pishon, the Tigris and Euphrates, symbolically referring to the Word (the four gospels). Sheep, representing the faithfuls, are drinking from the rivers. In the background are depictions of the the Holy Sepulchre with its door ajar, and two other buildings, symbolising Bethlehem and Jerusalem. <br />
<br />
From the threshold of the martyrdom erected in honour of Jesus Christ at the church of Iunca - Younga (in present the day region of Mahres in Tunisia). The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 6th century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian mosaic of the mosaic of the Most Holy Sepulchre and the memorial of Golgotha in Jerusalem .<br />
<br />
In the foreground is the dome of Golgotha, erected at the site of the crucifixion ofJesus Christ, from where  the four rivers of Paradise flow: the Geon = Gihon, the Fison = Pishon, the Tigris and Euphrates, symbolically referring to the Word (the four gospels). Sheep, representing the faithfuls, are drinking from the rivers. In the background are depictions of the the Holy Sepulchre with its door ajar, and two other buildings, symbolising Bethlehem and Jerusalem. <br />
<br />
From the threshold of the martyrdom erected in honour of Jesus Christ at the church of Iunca - Younga (in present the day region of Mahres in Tunisia). The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • Worker with a column on a horse cart, a detail from an early seventh Century Christian Roman Byzantine commemoration mosaic from the baptistery of a rural church in Wadi Arremal, present day Zaghouan Region of Tunisia, The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.<br />
<br />
The mosaic shows workers construction the early christian church the mosaic commemorates. The mosaic can be regarded as being late Roman of early Byzantine Roman as the area came under the rule of Constantinople during this period
  • Early seventh Century Christian Roman Byzantine commemoration mosaic from the baptistery of a rural church in Wadi Arremal, present day Zaghouan Region of Tunisia. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The mosaic shows workers construction the early christian church the mosaic commemorates. The mosaic can be regarded as being late Roman of early Byzantine Roman as the area came under the rule of Constantinople during this period
  • Early seventh Century Christian Roman Byzantine commemoration mosaic from the baptistery of a rural church in Wadi Arremal, present day Zaghouan Region of Tunisia. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The mosaic shows workers construction the early christian church the mosaic commemorates. The mosaic can be regarded as being late Roman of early Byzantine Roman as the area came under the rule of Constantinople during this period
  • Early seventh Century Christian Roman Byzantine commemoration mosaic from the baptistery of a rural church in Wadi Arremal, present day Zaghouan Region of Tunisia. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The mosaic shows workers construction the early christian church the mosaic commemorates. The mosaic can be regarded as being late Roman of early Byzantine Roman as the area came under the rule of Constantinople during this period
  • Early seventh Century Christian Roman Byzantine commemoration mosaic from the baptistery of a rural church in Wadi Arremal, present day Zaghouan Region of Tunisia. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.<br />
<br />
The mosaic shows workers construction the early christian church the mosaic commemorates. The mosaic can be regarded as being late Roman of early Byzantine Roman as the area came under the rule of Constantinople during this period
  • Early seventh Century Christian Eastern Roman Byzantine  commemoration mosaic from the baptistery of a rural church in Wadi Arremal, present day Zaghouan Region of Tunisia. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.<br />
<br />
The mosaic shows workers construction the early christian church the mosaic commemorates. The mosaic can be regarded as being late Roman of early Byzantine Roman as the area came under the rule of Constantinople during this period
  • Roman mosaic depicting The Education of Achilles by the Centaur Chiron. Achilles , left, is depicted riding a centaur ( mosaic of its body s missing) and is about to kill a deer. In the bottom right hand corner is a Chimera was, according to Greek mythology, a monstrous fire-breathing hybrid creature of Lycia in Asia Minor, composed of the parts of more than one animal. The mosaic follows the story of Bellerophon who was a ‘great slayer of monsters’. From Belalis Major (Henshir El-Fawar ) in the Beja region of Tunisia. Early 7th century AD.Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic depicting The Education of Achilles by the Centaur Chiron. Achilles , left, is depicted riding a centaur ( mosaic of its body s missing) and is about to kill a deer. In the bottom right hand corner is a Chimera was, according to Greek mythology, a monstrous fire-breathing hybrid creature of Lycia in Asia Minor, composed of the parts of more than one animal. The mosaic follows the story of Bellerophon who was a ‘great slayer of monsters’. From Belalis Major (Henshir El-Fawar ) in the Beja region of Tunisia. Early 7th century AD.Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic depicting The Education of Achilles by the Centaur Chiron. Achilles , left, is depicted riding a centaur ( mosaic of its body s missing) and is about to kill a deer. In the bottom right hand corner is a Chimera was, according to Greek mythology, a monstrous fire-breathing hybrid creature of Lycia in Asia Minor, composed of the parts of more than one animal. The mosaic follows the story of Bellerophon who was a ‘great slayer of monsters’. From Belalis Major (Henshir El-Fawar ) in the Beja region of Tunisia. Early 7th century AD.Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Neo-Assyrian basalt statue of King Shalmaneser III (858-824 B.C) . Inscription reads "Shalmaneser, the great king, the mighty king, king of all four region, the powerful and the mighty rival of the princes of the whole earth the great ones, the kings, son of Assur-Nasirapli, King of the universe, King of Assyria, grandson of ~Tukultiu-Ninurta, King of the Universe, King of Assyria". The inscription continues with his campaigns &b deeds in Uratu, Syria, Que & Tabal ending " At the time I rebuilt the walls of my city Ashur from their foundations to their summits. I made an image of my royal self and set it up in the metal gate". From Assur ( Qala't Sharqat) Iraq. Istanbul Archaeological Museum, Inv no. 4650.
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • African animals and fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • A tiger hunting from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • A tiger hunting from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • African animals and fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • Fish eating a serpant from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • African animals and fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • A bird from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • African animals and fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • A lion hunting from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • A bird from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • African animals and fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • African animals and fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • A lion hunting from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • African animals and fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • Hunting scene with a hare and dog from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • African animals and fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • African animals and fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • Fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • Hunting scene with a hare and dog from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.Israel.
  • Fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • African animals and fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • African animals and fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • African animals and fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • Fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • Fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • Fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • Fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • Fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • Fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • Fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • Fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • African animals and fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • African animals and fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • African animals and fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • African animals and fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • African animals and fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • African animals and fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • African animals and fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • African animals and fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • African animals and fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • African animals and fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • The Tomb of Payava ( 360 B.C), a typical Gothic arch shaped double barrel vaulted pillar tomb. From an inscription on the Tomb Payava was a ruler under Persian rule of Xanthos.  From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • The Tomb of Payava ( 360 B.C), a typical Gothic arch shaped double barrel vaulted pillar tomb. From an inscription on the Tomb Payava was a ruler under Persian rule of Xanthos.  From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • The Tomb of Payava ( 360 B.C), a typical Gothic arch shaped double barrel vaulted pillar tomb. From an inscription on the Tomb Payava was a ruler under Persian rule of Xanthos.  From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Guardian Sphinxes, part lion & part sphinx from the gable end of a vaulted Lycian sarcophagus from the Heros of the Acropolis (Building H Xanthos). The sphinx was linked to death and above each sphinx is a lion, a guardian of the dead.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-24-25 sculpture B 290.
  • Guardian Sphinxes, part lion & part sphinx from the gable end of a vaulted Lycian sarcophagus from the Heros of the Acropolis (Building H Xanthos). The sphinx was linked to death and above each sphinx is a lion, a guardian of the dead.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-24-25 sculpture B 290.
  • Guardian Sphinxes, part lion & part sphinx from the gable end of a vaulted Lycian sarcophagus from the Heros of the Acropolis (Building H Xanthos). The sphinx was linked to death and above each sphinx is a lion, a guardian of the dead.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-24-25 sculpture B 290.
  • Guardian Sphinxes, part lion & part sphinx from the gable end of a vaulted Lycian sarcophagus from the Heros of the Acropolis (Building H Xanthos). The sphinx was linked to death and above each sphinx is a lion, a guardian of the dead.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-24-25 sculpture B 290.
  • Guardian Sphinxes, part lion & part sphinx from the gable end of a vaulted Lycian sarcophagus from the Heros of the Acropolis (Building H Xanthos). The sphinx was linked to death and above each sphinx is a lion, a guardian of the dead.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-24-25 sculpture B 290.
  • Lion from the "Satyr Hunting Wils Animals, freezes, 460 B.C. From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-2-9 (sculpture B 2902- 298).
  • Lion from the "Satyr Hunting Wils Animals, freezes, 460 B.C. From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-2-9 (sculpture B 2902- 298).
  • Lion from the "Satyr Hunting Wils Animals, freezes, 460 B.C. From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-2-9 (sculpture B 2902- 298).
  • Satyr from the "Satyr Hunting Wils Animals, freezes, 460 B.C. From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-2-9 (sculpture B 2902- 298).
  • Satyr from the "Satyr Hunting Wils Animals, freezes, 460 B.C. From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-2-9 (sculpture B 2902- 298).
  • Lion killing deer  from the "Satyr Hunting Wils Animals, freezes, 460 B.C.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-2-9 (sculpture B 2902- 298).
  • Lion killing deer  from the "Satyr Hunting Wils Animals, freezes, 460 B.C.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-2-9 (sculpture B 2902- 298).
  • Wild Boar from the "Satyr Hunting Wils Animals, freezes, 460 B.C.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-2-9 (sculpture B 2902- 298).
  • Lion killing deer  from the "Satyr Hunting Wils Animals, freezes, 460 B.C.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-2-9 (sculpture B 2902- 298).
  • Wild Boar from the "Satyr Hunting Wils Animals, freezes, 460 B.C.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-2-9 (sculpture B 2902- 298).
  • Wild Boar from the "Satyr Hunting Wils Animals, freezes, 460 B.C.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-2-9 (sculpture B 2902- 298).
  • Guardian Sphinxes, part lion & part sphinx from the gable end of a vaulted Lycian sarcophagus from the Heros of the Acropolis (Building H Xanthos). The sphinx was linked to death and above each sphinx is a lion, a guardian of the dead.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-24-25 sculpture B 290.
  • Guardian Sphinxes, part lion & part sphinx from the gable end of a vaulted Lycian sarcophagus from the Heros of the Acropolis (Building H Xanthos). The sphinx was linked to death and above each sphinx is a lion, a guardian of the dead.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-24-25 sculpture B 290.
  • Wild Boar from the "Satyr Hunting Wils Animals, freezes, 460 B.C.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-2-9 (sculpture B 2902- 298).
  • Satyr from the "Satyr Hunting Wils Animals, freezes, 460 B.C. From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-2-9 (sculpture B 2902- 298).
  • Procession of Chariot & Horsemen freeze  from the Heros Shrine of the Acropolis of Xanthos, thought to be the shrines of legendary warriors of the trojan wars built by King Kuprlli (480 - 440 B.C). Xanthos was under Persian rule at the time & the freeze has the static style of persian sculpture with a Greek style.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-16-20.17-19 (sculptures B311-313).
  • Procession of Chariot & Horsemen freeze  from the Heros Shrine of the Acropolis of Xanthos, thought to be the shrines of legendary warriors of the trojan wars built by King Kuprlli (480 - 440 B.C). Xanthos was under Persian rule at the time & the freeze has the static style of persian sculpture with a Greek style.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-16-20.17-19 (sculptures B311-313).
  • Procession of Chariot & Horsemen freeze  from the Heros Shrine of the Acropolis of Xanthos, thought to be the shrines of legendary warriors of the trojan wars built by King Kuprlli (480 - 440 B.C). Xanthos was under Persian rule at the time & the freeze has the static style of persian sculpture with a Greek style.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-16-20.17-19 (sculptures B311-313).
  • Freeze from the Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb" after the female headed birds at the corners (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Procession of Chariot & Horsemen freeze  from the Heros Shrine of the Acropolis of Xanthos, thought to be the shrines of legendary warriors of the trojan wars built by King Kuprlli (480 - 440 B.C). Xanthos was under Persian rule at the time & the freeze has the static style of persian sculpture with a Greek style.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-16-20.17-19 (sculptures B311-313).
  • Freeze from the Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb" after the female headed birds at the corners (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Freeze from the Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb" after the female headed birds at the corners (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Wild Foul freeze from the east side of Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb"  (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit B299 - B306, excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Wild Foul freeze from the east side of Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb"  (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit B299 - B306, excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Procession of Chariot & Horsemen freeze  from the Heros Shrine of the Acropolis of Xanthos, thought to be the shrines of legendary warriors of the trojan wars built by King Kuprlli (480 - 440 B.C). Xanthos was under Persian rule at the time & the freeze has the static style of persian sculpture with a Greek style.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-16-20.17-19 (sculptures B311-313).
  • Freeze from the Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb" after the female headed birds at the corners (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Hunters freeze from the Large Podium of the sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • Wild Foul freeze from the east side of Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb"  (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit B299 - B306, excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Wild Foul freeze from the east side of Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb"  (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit B299 - B306, excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Two warriors clasing shields on a freeze from the Large Podium of the sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • Wild Foul freeze from the east side of Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb"  (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit B299 - B306, excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Wild Foul freeze from the east side of Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb"  (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit B299 - B306, excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Two warriors clasing shields on a freeze from the Large Podium of the sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • Two warriors clasing shields on a freeze from the Large Podium of the sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • Two warriors clasing shields on a freeze from the Large Podium of the sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • Statue of a Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) from the sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid  Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • Two warriors clasing shields on a freeze from the Large Podium of the sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • Statue of a Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) from the sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid  Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • Statue of a Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) from the sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid  Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • Statue of a Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) from the sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid  Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • The sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • The sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • The sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • The sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • The sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • The sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • The sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • Statue of a Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) from the sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid  Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • Guardian Sphinxes, part lion & part sphinx from the gable end of a vaulted Lycian sarcophagus from the Heros of the Acropolis (Building H Xanthos). The sphinx was linked to death and above each sphinx is a lion, a guardian of the dead.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-24-25 sculpture B 290.
  • Guardian Sphinxes, part lion & part sphinx from the gable end of a vaulted Lycian sarcophagus from the Heros of the Acropolis (Building H Xanthos). The sphinx was linked to death and above each sphinx is a lion, a guardian of the dead.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-24-25 sculpture B 290.
  • The sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • Lion from the "Satyr Hunting Wils Animals, freezes, 460 B.C. From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-2-9 (sculpture B 2902- 298).
  • Satyr from the "Satyr Hunting Wils Animals, freezes, 460 B.C. From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-2-9 (sculpture B 2902- 298).
  • Lion killing deer  from the "Satyr Hunting Wils Animals, freezes, 460 B.C.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-2-9 (sculpture B 2902- 298).
  • Wild Boar from the "Satyr Hunting Wils Animals, freezes, 460 B.C.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-2-9 (sculpture B 2902- 298).
  • Procession of Chariot & Horsemen freeze  from the Heros Shrine of the Acropolis of Xanthos, thought to be the shrines of legendary warriors of the trojan wars built by King Kuprlli (480 - 440 B.C). Xanthos was under Persian rule at the time & the freeze has the static style of persian sculpture with a Greek style.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-16-20.17-19 (sculptures B311-313).
  • Procession of Chariot & Horsemen freeze  from the Heros Shrine of the Acropolis of Xanthos, thought to be the shrines of legendary warriors of the trojan wars built by King Kuprlli (480 - 440 B.C). Xanthos was under Persian rule at the time & the freeze has the static style of persian sculpture with a Greek style.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-16-20.17-19 (sculptures B311-313).
  • Hunters freeze from the Large Podium of the sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • Freeze from the Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb" after the female headed birds at the corners (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Two warriors clasing shields on a freeze from the Large Podium of the sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • The sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • Roman mosaic depicting The Education of Achilles by the Centaur Chiron. Achilles , left, is depicted riding a centaur ( mosaic of its body s missing) and is about to kill a deer. In the bottom right hand corner is a Chimera was, according to Greek mythology, a monstrous fire-breathing hybrid creature of Lycia in Asia Minor, composed of the parts of more than one animal. The mosaic follows the story of Bellerophon who was a ‘great slayer of monsters’. From Belalis Major (Henshir El-Fawar ) in the Beja region of Tunisia. Early 7th century AD.Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • African animals and fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • African animals and fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • African animals and fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • African animals and fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • African animals and fish from the 3rd century Roman mosaic villa floor from Lod, near Tel Aviv, Israel. The Roman floor mosaic of Lod is the largest and best preserved mosaic floor from the levant region along the eastern Mediterranean coast. It is unclear whether the owners were Jewish, Christian or pagan but either way they would have been wealthy to own such a magnificent floor. The Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Centre, Lod, Israel.
  • Guardian Sphinxes, part lion & part sphinx from the gable end of a vaulted Lycian sarcophagus from the Heros of the Acropolis (Building H Xanthos). The sphinx was linked to death and above each sphinx is a lion, a guardian of the dead.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-24-25 sculpture B 290.
  • Lion from the "Satyr Hunting Wils Animals, freezes, 460 B.C. From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-2-9 (sculpture B 2902- 298).
  • Satyr from the "Satyr Hunting Wils Animals, freezes, 460 B.C. From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-2-9 (sculpture B 2902- 298).
  • Lion killing deer  from the "Satyr Hunting Wils Animals, freezes, 460 B.C.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-2-9 (sculpture B 2902- 298).
  • Wild Foul freeze from the east side of Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb"  (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit B299 - B306, excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • Wild Foul freeze from the east side of Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb"  (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit B299 - B306, excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • The sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • The sculptured  4th cent. B.C Lycian Nereid ( Mythical Greek Sea Nymphs) Monument tomb of Arbina, a Xanthian client ruler of the Persians conquerors of Lycia. From Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. British Museum exhibit excavated by Charles Fellows in 1840s.
  • Wild Boar from the "Satyr Hunting Wils Animals, freezes, 460 B.C.  From Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit GR 1848-10-20-2-9 (sculpture B 2902- 298).
  • Wild Foul freeze from the east side of Tomb of Kybernis also known as the "Harpy Tomb"  (480 B.C). Kybernis was a Lycian ruler of Xanthos who led the Lycian ships as part of the Persian invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. The Freeze comes from a nine meter high pillar tomb from Xanthos, UNESCO World Heritage site, south west Turkey. A British Museum exhibit B299 - B306, excavated by Charles Fellows in 1844.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century v Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century  Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.

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