• Murren fenicular Train - Switzerland
  • Murren fenicular Train - Switzerland
  • Gondolas on a small Canal near Rialto , Venice, Italy
  • Gondolas on the Grand Canal near St Marks Square , Venice, Italy
  • Gondolas at St Mark's Square with the island of San Giorgio Maggiore behind , with its church front designed by Andrea Palladio and begun in 1566.  Venice Italy
  • Sunset view of gondolas at St Mark's Square with the island of San Giorgio Maggiore behind , with its church front designed by Andrea Palladio and begun in 1566.  Venice Italy
  • Modern tram in the Square of Ban Josip Jela?i?,  Zagreb, Croatia
  • Pack Ponies waiting to be loaded with goods on Hydra, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Pack Ponies waiting to be loaded with goods on Hydra, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Pack Ponies on Hydra, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Pack Ponies on Hydra, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Gondolas in the early morning sun - Vnice Italy.
  • Fruit market on a boat - Campo San Barnarba - Venice Italy.
  • Paris - France - Velib - Hire Bicycles
  • Canale Della Guideca looking towards Church Rendentore - Venice Italy
  • Gondola At The Rialto Bridge - Venice Italy
  • Fruit market on a boat - Campo San Barnarba - Venice Italy.
  • Fruit market on a boat - Campo San Barnarba - Venice Italy.
  • Gondola at Campo San Barnarba - Venice Italy.
  • Water Taxi on the Grand Canal - Venice Italy
  • Gondola at the Rialto Bridge - Venice Italy
  • Gondolas in the early morning sun - Vnice Italy.
  • The punta della doganaand  Santa Maria della Salute on the Giudecca Canal, Venice Italy
  • Gondolas at St Mark's Square with the island of San Giorgio Maggiore behind , with its church front designed by Andrea Palladio and begun in 1566.  Venice Italy
  • Gondolas at St Mark's Square with the island of San Giorgio Maggiore behind , with its church front designed by Andrea Palladio and begun in 1566.  Venice Italy
  • Panorama of The punta della doganaand  Santa Maria della Salute on the Giudecca Canal, Venice Italy
  • Panorama of The punta della doganaand  Santa Maria della Salute on the Giudecca Canal, Venice Italy
  • The punta della doganaand  Santa Maria della Salute on the Giudecca Canal, Venice Italy
  • Gondolas on the Grand Canal near St Marks Square at sunset , Venice, Italy
  • Panoramic of Gondolas on the Grand Canal, Venice, Italy
  • Gondolas on the Grand Canal near St Marks Square at sunset , Venice, Italy
  • Gondolas on the Grand Canal near Rialto , Venice, Italy
  • Gondolas at St Mark's Square with the island of San Giorgio Maggiore behind , with its church front designed by Andrea Palladio and begun in 1566.  Venice Italy
  • Ferries in the Golden Horn by the Galata Bridge, Istanbul Turkey
  • Lotr??ak Tower  and fenicular railway to the Gradec area, Zagreb, Croatia
  • Modern tram in the Square of Ban Josip Jela?i?,  Zagreb, Croatia
  • Modern tram in the Square of Ban Josip Jela?i?,  Zagreb, Croatia
  • Pack Ponies saddles close up on Hydra, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Pack Ponies saddles close up on Hydra, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Pack Ponies saddles close up on Hydra, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Pack Ponies climbing the steps on Hydra,  Greek Saronic Islands
  • "Pony" sign on a pony saddle, Hydra,  Greek Saronic Islands
  • Pack Ponies waiting to be loaded with goods on Hydra, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Pack Ponies waiting to be loaded with goods on Hydra, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Pack Ponies waiting to be loaded with goods on Hydra, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Pack Ponies waiting to be loaded with goods on Hydra, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Pack Ponies waiting to be loaded with goods on Hydra, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Pack Ponies waiting to be loaded with goods on Hydra, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Pack Ponies waiting to be loaded with goods on Hydra, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Pack Ponies waiting to be loaded with goods on Hydra,  Greek Saronic Islands.
  • Pack Ponies waiting to be loaded with goods on Hydra, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Pack Pony moving a fridge on Hydra,  Greek Saronic Islands
  • Pack Pony moving a fridge on Hydra,  Greek Saronic Islands.
  • Pack Pony moving a fridge on Hydra,  Greek Saronic Islands
  • Pack Pony moving a fridge on Hydra,  Greek Saronic Islands
  • Pack Pony moving a fridge on Hydra,  Greek Saronic Islands
  • Pack Pony moving a fridge on Hydra,  Greek Saronic Islands.
  • Pack Ponies on Hydra, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Pack Ponies on Hydra,  Greek Saronic Islands.
  • Gondolas in the early morning sun - Vnice Italy.
  • Gondolas in the early morning sun - Vnice Italy.
  • Gondola From Academia Bridge - Venice Italy
  • Gondola at the Rialto Bridge - Venice Italy
  • Gondolas in the early morning sun - Vnice Italy.
  • Murren Train with The Eiger 9Left) Monch (middle) & Jungrau (left) - Alps Switzerland
  • Traditional yellow Budapest Tram, Hungary
  • Murren Train - Bernese Oberland Alps - Switzerland
  • Canal of Saint Mark  looking towards San Giorgio Maggiore Island - Venice Italy
  • Gondola At The Rialto Bridge - Venice Italy
  • Gondolas in the early morning sun - Vnice Italy.
  • Canal of Saint Mark  looking towards San Giorgio Maggiore Island - Venice Italy
  • Canale Della Guidecca - Venice ITALY
  • Island Of Saint Michele cemety- - Venice Italy
  • Island Of Saint Michele cemety- - Venice Italy
  • Gondola At The Rialto Bridge - Venice Italy
  • Fruit market on a boat - Campo San Barnarba - Venice Italy.
  • Fruit market on a boat - Campo San Barnarba - Venice Italy.
  • Fruit market on a boat - Campo San Barnarba - Venice Italy.
  • Fruit market on a boat - Campo San Barnarba - Venice Italy.
  • Gondola at Campo San Barnarba - Venice Italy.
  • Water Taxis & Gondolas on the Grand Canal - Venice Italy
  • Water Taxis & Gondolas on the Grand Canal - Venice Italy
  • Water Taxi on the Grand Canal - Venice Italy
  • Gondola at the Rialto Bridge - Venice Italy
  • Gondola at the Rialto Bridge - Venice Italy
  • Gondola at the Rialto Bridge - Venice Italy
  • Gondola at the Rialto Bridge - Venice Italy
  • Gondola at the Rialto Bridge - Venice Italy
  • Gondola at the Rialto Bridge - Venice Italy
  • Gondola at the Rialto Bridge - Venice Italy
  • Gondolas in the early morning sun - Vnice Italy.
  • Gondolas in the early morning sun - Vnice Italy.
  • Paris - France - Velib - Hire Bicycles
  • Paris - France - Velib - Hire Bicycles
  • Roman Fresco with a boat decorated for a festival and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .   <br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with a boat decorated for a festival and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .    Against a grey background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a white background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a white background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  <br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a black background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  <br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Roman Fresco with a boat decorated for a festival and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .   <br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with a boat decorated for a festival and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .   Against a white background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with a boat decorated for a festival and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .   <br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with a boat decorated for a festival and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .    Against a black background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with a boat decorated for a festival and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .   <br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with a boat decorated for a festival and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .   Against an art background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a black background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a grey background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  <br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against an art background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a black background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a grey background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against an art background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a white background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a grey background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a white background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a black background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  <br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a grey background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  <br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  <br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Assyrian Trader Colony Bronze Age terracotta sandal shaped ritual vessed. This cult pot is boat shaped with an animal head at the front. Inside the vessel is god. The deities associated with the ritual vessel were associated with trade and transportation in Ancient Mesopotamia and Summerian literature. The vessel signifies a religious river trip.  - 19th  century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey.. Against a white background.
  • Stone relief sculptured panel of cedar of Lebanon being transported. From the northern courtyard,  Inv AO 19889 from Dur Sharrukin the palace of Assyrian king Sargon II at Khorsabad, 713-706 BC.  Louvre Museum Room 4 , Paris
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the Life of St Lubin . Central panel shows A barrel of wine being transported to the Cathedral, below left - The young Lubin working as a shepherd, below right - A monk gives Lubin a belt with the alphabet written on it, above left - Lubin receiving instruction from a cleric, above right - Lubin spends his spare time learning to read, while his companion idles.  Cental bottom semi circle - wine cryers, above left -a procession, above right - a procession of laymen and clerics.  A UNESCO World Heritage Site..
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the Life of St Lubin . Central panel shows A barrel of wine being transported to the Cathedral, below left - The young Lubin working as a shepherd, below right - A monk gives Lubin a belt with the alphabet written on it, above left - Lubin receiving instruction from a cleric, above right - Lubin spends his spare time learning to read, while his companion idles.  A UNESCO World Heritage Site..
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Dionysus drunk being transported on a chariot pulled by a centaur, they are followed by a Bacchante, follower of Bacchus, and a Satyr, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD House of Tertulla. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Dionysus drunk being transported on a chariot pulled by a centaur, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD House of Tertulla. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Dionysus drunk being transported on a chariot pulled by a centaur, they are followed by a Bacchante, follower of Bacchus, and a Satyr, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD House of Tertulla. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against a white background
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Dionysus drunk being transported on a chariot pulled by a centaur, they are followed by a Bacchante, follower of Bacchus, and a Satyr, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD House of Tertulla. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against a black background
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Dionysus drunk being transported on a chariot pulled by a centaur, they are followed by a Bacchante, follower of Bacchus, and a Satyr, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD House of Tertulla. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Dionysus drunk being transported on a chariot pulled by a centaur, they are followed by a Bacchante, follower of Bacchus, and a Satyr, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD House of Tertulla. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against an art background
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Dionysus drunk being transported on a chariot pulled by a centaur, they are followed by a Bacchante, follower of Bacchus, and a Satyr, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD House of Tertulla. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against a grey background
  • Roman mosaics - The Wedding of Dionysus mosaic. Dionysus Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd  century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
<br />
The Wedding of Dionysus and Ariadne Mosaic, which belongs to the House of Dionysus, is one of the most special mosaics around the world. In the scene, Dionysus and Ariadne are sitting on a sofa. There are three maenads, musician, the wedding god and two sirens around them. <br />
<br />
The mosaic gives the impression of a painting due to the rich variety of colors and luminous/shadow effects used. The fact that there are many figures within the mosaic and their high pictorial quality, on the other hand, makes the mosaic much more special. <br />
<br />
The House of Dionysus is the villa where a rescue excavation was conducted in 1992 upon the received intelligence telling that traffickers had been digging the area. After the excavations, the mosaic now you behold was unearthed along with some geometric mosaics. In terms of the exactness in the anatomy of the figures, the perspective, and the rich variety of colors it is among the most precious and important mosaic around the world. <br />
<br />
<br />
The Museum had conducted activities in order to display the mosaic where it belongs and in a natural manner. However, such a big portion of the mosaic as two thirds was stolen by the historical artefact traffickers in 1998 from the place of display. The parts of the mosaic are not found yet. After the robbery, the remaining parts were transported to Gaziantep Museum and displayed after restoration. The stolen part of the mosaic was left blank. The searches continue in order to find the missing parts through the Interpol.
  • Roman mosaics - Close up of The Wedding of Dionysus mosaic. Dionysus Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd  century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
<br />
The Wedding of Dionysus and Ariadne Mosaic, which belongs to the House of Dionysus, is one of the most special mosaics around the world. In the scene, Dionysus and Ariadne are sitting on a sofa. There are three maenads, musician, the wedding god and two sirens around them. <br />
<br />
The mosaic gives the impression of a painting due to the rich variety of colors and luminous/shadow effects used. The fact that there are many figures within the mosaic and their high pictorial quality, on the other hand, makes the mosaic much more special. <br />
<br />
The House of Dionysus is the villa where a rescue excavation was conducted in 1992 upon the received intelligence telling that traffickers had been digging the area. After the excavations, the mosaic now you behold was unearthed along with some geometric mosaics. In terms of the exactness in the anatomy of the figures, the perspective, and the rich variety of colors it is among the most precious and important mosaic around the world. <br />
<br />
<br />
The Museum had conducted activities in order to display the mosaic where it belongs and in a natural manner. However, such a big portion of the mosaic as two thirds was stolen by the historical artefact traffickers in 1998 from the place of display. The parts of the mosaic are not found yet. After the robbery, the remaining parts were transported to Gaziantep Museum and displayed after restoration. The stolen part of the mosaic was left blank. The searches continue in order to find the missing parts through the Interpol.
  • Assyrian Trader Colony Bronze Age terracotta sandal shaped ritual vessed. This cult pot is boat shaped with an animal head at the front. Inside the vessel is god. The deities associated with the ritual vessel were associated with trade and transportation in Ancient Mesopotamia and Summerian literature. The vessel signifies a religious river trip.  - 19th  century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey. Against a white background.
  • Assyrian Trader Colony Bronze Age terracotta sandal shaped ritual vessed. This cult pot is boat shaped with an animal head at the front. Inside the vessel is god. The deities associated with the ritual vessel were associated with trade and transportation in Ancient Mesopotamia and Summerian literature. The vessel signifies a religious river trip.  - 19th  century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey.  Against a black background.
  • Assyrian Trader Colony Bronze Age terracotta sandal shaped ritual vessed. This cult pot is boat shaped with an animal head at the front. Inside the vessel is god. The deities associated with the ritual vessel were associated with trade and transportation in Ancient Mesopotamia and Summerian literature. The vessel signifies a religious river trip.  - 19th  century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey.  Against a grey background.
  • Assyrian Trader Colony Bronze Age terracotta sandal shaped ritual vessed. This cult pot is boat shaped with an animal head at the front. Inside the vessel is god. The deities associated with the ritual vessel were associated with trade and transportation in Ancient Mesopotamia and Summerian literature. The vessel signifies a religious river trip.  - 19th  century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey.  Against a warn art background.
  • Assyrian Trader Colony Bronze Age terracotta sandal shaped ritual vessed. This cult pot is boat shaped with an animal head at the front. Inside the vessel is god. The deities associated with the ritual vessel were associated with trade and transportation in Ancient Mesopotamia and Summerian literature. The vessel signifies a religious river trip.  - 19th  century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey.
  • Assyrian Trader Colony Bronze Age terracotta sandal shaped ritual vessed. This cult pot is boat shaped with an animal head at the front. Inside the vessel is god. The deities associated with the ritual vessel were associated with trade and transportation in Ancient Mesopotamia and Summerian literature. The vessel signifies a religious river trip.  - 19th  century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey. Against a grey background.
  • Assyrian Trader Colony Bronze Age terracotta sandal shaped ritual vessed. This cult pot is boat shaped with an animal head at the front. Inside the vessel is god. The deities associated with the ritual vessel were associated with trade and transportation in Ancient Mesopotamia and Summerian literature. The vessel signifies a religious river trip.  - 19th  century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey.  Against a black background.
  • Assyrian Trader Colony Bronze Age terracotta sandal shaped ritual vessed. This cult pot is boat shaped with an animal head at the front. Inside the vessel is god. The deities associated with the ritual vessel were associated with trade and transportation in Ancient Mesopotamia and Summerian literature. The vessel signifies a religious river trip.  - 19th  century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey.  Against a warn art background.
  • Assyrian Trader Colony Bronze Age terracotta sandal shaped ritual vessed. This cult pot is boat shaped with an animal head at the front. Inside the vessel is god. The deities associated with the ritual vessel were associated with trade and transportation in Ancient Mesopotamia and Summerian literature. The vessel signifies a religious river trip.  - 19th  century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey.
  • Assyrian Trader Colony Bronze Age terracotta sandal shaped ritual vessed. This cult pot is boat shaped with an animal head at the front. Inside the vessel is a model of a temple and goddess. The deities associated with the ritual vessel were associated with trade and transportation in Ancient Mesopotamia and Summerian literature. The vessel signifies a religious river trip.  - 19th  century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey. Against a white background.
  • Assyrian Trader Colony Bronze Age terracotta sandal shaped ritual vessed. This cult pot is boat shaped with an animal head at the front. Inside the vessel is a model of a temple and goddess. The deities associated with the ritual vessel were associated with trade and transportation in Ancient Mesopotamia and Summerian literature. The vessel signifies a religious river trip.  - 19th  century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey.  Against a black background.
  • Assyrian Trader Colony Bronze Age terracotta sandal shaped ritual vessed. This cult pot is boat shaped with an animal head at the front. Inside the vessel is a model of a temple and goddess. The deities associated with the ritual vessel were associated with trade and transportation in Ancient Mesopotamia and Summerian literature. The vessel signifies a religious river trip.  - 19th  century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey. Against a grey background.
  • Assyrian Trader Colony Bronze Age terracotta sandal shaped ritual vessed. This cult pot is boat shaped with an animal head at the front. Inside the vessel is a model of a temple and goddess. The deities associated with the ritual vessel were associated with trade and transportation in Ancient Mesopotamia and Summerian literature. The vessel signifies a religious river trip.  - 19th  century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey.  Against a warn art background.
  • Assyrian Trader Colony Bronze Age terracotta sandal shaped ritual vessed. This cult pot is boat shaped with an animal head at the front. Inside the vessel is a model of a temple and goddess. The deities associated with the ritual vessel were associated with trade and transportation in Ancient Mesopotamia and Summerian literature. The vessel signifies a religious river trip.  - 19th  century BC - Kültepe Kanesh - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara, Turkey.
  • Stone relief sculptured panel of cedar of Lebanon being transported. From the northern courtyard,  Inv AO 19888 from Dur Sharrukin the palace of Assyrian king Sargon II at Khorsabad, 713-706 BC.  Louvre Museum Room 4 , Paris
  • Stone relief sculptured panel of cedar of Lebanon being transported. From the northern courtyard,  Inv AO 19889 from Dur Sharrukin the palace of Assyrian king Sargon II at Khorsabad, 713-706 BC.  Louvre Museum Room 4 , Paris
  • Stone relief sculptured panel of cedar of Lebanon being transported. From the northern courtyard,  Inv AO 19890 from Dur Sharrukin the palace of Assyrian king Sargon II at Khorsabad, 713-706 BC.  Louvre Museum Room 4 , Paris
  • Stone relief sculptured panel of cedar of Lebanon being transported. From the northern courtyard,  Inv AO 19888 from Dur Sharrukin the palace of Assyrian king Sargon II at Khorsabad, 713-706 BC.  Louvre Museum Room 4 , Paris
  • Stone relief sculptured panel of cedar of Lebanon being transported. From the northern courtyard,  Inv AO 19888 from Dur Sharrukin the palace of Assyrian king Sargon II at Khorsabad, 713-706 BC.  Louvre Museum Room 4 , Paris
  • Stone relief sculptured panel of cedar of Lebanon being transported. From the northern courtyard,  Inv AO 19888 from Dur Sharrukin the palace of Assyrian king Sargon II at Khorsabad, 713-706 BC.  Louvre Museum Room 4 , Paris
  • Stone relief sculptured panel of cedar of Lebanon being transported. From the northern courtyard,  Inv AO 19888 from Dur Sharrukin the palace of Assyrian king Sargon II at Khorsabad, 713-706 BC.  Louvre Museum Room 4 , Paris
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the Life of St Lubin . Central bottom panel shows A barrel of wine being transported to the Cathedral, below left - The young Lubin working as a shepherd, below right - A monk gives Lubin a belt with the alphabet written on it, above left - Lubin receiving instruction from a cleric, above right - Lubin spends his spare time learning to read, while his companion idles.  Top central panel -  A cellerer draws sacramental wine into a cruet, below left - Lubin is accepted into a monastery, below right - Nileffus advises Lubin to visit other monasteries to broaden his knowledge, above left - Lubin, Nileffus and another monk, approach a new monastery, above right - Lubin and his companions leaving a monastery. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the Life of St Lubin . Central panel shows A barrel of wine being transported to the Cathedral, below left - The young Lubin working as a shepherd, below right - A monk gives Lubin a belt with the alphabet written on it, above left - Lubin receiving instruction from a cleric, above right - Lubin spends his spare time learning to read, while his companion idles.  Cental bottom semi circle - wine cryers, above left -a procession, above right - a procession of laymen and clerics.  A UNESCO World Heritage Site..
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the Life of St Lubin . Central panel shows A barrel of wine being transported to the Cathedral, below left - The young Lubin working as a shepherd, below right - A monk gives Lubin a belt with the alphabet written on it, above left - Lubin receiving instruction from a cleric, above right - Lubin spends his spare time learning to read, while his companion idles.  Cental bottom semi circle - wine cryers, above left -a procession, above right - a procession of laymen and clerics.  A UNESCO World Heritage Site..
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the Life of St Lubin . Central panel shows A barrel of wine being transported to the Cathedral, below left - The young Lubin working as a shepherd, below right - A monk gives Lubin a belt with the alphabet written on it, above left - Lubin receiving instruction from a cleric, above right - Lubin spends his spare time learning to read, while his companion idles.  A UNESCO World Heritage Site..
  • The Rape of the Sabine Women by the Flemish artist Jean de Boulogne ( Giambologna). Made from one imperfect block of white marble, the largest block ever transported to Florence. The Loggia dei Lanzi, also called the Loggia della Signoria, Piazza della Signoria in Florence, Italy,
  • The Rape of the Sabine Women by the Flemish artist Jean de Boulogne ( Giambologna). Made from one imperfect block of white marble, the largest block ever transported to Florence. The Loggia dei Lanzi, also called the Loggia della Signoria, Piazza della Signoria in Florence, Italy,
  • The Rape of the Sabine Women by the Flemish artist Jean de Boulogne ( Giambologna). Made from one imperfect block of white marble, the largest block ever transported to Florence. The Loggia dei Lanzi, also called the Loggia della Signoria, Piazza della Signoria in Florence, Italy,

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