• Islamic writings in the Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) , Istanbul, Turkey
  • Islamic writings in the Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) , Istanbul, Turkey
  • Islamic writings in the Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) , Istanbul, Turkey
  • Islamic writings in the Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) , Istanbul, Turkey
  • The 19th century Mihrap (Mihrab), the niche in a mosque that indicated the direction of Mecca, Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) , Istanbul, Turkey
  • Stone stele fragment with a Phrygian written inscription. From Grodion . Phrygian Collection, 8th-7th century BC - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations Ankara. Turkey. Against a white background
  • Stone stele fragment with a Phrygian written inscription. From Grodion . Phrygian Collection, 8th-7th century BC - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations Ankara. Turkey. Against a black background
  • Stone stele fragment with a Phrygian written inscription. From Grodion . Phrygian Collection, 8th-7th century BC - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations Ankara. Turkey.
  • Stone stele fragment with a Phrygian written inscription. From Grodion . Phrygian Collection, 8th-7th century BC - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations Ankara. Turkey. Against an art background
  • Stone stele fragment with a Phrygian written inscription. From Grodion . Phrygian Collection, 8th-7th century BC - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations Ankara Turkey. Against a grey background
  • Inscribed Xanthian Obelisk pillar from 425-400 B.C with the longest know Lycian inscriptions. The inscription commemorates the wars fought by Kherei, a prince of Lycia. Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage Archaeological Site, Turkey
  • Inscribed Xanthian Obelisk pillar from 425-400 B.C with the longest know Lycian inscriptions. The inscription commemorates the wars fought by Kherei, a prince of Lycia. Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage Archaeological Site, Turkey
  • Inscribed Xanthian Obelisk pillar from 425-400 B.C with the longest know Lycian inscriptions. The inscription commemorates the wars fought by Kherei, a prince of Lycia. Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage Archaeological Site, Turkey
  • Inscribed Xanthian Obelisk pillar from 425-400 B.C with the longest know Lycian inscriptions. The inscription commemorates the wars fought by Kherei, a prince of Lycia. Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage Archaeological Site, Turkey
  • Inscribed Xanthian Obelisk pillar from 425-400 B.C with the longest know Lycian inscriptions. The inscription commemorates the wars fought by Kherei, a prince of Lycia. Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage Archaeological Site, Turkey
  • Inscribed Xanthian Obelisk pillar from 425-400 B.C with the longest know Lycian inscriptions. The inscription commemorates the wars fought by Kherei, a prince of Lycia. Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage Archaeological Site, Turkey
  • Inscribed pillar from 425-400 B.C with the longest know Lycian inscriptions. The inscription commemorates the wars fought by Kherei, a prince of Lycia. Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage Archaeological Site, Turkey
  • Inscribed pillar from 425-400 B.C with the longest know Lycian inscriptions. The inscription commemorates the wars fought by Kherei, a prince of Lycia. Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage Archaeological Site, Turkey
  • Inscribed pillar from 425-400 B.C with the longest know Lycian inscriptions. The inscription commemorates the wars fought by Kherei, a prince of Lycia. Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage Archaeological Site, Turkey
  • Inscribed pillar from 425-400 B.C with the longest know Lycian inscriptions. The inscription commemorates the wars fought by Kherei, a prince of Lycia. Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage Archaeological Site, Turkey
  • Inscribed pillar from 425-400 B.C with the longest know Lycian inscriptions. The inscription commemorates the wars fought by Kherei, a prince of Lycia. Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage Archaeological Site, Turkey
  • Inscribed pillar from 425-400 B.C with the longest know Lycian inscriptions. The inscription commemorates the wars fought by Kherei, a prince of Lycia. Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage Archaeological Site, Turkey
  • The Church of San Vigilio in Pinzolo and its fresco paintings “Dance of Death” painted by Simone Baschenis of Averaria in1539, Pinzolo, Trentino, Italy.<br />
<br />
The procession continues with a depiction of a king then nobility followed by knights and soldiers and a beggar man with no legs. Between each figure are skeletons holding bows and arrows, banners with writings on them or a shovel to dig a grave.
  • The Church of San Vigilio in Pinzolo and its fresco paintings “Dance of Death” painted by Simone Baschenis of Averaria in1539, Pinzolo, Trentino, Italy.<br />
<br />
The Mural opens on its left with a skeleton on the throne, bearing a sceptre and the crown and playing a bagpipe. These skeletons are playing the music which is the backdrop to “Dance of Death” ( Danza macabra ) and suggests that they are playing with our fate on earth. <br />
<br />
The mural continues for another 21 meters with a long procession with 40 figures. To the right of the skeletons playing music is a depiction of the crucification. Christ is depicted on the cross with an arrow in him that has been fired by a skeleton with a bow. This suggests that because Christ was a man he suffered the fate of death as we all will. After Christ is a Pope also pierced by a spear, as are all the human figures in the mural. Next to the pope is a cardinal, a cleric and a monk all of whom have succumbed to the arrows of the skeletons. This tableau is a reminder to the hierarchy of the church that even they are not immune from death. The procession continues with a depiction of a king then nobility followed by knights and soldiers and a beggar man with no legs. Between each figure are skeletons holding bows and arrows, banners with writings on them or a shovel to dig a grave. After the beggar mad there are figures of women ending with a small skeleton and a cherub. To the far right a skeleton on a horse is riding into the procession holding a bow and arrow ready to far. To procession ends with the Angel Gabriel and the devil discussing the fates of the those in the procession as to whether they go to Heaven or to Purgatory and Hell.
  • Hittite bronze decorated sword blade close up with writing. Hittite Period 1650 - 1450 BC.  Hattusa Boğazkale. Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey. Against a white bacground.
  • Hittite bronze decorated sword blade close up with writing. Hittite Period 1650 - 1450 BC.  Hattusa Boğazkale. Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey. Against a black bacground.
  • Hittite bronze decorated sword blade close up with writing. Hittite Period 1650 - 1450 BC.  Hattusa Boğazkale. Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey
  • Hittite bronze decorated sword blade close up with writing. Hittite Period 1650 - 1450 BC.  Hattusa Boğazkale. Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey. Against a grey bacground.
  • Hittite bronze decorated sword blade close up with writing. Hittite Period 1650 - 1450 BC.  Hattusa Boğazkale. Çorum Archaeological Museum, Corum, Turkey. Against a warm art bacground.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Relief panels orthostat from northern part of the hall at the Palace of Sam 'al - Zincirli. On the throne sits the Prince Barrakib, before him stands a scribe with his pen with a writing board under his arm. Above their heads each side of a crescent moon  are inscriptions in Aramaic "I am Barrakib, son of Panammuwa" and the inscription "My Lord of the Ba 'al of Harran" with symbols of the moon god.Neo Syro Hittite.  Basalt around 730 BC. Neo Syro Hittite.  Basalt around 730 BC.  Pergamon Museum, Berlin, inv no VA2817
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman mosaic of a Hebrew, possibly from North Syria 5th-6th century AD J-C. dressed in Oriental clothing, that young man is identified by writing in Syriac has the right to his head: it tells of three Hebrews miraculously surviving after being thrown into a fire for refusing to worship the image of Nebuchadnezzar. This is biblical episode is from the Book Daniel (3 1-30), and is commonly illustrated in the East as in the West. Inv 3671, The Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Relief panels orthostat from northern part of the hall at the Palace of Sam 'al - Zincirli. On the throne sits the Prince Barrakib, before him stands a scribe with his pen with a writing board under his arm. Above their heads each side of a crescent moon  are inscriptions in Aramaic "I am Barrakib, son of Panammuwa" and the inscription "My Lord of the Ba 'al of Harran" with symbols of the moon god.Neo Syro Hittite.  Basalt around 730 BC. Neo Syro Hittite.  Basalt around 730 BC.  Pergamon Museum, Berlin, inv no VA2817
  • Relief panels orthostat from northern part of the hall at the Palace of Sam 'al - Zincirli. On the throne sits the Prince Barrakib, before him stands a scribe with his pen with a writing board under his arm. Above their heads each side of a crescent moon  are inscriptions in Aramaic "I am Barrakib, son of Panammuwa" and the inscription "My Lord of the Ba 'al of Harran" with symbols of the moon god.Neo Syro Hittite.  Basalt around 730 BC. Neo Syro Hittite.  Basalt around 730 BC.  Pergamon Museum, Berlin, inv no VA2817
  • Relief panels orthostat from northern part of the hall at the Palace of Sam 'al - Zincirli. On the throne sits the Prince Barrakib, before him stands a scribe with his pen with a writing board under his arm. Above their heads each side of a crescent moon  are inscriptions in Aramaic "I am Barrakib, son of Panammuwa" and the inscription "My Lord of the Ba 'al of Harran" with symbols of the moon god.Neo Syro Hittite.  Basalt around 730 BC. Neo Syro Hittite.  Basalt around 730 BC.  Pergamon Museum, Berlin, inv no VA2817

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