• Statue of Ceres, Roman "nurse" godess, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Statue of Ceres, Roman "nurse" godess, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • statue of a tortoise, a symbol of the feminine power of the waters and their godess Aphrodite or Venus, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Plutone or Neptune statue with a small dolphin in his hand , commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Whale statue , commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Statue of the head of Proteus, son of Neptune, the globe and castle on its head symolises the castle of Orsini and its rule over the world, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Statue of the head of Proteus, son of Neptune, the globe and castle on its head symolises the castle of Orsini and its rule over the world, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Plutone or Neptune statue with a small dolphin in his hand , commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Statue of the head of Proteus, son of Neptune, the globe and castle on its head symolises the castle of Orsini and its rule over the world, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Whale statue , commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • La Nuda Abbandonate, the abandoned nude sleeping nymph statue, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Statue of a dragon, representing wisdom,  fighting a dog and wolf, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Statue of the head of Proteus, son of Neptune, the globe and castle on its head symolises the castle of Orsini and its rule over the world, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • statue of a tortoise, a symbol of the feminine power of the waters and their godess Aphrodite or Venus, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Statue of a dragon, representing wisdom,  fighting a dog and wolf, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Statue of a dragon, representing wisdom,  fighting a dog and wolf, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Statue of the head of Proteus, son of Neptune, the globe and castle on its head symolises the castle of Orsini and its rule over the world, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Statue of the head of Proteus, son of Neptune, the globe and castle on its head symolises the castle of Orsini and its rule over the world, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • statue of Echidina, mother of the many enemies of Hercules, vainly in love with Glauco, the sea God, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Plutone or Neptune statue with a small dolphin in his hand , commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Plutone or Neptune statue with a small dolphin in his hand , commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Statue of Cabero the trhree haeded guardian of the underworld, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Statue of Cabero the trhree haeded guardian of the underworld, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Plutone or Neptune statue with a small dolphin in his hand , commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • La Nuda Abbandonate, the abandoned nude sleeping nymph statue, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • statue of Echidina, mother of the many enemies of Hercules, vainly in love with Glauco, the sea God, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • statue of Echidina, mother of the many enemies of Hercules, vainly in love with Glauco, the sea God, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • statue of Echidina, mother of the many enemies of Hercules, vainly in love with Glauco, the sea God, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • statue of Echidina, mother of the many enemies of Hercules, vainly in love with Glauco, the sea God, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Statue of a dragon, representing wisdom,  fighting a dog and wolf, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Statue of a dragon, representing wisdom,  fighting a dog and wolf, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Statue of a dragon, representing wisdom,  fighting a dog and wolf, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Statue of the head of Proteus, son of Neptune, the globe and castle on its head symolises the castle of Orsini and its rule over the world, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Statue of the head of Proteus, son of Neptune, the globe and castle on its head symolises the castle of Orsini and its rule over the world, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • sculpture of Orcus (l'orco) king of the underworld, with an incription"abondon all reason ye who enter here", a refernece from Dantes Inferno, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • sculpture of Orcus (l'orco) king of the underworld, with an incription"abondon all reason ye who enter here", a refernece from Dantes Inferno, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • sculpture of Orcus (l'orco) king of the underworld, with an incription"abondon all reason ye who enter here", a refernece from Dantes Inferno, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • sculpture of Orcus (l'orco) king of the underworld, with an incription"abondon all reason ye who enter here", a refernece from Dantes Inferno, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • sculpture of Orcus (l'orco) king of the underworld, with an incription"abondon all reason ye who enter here", a refernece from Dantes Inferno, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Sculture of an elephant with a castle on its back a popular Renaissance icon of power recalling Hanibals victories, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Wrestling Giants Staue, reprenting the battle of Hercules, good, and Caucus, evil, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Venus staue, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Furia Alta, Winged Fury, a greek and Etruscan deity that was important to the Romans as a guardian of national glory and fertility of the soil, hence the basket on her head, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Sculture of an elephant with a castle on its back a popular Renaissance icon of power recalling Hanibals victories, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Sculture of an elephant with a castle on its back a popular Renaissance icon of power recalling Hanibals victories, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Wrestling Giants Staue, reprenting the battle of Hercules, good, and Caucus, evil, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Sculpture commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • , commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Wrestling Giants Staue, reprenting the battle of Hercules, good, and Caucus, evil, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • , commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Furia Alta, Winged Fury, a greek and Etruscan deity that was important to the Romans as a guardian of national glory and fertility of the soil, hence the basket on her head, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Wrestling Giants Staue, reprenting the battle of Hercules, good, and Caucus, evil, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Sphinx, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Sphinx, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Casa Pendente, a leaning house  commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, in The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Casa Pendente, a leaning house  commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, in The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Casa Pendente, a leaning house  commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, in The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Casa Pendente, a leaning house  commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, in The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Casa Pendente, a leaning house  commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, in The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • The Etruscan bench with the inscription "you who have travelled the world wishing to see great stupendous marvels, come here, where there are horrendous faces, elephants, lions, bears, orcs and dragons", commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • The Etruscan bench with the inscription "you who have travelled the world wishing to see great stupendous marvels, come here, where there are horrendous faces, elephants, lions, bears, orcs and dragons", commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • The Theatre, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Casa Pendente, a leaning house  commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, in The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Casa Pendente, a leaning house  commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, in The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Pegasus fountain, a tribute to the Farnese family, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Pegasus fountain, a tribute to the Farnese family, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Casa Pendente, a leaning house  commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, in The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Temple built to the memory of Giulia Farnese by her husband Pier Francesco Orsini, Duke of Babarzo c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist style Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Temple built to the memory of Giulia Farnese by her husband Pier Francesco Orsini, Duke of Babarzo c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist style Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Temple built to the memory of Giulia Farnese by her husband Pier Francesco Orsini, Duke of Babarzo c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist style Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Statue of Ceres, Roman "nurse" godess, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • La Nuda Abbandonate, the abandoned nude sleeping nymph statue, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • La Nuda Abbandonate, the abandoned nude sleeping nymph statue, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Whale statue , commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Statue of a dragon, representing wisdom,  fighting a dog and wolf, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Statue of the head of Proteus, son of Neptune, the globe and castle on its head symolises the castle of Orsini and its rule over the world, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Statue of a dragon, representing wisdom,  fighting a dog and wolf, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • statue of Echidina, mother of the many enemies of Hercules, vainly in love with Glauco, the sea God, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • statue of a tortoise, a symbol of the feminine power of the waters and their godess Aphrodite or Venus, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Statue of the head of Proteus, son of Neptune, the globe and castle on its head symolises the castle of Orsini and its rule over the world, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Statue of the head of Proteus, son of Neptune, the globe and castle on its head symolises the castle of Orsini and its rule over the world, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Statue of the head of Proteus, son of Neptune, the globe and castle on its head symolises the castle of Orsini and its rule over the world, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Green Boy and a dog Statue Polaroid Lift
  • Paris - France -Jardin des Tuileries - Statue with carousel behind
  • Paris - France -Jardin des Tuileries - Statue
  • Paris - France -Jardin des Tuileries-Statue
  • Villa; Palagonia; Bagheria; Sicily; Grotesque Pictures, photos, images & fotos
  • Villa; Palagonia; Bagheria; Sicily; Grotesque Pictures, photos, images & fotos
  • Villa; Palagonia; Bagheria; Sicily; Grotesque Pictures, photos, images & fotos
  • Villa; Palagonia; Bagheria; Sicily; Grotesque Pictures, photos, images & fotos
  • Villa; Palagonia; Bagheria; Sicily; Grotesque Pictures, photos, images & fotos
  • Villa; Palagonia; Bagheria; Sicily; Grotesque Pictures, photos, images & fotos
  • Villa; Palagonia; Bagheria; Sicily; Grotesque Pictures, photos, images & fotos
  • Villa Palagonia, Bagheria, Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos
  • Villa Palagonia, Bagheria, Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos
  • Villa Palagonia, Bagheria, Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos
  • Villa Palagonia, Bagheria, Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos
  • Villa Palagonia, Bagheria, Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos
  • Villa Palagonia, Bagheria, Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos
  • Villa Palagonia, Bagheria, Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos
  • Villa Palagonia, Bagheria, Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos
  • Villa Palagonia, Bagheria, Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos
  • Villa Palagonia, Bagheria, Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Anchyrrhoe Nymph - a 2nd century Roman sculpture from Iatly. The Anchyrrhoe Nymph is an allegory of Fortune and was desd in the gardens of the chateau d’Ecouen in the 17th century. The style is copied from a Hellanistic Greek original and also reprints the dance as a muse. Inv No. MR 310 (Usual No Ma 868), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Bust of Greek Philosopher Plato. A  2nd century AD Roman sculpture in marble. In  423-348 BC Greek sculptor Silanion created a bronze bust of Plato to adorn the gardens of the Acadamy in Athens, at the request of Persia Mithridite, according to Diogenes Laertius (De Vitis Philosophorum III, 25 citing Memorabilia Favorinus ). This Roman copy of the Greek original can be identified by the la two letters of “Plato” inscribed on it.  Inv MR 415   (or Ma 2654), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Bust of Greek Philosopher Plato. A  2nd century AD Roman sculpture in marble. In  423-348 BC Greek sculptor Silanion created a bronze bust of Plato to adorn the gardens of the Acadamy in Athens, at the request of Persia Mithridite, according to Diogenes Laertius (De Vitis Philosophorum III, 25 citing Memorabilia Favorinus ). This Roman copy of the Greek original can be identified by the la two letters of “Plato” inscribed on it.  Inv MR 415   (or Ma 2654), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • sculpture of Orcus (l'orco) king of the underworld, with an incription"abondon all reason ye who enter here", a refernece from Dantes Inferno, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Wrestling Giants Staue, reprenting the battle of Hercules, good, and Caucus, evil, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Wrestling Giants Staue, reprenting the battle of Hercules, good, and Caucus, evil, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • sculpture of Orcus (l'orco) king of the underworld, with an incription"abondon all reason ye who enter here", a refernece from Dantes Inferno, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • sculpture of Orcus (l'orco) king of the underworld, with an incription"abondon all reason ye who enter here", a refernece from Dantes Inferno, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Anchyrrhoe Nymph - a 2nd century Roman sculpture from Iatly. The Anchyrrhoe Nymph is an allegory of Fortune and was desd in the gardens of the chateau d’Ecouen in the 17th century. The style is copied from a Hellanistic Greek original and also reprints the dance as a muse. Inv No. MR 310 (Usual No Ma 868), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Anchyrrhoe Nymph - a 2nd century Roman sculpture from Iatly. The Anchyrrhoe Nymph is an allegory of Fortune and was desd in the gardens of the chateau d’Ecouen in the 17th century. The style is copied from a Hellanistic Greek original and also reprints the dance as a muse. Inv No. MR 310 (Usual No Ma 868), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Anchyrrhoe Nymph - a 2nd century Roman sculpture from Iatly. The Anchyrrhoe Nymph is an allegory of Fortune and was desd in the gardens of the chateau d’Ecouen in the 17th century. The style is copied from a Hellanistic Greek original and also reprints the dance as a muse. Inv No. MR 310 (Usual No Ma 868), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Anchyrrhoe Nymph - a 2nd century Roman sculpture from Iatly. The Anchyrrhoe Nymph is an allegory of Fortune and was desd in the gardens of the chateau d’Ecouen in the 17th century. The style is copied from a Hellanistic Greek original and also reprints the dance as a muse. Inv No. MR 310 (Usual No Ma 868), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Bust of Greek Philosopher Plato. A  2nd century AD Roman sculpture in marble. In  423-348 BC Greek sculptor Silanion created a bronze bust of Plato to adorn the gardens of the Acadamy in Athens, at the request of Persia Mithridite, according to Diogenes Laertius (De Vitis Philosophorum III, 25 citing Memorabilia Favorinus ). This Roman copy of the Greek original can be identified by the la two letters of “Plato” inscribed on it.  Inv MR 415   (or Ma 2654), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Bust of Greek Philosopher Plato. A  2nd century AD Roman sculpture in marble. In  423-348 BC Greek sculptor Silanion created a bronze bust of Plato to adorn the gardens of the Acadamy in Athens, at the request of Persia Mithridite, according to Diogenes Laertius (De Vitis Philosophorum III, 25 citing Memorabilia Favorinus ). This Roman copy of the Greek original can be identified by the la two letters of “Plato” inscribed on it.  Inv MR 415   (or Ma 2654), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Bust of Greek Philosopher Plato. A  2nd century AD Roman sculpture in marble. In  423-348 BC Greek sculptor Silanion created a bronze bust of Plato to adorn the gardens of the Acadamy in Athens, at the request of Persia Mithridite, according to Diogenes Laertius (De Vitis Philosophorum III, 25 citing Memorabilia Favorinus ). This Roman copy of the Greek original can be identified by the la two letters of “Plato” inscribed on it.  Inv MR 415   (or Ma 2654), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Bust of Greek Philosopher Plato. A  2nd century AD Roman sculpture in marble. In  423-348 BC Greek sculptor Silanion created a bronze bust of Plato to adorn the gardens of the Acadamy in Athens, at the request of Persia Mithridite, according to Diogenes Laertius (De Vitis Philosophorum III, 25 citing Memorabilia Favorinus ). This Roman copy of the Greek original can be identified by the la two letters of “Plato” inscribed on it.  Inv MR 415   (or Ma 2654), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Bust of Greek Philosopher Plato. A  2nd century AD Roman sculpture in marble. In  423-348 BC Greek sculptor Silanion created a bronze bust of Plato to adorn the gardens of the Acadamy in Athens, at the request of Persia Mithridite, according to Diogenes Laertius (De Vitis Philosophorum III, 25 citing Memorabilia Favorinus ). This Roman copy of the Greek original can be identified by the la two letters of “Plato” inscribed on it.  Inv MR 415   (or Ma 2654), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Anchyrrhoe Nymph - a 2nd century Roman sculpture from Iatly. The Anchyrrhoe Nymph is an allegory of Fortune and was desd in the gardens of the chateau d’Ecouen in the 17th century. The style is copied from a Hellanistic Greek original and also reprints the dance as a muse. Inv No. MR 310 (Usual No Ma 868), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Anchyrrhoe Nymph - a 2nd century Roman sculpture from Iatly. The Anchyrrhoe Nymph is an allegory of Fortune and was desd in the gardens of the chateau d’Ecouen in the 17th century. The style is copied from a Hellanistic Greek original and also reprints the dance as a muse. Inv No. MR 310 (Usual No Ma 868), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Anchyrrhoe Nymph - a 2nd century Roman sculpture from Iatly. The Anchyrrhoe Nymph is an allegory of Fortune and was desd in the gardens of the chateau d’Ecouen in the 17th century. The style is copied from a Hellanistic Greek original and also reprints the dance as a muse. Inv No. MR 310 (Usual No Ma 868), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Anchyrrhoe Nymph - a 2nd century Roman sculpture from Iatly. The Anchyrrhoe Nymph is an allegory of Fortune and was desd in the gardens of the chateau d’Ecouen in the 17th century. The style is copied from a Hellanistic Greek original and also reprints the dance as a muse. Inv No. MR 310 (Usual No Ma 868), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Anchyrrhoe Nymph - a 2nd century Roman sculpture from Iatly. The Anchyrrhoe Nymph is an allegory of Fortune and was desd in the gardens of the chateau d’Ecouen in the 17th century. The style is copied from a Hellanistic Greek original and also reprints the dance as a muse. Inv No. MR 310 (Usual No Ma 868), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Bust of Greek Philosopher Plato. A  2nd century AD Roman sculpture in marble. In  423-348 BC Greek sculptor Silanion created a bronze bust of Plato to adorn the gardens of the Acadamy in Athens, at the request of Persia Mithridite, according to Diogenes Laertius (De Vitis Philosophorum III, 25 citing Memorabilia Favorinus ). This Roman copy of the Greek original can be identified by the la two letters of “Plato” inscribed on it.  Inv MR 415   (or Ma 2654), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Bust of Greek Philosopher Plato. A  2nd century AD Roman sculpture in marble. In  423-348 BC Greek sculptor Silanion created a bronze bust of Plato to adorn the gardens of the Acadamy in Athens, at the request of Persia Mithridite, according to Diogenes Laertius (De Vitis Philosophorum III, 25 citing Memorabilia Favorinus ). This Roman copy of the Greek original can be identified by the la two letters of “Plato” inscribed on it.  Inv MR 415   (or Ma 2654), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Bust of Greek Philosopher Plato. A  2nd century AD Roman sculpture in marble. In  423-348 BC Greek sculptor Silanion created a bronze bust of Plato to adorn the gardens of the Acadamy in Athens, at the request of Persia Mithridite, according to Diogenes Laertius (De Vitis Philosophorum III, 25 citing Memorabilia Favorinus ). This Roman copy of the Greek original can be identified by the la two letters of “Plato” inscribed on it.  Inv MR 415   (or Ma 2654), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Casa Pendente, a leaning house  commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, in The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Casa Pendente, a leaning house  commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, in The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Casa Pendente, a leaning house  commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, in The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Casa Pendente, a leaning house  commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, in The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Casa Pendente, a leaning house  commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, in The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Casa Pendente, a leaning house  commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, in The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Casa Pendente, a leaning house  commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, in The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Statue of Florence Trevelyan her Gardens in Taormina Italy, also known as, the Giardino Trevelyan and the Parco Duchi di Cesarò.
  • Statue of Florence Trevelyan her Gardens in Taormina Italy, also known as, the Giardino Trevelyan and the Parco Duchi di Cesarò.
  • Statue of Florence Trevelyan her Gardens in Taormina Italy, also known as, the Giardino Trevelyan and the Parco Duchi di Cesarò.
  • Paris - France -Jardin des Tuileries - women sunbathing.

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