• Wheat field ready to harvest
  • Wheat field ready to harvest
  • Wheat field ready to harvest
  • Wheat field ready to harvest
  • Stock photos of  City wall and roof to views of Dubrovnik Croatia
  • Shrine to the Virgin Mary in The Stone Gate entrance Kamenita Vrata) to Zagreb's Gornji Grad, Croatia
  • Wheat field ready to harvest
  • Wheat field ready to harvest
  • Wheat field ready to harvest
  • Wheat field ready to harvest
  • Wheat field ready to harvest
  • Wheat field ready to harvest
  • Wheat field ready to harvest
  • Wheat field ready to harvest
  • Wheat field ready to harvest
  • Wheat field ready to harvest
  • Wheat field ready to harvest
  • Wheat field ready to harvest
  • Wheat field ready to harvest
  • Wheat field ready to harvest
  • Wheat field ready to harvest
  • Wheat field ready to harvest
  • Wheat field ready to harvest
  • Wheat field ready to harvest
  • Wheat field ready to harvest
  • Wheat field ready to harvest
  • Wheat field ready to harvest
  • Wheat field ready to harvest
  • Wheat field ready to harvest
  • Entrance to Bishop's Palace gardens - ( Gy?r )  Gyor Hungary
  • Stock photos of  the city wall and roof to views of Dubrovnik Croatia
  • Wheat field ready to harvest
  • Stock photos of  City wall and roof to views of Dubrovnik Croatia
  • Whole coriander Seeds - stock photos
  • Animal quarters in the original interior of The Blackhouse, 24 Arnol, Bragar, Isle of Lewis, Scotland.
  • Picture & image of the exterior with stone walls and thatched roof of The historic Blackhouse, 24 Arnol, Bragar, Isle of Lewis, Scotland.
  • Picture & image of the exterior with stone walls and thatched roof of The historic Blackhouse, 24 Arnol, Bragar, Isle of Lewis, Scotland.
  • Fresh Tomatoes
  • mixed yellow & red vine tomatoes
  • Mixed tomatoes photos, pictures & images
  • Mixed tomatoes photos, pictures & images
  • Jubilee vine tomatoes
  • Jubilee vine tomatoes
  • Jubilee vine tomatoes
  • Mixed fresh yellow & red Pomodorino Tomatoes
  • Jubilee vine tomatoes
  • mixed yellow & red vine tomatoes
  • Fresh picked plum tomatoes
  • mixed yellow & red vine tomatoes
  • Mixed tomatoes photos, pictures & images
  • Selection of fresh red and yellow tomatoes and plum tomatoes food photography
  • - ( Gy?r )  Gyor Hungary
  • - ( Gy?r )  Gyor Hungary
  • - ( Gy?r )  Gyor Hungary
  • - ( Gy?r )  Gyor Hungary
  • - ( Gy?r )  Gyor Hungary
  • Stock photos of roof top views and courtyards - Dubrovnik - Croatia
  • Fresh Tom Tom tomatoes
  • Fresh Tom Tom tomatoes
  • Fresh Tom Tom tomatoes
  • Fresh Tom Tom tomatoes
  • Fresh Tom Tom tomatoes
  • Fresh Tomatoes
  • Fresh Tomatoes
  • beef burger with sweetcorn relish and salad in a bun photos. Funky Stock Photos
  • Volavents filled with salmon & dill cream and olive tapenade on a gold plate with gold presents
  • Electrum, gold silver alloy, Mycenaean death mask from Grave delta and Gamma, Grave Circle B, Mycenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens.  White background.
  • Electrum, gold silver alloy, Mycenaean death mask from Grave delta and Gamma, Grave Circle B, Mycenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens.  Black Background
  • Electrum, gold silver alloy, Mycenaean death mask from Grave delta and Gamma, Grave Circle B, Mycenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens.  Grey Background
  • Electrum, gold silver alloy, Mycenaean death mask from Grave delta and Gamma, Grave Circle B, Mycenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens
  • Electrum, gold silver alloy, Mycenaean death mask from Grave delta and Gamma, Grave Circle B, Mycenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens
  • Original interior of the kitchen area with paet fire burning in The Blackhouse, 24 Arnol, Bragar, Isle of Lewis, Scotland.
  • Original interior of the kitchen area with paet fire burning in The Blackhouse, 24 Arnol, Bragar, Isle of Lewis, Scotland.
  • Original interior of an isle of Lewis White house which replaced the Black hosuses on the Island, Scotland
  • Original interior of the kitchen area with paet fire burning in The Blackhouse, 24 Arnol, Bragar, Isle of Lewis, Scotland.
  • Original interior of the kitchen area with paet fire burning in The Blackhouse, 24 Arnol, Bragar, Isle of Lewis, Scotland.
  • Hen coupe in the store room  of The Blackhouse, 24 Arnol, Bragar, Isle of Lewis, Scotland.
  • Original bedroom interior with original box-beds of The Blackhouse, 24 Arnol, Bragar, Isle of Lewis, Scotland.
  • Picture & image peat pile oustide the exterior with stone walls and thatched roof of The historic Blackhouse, 24 Arnol, Bragar, Isle of Lewis, Scotland.
  • Picture & image of the exterior with stone walls and thatched roof of The historic Blackhouse, 24 Arnol, Bragar, Isle of Lewis, Scotland.
  • Picture & image of the exterior with stone walls and thatched roof of The historic Blackhouse, 24 Arnol, Bragar, Isle of Lewis, Scotland.
  • Picture & image of the exterior with stone walls and thatched roof of The historic Blackhouse, 24 Arnol, Bragar, Isle of Lewis, Scotland.
  • Sussex Plum Tomaotes
  • yellow tomatoes amongst other mixed tomatoes
  • Mixed tomatoes photos, pictures & images
  • Fresh picked plum tomatoes
  • Fresh Sussex plum tomatoes
  • Vittoris vine tomatoes
  • Jubilee vine tomatoes
  • Mixed beefsteak, cheery, plum & tom tom vive tomatoes
  • mixed yellow & red vine tomatoes
  • mixed yellow & red vine tomatoes
  • Mixed beefsteak, cheery, plum & tom tom vive tomatoes
  • mixed yellow & red vine tomatoes
  • Mixed tomatoes photos, pictures & images
  • Mixed tomatoes photos, pictures & images
  • Mixed tomatoes photos, pictures & images
  • Mixed tomatoes photos, pictures & images
  • Mixed tomatoes photos, pictures & images
  • Mixed tomatoes photos, pictures & images
  • Selection of fresh red and yellow tomatoes and plum tomatoes food photography
  • Cheddar cheese and fresh tomatoes food photos.
  • - ( Gy?r )  Gyor Hungary
  • - ( Gy?r )  Gyor Hungary
  • - ( Gy?r )  Gyor Hungary
  • Stock photos of roof top views and courtyards - Dubrovnik - Croatia
  • Stock photos of Panoramic roof top views of Dubrovnik - Croatia
  • Stock photos of roof top views and courtyards - Dubrovnik - Croatia
  • Fresh  plum Tomatoes
  • Fresh Tomatoes
  • Fresh Tomatoes
  • Fresh Tomatoes
  • Organic beef burger with tomato relish and salad in a bun photo. Funky Stock Photos
  • beef burger with sweetcorn relish and salad in a bun photos. Funky Stock Photos
  • Red and Yellow Tomatoes on the vine
  • Volavents filled with salmon & dill cream and olive tapenade on a gold plate with gold presents
  • Volavents filled with salmon & dill cream and olive tapenade
  • Volavents filled with salmon & dill cream and olive tapenade
  • Volavents filled with salmon & dill cream and olive tapenade on a gold plate with gold presents
  • Volavents filled with salmon & dill cream and olive tapenade on a gold plate with gold presents
  • Art photo of Mushrooms by photographer Paul E Williams. Available to buy online as wall art prints.
  • The Broch of Gurness is a rare example of a well preserved iron age Broch village. Dating from 500 to 200BC the central round tower probably reached 10 meters (30ft). This was surrounded by thatched roofed houses. The settlement was surrounded by walls and two deep ditches. Gurness was probably the most important settlement on Orkney 2000 years ago.
  • The Broch of Gurness is a rare example of a well preserved iron age Broch village. Dating from 500 to 200BC the central round tower probably reached 10 meters (30ft). This was surrounded by thatched roofed houses. The settlement was surrounded by walls and two deep ditches. Gurness was probably the most important settlement on Orkney 2000 years ago.
  • The Broch of Gurness is a rare example of a well preserved iron age Broch village. Dating from 500 to 200BC the central round tower probably reached 10 meters (30ft). This was surrounded by thatched roofed houses. The settlement was surrounded by walls and two deep ditches. Gurness was probably the most important settlement on Orkney 2000 years ago.
  • The Broch of Gurness is a rare example of a well preserved iron age Broch village. Dating from 500 to 200BC the central round tower probably reached 10 meters (30ft). This was surrounded by thatched roofed houses. The settlement was surrounded by walls and two deep ditches. Gurness was probably the most important settlement on Orkney 2000 years ago.
  • The Broch of Gurness is a rare example of a well preserved iron age Broch village. Dating from 500 to 200BC the central round tower probably reached 10 meters (30ft). This was surrounded by thatched roofed houses. The settlement was surrounded by walls and two deep ditches. Gurness was probably the most important settlement on Orkney 2000 years ago.
  • The Broch of Gurness is a rare example of a well preserved iron age Broch village. Dating from 500 to 200BC the central round tower probably reached 10 meters (30ft). This was surrounded by thatched roofed houses. The settlement was surrounded by walls and two deep ditches. Gurness was probably the most important settlement on Orkney 2000 years ago.
  • The Broch of Gurness is a rare example of a well preserved iron age Broch village. Dating from 500 to 200BC the central round tower probably reached 10 meters (30ft). This was surrounded by thatched roofed houses. The settlement was surrounded by walls and two deep ditches. Gurness was probably the most important settlement on Orkney 2000 years ago.
  • The Broch of Gurness is a rare example of a well preserved iron age Broch village. Dating from 500 to 200BC the central round tower probably reached 10 meters (30ft). This was surrounded by thatched roofed houses. The settlement was surrounded by walls and two deep ditches. Gurness was probably the most important settlement on Orkney 2000 years ago.
  • The Broch of Gurness is a rare example of a well preserved iron age Broch village. Dating from 500 to 200BC the central round tower probably reached 10 meters (30ft). This was surrounded by thatched roofed houses. The settlement was surrounded by walls and two deep ditches. Gurness was probably the most important settlement on Orkney 2000 years ago.
  • The Broch of Gurness is a rare example of a well preserved iron age Broch village. Dating from 500 to 200BC the central round tower probably reached 10 meters (30ft). This was surrounded by thatched roofed houses. The settlement was surrounded by walls and two deep ditches. Gurness was probably the most important settlement on Orkney 2000 years ago.
  • Photo of a late Helladic jug decorated with serpentine bands showing Cycladic and Minoan influences.   Mycenae Shaft Grave V, Greece. 16th to early 15th century BC,  cat no: 950,  National Archaeological Museum, Athens.
  • Photo of a late Helladic jug decorated with serpentine bands showing Cycladic and Minoan influences.   Mycenae Shaft Grave V, Greece. 16th to early 15th century BC,  cat no: 950,  National Archaeological Museum, Athens.
  • Ancient Egyptian shabti box, wood, Intermediate Period, 21st-22nd Dynasty (1076-746 BC), Thebes, Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.<br />
<br />
Floor 1 room 10 of Museum - Essential items of funerary equipment from the New Kingdom on, shabti figures, of which there could be from 1 to over 400 examples in a single tomb, were meant to substitute for the deceased whenever he or she was called upon to perform manual labor in the afterlife. the shabti box is a decorated wooden box to hold the figures<br />
<br />
Essential items of funerary equipment from the New Kingdom on, shabti figures, of which there could be from 1 to over 400 examples in a single tomb, were meant to substitute for the deceased whenever he or she was called upon to perform manual labor in the afterlife. the shabti box is a decorated wooden box to hold the figures
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • Ancient Egyptian bed delonging to Kha , tomb of Kha, Theban Tomb 8 , mid-18th dynasty (1550 to 1292 BC), Turin Egyptian Museum. <br />
<br />
According to excavator Shciaparelli " the beds were found in Kcha's tomb also. The larger one, his own, was found in the antechamber." Egyptians believed that in the Afterlife they would require the same comforts as they enjoyed in life so beds and many other worldly requirements were put into their tombs.
  • Egyptian Roman mummy portrait or Fayum mummy portrait painted panel of a man, Roman Period, 1st to 3rd cent AD, Egypt. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Black background,<br />
<br />
Mummy portraits or Fayum mummy portraits (also Faiyum mummy portraits) are a type of naturalistic painted portrait on wooden boards attached to Upper class mummies from Roman Egypt. They belong to the tradition of panel painting, one of the most highly regarded forms of art in the Classical world. he portraits covered the faces of bodies that were mummified for burial. Extant examples indicate that they were mounted into the bands of cloth that were used to wrap the bodies.
  • Egyptian Roman mummy portrait or Fayum mummy portrait painted panel of a man, Roman Period, 1st to 3rd cent AD, Egypt. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background;<br />
<br />
Mummy portraits or Fayum mummy portraits (also Faiyum mummy portraits) are a type of naturalistic painted portrait on wooden boards attached to Upper class mummies from Roman Egypt. They belong to the tradition of panel painting, one of the most highly regarded forms of art in the Classical world. he portraits covered the faces of bodies that were mummified for burial. Extant examples indicate that they were mounted into the bands of cloth that were used to wrap the bodies.
  • Egyptian Roman mummy portrait or Fayum mummy portrait painted panel of a man, Roman Period, 1st to 3rd cent AD, Egypt. Egyptian Museum, Turin. <br />
<br />
Mummy portraits or Fayum mummy portraits (also Faiyum mummy portraits) are a type of naturalistic painted portrait on wooden boards attached to Upper class mummies from Roman Egypt. They belong to the tradition of panel painting, one of the most highly regarded forms of art in the Classical world. he portraits covered the faces of bodies that were mummified for burial. Extant examples indicate that they were mounted into the bands of cloth that were used to wrap the bodies.
  • Egyptian Roman mummy portrait or Fayum mummy portrait painted panel of a man, Roman Period, 1st to 3rd cent AD, Egypt. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Black background,<br />
<br />
Mummy portraits or Fayum mummy portraits (also Faiyum mummy portraits) are a type of naturalistic painted portrait on wooden boards attached to Upper class mummies from Roman Egypt. They belong to the tradition of panel painting, one of the most highly regarded forms of art in the Classical world. he portraits covered the faces of bodies that were mummified for burial. Extant examples indicate that they were mounted into the bands of cloth that were used to wrap the bodies.
  • Egyptian Roman mummy portrait or Fayum mummy portrait painted panel of a man, Roman Period, 1st to 3rd cent AD, Egypt. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background;<br />
<br />
Mummy portraits or Fayum mummy portraits (also Faiyum mummy portraits) are a type of naturalistic painted portrait on wooden boards attached to Upper class mummies from Roman Egypt. They belong to the tradition of panel painting, one of the most highly regarded forms of art in the Classical world. he portraits covered the faces of bodies that were mummified for burial. Extant examples indicate that they were mounted into the bands of cloth that were used to wrap the bodies.
  • Egyptian Roman mummy portrait or Fayum mummy portrait painted panel of a man, Roman Period, 1st to 3rd cent AD, Egypt. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Black background,<br />
<br />
Mummy portraits or Fayum mummy portraits (also Faiyum mummy portraits) are a type of naturalistic painted portrait on wooden boards attached to Upper class mummies from Roman Egypt. They belong to the tradition of panel painting, one of the most highly regarded forms of art in the Classical world. he portraits covered the faces of bodies that were mummified for burial. Extant examples indicate that they were mounted into the bands of cloth that were used to wrap the bodies.
  • Ancient Egyptian decorated mari ware, class D, baked clay, Predynastic Period, Naqada II Protodynastic Period (3700-300 BC). Egyptian Museum, Turin. White background.<br />
<br />
Mari was a new raw material used to make vases from Naqada II onwards. The material was a marl of rich clay found in some ancient Egyptian desert site which was pulverised and mixed with water. Typically the pottery had a rosy sinish when fired making a good background for painted motifs.
  • Ancient Egyptian  decorated jar sealed with linen , tomb of Kha, Theban Tomb 8 , mid-18th dynasty (1550 to 1292 BC), Turin Egyptian Museum. Grey background. <br />
<br />
TT8 or Theban Tomb 8 was the tomb of Kha, the overseer of works from Deir el-Medina in the mid-18th dynasty[2] and his wife, Merit. TT8 was one of the greatest archaeological discoveries of ancient Egypt, one of few tombs of nobility to survive intact.
  • Ancient Egyptian glong neckedr jar  sealed with linen strips , tomb of Kha, Theban Tomb 8 , mid-18th dynasty (1550 to 1292 BC), Turin Egyptian Museum. White background. Cat 8465.<br />
<br />
TT8 or Theban Tomb 8 was the tomb of Kha, the overseer of works from Deir el-Medina in the mid-18th dynasty[2] and his wife, Merit. TT8 was one of the greatest archaeological discoveries of ancient Egypt, one of few tombs of nobility to survive intact.
  • Ancient Egyptian globular jar  with Kha's monogram , tomb of Kha, Theban Tomb 8 , mid-18th dynasty (1550 to 1292 BC), Turin Egyptian Museum. Grey background. Cat 8465.<br />
<br />
TT8 or Theban Tomb 8 was the tomb of Kha, the overseer of works from Deir el-Medina in the mid-18th dynasty[2] and his wife, Merit. TT8 was one of the greatest archaeological discoveries of ancient Egypt, one of few tombs of nobility to survive intact.
  • Ancient Egyptian sealed incised decorated jar and support with Kha's monogram , tomb of Kha, Theban Tomb 8 , mid-18th dynasty (1550 to 1292 BC), Turin Egyptian Museum. Grey background. Cat 8523.<br />
<br />
TT8 or Theban Tomb 8 was the tomb of Kha, the overseer of works from Deir el-Medina in the mid-18th dynasty[2] and his wife, Merit. TT8 was one of the greatest archaeological discoveries of ancient Egypt, one of few tombs of nobility to survive intact.
  • Ancient Egyptian Human headed canopic jar for Amenemheb, clay, New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty (1292-1190 BC), Deir el-Medina. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Old Fund cat 3471. White background.<br />
<br />
The canopic jars were four in number, each for the safekeeping of particular human organs: the stomach, intestines, lungs, and liver, all of which, it was believed, would be needed in the afterlife. By the First Intermediate Period jars with human heads (assumed to represent the dead) began to appear
  • Ancient Egyptian pylon (gateway) shaped Canopic chest for internal organs, wood, Late  to Ptolemaic Period(722-40 BC), Egyptian Museum, Turin. Old Fund Cat 2427. <br />
<br />
Canopic chests are cases used by Ancient Egyptians to contain the internal organs removed during the process of mummification.
  • Ancient Egyptian shabti box, wood, Intermediate Period, 21st-22nd Dynasty (1076-746 BC), Thebes, Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.<br />
<br />
Floor 1 room 10 of Museum - Essential items of funerary equipment from the New Kingdom on, shabti figures, of which there could be from 1 to over 400 examples in a single tomb, were meant to substitute for the deceased whenever he or she was called upon to perform manual labor in the afterlife. the shabti box is a decorated wooden box to hold the figures<br />
<br />
Essential items of funerary equipment from the New Kingdom on, shabti figures, of which there could be from 1 to over 400 examples in a single tomb, were meant to substitute for the deceased whenever he or she was called upon to perform manual labor in the afterlife. the shabti box is a decorated wooden box to hold the figures
  • Ancient Egyptian shabti box, wood, Intermediate Period, 21st-22nd Dynasty (1076-746 BC), Thebes, Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.<br />
<br />
Floor 1 room 10 of Museum - Among the 401 shabti found in this tomb were 36 overseerers, one for every 10 servants. These were maent to serve the deceased in the afterlife<br />
<br />
Essential items of funerary equipment from the New Kingdom on, shabti figures, of which there could be from 1 to over 400 examples in a single tomb, were meant to substitute for the deceased whenever he or she was called upon to perform manual labor in the afterlife. the shabti box is a decorated wooden box to hold the figures
  • Ancient Egyptian shabti box, wood, Intermediate Period, 21st-22nd Dynasty (1076-746 BC), Thebes, Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.<br />
<br />
Floor 1 room 10 of Museum - Among the 401 shabti found in this tomb were 36 overseerers, one for every 10 servants. These were maent to serve the deceased in the afterlife<br />
<br />
Essential items of funerary equipment from the New Kingdom on, shabti figures, of which there could be from 1 to over 400 examples in a single tomb, were meant to substitute for the deceased whenever he or she was called upon to perform manual labor in the afterlife. the shabti box is a decorated wooden box to hold the figures
  • Ancient Egyptian shabti box, wood, Intermediate Period, 21st-22nd Dynasty (1076-746 BC), Thebes, Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.<br />
<br />
Floor 1 room 10 of Museum - Essential items of funerary equipment from the New Kingdom on, shabti figures, of which there could be from 1 to over 400 examples in a single tomb, were meant to substitute for the deceased whenever he or she was called upon to perform manual labor in the afterlife. the shabti box is a decorated wooden box to hold the figures<br />
<br />
Essential items of funerary equipment from the New Kingdom on, shabti figures, of which there could be from 1 to over 400 examples in a single tomb, were meant to substitute for the deceased whenever he or she was called upon to perform manual labor in the afterlife. the shabti box is a decorated wooden box to hold the figures
  • Ancient Egyptian shabti box, wood, Intermediate Period, 21st-22nd Dynasty (1076-746 BC), Thebes, Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.<br />
<br />
Floor 1 room 10 of Museum - Among the 401 shabti found in this tomb were 36 overseerers, one for every 10 servants. These were maent to serve the deceased in the afterlife<br />
<br />
Essential items of funerary equipment from the New Kingdom on, shabti figures, of which there could be from 1 to over 400 examples in a single tomb, were meant to substitute for the deceased whenever he or she was called upon to perform manual labor in the afterlife. the shabti box is a decorated wooden box to hold the figures
  • Ancient Egyptian Talatat block with a female worhiper of tambourine player relief, sandstone, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty (1353-1336 BC), Thebes, Karnac. Egyptian Museum, Turin. White background.<br />
<br />
The talatat was introduced to increase the speed new monuments to Aten could be built. The talatat were smaller, about 52x26x24 cm, than the usual building blocks used and therfore were easier to handle and build with. They were first used on the new buildings of Akhenaten at Thebes during his reign, the, after his capital was moved , for the monumenta of Amarna. When Amon was restored all the Aten temples were taken down and their blocks used in other buildings. Over 100,000 talatat have been excavated so far in Thebes and they represent a massive jigsaw puzzle as archaeologist try to piece them together into their original reliefs.
  • Ancient Egyptian stele dedicated to Re-Harakhty by Irtiertjay,  Late Period, 25th Dynasty, (7620-580 BC), Thebes, Cat 1530. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.<br />
<br />
The round topped stele dedicated by Irtiertjay to Re-Harakhty , Isis and the 4 sons of Horus. Gifted by the Cairo Museum
  • Ancient Egyptian stele dedicated to Osiris by Neskhonsu,  Late Period, 25th Dynasty, (722-664 BC), Thebes, Cat 1596. Egyptian Museum, Turin. <br />
<br />
The round topped stele dedicated by Osiris to Neskhonsu, daaughter of Nespernebu, "gogs father" of Amon. Gifted by the Cairo Museum
  • Ancient Egyptian stele dedicated to Ra-Harakhty & Atum by Psetjerfi, Late Period 26th Dynasty, (590-525 BC), Cat 1568. Egyptian Museum, Turin. black background,<br />
<br />
Gifted by the Cairo Museum
  • Ancient Egyptian stele dedicated to Ra-Harakhty & Atum by Psetjerfi, Late Period 26th Dynasty, (590-525 BC), Cat 1568. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.<br />
<br />
Gifted by the Cairo Museum
  • Ancient Egyptian Stele of Amenemope dedicated to Amenhotep I and Ahmose-Nefertari, limestone, New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, (1279-1213 BC), Deir el-Medina, Drovetti cat 1454. Egyptian Museum, Turin. black background.<br />
<br />
The stele is dedicated to Amenhotep I and Ahmose-Nefertari by the 'Servant in the Place of Truth' Amenemope and Amennakht. The king and the queen are shown sitting on their thrones. Above the sovereign there is a solar disc flanked by two sacred cobras and their cartouches are shown to the right of each of them. In the bottom register Amenemope is shown with his son  Amennakht, who also was a "Servant in the Place of Truth", in the pose of adoration.
  • Ancient Egyptian stele odedicated to Amon Re the "good Ram" by foreman Baki, limestone, New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, (1290-1213 BC), Deir el-Medina, Drovetti cat 1549. Egyptian Museum, Turin. black background. Reign of Ramesses II.<br />
<br />
This round-topped stele is carved in low relief and painted <br />
in several colours. The pictorial plane is divided into two <br />
registers, the upper one containing two rams facing each <br />
other. The animals, with cobras rising on their foreheads, <br />
wear tall headdresses composed of two tall plumes with a <br />
solar disk at the centre. Between them is a small offering <br />
table with lotus flowers. The mirror image hieroglyphic <br />
inscription refers to the rams and reveals their divine <br />
nature as that of Amun-Ra. In the register below, <br />
foreman Baki is shown in the pose of adoration.
  • Ancient Egyptian stele odedicated to Amon Re the "good Ram" by foreman Baki, limestone, New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, (1290-1213 BC), Deir el-Medina, Drovetti cat 1549. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Reign of Ramesses II.<br />
<br />
This round-topped stele is carved in low relief and painted <br />
in several colours. The pictorial plane is divided into two <br />
registers, the upper one containing two rams facing each <br />
other. The animals, with cobras rising on their foreheads, <br />
wear tall headdresses composed of two tall plumes with a <br />
solar disk at the centre. Between them is a small offering <br />
table with lotus flowers. The mirror image hieroglyphic <br />
inscription refers to the rams and reveals their divine <br />
nature as that of Amun-Ra. In the register below, <br />
foreman Baki is shown in the pose of adoration.
  • Ancient Egyptian stele odedicated to Amon Re the "good Ram" by foreman Baki, limestone, New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, (1290-1213 BC), Deir el-Medina, Drovetti cat 1549. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background. Reign of Ramesses II.<br />
<br />
This round-topped stele is carved in low relief and painted <br />
in several colours. The pictorial plane is divided into two <br />
registers, the upper one containing two rams facing each <br />
other. The animals, with cobras rising on their foreheads, <br />
wear tall headdresses composed of two tall plumes with a <br />
solar disk at the centre. Between them is a small offering <br />
table with lotus flowers. The mirror image hieroglyphic <br />
inscription refers to the rams and reveals their divine <br />
nature as that of Amun-Ra. In the register below, <br />
foreman Baki is shown in the pose of adoration.
  • Ancient Egyptian stele dedicated to the god Khonsu by draftsman Pay, limestone, New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, (1279-1213 BC), Deir el-Medina, Drovetti cat 1553. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background
  • Ancient Egyptian funerary stele of painter Maya, limestone, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, (1336-1292 BC), Deir el-Medina,  Egyptian Museum, Turin.  Drovetti cat 1579.<br />
<br />
<br />
In the upper portion Maya and his wife Tamit pay homage to Osiris and Hathor, the gods of the necropolis. In the lower register is a similar scene in which his wife recieves food offerings from their many children, as was traditional at the time.
  • Ancient Egyptian stele of ssuperintendant of chancellor Meru, limestone, Middle Kingdom, 11th Dynasty, (2009-1959 BC), Abydos or Thebes, Egyptian Museum, Turin.  Grey background. Drovetti cat 1447.<br />
<br />
The upper section of the stele is dedicated to Meru's father, the central part contains a funerary invocation to Osiris. Lower register depict offerings to the dignitary and his mother, The figures are in bas-relief whereas the main text is carved in sunken relief which is less labour intensive. The Stele may have come from Meru's tomb in Thebes.
  • Ancient Egyptian stele of ssuperintendant of chancellor Meru, limestone, Middle Kingdom, 11th Dynasty, (2009-1959 BC), Abydos or Thebes, Egyptian Museum, Turin.  Grey background. Drovetti cat 1447.<br />
<br />
The upper section of the stele is dedicated to Meru's father, the central part contains a funerary invocation to Osiris. Lower register depict offerings to the dignitary and his mother, The figures are in bas-relief whereas the main text is carved in sunken relief which is less labour intensive. The Stele may have come from Meru's tomb in Thebes.
  • Ancient Egyptian stele of ssuperintendant of chancellor Meru, limestone, Middle Kingdom, 11th Dynasty, (2009-1959 BC), Abydos or Thebes, Egyptian Museum, Turin.  Grey background. Drovetti cat 1447.<br />
<br />
The upper section of the stele is dedicated to Meru's father, the central part contains a funerary invocation to Osiris. Lower register depict offerings to the dignitary and his mother, The figures are in bas-relief whereas the main text is carved in sunken relief which is less labour intensive. The Stele may have come from Meru's tomb in Thebes.
  • Ancient Egyptian stele of ssuperintendant of chancellor Meru, limestone, Middle Kingdom, 11th Dynasty, (2009-1959 BC), Abydos or Thebes, Egyptian Museum, Turin.  Grey background. Drovetti cat 1447.<br />
<br />
The upper section of the stele is dedicated to Meru's father, the central part contains a funerary invocation to Osiris. Lower register depict offerings to the dignitary and his mother, The figures are in bas-relief whereas the main text is carved in sunken relief which is less labour intensive. The Stele may have come from Meru's tomb in Thebes.
  • Ancient Egyptian stele dedicated to Meretsesger, limestone, New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, (1279-1213 BC), Deir el-Medina, Egyptian Museum, Turin. black background.<br />
<br />
The stele is divided into 3 registers. In the top section 2 wedjat eyes with shen sign above 3 zigzag lines indicating water are depicted. The second, largest register, is divided into 12 horizontal strips. Each is occupied by a coloured snake facing to the right.In the bottom register 3 columns of hieroglyphic text worship the goddess Meretseger: "life, strength and health to the ka and the lady of the house Wab, the justified." To the right of the text the deceased woman is kneeling with her hands raised in adoration. She  wears a white robe. A lotus flower is placed on top of her wig. Behind her head there are 4 hieroglyphic signs that form the phrase "at peace". To the right of the scene there is an offering table with a vessel flanked by a bunch of lotus flowers. Below the table there are 2 vessels on pedestals.
  • Ancient Egyptian stele dedicated to Meretsesger, limestone, New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, (1279-1213 BC), Deir el-Medina, Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.<br />
<br />
The stele is divided into 3 registers. In the top section 2 wedjat eyes with shen sign above 3 zigzag lines indicating water are depicted. The second, largest register, is divided into 12 horizontal strips. Each is occupied by a coloured snake facing to the right.In the bottom register 3 columns of hieroglyphic text worship the goddess Meretseger: "life, strength and health to the ka and the lady of the house Wab, the justified." To the right of the text the deceased woman is kneeling with her hands raised in adoration. She  wears a white robe. A lotus flower is placed on top of her wig. Behind her head there are 4 hieroglyphic signs that form the phrase "at peace". To the right of the scene there is an offering table with a vessel flanked by a bunch of lotus flowers. Below the table there are 2 vessels on pedestals.
  • Ancient Egyptian stele dedicated to Meretsesger, limestone, New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, (1279-1213 BC), Deir el-Medina, Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.<br />
<br />
The stele is divided into 3 registers. In the top section 2 wedjat eyes with shen sign above 3 zigzag lines indicating water are depicted. The second, largest register, is divided into 12 horizontal strips. Each is occupied by a coloured snake facing to the right.In the bottom register 3 columns of hieroglyphic text worship the goddess Meretseger: "life, strength and health to the ka and the lady of the house Wab, the justified." To the right of the text the deceased woman is kneeling with her hands raised in adoration. She  wears a white robe. A lotus flower is placed on top of her wig. Behind her head there are 4 hieroglyphic signs that form the phrase "at peace". To the right of the scene there is an offering table with a vessel flanked by a bunch of lotus flowers. Below the table there are 2 vessels on pedestals.
  • Ancient Egyptian stele dedicated by Pendua to Meretsesger, limestone, New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, (1279-1213 BC), Deir el-Medina, Old Fund cat 1564. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background
  • Ancient Egyptian ostracon dedicated by Amenkhau to Mereteseger, limestone, New Kingdom, 20th Dynasty, (1187-1150 BC), Deir el-Medina, ODrovetti cat 1564. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background
  • Ancient Egyptian stele of sculptor Qen, limestone, New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, (1279-1213 BC), Deir el-Medina, Old Fund cat 1635. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background<br />
<br />
This stele belongs to the "painter of outlines' and sculptor Qen who lived in the reign of Ramesses II. It depicrs a funeral celebration for him infront of funerary chapel with his sond Meryre and Huy, who are performing the "ceremony of Opening of the Mouth". His daughter Taqri is depicted grieving over the loss of her father. The chapel is summounted by a Pyramidion.
  • Ancient Egyptian Pyramidion of Ramose North & East sides, Limestone, New Kingdom, 19th Dtnasty (1292-1190 BC), Dier el-Medina. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Old Fund cat 1603. black background.<br />
<br />
The north face of the Ramose Pyramidion explains the attribute of Horus as the strong coronal electric field of the Sun gifting the Ankh as a support to Life. It reads "Strong coronal electric field supporting the Sun, negative charge induction."" Weak electric field is an attribute of the anode Sun.""Electricity supporting life to core charge store God".<br />
<br />
The east face of the Ramose Pyramidion shows the support for the structured plasma, her hands are held up representing the electric force on the perpendicular face to the North South axis of Horus, the strong coronal electric field. It reads" Structured plasma watched, attribute supporting life projecting power (negative charge) to support charge store (celestial body) electrostatic resonance."" Seek home structured plasma to land negative charge projection by God as lightning attribute support celestial body via connection giving movement and [light]."<br />
<br />
The limestone Pyramidion of Ramose, from the top of the tomb of the 'Necropolis Scribe'. Scenes on all four sides depict the worship of the sun.
  • Ancient Egyptian Pyramidion of Ramose North & East sides, Limestone, New Kingdom, 19th Dtnasty (1292-1190 BC), Dier el-Medina. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Old Fund cat 1603. Grey background.<br />
<br />
The north face of the Ramose Pyramidion explains the attribute of Horus as the strong coronal electric field of the Sun gifting the Ankh as a support to Life. It reads "Strong coronal electric field supporting the Sun, negative charge induction."" Weak electric field is an attribute of the anode Sun.""Electricity supporting life to core charge store God".<br />
<br />
The east face of the Ramose Pyramidion shows the support for the structured plasma, her hands are held up representing the electric force on the perpendicular face to the North South axis of Horus, the strong coronal electric field. It reads" Structured plasma watched, attribute supporting life projecting power (negative charge) to support charge store (celestial body) electrostatic resonance."" Seek home structured plasma to land negative charge projection by God as lightning attribute support celestial body via connection giving movement and [light]."<br />
<br />
The limestone Pyramidion of Ramose, from the top of the tomb of the 'Necropolis Scribe'. Scenes on all four sides depict the worship of the sun.
  • Ancient Egyptian Pyramidion of Ramose North & East sides, Limestone, New Kingdom, 19th Dtnasty (1292-1190 BC), Dier el-Medina. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Old Fund cat 1603. <br />
<br />
The north face of the Ramose Pyramidion explains the attribute of Horus as the strong coronal electric field of the Sun gifting the Ankh as a support to Life. It reads "Strong coronal electric field supporting the Sun, negative charge induction."" Weak electric field is an attribute of the anode Sun.""Electricity supporting life to core charge store God".<br />
<br />
The east face of the Ramose Pyramidion shows the support for the structured plasma, her hands are held up representing the electric force on the perpendicular face to the North South axis of Horus, the strong coronal electric field. It reads" Structured plasma watched, attribute supporting life projecting power (negative charge) to support charge store (celestial body) electrostatic resonance."" Seek home structured plasma to land negative charge projection by God as lightning attribute support celestial body via connection giving movement and [light]."<br />
<br />
The limestone Pyramidion of Ramose, from the top of the tomb of the 'Necropolis Scribe'. Scenes on all four sides depict the worship of the sun.
  • Ancient Egyptian Cat Sarcophagus conating cat mummy, Late to Plolomaic Period, (722-30 BC), Egyptian Museum, Turin.Old Fund Cat 2361. black background<br />
<br />
Animal mummification was common in ancient Egypt. They mummified various animals. It was an enormous part of Egyptian culture, not only in their role as food and pets, but also for religious reasons. They were typically mummified for four main purposes—to allow beloved pets to go on to the afterlife, to provide food in the afterlife, to act as offerings to a particular god, and because some were seen as physical manifestations of specific deities that the Egyptians worshipped. Bast, the cat goddess is an example of one such deity.
  • Ancient Egyptian Cat Sarcophagus conating cat mummy, Late to Plolomaic Period, (722-30 BC), Egyptian Museum, Turin.Old Fund Cat 2361. white background<br />
<br />
Animal mummification was common in ancient Egypt. They mummified various animals. It was an enormous part of Egyptian culture, not only in their role as food and pets, but also for religious reasons. They were typically mummified for four main purposes—to allow beloved pets to go on to the afterlife, to provide food in the afterlife, to act as offerings to a particular god, and because some were seen as physical manifestations of specific deities that the Egyptians worshipped. Bast, the cat goddess is an example of one such deity.
  • Ancient Egyptian Cat Sarcophagus conating cat mummy, Late to Plolomaic Period, (722-30 BC), Egyptian Museum, Turin.Old Fund Cat 2361. Grey background. <br />
<br />
Animal mummification was common in ancient Egypt. They mummified various animals. It was an enormous part of Egyptian culture, not only in their role as food and pets, but also for religious reasons. They were typically mummified for four main purposes—to allow beloved pets to go on to the afterlife, to provide food in the afterlife, to act as offerings to a particular god, and because some were seen as physical manifestations of specific deities that the Egyptians worshipped. Bast, the cat goddess is an example of one such deity.
  • Ancient Egyptian Cat Sarcophagus conating cat mummy, Late to Plolomaic Period, (722-30 BC), Egyptian Museum, Turin.Old Fund Cat 2361.<br />
<br />
Animal mummification was common in ancient Egypt. They mummified various animals. It was an enormous part of Egyptian culture, not only in their role as food and pets, but also for religious reasons. They were typically mummified for four main purposes—to allow beloved pets to go on to the afterlife, to provide food in the afterlife, to act as offerings to a particular god, and because some were seen as physical manifestations of specific deities that the Egyptians worshipped. Bast, the cat goddess is an example of one such deity.
  • Ancient Egyptian wooden model of bread making, Middle Kingdom, 12th Dynasty, (1939-1875 BC), Asyut., Tomb of Minhotep Egyptian Museum, Turin. Cat 8789. Grey background. <br />
<br />
Wooden tomb models were an Egyptian funerary custom throughout the Middle Kingdom in which wooden figurines and sets were constructed to be placed in the tombs of Egyptian royalty. These wooden models represented the work of servants, farmers, other skilled craftsman, armies, and religious rituals
  • Ancient Egyptian wooden falcon bird, Late Period (722-322 BC), Egyptian Museum, Turin. Cat 986. <br />
<br />
Wooden tomb models were an Egyptian funerary custom from the Middle Kingdom in which wooden figurines and sets were constructed to be placed in the tombs of Egyptian royalty. These wooden models represented the work of servants, farmers, other skilled craftsman, armies, and religious rituals
  • Ancient Egyptian statuette of Taweret decicated to draughtsman Parahotep, wood, New Kingdom, 19 Dynasty, (14292-1190 BC), deir el Medina. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background. Cat 526.<br />
<br />
 Taweret is the protective ancient Egyptian goddess of childbirth and fertility. The deity is typically depicted as a bipedal female hippopotamus with feline attributes, pendulous female human breasts, the limbs and paws of a lion, and the back and tail of a Nile crocodile.
  • Ancient Egyptian shabtis doll, lwood, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, (1538-1040 BC), Deir el Medina. Egyptian Museum, Turin.Grey background. <br />
<br />
shabti figures began to occur in Middle Kingdom tombs with a twofold nature: on <br />
the one hand, they were meant to be images of their owners, representatives of the deceased in the realm of the Lord of Eternity. <br />
On the other hand, they were also considered to be servants of the deceased, taking the role of the servant statues. The complex <br />
nature of the shabti figure as a substitute of both the owner and his or her servants remains unaltered during the New Kingdom
  • Ancient Egyptian four sided capital dedicated to Hathor, limestone, Ptolomaic Period (332039 BC). Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background. Cat 7031. <br />
<br />
Hathor, goddess of love and beauty and wet nurse of Horus, is often portrayed frontally with bovine ears. She was also protector of the turquoise mines in Sinai and the guardian of the 4 cardinal points awhich is why she is depicted with faces on each side of the capital
  • Ancient Egyptian stelophorus statue of Ubenre, New Kingdom, 19th-20th Dynasty, (1292-1076 BC), Deir el-Medina, Egyptian Museum, Turin. Cat 3040. Grey background.<br />
<br />
This type of stele is so called stelophorous statue. It consists of kneeling figure holding or offering stele. They were produced from the 18th dynasty onwards. Such stelae were usually inscribed with hymns to the sun-god.
  • Ancient Egyptian Roman female mummy mask, limestone, Roman Period, 2nd Cent AD, Hawara,  Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background<br />
<br />
This is a remarkable gilt cartonnage with inlaid cystal eyes . The woman wears a Roman style hardo half covered by a veil, a himation, fringed cloak, yied to her breat, snake shaped bracelets and a necklace of pink flowers, all of which are connected to the cult of Isis.
  • Ancient Egyptian statue head of a monarch, limestone, Middle Kingdom, mis 12th Dynasty, (1900-1850 BC), Qqw el-Kebir, tomb of Ibu. Egyptian Museum, Turin. white background.<br />
<br />
Since this statue head comes from the tomb of Ibu it is likely that they depict a powerful gosvenor, although the incsription is lost. It can be dated by its style which is close to the statues of Amenemhat II and Sesostris II. Schiaparelli excavations. Cat 4410 & 4414
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of Aanen, second priest to Amon, granodioite, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, (1390-1353, Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. <br />
<br />
A dignitary wearing a wig, a long gown and the leopard skin of a priest. Writing on his belt are the names of Amenhotep III, Aanen and an inscription tells us that the statue depicts the astronomer priest Aanen  by saying " one knows the procession of the sky". Aanen was the brother of the queen Teye wife of Amenhotep III. Drovetti collection, cat 1377
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of Aanen, second priest to Amon, granodioite, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, (1390-1353, Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. <br />
<br />
A dignitary wearing a wig, a long gown and the leopard skin of a priest. Writing on his belt are the names of Amenhotep III, Aanen and an inscription tells us that the statue depicts the astronomer priest Aanen  by saying " one knows the procession of the sky". Aanen was the brother of the queen Teye wife of Amenhotep III. Drovetti collection, cat 1377
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of Aanen, second priest to Amon, granodioite, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, (1390-1353, Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. <br />
<br />
A dignitary wearing a wig, a long gown and the leopard skin of a priest. Writing on his belt are the names of Amenhotep III, Aanen and an inscription tells us that the statue depicts the astronomer priest Aanen  by saying " one knows the procession of the sky". Aanen was the brother of the queen Teye wife of Amenhotep III. Drovetti collection, cat 1377
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of a Ram protecting King Amenhotep III, granite, New Kingdom, early 18th Dynasty (1390-1353), Karnak, Temple of Mut. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background<br />
<br />
a figure of Amenhotep III as Osiris stands between the legs of the Ram. there is a hole in the top of the rams head for the insertion of a solar disk associating it to the god Amon, whose animal form is the ram, and with the sun god Re. The statue may have stood in the Soleb of Nubia. Drovetti Collection. C 836
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 255
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. black background.<br />
<br />
In this statue of Sekhmet the goddess is called "mistress of Shenut" possibly linking her to the lioness goddess Repyt of Anthribis.  Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 248
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
In this statue of Sekhmet the goddess is called "mistress of Shenut" possibly linking her to the lioness goddess Repyt of Anthribis.  Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 248
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 249
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of goddess Sekhmet, grandodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th & 20thDynasty (1390-1150 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
This statue is unfinished and is in the stage before polishing. Sekhmet, "the Powerful One" was a fearsome goddess symbolised by her lioness head. Daughter of the sun she personifies the disk of the world during the day. Sekhmet is the angry manifestation of Hathor inflicting the scourges of summer heat, famine and illness which is why the goddess needed to be exorcised every day. Drovetti Collection. C 264
  • Colossal ancient Egyptian statue of Sethy II, sandstone, New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, (1202-1198 BC), Karnak Temple of Amon. Egyptian Museum, Turin. black background.<br />
<br />
A striking monumental sculpture expresses the strength of Sethy II who is depicted with his muscular left leg forward to express jis capability. He holds the standard of Amon depicted on it. It stood in the courtyard of the temple at Karnak along with a sister statue, now in the Louvre.Drovetti Collection. C 1383
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of Ramesses II , granite, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, (1500-1400 BC, Karnak, Temple of Mut. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.<br />
<br />
The statue depicting Ramesses II  was reworked over a statue of an earlier pharaoh. This can be seen around the corners of the mouth which show reworking. The roundness of the face and short apron also point to an earlier style.  Ramesses II is depicted praying with his arms out straight and his hands resting flat on the apron of his kilt.
  • Ancient Egyptian statue of king Horemheb & his wife Mutnedjemet, granodiorite, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, (1319-1292 BC), Karnak, Temple of Amon. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey Background.<br />
<br />
Queen Mutnedjemet is depicted in the role of Hathor, the sun god, embracing her husband. The statue is unfinished with details missing including the stripes in the Royal kilt, the wings of a vulture on the queens headdress and bound enemies on one side of the throne. On the back of the throne is a long inscription recording the coronation of Horemheb who was the general of Tutenkhamun before ascending to the throne. Drovetto collection. C 1379.
  • Ancient Egyptian mummy of a baby and painted cartonnage funereal mask- Late Ptolomaic Roman Period, 1at cent BC to 2 cent AD. Egyptian Museum, Turin. black background
  • Ancient Egyptian mummy of a baby and painted cartonnage funereal mask- Late Ptolomaic Roman Period, 1at cent BC to 2 cent AD. Egyptian Museum, Turin.
  • Ancient Egyptian Sarcophagus coffin of Tamutmutef, chantress of Amun, 18th Dynasty, (1550 to 1292 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. black background.<br />
<br />
The Tamutmutef sarcophagus belongs to a group of 18th Dynasty coffins characterised by the representation of the deceased wearing everyday clothes instead of as a mummy. It is carved in relief to reveal the pleated linen dress eith arms and feet sticking out from the pleats of the cloth. This coffin may have been reused from earlier use updated with dense yellow decorations.
  • Ancient Egyptian Sarcophagus coffin of Tamutmutef, chantress of Amun, 18th Dynasty, (1550 to 1292 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. white background.<br />
<br />
The Tamutmutef sarcophagus belongs to a group of 18th Dynasty coffins characterised by the representation of the deceased wearing everyday clothes instead of as a mummy. It is carved in relief to reveal the pleated linen dress eith arms and feet sticking out from the pleats of the cloth. This coffin may have been reused from earlier use updated with dense yellow decorations.
  • Ancient Egyptian Sarcophagus coffin of Tamutmutef, chantress of Amun, 18th Dynasty, (1550 to 1292 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.<br />
<br />
The Tamutmutef sarcophagus belongs to a group of 18th Dynasty coffins characterised by the representation of the deceased wearing everyday clothes instead of as a mummy. It is carved in relief to reveal the pleated linen dress eith arms and feet sticking out from the pleats of the cloth. This coffin may have been reused from earlier use updated with dense yellow decorations.
  • Ancient Egyptian Sarcophagus coffin of Tamutmutef, chantress of Amun, 18th Dynasty, (1550 to 1292 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.<br />
<br />
The Tamutmutef sarcophagus belongs to a group of 18th Dynasty coffins characterised by the representation of the deceased wearing everyday clothes instead of as a mummy. It is carved in relief to reveal the pleated linen dress eith arms and feet sticking out from the pleats of the cloth. This coffin may have been reused from earlier use updated with dense yellow decorations.
  • Ancient Egyptian sarcophagus inner coffin of  singer Tabakenkhonsu, Temple of Hatshepsut at Deir el-Bahri. Thebes, 2nd half of 21st Dynasty, 680–670 B.C. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.<br />
<br />
The deceased is depicted with her hands rendered in high relief on top of a wesekh collar. a stylistic trait that allows the coffin to be dated from the late 21st Dynsaty. the inner coffin is of great quality depicting mythological scenes derived from the Book of the Dead spells.
  • Ancient Egyptian greywacke sarcophagus lid of Ibi - late Period, 26th Dynasty (664-610BC). Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background<br />
<br />
Ibi was overseer of the priests of Thebes and chief steward of Nitocris, Divine Adoratrice of Amon during the reign of Psamtek I. The sarcophagus lid shows his hands emerging from a shroud to grasp the dfed-pillar, which allows him to rise to his feet again after resurrection. The lid weighs more than a ton and is finely sculpted. Despite the hardness of the greywacke stone the sarcophagus is made from, its makers have shown incredible skill creating a sarcophagus with intricate detail and a highly polished finish.
  • Ancient Egyptian greywacke sarcophagus lid of Ibi - late Period, 26th Dynasty (664-610BC). Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background<br />
<br />
Ibi was overseer of the priests of Thebes and chief steward of Nitocris, Divine Adoratrice of Amon during the reign of Psamtek I. The sarcophagus lid shows his hands emerging from a shroud to grasp the dfed-pillar, which allows him to rise to his feet again after resurrection. The lid weighs more than a ton and is finely sculpted. Despite the hardness of the greywacke stone the sarcophagus is made from, its makers have shown incredible skill creating a sarcophagus with intricate detail and a highly polished finish.
  • Ancient Egyptian greywacke sarcophagus lid of Ibi - late Period, 26th Dynasty (664-610BC). Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background<br />
<br />
Ibi was overseer of the priests of Thebes and chief steward of Nitocris, Divine Adoratrice of Amon during the reign of Psamtek I. The sarcophagus lid shows his hands emerging from a shroud to grasp the dfed-pillar, which allows him to rise to his feet again after resurrection. The lid weighs more than a ton and is finely sculpted. Despite the hardness of the greywacke stone the sarcophagus is made from, its makers have shown incredible skill creating a sarcophagus with intricate detail and a highly polished finish.
  • Acient Egyptian sacophagus of Merit -  inner coffin from tomb of Kha, Theban Tomb 8 , mid-18th dynasty (1550 to 1292 BC), Turin Egyptian Museum.  black background
  • Ancient Egyptian wooden sarcophagus - the coffin of Puia circa 1800BC - Thebes Necropolis. Egyptian Museum, Turin. white background<br />
<br />
From about 100BC "anthropoid " sarcophagi with fihure shaped lids started to replace rectangular coffins. Pia was probably the son of Puyemre, a high official of Thebes and second priest of Amon under the woman pharoah, Hatshepsut (1479-1458). The sarcophagus was excavated by Robert Mond from a shaft grave found close to the tomb of Puyemre in Thebes Necropolis.
  • Ancient Egyptian wooden sarcophagus - the coffin of Puia circa 1800BC - Thebes Necropolis. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Black background<br />
<br />
From about 100BC "anthropoid " sarcophagi with fihure shaped lids started to replace rectangular coffins. Pia was probably the son of Puyemre, a high official of Thebes and second priest of Amon under the woman pharoah, Hatshepsut (1479-1458). The sarcophagus was excavated by Robert Mond from a shaft grave found close to the tomb of Puyemre in Thebes Necropolis.
  • Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead papyrus - From  tomb of Kha & Merit, Theban Tomb 8 , mid-18th dynasty (1550 to 1292 BC), Turin Egyptian Museum.  white background
  • Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead papyrus - From  tomb of Kha, Theban Tomb 8 , mid-18th dynasty (1550 to 1292 BC), Turin Egyptian Museum. Black background
  • Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead papyrus - Spell 126 - what to say in the judgement before Osiris, Iufankh's Book of the Dead, Ptolemaic period (332-30BC).Turin Egyptian Museum. White Background<br />
<br />
Spell 125 instruct the deceased as to waht to say infront of Osiris and the Forty Two Judges in the Hall of Two Maat, the netherworlds Judgement Hall. <br />
<br />
The translation of  Iuefankh's Book of the Dead papyrus by Richard Lepsius marked a truning point in the studies of ancient Egyptian funereal studies.
  • Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead papyrus - Spell 126 - what to say in the judgement before Osiris, Iufankh's Book of the Dead, Ptolemaic period (332-30BC).Turin Egyptian Museum. Grey Background<br />
<br />
Spell 125 instruct the deceased as to waht to say infront of Osiris and the Forty Two Judges in the Hall of Two Maat, the netherworlds Judgement Hall. <br />
<br />
The translation of  Iuefankh's Book of the Dead papyrus by Richard Lepsius marked a truning point in the studies of ancient Egyptian funereal studies.
  • Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead papyrus - Spell 126 - what to say in the judgement before Osiris, Iufankh's Book of the Dead, Ptolemaic period (332-30BC).Turin Egyptian Museum. <br />
<br />
Spell 125 instruct the deceased as to waht to say infront of Osiris and the Forty Two Judges in the Hall of Two Maat, the netherworlds Judgement Hall. <br />
<br />
The translation of  Iuefankh's Book of the Dead papyrus by Richard Lepsius marked a truning point in the studies of ancient Egyptian funereal studies.
  • Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead papyrus - Spell 126 - what to say in the judgement before Osiris, Iufankh's Book of the Dead, Ptolemaic period (332-30BC).Turin Egyptian Museum. Grey background<br />
<br />
Spell 125 instruct the deceased as to waht to say infront of Osiris and the Forty Two Judges in the Hall of Two Maat, the netherworlds Judgement Hall. <br />
<br />
The translation of  Iuefankh's Book of the Dead papyrus by Richard Lepsius marked a truning point in the studies of ancient Egyptian funereal studies.
  • Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead papyrus - Spell 126 - what to say in the judgement before Osiris, Iufankh's Book of the Dead, Ptolemaic period (332-30BC).Turin Egyptian Museum. Grey Background<br />
<br />
Spell 125 instruct the deceased as to waht to say infront of Osiris and the Forty Two Judges in the Hall of Two Maat, the netherworlds Judgement Hall. <br />
<br />
The translation of  Iuefankh's Book of the Dead papyrus by Richard Lepsius marked a truning point in the studies of ancient Egyptian funereal studies.
  • Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead papyrus - Spell 126 - what to say in the judgement before Osiris, Iufankh's Book of the Dead, Ptolemaic period (332-30BC).Turin Egyptian Museum. Grey Background<br />
<br />
Spell 125 instruct the deceased as to waht to say infront of Osiris and the Forty Two Judges in the Hall of Two Maat, the netherworlds Judgement Hall. <br />
<br />
The translation of  Iuefankh's Book of the Dead papyrus by Richard Lepsius marked a truning point in the studies of ancient Egyptian funereal studies.
  • Ancinet Egyptian Book of the Dead papyrus - Spell 126 - what to say in the judgement before Osiris, Iufankh's Book of the Dead, Pyolemic period (332-30BC).Turin Egyptian Museum. grey background<br />
<br />
Spell 125 instruct the deceased as to waht to say infront of Osiris and the Forty Two Judges in the Hall of Two Maat, the netherworlds Judgement Hall. <br />
<br />
The translation of  Iuefankh's Book of the Dead papyrus by Richard Lepsius marked a truning point in the studies of ancient Egyptian funereal studies.

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