• The Seville tiled Alcove along the walls of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • The Seville tiled Alcove along the walls of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • Tiled commemoration plague in the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • Tiled stair balistrades of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • The tiled 'Province Alcoves' along the walls of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • The tiled Albacette Alcove along the walls of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • The tiled Albacette Alcove along the walls of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • The tiled Alicante Alcove along the walls of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • The Almera tiled Alcove along the walls of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • The Almera tiled Alcove along the walls of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • The Almera tiled Alcove along the walls of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • The Almera tiled Alcove along the walls of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • The Seville tiled Alcove along the walls of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • Tiled  lamp column of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • Tiled stair balistrades of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • The tiled Albacette Alcove along the walls of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • The tiled Albacette Alcove along the walls of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • The tiled Alicante Alcove along the walls of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • The Almera tiled Alcove along the walls of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • The Almera tiled Alcove along the walls of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • The Seville tiled Alcove along the walls of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • Tiled  lamp column of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • Tiled architectural details of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • Tiled architectural details of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • Tiled stair balistrades of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • The tiled Alicante Alcove along the walls of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • The Seville tiled Alcove along the walls of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • Tiled Arabesuqe Berber street fountain wells of the Medina. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. Meknes, Meknes-Tafilalet, Morocco
  • Arabesque Berber tiled niche of the Mauseleum of Moulay Ismaïl Ibn Sharif , reigned 1672–1727. A UNESCO World Heritage Site .Meknes, Meknes-Tafilalet, Morocco.
  • Tiled Arabesuqe Berber street fountain wells of the Medina. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. Meknes, Meknes-Tafilalet, Morocco
  • Tiled Arabesuqe Berber street fountain wells of the Medina. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. Meknes, Meknes-Tafilalet, Morocco
  • Tiled Arabesuqe Berber street fountain wells of the Medina. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. Meknes, Meknes-Tafilalet, Morocco
  • Inner fountain courtyard with Berber Mocarabe Honeycomb work plaster decorations and Berber design tiles of the Mauseleum of Moulay Ismaïl Ibn Sharif , reigned 1672–1727. A UNESCO World Heritage Site .Meknes, Meknes-Tafilalet, Morocco.
  • Inner fountain courtyard with Berber Mocarabe Honeycomb work plaster decorations and Berber design tiles of the Mauseleum of Moulay Ismaïl Ibn Sharif , reigned 1672–1727. A UNESCO World Heritage Site .Meknes, Meknes-Tafilalet, Morocco.
  • Berber Mocarabe Honeycomb work plaster decorations and Berber design tiles of the 17th century Berber Pavillion of the Ambassadors built Sultan Moulay Ismail.   A UNESCO World Heritage Site .Meknes, Meknes-Tafilalet, Morocco.
  • Berber Mocarabe Honeycomb work plaster decorations and Berber design tiles of the 17th century Berber Pavillion of the Ambassadors built Sultan Moulay Ismail.   A UNESCO World Heritage Site .Meknes, Meknes-Tafilalet, Morocco.
  • Berber Mocarabe Honeycomb work plaster decorations and Berber design tiles of the Mauseleum of Moulay Ismaïl Ibn Sharif , reigned 1672–1727. A UNESCO World Heritage Site .Meknes, Meknes-Tafilalet, Morocco.
  • Berber Mocarabe Honeycomb work plaster decorations and Berber design tiles of the Mauseleum of Moulay Ismaïl Ibn Sharif , reigned 1672–1727. A UNESCO World Heritage Site .Meknes, Meknes-Tafilalet, Morocco.
  • Inner fountain courtyard with Berber Mocarabe Honeycomb work plaster decorations and Berber design tiles of the Mauseleum of Moulay Ismaïl Ibn Sharif , reigned 1672–1727. A UNESCO World Heritage Site .Meknes, Meknes-Tafilalet, Morocco.
  • Berber Mocarabe Honeycomb work plaster decorations and Berber design tiles of the 17th century Berber Pavillion of the Ambassadors built Sultan Moulay Ismail.   A UNESCO World Heritage Site .Meknes, Meknes-Tafilalet, Morocco.
  • Inner fountain courtyard with Berber Mocarabe Honeycomb work plaster decorations and Berber design tiles of the Mauseleum of Moulay Ismaïl Ibn Sharif , reigned 1672–1727. A UNESCO World Heritage Site .Meknes, Meknes-Tafilalet, Morocco.
  • Inner fountain courtyard with Berber Mocarabe Honeycomb work plaster decorations and Berber design tiles of the Mauseleum of Moulay Ismaïl Ibn Sharif , reigned 1672–1727. A UNESCO World Heritage Site .Meknes, Meknes-Tafilalet, Morocco.
  • Inner fountain courtyard with Berber Mocarabe Honeycomb work plaster decorations and Berber design tiles of the Mauseleum of Moulay Ismaïl Ibn Sharif , reigned 1672–1727. A UNESCO World Heritage Site .Meknes, Meknes-Tafilalet, Morocco.
  • Inner fountain courtyard with Berber Mocarabe Honeycomb work plaster decorations and Berber design tiles of the Mauseleum of Moulay Ismaïl Ibn Sharif , reigned 1672–1727. A UNESCO World Heritage Site .Meknes, Meknes-Tafilalet, Morocco.
  • Inner fountain courtyard with Berber Mocarabe Honeycomb work plaster decorations and Berber design tiles of the Mauseleum of Moulay Ismaïl Ibn Sharif , reigned 1672–1727. A UNESCO World Heritage Site .Meknes, Meknes-Tafilalet, Morocco.
  • Inner fountain courtyard with Berber Mocarabe Honeycomb work plaster decorations and Berber design tiles of the Mauseleum of Moulay Ismaïl Ibn Sharif , reigned 1672–1727. A UNESCO World Heritage Site .Meknes, Meknes-Tafilalet, Morocco.
  • Berber Mocarabe Honeycomb work plaster decorations and Berber design tiles of the Mauseleum of Moulay Ismaïl Ibn Sharif , reigned 1672–1727. A UNESCO World Heritage Site .Meknes, Meknes-Tafilalet, Morocco.
  • Berber Mocarabe Honeycomb work plaster decorations and Berber design tiles of the Mauseleum of Moulay Ismaïl Ibn Sharif , reigned 1672–1727. A UNESCO World Heritage Site .Meknes, Meknes-Tafilalet, Morocco.
  • Berber Mocarabe Honeycomb work plaster decorations and Berber design tiles of the Mauseleum of Moulay Ismaïl Ibn Sharif , reigned 1672–1727. A UNESCO World Heritage Site .Meknes, Meknes-Tafilalet, Morocco.
  • Berber Mocarabe Honeycomb work plaster decorations and Berber design tiles of the Mauseleum of Moulay Ismaïl Ibn Sharif , reigned 1672–1727. A UNESCO World Heritage Site .Meknes, Meknes-Tafilalet, Morocco.
  • Berber Mocarabe Honeycomb work plaster decorations and Berber design tiles of the Mauseleum of Moulay Ismaïl Ibn Sharif , reigned 1672–1727. A UNESCO World Heritage Site .Meknes, Meknes-Tafilalet, Morocco.
  • Berber Mocarabe Honeycomb work plaster decorations and Berber design tiles of the Mauseleum of Moulay Ismaïl Ibn Sharif , reigned 1672–1727. A UNESCO World Heritage Site .Meknes, Meknes-Tafilalet, Morocco.
  • Inner fountain courtyard with Berber Mocarabe Honeycomb work plaster decorations and Berber design tiles of the Mauseleum of Moulay Ismaïl Ibn Sharif , reigned 1672–1727. A UNESCO World Heritage Site .Meknes, Meknes-Tafilalet, Morocco.
  • Inner fountain courtyard with Berber Mocarabe Honeycomb work plaster decorations and Berber design tiles of the Mauseleum of Moulay Ismaïl Ibn Sharif , reigned 1672–1727. A UNESCO World Heritage Site .Meknes, Meknes-Tafilalet, Morocco.
  • Inner fountain courtyard with Berber Mocarabe Honeycomb work plaster decorations and Berber design tiles of the Mauseleum of Moulay Ismaïl Ibn Sharif , reigned 1672–1727. A UNESCO World Heritage Site .Meknes, Meknes-Tafilalet, Morocco.
  • Inner fountain courtyard with Berber Mocarabe Honeycomb work plaster decorations and Berber design tiles of the Mauseleum of Moulay Ismaïl Ibn Sharif , reigned 1672–1727. A UNESCO World Heritage Site .Meknes, Meknes-Tafilalet, Morocco.
  • Berber Mocarabe Honeycomb work plaster decorations and Berber design tiles of the Mauseleum of Moulay Ismaïl Ibn Sharif , reigned 1672–1727. A UNESCO World Heritage Site .Meknes, Meknes-Tafilalet, Morocco.
  • Berber Mocarabe Honeycomb work plaster decorations and Berber design tiles of the Mauseleum of Moulay Ismaïl Ibn Sharif , reigned 1672–1727. A UNESCO World Heritage Site .Meknes, Meknes-Tafilalet, Morocco.
  • Interior courtyard of the Mauseleum of Moulay Ismaïl Ibn Sharif , reigned 1672–1727. A UNESCO World Heritage Site .Meknes, Meknes-Tafilalet, Morocco.
  • Hospice De Beaune in the snow
  • Hospice De Beaune in the snow
  • Hospice De Beaune in the snow
  • Interior courtyard of the Mauseleum of Moulay Ismaïl Ibn Sharif , reigned 1672–1727. A UNESCO World Heritage Site .Meknes, Meknes-Tafilalet, Morocco.
  • The tiled Alicante Alcove along the walls of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • The Almera tiled Alcove along the walls of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • Decorative tiled panels of the Harem in the Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Ottoman. designed tiled rooms of the Crown Prince in the Harem of the  Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Ottoman. designed tiled rooms of the Crown Prince in the Harem of the  Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Ottoman. designed tiled rooms of the Crown Prince in the Harem of the  Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Ottoman. designed tiled rooms of the Crown Prince in the Harem of the  Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Tiled passage to the Privy Chamber of Sultan Murad III. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Tiled room and Ottoman architecture of the Harem. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Tiled room and Ottoman architecture of the Harem. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Decorative tiled panels of the Harem in the Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Ottoman. designed tiled rooms of the Crown Prince in the Harem of the  Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Ottoman. designed tiled rooms of the Crown Prince in the Harem of the  Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Ottoman. designed tiled rooms of the Crown Prince in the Harem of the  Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Ottoman. designed tiled rooms of the Crown Prince in the Harem of the  Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Ottoman. designed tiled rooms of the Crown Prince in the Harem of the  Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Decorative tiled panels of the Harem in the Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Ottoman. designed tiled rooms of the Crown Prince in the Harem of the  Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Glazed ceramic Ottoman Arabesque Iznik tiled window facade from Haseki Hürrem ( Roxelana or Alexandra Lisowska ) Sultan Medrese, a type of religious school built by Her Imperial Higness , Imperial Princess Consort of the Ottoman Empire, wife of Suleyman the Magnificent, in 1540. From the Pavillion of the Istanbul Archaeological Museum, Inv. 41/544.
  • Glazed ceramic Ottoman arabesque Iznik Polychrome Lunette  tiled  window facade. In the Pavillion of the Istanbul Archaeological Museum, Inv. 41/545.
  • Glazed ceramic Ottoman Arabesque Iznik tiled window facade from Haseki Hürrem ( Roxelana or Alexandra Lisowska ) Sultan Medrese, a type of religious school built by Her Imperial Higness , Imperial Princess Consort of the Ottoman Empire, wife of Suleyman the Magnificent, in 1540. From the Pavillion of the Istanbul Archaeological Museum, Inv. 41/543.
  • Glazed ceramic Ottoman Arabesque Iznik tiled window facade from Haseki Hürrem ( Roxelana or Alexandra Lisowska ) Sultan Medrese, a type of religious school built by Her Imperial Higness , Imperial Princess Consort of the Ottoman Empire, wife of Suleyman the Magnificent, in 1540. From the Pavillion of the Istanbul Archaeological Museum, Inv. 41/543.
  • Glazed ceramic Ottoman Arabesque Iznik tiled window facade from Haseki Hürrem ( Roxelana or Alexandra Lisowska ) Sultan Medrese, a type of religious school built by Her Imperial Higness , Imperial Princess Consort of the Ottoman Empire, wife of Suleyman the Magnificent, in 1540. From the Pavillion of the Istanbul Archaeological Museum, Inv. 41/544.
  • Glazed ceramic Ottoman arabesque Iznik Polychrome Lunette  tiled  window facade. In the Pavillion of the Istanbul Archaeological Museum, Inv. 41/545.
  • Glazed ceramic Ottoman arabesque Iznik Polychrome Lunette  tiled  window facade. In the Pavillion of the Istanbul Archaeological Museum, Inv. 41/545.
  • Glazed ceramic Ottoman Arabesque Iznik tiled window facade from Haseki Hürrem ( Roxelana or Alexandra Lisowska ) Sultan Medrese, a type of religious school built by Her Imperial Higness , Imperial Princess Consort of the Ottoman Empire, wife of Suleyman the Magnificent, in 1540. From the Pavillion of the Istanbul Archaeological Museum, Inv. 41/543.
  • Glazed ceramic Ottoman Arabesque Iznik tiled window facade from Haseki Hürrem ( Roxelana or Alexandra Lisowska ) Sultan Medrese, a type of religious school built by Her Imperial Higness , Imperial Princess Consort of the Ottoman Empire, wife of Suleyman the Magnificent, in 1540. From the Pavillion of the Istanbul Archaeological Museum, Inv. 41/544.
  • Berber Zellige decorative tiles inside the Riad of the Kasbah Telouet, Atlas Mountains, Morocco.
  • Berber Zellige decorative tiles inside the Riad of the Kasbah Telouet, Atlas Mountains, Morocco.
  • Berber Zellige decorative tiles inside the Riad of the Kasbah Telouet, Atlas Mountains, Morocco.
  • Berber Zellige decorative tiles inside the Riad of the Kasbah Telouet, Atlas Mountains, Morocco.
  • Berber Zellige decorative tiles inside the Riad of the Kasbah Telouet, Atlas Mountains, Morocco.
  • Berber Zellige decorative tiles inside the Riad of the Kasbah Telouet, Atlas Mountains, Morocco.
  • Berber Zellige decorative tiles inside the Riad of the Kasbah Telouet, Atlas Mountains, Morocco.
  • Berber Zellige decorative tiles inside the Riad of the Kasbah Telouet, Atlas Mountains, Morocco.
  • Berber Zellige decorative tiles inside the Riad of the Kasbah Telouet, Atlas Mountains, Morocco.
  • Berber Zellige decorative tiles inside the Riad of the Kasbah Telouet, Atlas Mountains, Morocco.
  • Berber Zellige decorative tiles inside the Riad of the Kasbah Telouet, Atlas Mountains, Morocco.
  • Berber Zellige decorative tiles inside the Riad of the Kasbah Telouet, Atlas Mountains, Morocco.
  • Berber Zellige decorative tiles inside the Riad of the Kasbah Telouet, Atlas Mountains, Morocco.
  • Berber Zellige decorative tiles inside the Riad of the Kasbah Telouet, Atlas Mountains, Morocco.
  • Berber Zellige decorative tiles inside the Riad of the Kasbah Telouet, Atlas Mountains, Morocco.
  • Berber Zellige decorative tiles inside the Riad of the Kasbah Telouet, Atlas Mountains, Morocco.
  • Berber Zellige decorative tiles inside the Riad of the Kasbah Telouet, Atlas Mountains, Morocco.
  • Berber Zellige decorative tiles inside the Riad of the Kasbah Telouet, Atlas Mountains, Morocco.
  • The North Tower of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • The Avilla alcove along the walls of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • The Avilla alcove along the walls of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • The Avilla alcove along the walls of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • The Badajoz alcove along the walls of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • The Badajoz alcove along the walls of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • The Badajoz alcove along the walls of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • The North Tower of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • The North Tower of the Plaza de Espana in Seville built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929, Seville Spain
  • Interior & Iznik Tiles of the Ottoman style İznik ceramic tiles of the Tomb of Sultan Selim II in the outer courtyard of Aya Sophia. Built in in 1577 , Istanbul, Turkey
  • Interior & Iznik Tiles of the Ottoman style İznik ceramic tiles of the Tomb of Sultan Selim II in the outer courtyard of Aya Sophia. Built in in 1577 , Istanbul, Turkey
  • Interior & Iznik Tiles of the Ottoman style İznik ceramic tiles of the Tomb of Sultan Selim II in the outer courtyard of Aya Sophia. Built in in 1577 , Istanbul, Turkey
  • Interior & Iznik Tiles of the Ottoman style İznik ceramic tiles of the Tomb of Sultan Selim II in the outer courtyard of Aya Sophia. Built in in 1577 , Istanbul, Turkey
  • Interior & Iznik Tiles of the Ottoman style İznik ceramic tiles of the Tomb of Sultan Selim II in the outer courtyard of Aya Sophia. Built in in 1577 , Istanbul, Turkey
  • Interior & Iznik Tiles of the Ottoman style İznik ceramic tiles of the Tomb of Sultan Selim II in the outer courtyard of Aya Sophia. Built in in 1577 , Istanbul, Turkey
  • Interior & Iznik Tiles of the Ottoman style İznik ceramic tiles of the Tomb of Sultan Selim II in the outer courtyard of Aya Sophia. Built in in 1577 , Istanbul, Turkey
  • "The Hall with a Fountain" of the Harem, the vestibule where princes & consorts of the sultan waited before entering the Imperial Hall. The tiles are 17th century Kutahaya and Iznik tiles. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • "The Hall with a Fountain" of the Harem, the vestibule where princes & consorts of the sultan waited before entering the Imperial Hall. The tiles are 17th century Kutahaya and Iznik tiles. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • "The Hall with a Fountain" of the Harem, the vestibule where princes & consorts of the sultan waited before entering the Imperial Hall. The tiles are 17th century Kutahaya and Iznik tiles. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • "The Hall with a Fountain" of the Harem, the vestibule where princes & consorts of the sultan waited before entering the Imperial Hall. The tiles are 17th century Kutahaya and Iznik tiles. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • "The Hall with a Fountain" of the Harem, the vestibule where princes & consorts of the sultan waited before entering the Imperial Hall. The tiles are 17th century Kutahaya and Iznik tiles. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Urban textures - reflections in water with blue tiles
  • Urban textures - reflections in water with blue tiles
  • Interior & Iznik Tiles of the Ottoman style İznik ceramic tiles of the Tomb of Sultan Selim II in the outer courtyard of Aya Sophia. Built in in 1577 , Istanbul, Turkey
  • Berber Arabesque  Zellige tiles of the Marrakesh museum in the Dar Menebhi Palace, Marrakesh, Morocco
  • Berber Arabesque  Zellige tiles of the Marrakesh museum in the Dar Menebhi Palace, Marrakesh, Morocco
  • Berber Arabesque  Zellige tiles of the Marrakesh museum in the Dar Menebhi Palace, Marrakesh, Morocco
  • Berber Arabesque  Zellige tiles of the Marrakesh museum in the Dar Menebhi Palace, Marrakesh, Morocco
  • Berber Arabesque  Zellige tiles of the Marrakesh museum in the Dar Menebhi Palace, Marrakesh, Morocco
  • Berber Arabesque  Zellige tiles of the Marrakesh museum in the Dar Menebhi Palace, Marrakesh, Morocco
  • Berber tiles of the  Alaouite Ksar Fida built by Moulay Ismaïl the second ruler of the Moroccan Alaouite dynasty ( reigned 1672–1727 ). Residence of the Khalifa or Caid of Tafilalet until 1965. Tafilalet Oasis, near Rissini, Morocco
  • The 17th century Ottoman Style Twin Kiosk  or Apartments of the Crown Prince dating from the reign of Sultan Murat III, finished in znik tiles. Topkapi Palace Istanbult
  • Ottoman style İznik ceramic tiles of the Tomb of Sultan Murad III in the outer courtyard of Aya Sophia. Built in in 1599 by Architect Davud Agha and his assistant Dalgıç Ahmet Agha, it is one of the largest Ottoman tombs with its hexagon layout, double domes, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Ottoman style İznik ceramic tiles of the Tomb of Sultan Murad III in the outer courtyard of Aya Sophia. Built in in 1599 by Architect Davud Agha and his assistant Dalgıç Ahmet Agha, it is one of the largest Ottoman tombs with its hexagon layout, double domes, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Tomb & sacrophaguses of Ottoman  Sultan Murad III and his family in the outer courtyard of Aya Sophia. Built in in 1599 by Architect Davud Agha and his assistant Dalgıç Ahmet Agha, it is one of the largest Ottoman tombs with its hexagon layout and İznik ceramic tiles, double domes, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Ottoman style İznik ceramic tiles of the Tomb of Sultan Murad III in the outer courtyard of Aya Sophia. Built in in 1599 by Architect Davud Agha and his assistant Dalgıç Ahmet Agha, it is one of the largest Ottoman tombs with its hexagon layout, double domes, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Ottoman style Tomb of Sultan Selim II in the outer courtyard of Aya Sophia. Built in in 1577 the exterior is white marble and İznik ceramic tiles , Istanbul, Turkey
  • Entrance to the Ottoman style Tomb of Sultan Selim II in the outer courtyard of Aya Sophia. Built in in 1577 the exterior is white marble and İznik ceramic tiles , Istanbul, Turkey
  • Entrance to the Ottoman style Tomb of Sultan Selim II in the outer courtyard of Aya Sophia. Built in in 1577 the exterior is white marble and İznik ceramic tiles , Istanbul, Turkey
  • Entrance to the Ottoman style Tomb of Sultan Selim II in the outer courtyard of Aya Sophia. Built in in 1577 the exterior is white marble and İznik ceramic tiles , Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Ottoman architecture of the Privy Chamber of Sultan Murad III decorated with 16th century Iznk tiles. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Ottoman architecture of the Privy Chamber of Sultan Murad III decorated with 16th century Iznk tiles. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Ottoman architecture of the Privy Chamber of Sultan Murad III decorated with 16th century Iznk tiles. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Ottoman architecture of the fountain in the Privy Chamber of Sultan Murad III decorated with 16th century Iznk tiles. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Ottoman architecture of the Privy Chamber of Sultan Murad III decorated with 16th century Iznk tiles. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Ottoman architecture of the Privy Chamber of Sultan Murad III decorated with 16th century Iznk tiles. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Ottoman architecture of the Privy Chamber of Sultan Murad III decorated with 16th century Iznk tiles. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Ottoman Isnik tiles decorations in the Harem of the Topkapi Palace, Istanbul Turkey
  • Ottoman Isnik tiles decorations in the Harem of the Topkapi Palace, Istanbul Turkey
  • The Enderûn Library (Enderûn Kütüphanesi), also known as "Library of Sultan Ahmed III" . The walls above the windows are decorated with 16th and 17th century İznik tiles of variegated design and the  dome and vaults are typical of the Tulip period, which lasted from 1703 to 1730.  Tarkapi Palace Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Enderûn Library (Enderûn Kütüphanesi), also known as "Library of Sultan Ahmed III" . The walls above the windows are decorated with 16th and 17th century İznik tiles of variegated design and the  dome and vaults are typical of the Tulip period, which lasted from 1703 to 1730.  Tarkapi Palace Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Enderûn Library (Enderûn Kütüphanesi), also known as "Library of Sultan Ahmed III" . The walls above the windows are decorated with 16th and 17th century İznik tiles of variegated design and the  dome and vaults are typical of the Tulip period, which lasted from 1703 to 1730.  Tarkapi Palace Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Enderûn Library (Enderûn Kütüphanesi), also known as "Library of Sultan Ahmed III" . The walls above the windows are decorated with 16th and 17th century İznik tiles of variegated design and the  dome and vaults are typical of the Tulip period, which lasted from 1703 to 1730.  Tarkapi Palace Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Enderûn Library (Enderûn Kütüphanesi), also known as "Library of Sultan Ahmed III" . The walls above the windows are decorated with 16th and 17th century İznik tiles of variegated design and the  dome and vaults are typical of the Tulip period, which lasted from 1703 to 1730.  Tarkapi Palace Istanbul, Turkey
  • Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • Bell tower of the Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • The 1902 Art Nouveau (Sezesszion) Cifra Palota (Cifra Palace) with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • The 1902 Art Nouveau (Sezesszion) Cifra Palota (Cifra Palace) with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • The 1902 Art Nouveau (Sezesszion) Cifra Palota (Cifra Palace) with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • The 1902 Art Nouveau (Sezesszion) Cifra Palota (Cifra Palace) with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • The 1902 Art Nouveau (Sezesszion) Cifra Palota (Cifra Palace) with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • The 1902 Art Nouveau (Sezesszion) Cifra Palota (Cifra Palace) with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • The 1902 Art Nouveau (Sezesszion) Cifra Palota (Cifra Palace) with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • The 1902 Art Nouveau (Sezesszion) Cifra Palota (Cifra Palace) with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • The 1902 Art Nouveau (Sezesszion) Cifra Palota (Cifra Palace) with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • Architectural details from the Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • Architectural details from the Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • Architectural details from the Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • Architectural details from the Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles at night, Hungary Kecskemét
  • "Justice" from the Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • Architectural details from the Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • The 1902 Art Nouveau (Sezession) Cifra Palota (Cifra Palace) with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • The 1902 Art Nouveau (Sezession) Cifra Palota (Cifra Palace) with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • The 1902 Art Nouveau (Sezession) Cifra Palota (Cifra Palace) with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • The Lion Pharmacy with Zolnay tiles - Sopron, Hungary
  • The Lion Pharmacy with Zolnay tiles - Sopron, Hungary
  • The Lion Pharmacy with Zolnay tiles - Sopron, Hungary
  • The Lion Pharmacy with Zolnay tiles - Sopron, Hungary
  • The Lion Pharmacy with Zolnay tiles - Sopron, Hungary
  • The Lion Pharmacy with Zolnay tiles - Sopron, Hungary
  • The Lion Pharmacy with Zolnay tiles - Sopron, Hungary
  • The Lion Pharmacy with Zolnay tiles - Sopron, Hungary
  • The Lion Pharmacy with Zolnay tiles - Sopron, Hungary
  • Berber Arabesque  Zellige tiles of the Marrakesh museum in the Dar Menebhi Palace, Marrakesh, Morocco
  • The 17th century Ottoman Style Twin Kiosk  or Apartments of the Crown Prince dating from the reign of Sultan Murat III, finished in znik tiles. Topkapi Palace Istanbult
  • Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • Art Nouveau (Sezession) City Hall designed by Lechner Ödön with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • The 1902 Art Nouveau (Sezession) Cifra Palota (Cifra Palace) with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • The 1902 Art Nouveau (Sezession) Cifra Palota (Cifra Palace) with Zolnay tiles, Hungary Kecskemét
  • The  Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The  Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Entrance to the inner courtyards of the  Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Entrance to the inner courtyards of the  Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Entrance to the apartments of  the Eunuchs in the Harem. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Main square with Town Hall . Kecskemét , Hungary
  • The Moorish design influenced Synagogue, Hungary Kecskemét
  • The Moorish design influenced Synagogue, Hungary Kecskemét
  • The Moorish design influenced Synagogue, Hungary Kecskemét
  • The Moorish design influenced Synagogue, Hungary Kecskemét
  • Zsolnay architectural features on the old Zoltan Csukas furniture shop Pecs ( Pécs ) - European Cultural City of The Year 2010 , Hungary
  • Zsolnay architectural features on the old Zoltan Csukas furniture shop Pecs ( Pécs ) - European Cultural City of The Year 2010 , Hungary
  • The Moorish design influenced Synagogue, Hungary Kecskemét
  • The Moorish design influenced Synagogue, Hungary Kecskemét
  • The Moorish design influenced Synagogue, Hungary Kecskemét
  • The Moorish design influenced Synagogue, Hungary Kecskemét
  • Zsolnay architectural features on the old Zoltan Csukas furniture shop Pecs ( Pécs ) - European Cultural City of The Year 2010 , Hungary
  • Zsolnay architectural features on the old Zoltan Csukas furniture shop Pecs ( Pécs ) - European Cultural City of The Year 2010 , Hungary
  • Moorish arabesque ceramic tiles sculpted plasterwork of the Palacios Nazaries,  Alhambra. Granada, Andalusia, Spain.
  • Moorish arabesque ceramic tiles sculpted plasterwork of the Palacios Nazaries,  Alhambra. Granada, Andalusia, Spain.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century v Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.

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