• Natural texture of wood outside a swiss chalet - Grindelwald, Swiss Alps, Switzerland
  • Natural texture of wood outside a swiss chalet - Grindelwald, Swiss Alps, Switzerland
  • Natural texture of wood outside a swiss chalet - Grindelwald, Swiss Alps, Switzerland
  • Natural texture of wood outside a swiss chalet - Grindelwald, Swiss Alps, Switzerland
  • Natural texture of wood outside a swiss chalet - Grindelwald, Swiss Alps, Switzerland
  • Natural texture of wood outside a swiss chalet - Grindelwald, Swiss Alps, Switzerland
  • Traditional decorations outside the rock houses of Uchisar, Cappadocia Turkey
  • Sculpture outside Bishop's Palace - ( Gy?r )  Gyor Hungary
  • Natural texture of wood outside a swiss chalet - Grindelwald, Swiss Alps, Switzerland
  • Statue head of Herekles in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from right, Herekles & Apollo  in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head of Commagene in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads at sunset, from left,  Eagle, Antiochus, Commagene, Zeus, Apollo, & Herekles with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head of from left, Zeus, Commagene, Apollo, Herekles & Eagle in front of the 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head of from left, Apollo, Herekles & Eagle in front of the 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head at sunset of Zeus & Antiocchus behind, in front of the 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head of  Antiochus, the 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • The Matterhorn or Monte Cervino mountain peak, Zermatt, Switzerland
  • The Matterhorn or Monte Cervino mountain peak, Zermatt, Switzerland
  • The Matterhorn or Monte Cervino mountain peak, Zermatt, Switzerland
  • The Matterhorn or Monte Cervino mountain peak, Zermatt, Switzerland
  • Chicken fillets cooking on a bbq. Food photos, pictures & images.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Statue head of Zeus in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads at sunset, from right,  Lion, Eagle, Herekles & Apollo,  with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads at sunrise, from right, Eagle, Herekles, Apollo, Zeus, Commagene, Antiochus, & Eagle, 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • The Matterhorn or Monte Cervino mountain peak, Zermatt, Switzerland
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock at Uchisar, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock at Uchisar, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock at Uchisar, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • Troglodyte cave houses in tuff volcanic rock at Uchisar, Cappadocia, Anatolia, Turkey
  • The 14th Century Gothic style eastern facade of The Doge's Palace on St Marks Square, Palazzo Ducale, Venice Italy
  • The Doges Palace  and Campinale of St Mark from the Saint Mark's Basin Venice
  • Arial view form St Mark's Campinale of St Mark's Square and the Doges with the island of San Giorgio Maggiore behind , with its church front designed by Andrea Palladio and begun in 1566.  Venice Italy
  • Venice gondola trip on the venetian grand canal at sunset
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • Venice gondola trip on the venetian grand canal at sunset
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • Stonehenge Neolithic ancient standing stone circle monument, A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Wilshire, England
  • Stonehenge Neolithic ancient standing stone circle monument, A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Wilshire, England
  • The south tower and great hall of the  finest fortified medieval manor house in England built in the 1280s, Stokesay Castle, Shropshire, England
  • Avebury Neolithic standing stone Circle the largest in England, Wiltshire, England, Europe
  • Avebury Neolithic standing stone Circle the largest in England, Wiltshire, England, Europe
  • Avebury Neolithic standing stone Circle the largest in England, Wiltshire, England, Europe
  • Avebury Neolithic standing stone Circle the largest in England, Wiltshire, England, Europe
  • The Anglo Saxon Romanesque Lindisfarne Abbey ruins looking to Lidisfarne Castle,  Holy Island, Lindisfarne, Northumbria, England
  • The Anglo Saxon Romanesque Lindisfarne Abbey ruins,  Holy Island, Lindisfarne, Northumbria, England
  • Panoramic view of traditional blue domed Greek Orthodox church of Oia, Island of Thira, Santorini, Greece.
  • Panoramic sunset over the traditional Greek Orthodox churches of Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Panoramic sunset over the traditional Greek Orthodox churches of Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Sunset over the traditional Greek Orthodox churches of Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Sunset over the traditional Greek Orthodox churches of Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Sunset over the traditional Greek Orthodox churches of Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Sunset over the traditional Greek Orthodox churches of Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Panoramic view of Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Sunset over the traditional Greek Orthodox churches of Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Traditional blue domed Greek Orthodox church of Oia, Santorini ( Thira ) Island, Greece.
  • Sunset over Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Sunset over the traditional Greek Orthodox churches of Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Sunset over the traditional Greek Orthodox churches of Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Sunset over the traditional Greek Orthodox churches of Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Panoramic view of traditional blue domed Greek Orthodox church of Oia, Island of Thira, Santorini, Greece.
  • Sunset over Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Traditional blue domed Greek Orthodox church of Imerovigli, Island of Thira, Santorini, Greece.
  • Traditional blue domed Greek Orthodox church of Imerovigli, Island of Thira, Santorini, Greece.
  • Traditional blue domed Greek Orthodox church of Imerovigli, Island of Thira, Santorini, Greece.
  • Panoramic view of Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece
  • Sunset over Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Sunset over Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Panoramic view of traditional blue domed Greek Orthodox church of Oia, Island of Thira, Santorini, Greece.
  • Sunset over Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Bell tower of traditional blue domed Greek Orthodox church of Oia, Thira Island, Santorini Greece.
  • Panoramic  over the traditional Greek Orthodox churches of Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Sunset over the traditional Greek Orthodox churches of Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Sunset over the traditional Greek Orthodox churches of Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Panoramic sunset over the traditional Greek Orthodox churches of Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Sunset over the traditional Greek Orthodox churches of Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Sunset over the traditional Greek Orthodox churches of Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Sunset over the traditional Greek Orthodox churches of Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Sunset over the traditional Greek Orthodox churches of Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Sunset over the traditional Greek Orthodox churches of Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Sunset over the traditional Greek Orthodox churches of Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Sunset over the traditional Greek Orthodox churches of Oia (ia), Cyclades Island of  Thira, Santorini, Greece.<br />
<br />
The settlement of Oia had been mentioned in various travel reports before the beginning of Venetian rule, when Marco Sanudo founded the Duchy of Naxos in 1207 and feudal rule was instituted on Santorini. n 1537, Hayreddin Barbarossa conquered the Aegean islands and placed them under Sultan Selim II. However, Santorini remained under the Crispo family until 1566, passing then to Joseph Nasi and after his death in 1579 to the Ottoman Empire.
  • Traditional blue domed Greek Orthodox church of Oia, Santorini ( Thira ) Island, Greece.
  • Traditional blue domed Greek Orthodox church of Oia, Island of Thira, Santorini, Greece.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Matera view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera from inside a Sassi cave, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic ew of "la Gravina" ravine and the Sassi of Matera, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • View of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • View of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Vew of "la Gravina" ravine and the Sassi of Matera, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Matera view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera from inside a Sassi cave, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Ruins of a Zoroastrian Fire Temple at Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road ,  Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Seljuk Turk Mosque of Ebul Minuchihr (Minuchir) built in 1072, Ani archaelogical site on the ancient Silk Road  , Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Armenian church of St Gregory of the Abughamrents, Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road ,  Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Armenian church of St Gregory of the Abughamrents, Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road ,  Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Armenian church of St Gregory of the Abughamrents, Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road ,  Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Armenian church of St Gregory of the Abughamrents, Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road ,  Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Armenian church of St Gregory of the Abughamrents, Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road ,  Anatolia, Turkey
  • The Armenian church of St Gregory of the Abughamrents, Ani archaelogical site on the Ancient Silk Road ,  Anatolia, Turkey
  • Courtyard of the 18th Century Ottoman architecture of the Ishak Pasha Palace (Turkish: İshak Paşa Sarayı) ,  Ağrı province of eastern Turkey.
  • Exterior walls with Minarete of the Mosque of the 18th Century Ottoman architecture of the Ishak Pasha Palace (Turkish: İshak Paşa Sarayı) ,  Agrı province of eastern Turkey.
  • Minarete of the Mosque of the 18th Century Ottoman architecture of the Ishak Pasha Palace (Turkish: İshak Paşa Sarayı) ,  Agrı province of eastern Turkey.
  • Minarete of the Mosque of the 18th Century Ottoman architecture of the Ishak Pasha Palace (Turkish: İshak Paşa Sarayı) ,  Agrı province of eastern Turkey.
  • Minarete of the Mosque of the 18th Century Ottoman architecture of the Ishak Pasha Palace (Turkish: İshak Paşa Sarayı) ,  Agrı province of eastern Turkey.
  • Minarete of the Mosque of the 18th Century Ottoman architecture of the Ishak Pasha Palace (Turkish: İshak Paşa Sarayı) ,  Agrı province of eastern Turkey.
  • Minarete of the Mosque of the 18th Century Ottoman architecture of the Ishak Pasha Palace (Turkish: İshak Paşa Sarayı) ,  Agrı province of eastern Turkey.
  • Main Hareem entrance of the 18th Century Ottoman architecture of the Ishak Pasha Palace (Turkish: İshak Paşa Sarayı) ,  Agrı province of eastern Turkey.
  • close up of bas relief on the entrance to the Hareem of the 18th Century Ottoman architecture of the Ishak Pasha Palace (Turkish: İshak Paşa Sarayı) ,  Agrı province of eastern Turkey.
  • close up of bas relief on the entrance to the Hareem of the 18th Century Ottoman architecture of the Ishak Pasha Palace (Turkish: İshak Paşa Sarayı) ,  Agrı province of eastern Turkey.
  • close up of bas relief on the entrance to the Hareem of the 18th Century Ottoman architecture of the Ishak Pasha Palace (Turkish: İshak Paşa Sarayı) ,  Agrı province of eastern Turkey.
  • Minarete of the Mosque of the 18th Century Ottoman architecture of the Ishak Pasha Palace (Turkish: İshak Paşa Sarayı) ,  Agrı province of eastern Turkey.
  • Minarete of the Mosque of the 18th Century Ottoman architecture of the Ishak Pasha Palace (Turkish: İshak Paşa Sarayı) ,  Agrı province of eastern Turkey.
  • Main gate  of the 18th Century Ottoman architecture of the Ishak Pasha Palace (Turkish: İshak Paşa Sarayı) ,  Agrı province of eastern Turkey.
  • Main gate  of the 18th Century Ottoman architecture of the Ishak Pasha Palace (Turkish: İshak Paşa Sarayı) ,  Agrı province of eastern Turkey.
  • Rock pools on the beach of the historic fishing village of Robin Hood's Bay, Near Whitby, North Yorkshire, England.
  • Bay Hotel & fishermans houses of the historic fishing village of Robin Hood's Bay, Near Whitby, North Yorkshire, England.
  • Bay Hotel Pub, village & beach of historic fishing village of Robin Hood's Bay, Near Whitby, North Yorkshire, England.
  • Harbour  of historic fishing village of Robin Hood's Bay, Near Whitby, North Yorkshire, England.
  • Sea front houses and Elizabethan Moat House Aldeburgh - Suffolk - England
  • Adobe buildings of the Berber Ksar or fortified village of Ait Benhaddou, Sous-Massa-Dra Morocco
  • Adobe buildings of the Berber Ksar or fortified village of Ait Benhaddou, Sous-Massa-Dra Morocco
  • Adobe buildings of the Berber Ksar or fortified village of Ait Benhaddou, Sous-Massa-Dra Morocco
  • Adobe buildings of the Berber Ksar or fortified village of Ait Benhaddou, Sous-Massa-Dra Morocco
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • The Roman Theatre of Aspendos, Turkey.  Built in 155 AD during the rule of Marcus Aurelius, Aspendos Theatre is the best preserved ancient theatre in Asia Minor. 96 metres in diameter it can seat 7000 the csaenae frond or backdrop wall is still intact. Following Hellenistic traditions the theatre is built into the hillside below the Acropolis.
  • Stonehenge Neolithic ancient standing stone circle monument, Wilshire, England
  • Stonehenge Neolithic ancient standing stone circle monument, Wilshire, England
  • Sea front houses and fushing baist on the shingle beach of Aldeburgh , Suffolk, England
  • Sea front houses and shingle beach of Aldeburgh , Suffolk, England
  • Adobe buildings of the Berber Ksar or fortified village of Ait Benhaddou, Sous-Massa-Dra Morocco
  • Adobe buildings of the Berber Ksar or fortified village of Ait Benhaddou, Sous-Massa-Dra Morocco
  • Stonehenge Neolithic ancient standing stone circle monument, Wilshire, England
  • Courtyard of the 18th Century Ottoman architecture of the Ishak Pasha Palace (Turkish: İshak Paşa Sarayı) ,  Ağrı province of eastern Turkey.
  • Main entrance to the Hareem of the 18th Century Ottoman architecture of the Ishak Pasha Palace (Turkish: İshak Paşa Sarayı) ,  Agrı province of eastern Turkey.
  • Minarete of the Mosque of the 18th Century Ottoman architecture of the Ishak Pasha Palace (Turkish: İshak Paşa Sarayı) ,  Agrı province of eastern Turkey.
  • Pictures & Images of the Tortum Water Falls, Coruh Valley, Erzurum in the Eastern Anatolia, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The Tortum water falls are the largest in turkey with a drop of 164 feet (50 m) and 15 meters wide. Geologists believe they were formed in the Quaternary period by a massive landslide which blocked the deep steep sided Tortum Valley. This resulted in the formation of Tortum Lake which is 8 km long, 1 km wide and 100 meters deep.
  • Pictures & Images of the Tortum Water Falls, Coruh Valley, Erzurum in the Eastern Anatolia, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The Tortum water falls are the largest in turkey with a drop of 164 feet (50 m) and 15 meters wide. Geologists believe they were formed in the Quaternary period by a massive landslide which blocked the deep steep sided Tortum Valley. This resulted in the formation of Tortum Lake which is 8 km long, 1 km wide and 100 meters deep.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • close up of the facade and relief sculptures of the Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Close up of two sphinxes relief scul[ptures of the Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Close up of two sphinxes relief scul[ptures of the Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Close up of 2 standing lions of the Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Sebasteion sanctuary building ruins and relief panels,  Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Sebasteion sanctuary building ruins and relief panels,  Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Sebasteion sanctuary building ruins and relief panels,  Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman sculpted frieze blocks with garland relief sculptures, North Portico, Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman theatre of Aphrodisias dedicated to Aphrodite and the people of the city by Julius Zoilos in the  2nd half of 1st century BC. Seats over 8000 people. Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman theatre of Aphrodisias dedicated to Aphrodite and the people of the city by Julius Zoilos in the  2nd half of 1st century BC. Seats over 8000 people. Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Odeon (Concert-hall) seating  around 1700 people. It was used also as the Bouleuterion for the meetings of the Senate and remained in this form until the early fifth century.<br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Close up of the pediments of the Tetrapylon monumental gateway to  the Temple of Aphrodite. The Tetrapylon consisted of four rows of four columns and It connects the major street to the sacred way heading toward the sanctuary of Aphrodite. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Tetrapylon monumental gateway to  the Temple of Aphrodite. The Tetrapylon consisted of four rows of four columns and It connects the major street to the sacred way heading toward the sanctuary of Aphrodite. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Tetrapylon monumental gateway to  the Temple of Aphrodite. The Tetrapylon consisted of four rows of four columns and It connects the major street to the sacred way heading toward the sanctuary of Aphrodite. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of Roman sacrcophagi on a Tomb North Necropolis. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.
  • Picture of Tomb North Necropolis  main road . Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.
  • Picture of Tomb Tomb 114 "tomb of curses" of the North Necropolis. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.<br />
<br />
TOMB 114 (Second half of the 2nd century AD) <br />
<br />
The tomb lies on the left hand side of the road and is enclosed by a perimeter wall; it rests on a base withifiree steps, with a bench piked(1 front of it. Inside are three beds and the ossuary. On the roof, a sarcophagus, broken as result of an <br />
earthquake, bears an inscription mentioning the occupant Aelios Apollinarios and his wife Neratia Apollonis. On the facade is an inscription of great interest which refers to the punishment inflicted on those who violate the sepulchre: as well as the usual fines, it invokes diseases, misfortunes and punishments in the next world. This inscription has led to the building being named the Tomb of the Curses.
  • Picture of a Tomb North Necropolis. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.
  • Picture of a Roman raised sarcophagus of the North Necropolis. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.
  • Greek Theatre remodelled in 225-200 BC & again in 175 BC, 68 AD & 299 AD to a width of 139.8 meters to seat 18,500 people. <br />
Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Greek Theatre remodelled in 225-200 BC & again in 175 BC, 68 AD & 299 AD to a width of 139.8 meters to seat 18,500 people. <br />
Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Roman Great Harbour Monument opened by the city of Miletus either in honour of the achievements of Pompeius in his war against the pirates (67 BC) or for the victory of Augustus over Mark Antony and Cleopatra in the battle of Actium (31 BC). Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Roman Ionic Stoa forms a colonnade 99 m long & 9 m high at the beginning of the Sacred Way to Didyma. An Ionic portica at its centre which served as a grandstand during ceremonial processions on the street in front of it. 1st century AD, Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Roman Ionic Stoa forms a colonnade 99 m long & 9 m high at the beginning of the Sacred Way to Didyma. An Ionic portica at its centre which served as a grandstand during ceremonial processions on the street in front of it. 1st century AD, Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Roman Ionic Stoa forms a colonnade 99 m long & 9 m high at the beginning of the Sacred Way to Didyma. An Ionic portica at its centre which served as a grandstand during ceremonial processions on the street in front of it. 1st century AD, Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Roman Baths of Faustina established by Faustina the Younger, wife of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius (161-180 AD). Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatilia, Turkey.
  • Roman Baths of Faustina established by Faustina the Younger, wife of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius (161-180 AD). Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatilia, Turkey.
  • Roman Baths of Faustina established by Faustina the Younger, wife of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius (161-180 AD). Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatilia, Turkey.
  • The marble crown gate of the Sifaiye Medrese has a very rich decorative appearance, 1217. Its islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. Sivas, Turkey
  • Close up of the Crown Gate of the Buruciye Medrese (Madrasah) built in 1271 by Dr. Muzaffer Burucerdî of Iran as a school teach physics, chemistry and astronomy. Its magnificent crown gate is one of the best examples of Seljuk architecture in Anatolia. The islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. Sivas, Turkey
  • Close up of the Crown Gate of the Buruciye Medrese (Madrasah) built in 1271 by Dr. Muzaffer Burucerdî of Iran as a school teach physics, chemistry and astronomy. Its magnificent crown gate is one of the best examples of Seljuk architecture in Anatolia. The islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. Sivas, Turkey
  • Close up of the Crown Gate of the Buruciye Medrese (Madrasah) built in 1271 by Dr. Muzaffer Burucerdî of Iran as a school teach physics, chemistry and astronomy. Its magnificent crown gate is one of the best examples of Seljuk architecture in Anatolia. The islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. Sivas, Turkey
  • Close up of the Crown Gate of the Buruciye Medrese (Madrasah) built in 1271 by Dr. Muzaffer Burucerdî of Iran as a school teach physics, chemistry and astronomy. Its magnificent crown gate is one of the best examples of Seljuk architecture in Anatolia. The islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. Sivas, Turkey
  • Door of Gök Medrese which has a very rich decorative appearance. Its islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. The crown gate of Gök Medrese is one of the best examples of Sejuk architecture in Anatolia, Sivas, Turkey
  • Door of Gök Medrese which has a very rich decorative appearance. Its islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. The crown gate of Gök Medrese is one of the best examples of Sejuk architecture in Anatolia, Sivas, Turkey
  • Close up of the richly decorated corner stoes of the  of Gök Medrese , Sivas, Turkey
  • The Gökmedrese or Gök Medrese built in 1271 by Vizier Ata Faahreddin Ali. Above the crown door are two minarets with a bow and single cone decorated with glazed bricks and tiles. Sivas, Turkey
  • The Gökmedrese or Gök Medrese built in 1271 by Vizier Ata Faahreddin Ali. Above the crown door are two minarets with a bow and single cone decorated with glazed bricks and tiles. Sivas, Turkey
  • The Gökmedrese or Gök Medrese built in 1271 by Vizier Ata Faahreddin Ali. Above the crown door are two minarets with a bow and single cone decorated with glazed bricks and tiles. Sivas, Turkey
  • The Gökmedrese or Gök Medrese built in 1271 by Vizier Ata Faahreddin Ali. Above the crown door are two minarets with a bow and single cone decorated with glazed bricks and tiles. Sivas, Turkey
  • Royal rock tombs of Pontus including Mithridates I, died 266 BC. Amasya, Turkey
  • Ottoman villas of Amasya along the banks of the river Yeşilırmak, below the Pontic Royal rock tombs and mountain top ancient citadel at sunset, Turkey
  • Ottoman villas of Amasya along the banks of the river Yeşilırmak, below the Pontic Royal rock tombs and mountain top ancient citadel, Turkey
  • Ottoman villas of Amasya along the banks of the river Yeşilırmak, below the Pontic Royal rock tombs and mountain top ancient citadel at sunrise, Turkey
  • Ottoman villas of Amasya along the banks of the river Yeşilırmak, below the Pontic Royal rock tombs and mountain top ancient citadel, Turkey
  • Ottoman villas of Amasya along the banks of the river Yeşilırmak, below the Pontic Royal rock tombs and mountain top ancient citadel, Turkey
  • Ottoman villas of Amasya along the banks of the river Yeşilırmak, below the Pontic Royal rock tombs and mountain top ancient citadel, Turkey
  • Upper Temple, Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Hieroglyphics on rock face, Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • walls of Royal castle palace, Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Hieroglyphics on rock face, Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Ruins of walls of Temple I, Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Hittite Lion sculptures of Temple I, Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Green polished cult stone of temple I, Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • A cult chamber built by Suiluliuma II, 1200 BC, with Hieroglyphic stone panelled walls. Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • A cult chamber built by Suiluliuma II, 1200 BC, with Hieroglyphic stone panelled walls. Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Ruins of a chamber, Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Picture & image of the Hittite Relief sculpture of the God of War of the Kings Gate. Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Picture & image of the Hittite Relief sculpture of the God of War of the Kings Gate. Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Picture & image of the Hittite Relief sculpture of the God of War of the Kings Gate. Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Picture & image of the Hittite lion sculpture of the Lion Gate. Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Picture & image of the Hittite Relief sculpture of the God of War of the Kings Gate. Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Picture & image of the Hittite lion sculpture of the Lion Gate. Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Picture & image of the Hittite lion sculpture of the Lion Gate. Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Picture & image of Hittite ramparts of the Sphinx Gate. Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Picture & image of Hittite Sphinx sculpture of the Sphinx Gate. Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Picture & image of Hittite Sphinx sculpture of the Sphinx Gate. Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Picture & image of Hittite Sphinx sculpture of the Sphinx Gate. Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Picture & image of Hittite Sphinx sculpture of the Sphinx Gate. Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.

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