• The Venus of Arles (  Greek Goddess Aphrodite) is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) marble sculpture of Venus probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The style of the Venus of Arles, like the Venus de Milo, is not a fully nude figure both having draped clothes from the waist down. The first known example of a totally nude Venus is the 4th century BC  Aphrodite of Cnidus by.Praxiteles  The Venus of Arles was probably an earlier statue by Praxiteles known as the Aphrodite of Thespiae . <br />
The venus of Arles was found in 1651 by workmen digging a well in Arles. In 1681 it was given to Louis XIV to decorate the Galerie des Glaces of Versailles. The statue was moved to the Musée du Louvre after the French Revolution.
  • The Venus of Arles (  Greek Goddess Aphrodite) is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) marble sculpture of Venus probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The style of the Venus of Arles, like the Venus de Milo, is not a fully nude figure both having draped clothes from the waist down. The first known example of a totally nude Venus is the 4th century BC  Aphrodite of Cnidus by.Praxiteles  The Venus of Arles was probably an earlier statue by Praxiteles known as the Aphrodite of Thespiae . <br />
The venus of Arles was found in 1651 by workmen digging a well in Arles. In 1681 it was given to Louis XIV to decorate the Galerie des Glaces of Versailles. The statue was moved to the Musée du Louvre after the French Revolution.
  • The Venus of Arles (  Greek Goddess Aphrodite) is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) marble sculpture of Venus probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The style of the Venus of Arles, like the Venus de Milo, is not a fully nude figure both having draped clothes from the waist down. The first known example of a totally nude Venus is the 4th century BC  Aphrodite of Cnidus by.Praxiteles  The Venus of Arles was probably an earlier statue by Praxiteles known as the Aphrodite of Thespiae . <br />
The venus of Arles was found in 1651 by workmen digging a well in Arles. In 1681 it was given to Louis XIV to decorate the Galerie des Glaces of Versailles. The statue was moved to the Musée du Louvre after the French Revolution.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The Roman Sculpture Venus of Italica or Diosa Venus, found in 1940 near the theatre.  A famous Roman statue,  the "Venus of Itálica", dates from the time of Hadrian (117-138 A.D.). Unlike the other Venus statues of the Era the Venus of Itálica does not try to hide her nudity but rather displays it. The state has rounded proportions with clearly defined anatomical features thanks to the exquisitely skilled carving, and the excellent quality of the marble. She is shown accompanied by a dolphin, and has a colocasia leaf in her left hand. <br />
Archaeological Museum, Seville, Spain<br />
<br />
Against a Grey background
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • The Roman Sculpture Venus of Italica or Diosa Venus, found in 1940 near the theatre. 117 AD. Archaeological Museum, Seville, Spain
  • The Roman Sculpture Venus of Italica or Diosa Venus, found in 1940 near the theatre. 117 AD. Archaeological Museum, Seville, Spain
  • The Roman Sculpture Venus of Italica or Diosa Venus, found in 1940 near the theatre. 117 AD. Archaeological Museum, Seville, Spain
  • The Roman Sculpture Venus of Italica or Diosa Venus, found in 1940 near the theatre. 117 AD. Archaeological Museum, Seville, Spain
  • The Roman Sculpture Venus of Italica or Diosa Venus, found in 1940 near the theatre. 117 AD. Archaeological Museum, Seville, Spain
  • Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus) of the Venus Felix Type , copied from a  2nd to 1st century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6300, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus) of the Venus Felix Type , copied from a  2nd to 1st century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6300, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus) of the Venus Felix Type , copied from a  2nd to 1st century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6300, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus) of the Venus Felix Type , copied from a  2nd to 1st century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6300 Farnese Collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus) of the Venus Felix Type , copied from a  2nd to 1st century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6300, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus) of the Venus Felix Type , copied from a  2nd to 1st century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6300, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus) of the Venus Felix Type , copied from a  2nd to 1st century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6300, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus) of the Venus Felix Type , copied from a  2nd to 1st century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6300, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • The Roman Sculpture Venus of Italica or Diosa Venus, found in 1940 near the theatre. 117 AD. Archaeological Museum, Seville, Spain
  • The Roman Sculpture Venus of Italica or Diosa Venus, found in 1940 near the theatre. 117 AD. Archaeological Museum, Seville, Spain
  • The Roman Sculpture Venus of Italica or Diosa Venus, found in 1940 near the theatre. 117 AD. Archaeological Museum, Seville, Spain
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus) of the Venus Felix Type , copied from a  2nd to 1st century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6300, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • The Roman Venus Statue, the Goddess of Love, follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of Ttththird century BC Hellenistic Greek statues now lost. Dated circa 1st quarter of second century AD, the Venus statue was excavated from the Odeon of Carthage. The National Bardo Museum, Tunis.   Against a grey background.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • The Roman Venus Statue, the Goddess of Love, follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of the third century BC Hellenistic Greek statues now lost. Dated circa 1st quarter of second century AD, the Venus statue was excavated from the Odeon of Carthage. The National Bardo Museum, Tunis.  Against a white background.
  • The Roman Venus Statue, the Goddess of Love, follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of Ttththird century BC Hellenistic Greek statues now lost. Dated circa 1st quarter of second century AD, the Venus statue was excavated from the Odeon of Carthage. The National Bardo Museum, Tunis.   Against a grey background.
  • The Roman Venus Statue, the Goddess of Love, follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of the third century BC Hellenistic Greek statues now lost. Dated circa 1st quarter of second century AD, the Venus statue was excavated from the Odeon of Carthage. The National Bardo Museum, Tunis.
  • The Roman Venus Statue, the Goddess of Love, follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of The third century BC Hellenistic Greek statues now lost. Dated circa 1st quarter of second century AD, the Venus statue was excavated from the Odeon of Carthage. The National Bardo Museum, Tunis.  Against a white background.
  • The Roman Venus Statue, the Goddess of Love, follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of Ttththird century BC Hellenistic Greek statues now lost. Dated circa 1st quarter of second century AD, the Venus statue was excavated from the Odeon of Carthage. The National Bardo Museum, Tunis.  Against a black background.
  • The Roman Venus Statue, the Goddess of Love, follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of Ttththird century BC Hellenistic Greek statues now lost. Dated circa 1st quarter of second century AD, the Venus statue was excavated from the Odeon of Carthage. The National Bardo Museum, Tunis. Against a grey art background.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • The Roman Venus Statue, the Goddess of Love, follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of Ttththird century BC Hellenistic Greek statues now lost. Dated circa 1st quarter of second century AD, the Venus statue was excavated from the Odeon of Carthage. The National Bardo Museum, Tunis.  Against a black background.
  • The Roman Venus Statue, the Goddess of Love, follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of Ttththird century BC Hellenistic Greek statues now lost. Dated circa 1st quarter of second century AD, the Venus statue was excavated from the Odeon of Carthage. The National Bardo Museum, Tunis. Against a grey art background.
  • The Roman Venus Statue, the Goddess of Love, follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of the third century BC Hellenistic Greek statues now lost. Dated circa 1st quarter of second century AD, the Venus statue was excavated from the Odeon of Carthage. The National Bardo Museum, Tunis.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Bronze Hellanistic original from the mid 3rd century BC  attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia,  inv 6283  Farnese Collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238  Farnese Collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Bronze Hellanistic original from the mid 3rd century BC  attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia,  inv 6283 Farnese Collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Bronze Hellanistic original from the mid 3rd century BC  attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia,  inv 6283  Farnese Collection, Naples  Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Bronze Hellanistic original from the mid 3rd century BC  attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia,  inv 6293, Farnese Collection - Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238 Farnese Collection, Naples  Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238 Farnese Collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238  Farnese Collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238 Farnese Collection, Naples  Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • a 2nd century Roman Copy Statue of Aphrodite or Venus, . This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style  and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Merida Archaeological Museum, Spain
  • a 2nd century Roman Copy Statue of Aphrodite or Venus, . This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style  and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Merida Archaeological Museum, Spain
  • a 2nd century Roman Copy Statue of Aphrodite or Venus, . This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style  and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Merida Archaeological Museum, Spain
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum Assyrian  Archaeological exhibit.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Bronze Hellanistic original from the mid 3rd century BC  attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia,  inv 6283, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Bronze Hellanistic original from the mid 3rd century BC  attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia,  inv 6283, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Lely's Venus (Aphrodite). 1st or 2nd cent. AD Roman copy of a Greek original. The goddess Venus id surprised whilst bathing and she nervously turns. Her hair is in the style typical of the time and her pose has been designed to be unrevealing from any angle.  British Museum exhibit, London.<br />
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. The sculpture here changes the pattern by raising the right arm to the neck, rather than making her arm cross her chest, this flattens the composition.
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Bronze Hellanistic original from the mid 3rd century BC  attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia,  inv 6283 Farnese Collection, Naples  Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238  Farnese Collection, Naples  Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6283 - Farnese Collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6283 - Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238  Farnese Collection, Naples  Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238 Farnese Collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • a 2nd century Roman Copy Statue of Aphrodite or Venus, . This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style  and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Merida Archaeological Museum, Spain
  • a 2nd century Roman Copy Statue of Aphrodite or Venus, . This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style  and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Merida Archaeological Museum, Spain
  • a 2nd century Roman Copy Statue of Aphrodite or Venus, . This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style  and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Merida Archaeological Museum, Spain
  • a 2nd century Roman Copy Statue of Aphrodite or Venus, . This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style  and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Merida Archaeological Museum, Spain
  • a 2nd century Roman Copy Statue of Aphrodite or Venus, . This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style  and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Merida Archaeological Museum, Spain
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Bronze Hellanistic original from the mid 3rd century BC  attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia,  inv 6283, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Bronze Hellanistic original from the mid 3rd century BC  attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia,  inv 6283, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Aphrodite, Roman Venus, of Vienne Goddess of Love. This 1st to 2nd century Roman marble copy of a lost Greek original attributed to attibuee Doidalsas Bithynia around 250BC, is of the crouching Venus style. Excavated from the Palace of Mirrors in Saint Romain en Gal (Isere France). The Crouching Venus is a Hellenistic model of Venus surprised at her bath. Venus crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. Louvre Museum, Inv No MNB 1292 ( Usual No Ma 2240)
  • Aphrodite, Roman Venus, of Vienne Goddess of Love. This 1st to 2nd century Roman marble copy of a lost Greek original attributed to attibuee Doidalsas Bithynia around 250BC, is of the crouching Venus style. Excavated from the Palace of Mirrors in Saint Romain en Gal (Isere France). The Crouching Venus is a Hellenistic model of Venus surprised at her bath. Venus crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. Louvre Museum, Inv No MNB 1292 ( Usual No Ma 2240)
  • Aphrodite, Roman Venus, of Vienne Goddess of Love. This 1st to 2nd century Roman marble copy of a lost Greek original attributed to attibuee Doidalsas Bithynia around 250BC, is of the crouching Venus style. Excavated from the Palace of Mirrors in Saint Romain en Gal (Isere France). The Crouching Venus is a Hellenistic model of Venus surprised at her bath. Venus crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. Louvre Museum, Inv No MNB 1292 ( Usual No Ma 2240)
  • Aphrodite, Roman Venus, of Vienne Goddess of Love. This 1st to 2nd century Roman marble copy of a lost Greek original attributed to attibuee Doidalsas Bithynia around 250BC, is of the crouching Venus style. Excavated from the Palace of Mirrors in Saint Romain en Gal (Isere France). The Crouching Venus is a Hellenistic model of Venus surprised at her bath. Venus crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. Louvre Museum, Inv No MNB 1292 ( Usual No Ma 2240)
  • Statue of Venus, 1st 2nd century Roman. This Roman sculpture retains elements of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. In this version Venus no longer hides her modesty and stands with an arm raised revealing her breasts. British Museum, London.
  • Statue of Venus, 1st 2nd century Roman. This Roman sculpture retains elements of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. In this version Venus no longer hides her modesty and stands with an arm raised revealing her breasts. British Museum, London.
  • Statue of Venus, 1st 2nd century Roman. This Roman sculpture retains elements of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. In this version Venus no longer hides her modesty and stands with an arm raised revealing her breasts. British Museum, London.
  • The Venus of Arles (  Greek Goddess Aphrodite) is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) marble sculpture of Venus probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The Venus of Arles (  Greek Goddess Aphrodite) is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) marble sculpture of Venus probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Venus, 1st 2nd century Roman. This Roman sculpture retains elements of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. In this version Venus no longer hides her modesty and stands with an arm raised revealing her breasts. British Museum, London.
  • The Venus of Arles (  Greek Goddess Aphrodite) is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) marble sculpture of Venus probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. In this variant of the style she is accompanied by Eros, traces of whose feet and hand survive, and a swan. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. In this variant of the style she is accompanied by Eros, traces of whose feet and hand survive, and a swan. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • The Venus of Arles (  Greek Goddess Aphrodite) is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) marble sculpture of Venus probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • This 2nd to 3rd century Italian marble statue of Venus (Aphrodite) is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369)
  • This 2nd to 3rd century Italian marble statue of Venus (Aphrodite) is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369)
  • This 2nd to 3rd century Italian marble statue of Venus (Aphrodite) is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369)
  • This 2nd to 3rd century Italian marble statue of Venus (Aphrodite) is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369)
  • This 2nd to 3rd century Italian marble statue of Venus (Aphrodite) is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369)
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 371 
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. The sculpture here changes the pattern by raising the right arm to the neck, rather than making her arm cross her chest, this flattens the composition.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 371 
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. The sculpture here changes the pattern by raising the right arm to the neck, rather than making her arm cross her chest, this flattens the composition.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Lely’s Venus (Aphrodite) Greek goddess of love, 1st 2nd century Roman Copy of a lost Greek original. This style of Aphrodite statue is known as the Crouching or bathing Aphrodite. Her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder hiding her breasts. she looks to one side in surprise as if disturbed whilst bathing. Walking around the statue reveals 4 distinct viewpoints that tantalise the viewer and reveal nothing of Aphrodites nakedness. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC Bronze attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. British Museum, London.
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. In this variant of the style she is accompanied by Eros, traces of whose feet and hand survive, and a swan. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. In this variant of the style she is accompanied by Eros, traces of whose feet and hand survive, and a swan. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • This 2nd to 3rd century Italian marble statue of Venus (Aphrodite) is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369)
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 371 
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. The sculpture here changes the pattern by raising the right arm to the neck, rather than making her arm cross her chest, this flattens the composition.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • 1 cent AD Roman Erotic  fresco depicting Mars and Venus  Pompeii (VI, 9, 2,) Casa die Meleagro, inv 9250, 1st century AD, Naples Archaological Museum , Italy
  • This 2nd to 3rd century Italian marble statue of Venus (Aphrodite) is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369)
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 371 
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. The sculpture here changes the pattern by raising the right arm to the neck, rather than making her arm cross her chest, this flattens the composition.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • This 2nd to 3rd century Italian marble statue of Venus (Aphrodite) is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369)
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 2nd century Roman Copy. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 2nd century Roman Copy. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 1st century Roman Copy with a portrait head. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 2nd century Roman Copy. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Dresden-Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • 1st Century BC statue of Aphordite by Menophantos. The casket of the sculpture is inscribed “ of the Aphrodite which is situated in the Troad (Troy) Menophantos made it”. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 2nd century Roman Copy. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 1st century Roman Copy with a portrait head. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 1st century Roman Copy with a portrait head. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 2nd century Roman Copy. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Dresden-Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 2nd century Roman Copy. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Dresden-Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • 1st Century BC statue of Aphordite by Menophantos. The casket of the sculpture is inscribed “ of the Aphrodite which is situated in the Troad (Troy) Menophantos made it”. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • 1st Century BC statue of Aphordite by Menophantos. The casket of the sculpture is inscribed “ of the Aphrodite which is situated in the Troad (Troy) Menophantos made it”. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • 1st Century BC statue of Aphordite by Menophantos. The casket of the sculpture is inscribed “ of the Aphrodite which is situated in the Troad (Troy) Menophantos made it”. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • 1st Century BC statue of Aphordite by Menophantos. The casket of the sculpture is inscribed “ of the Aphrodite which is situated in the Troad (Troy) Menophantos made it”. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • 1st Century BC statue of Aphordite by Menophantos. The casket of the sculpture is inscribed “ of the Aphrodite which is situated in the Troad (Troy) Menophantos made it”. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • 1st Century BC statue of Aphordite by Menophantos. The casket of the sculpture is inscribed “ of the Aphrodite which is situated in the Troad (Troy) Menophantos made it”. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • 1st Century BC statue of Aphordite by Menophantos. The casket of the sculpture is inscribed “ of the Aphrodite which is situated in the Troad (Troy) Menophantos made it”. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • The Kaufmann Aphrodite head. 2nd century Roman marble copy modelled on the statue head of Aphrodite of Cnidus by Praixitele. Many Roman replicas exist of the Aphrodite of Cnidus which is one of the most famous statues of antiquity. The statue depicts the goddess bathing with a vase of water beside her. The lost original is a Hellenistic Greek sculpture made in 360-350 BC which is attributed to Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Tradition has it that the model for the original was the lover of sculptor Phryne. The original is the oldest known female nude in Greek sculpture. Borghese Collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv no MR657 ( Usual No Ma 421)
  • The Kaufmann Aphrodite head. 2nd century Roman marble copy modelled on the statue head of Aphrodite of Cnidus by Praixitele. Many Roman replicas exist of the Aphrodite of Cnidus which is one of the most famous statues of antiquity. The statue depicts the goddess bathing with a vase of water beside her. The lost original is a Hellenistic Greek sculpture made in 360-350 BC which is attributed to Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Tradition has it that the model for the original was the lover of sculptor Phryne. The original is the oldest known female nude in Greek sculpture. Borghese Collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv no MR657 ( Usual No Ma 421)
  • The Kaufmann Aphrodite head. 2nd century Roman marble copy modelled on the statue head of Aphrodite of Cnidus by Praixitele. Many Roman replicas exist of the Aphrodite of Cnidus which is one of the most famous statues of antiquity. The statue depicts the goddess bathing with a vase of water beside her. The lost original is a Hellenistic Greek sculpture made in 360-350 BC which is attributed to Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Tradition has it that the model for the original was the lover of sculptor Phryne. The original is the oldest known female nude in Greek sculpture. Borghese Collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv no MR657 ( Usual No Ma 421)
  • The Kaufmann Aphrodite head. 2nd century Roman marble copy modelled on the statue head of Aphrodite of Cnidus by Praixitele. Many Roman replicas exist of the Aphrodite of Cnidus which is one of the most famous statues of antiquity. The statue depicts the goddess bathing with a vase of water beside her. The lost original is a Hellenistic Greek sculpture made in 360-350 BC which is attributed to Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Tradition has it that the model for the original was the lover of sculptor Phryne. The original is the oldest known female nude in Greek sculpture. Borghese Collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv no MR657 ( Usual No Ma 421)
  • 2nd century Roman marble torso copy of the statue of Aphrodite of Cnidus by Praixitele. Many Roman replicas exist of the Aphrodite of Cnidus which is one of the most famous statues of antiquity. The statue depicts the goddess bathing with a vase of water beside her. The lost original is a Hellenistic Greek sculpture made in 360-350 BC which is attributed to Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Tradition has it that the model for the original was the lover of sculptor Phryne. The original is the oldest known female nude in Greek sculpture. Louvre Museum, Paris. Usual No 2184
  • 2nd century Roman marble torso copy of the statue of Aphrodite of Cnidus by Praixitele. Many Roman replicas exist of the Aphrodite of Cnidus which is one of the most famous statues of antiquity. The statue depicts the goddess bathing with a vase of water beside her. The lost original is a Hellenistic Greek sculpture made in 360-350 BC which is attributed to Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Tradition has it that the model for the original was the lover of sculptor Phryne. The original is the oldest known female nude in Greek sculpture. Louvre Museum, Paris. Usual No 2184
  • 2nd century Roman marble torso copy of the statue of Aphrodite of Cnidus by Praixitele. Many Roman replicas exist of the Aphrodite of Cnidus which is one of the most famous statues of antiquity. The statue depicts the goddess bathing with a vase of water beside her. The lost original is a Hellenistic Greek sculpture made in 360-350 BC which is attributed to Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Tradition has it that the model for the original was the lover of sculptor Phryne. The original is the oldest known female nude in Greek sculpture. Louvre Museum, Paris. Usual No 2184
  • 2nd century Roman marble torso copy of the statue of Aphrodite of Cnidus by Praixitele. Many Roman replicas exist of the Aphrodite of Cnidus which is one of the most famous statues of antiquity. The statue depicts the goddess bathing with a vase of water beside her. The lost original is a Hellenistic Greek sculpture made in 360-350 BC which is attributed to Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Tradition has it that the model for the original was the lover of sculptor Phryne. The original is the oldest known female nude in Greek sculpture. Louvre Museum, Paris. Usual No 2184
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite 2nd - 1st century BC Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Marine Venus' Type with a dolphin, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6296, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy, white background
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy, black background
  • The Venus of Arles (  Greek Goddess Aphrodite) is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) marble sculpture of Venus probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The style of the Venus of Arles, like the Venus de Milo, is not a fully nude figure both having draped clothes from the waist down. The first known example of a totally nude Venus is the 4th century BC  Aphrodite of Cnidus by.Praxiteles  The Venus of Arles was probably an earlier statue by Praxiteles known as the Aphrodite of Thespiae . <br />
The venus of Arles was found in 1651 by workmen digging a well in Arles. In 1681 it was given to Louis XIV to decorate the Galerie des Glaces of Versailles. The statue was moved to the Musée du Louvre after the French Revolution.
  • The Venus of Arles (  Greek Goddess Aphrodite) is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) marble sculpture of Venus probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The style of the Venus of Arles, like the Venus de Milo, is not a fully nude figure both having draped clothes from the waist down. The first known example of a totally nude Venus is the 4th century BC  Aphrodite of Cnidus by.Praxiteles  The Venus of Arles was probably an earlier statue by Praxiteles known as the Aphrodite of Thespiae . <br />
The venus of Arles was found in 1651 by workmen digging a well in Arles. In 1681 it was given to Louis XIV to decorate the Galerie des Glaces of Versailles. The statue was moved to the Musée du Louvre after the French Revolution.
  • The Venus of Arles (  Greek Goddess Aphrodite) is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) marble sculpture of Venus probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The style of the Venus of Arles, like the Venus de Milo, is not a fully nude figure both having draped clothes from the waist down. The first known example of a totally nude Venus is the 4th century BC  Aphrodite of Cnidus by.Praxiteles  The Venus of Arles was probably an earlier statue by Praxiteles known as the Aphrodite of Thespiae . <br />
The venus of Arles was found in 1651 by workmen digging a well in Arles. In 1681 it was given to Louis XIV to decorate the Galerie des Glaces of Versailles. The statue was moved to the Musée du Louvre after the French Revolution.
  • The Venus of Arles (  Greek Goddess Aphrodite) is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) marble sculpture of Venus probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The style of the Venus of Arles, like the Venus de Milo, is not a fully nude figure both having draped clothes from the waist down. The first known example of a totally nude Venus is the 4th century BC  Aphrodite of Cnidus by.Praxiteles  The Venus of Arles was probably an earlier statue by Praxiteles known as the Aphrodite of Thespiae . <br />
The venus of Arles was found in 1651 by workmen digging a well in Arles. In 1681 it was given to Louis XIV to decorate the Galerie des Glaces of Versailles. The statue was moved to the Musée du Louvre after the French Revolution.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus and Cupid - a its or 2nd Roman statue restored in the 17th century by Alessandro l’Algarde. The statue was acquired in Rome in 1630 by Cardinal Richelieu. Restored by Alessandro l’Algarde the modern head is a copy of the Medici Venus or Aphrodite in Florence.  The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 386 (Usual No Ma 2287), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus and Cupid - a its or 2nd Roman statue restored in the 17th century by Alessandro l’Algarde. The statue was acquired in Rome in 1630 by Cardinal Richelieu. Restored by Alessandro l’Algarde the modern head is a copy of the Medici Venus or Aphrodite in Florence.  The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 386 (Usual No Ma 2287), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus and Cupid - a its or 2nd Roman statue restored in the 17th century by Alessandro l’Algarde. The statue was acquired in Rome in 1630 by Cardinal Richelieu. Restored by Alessandro l’Algarde the modern head is a copy of the Medici Venus or Aphrodite in Florence.  The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 386 (Usual No Ma 2287), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite 2nd - 1st century BC Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Marine Venus' Type with a dolphin, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6296, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, white background
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite 2nd - 1st century BC Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Marine Venus' Type with a dolphin, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6296, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, white background

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