• Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
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In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • This 2nd to 3rd century Italian marble statue of Venus (Aphrodite) is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369)
  • This 2nd to 3rd century Italian marble statue of Venus (Aphrodite) is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Louvre Museum, Paris. Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369)
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
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The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Nymph with a shell ( Nymphe a la coquille ) a 1st century marble statue from Italy which was part of the Borghese collection . Louvre Museum, Paris Cat No MR 309. <br />
The Nymph with a shell statue was much admired in the 17th century and influenced such art its as Velasquez. The statue symbolises a carefree childhood and the fact that terracotta versions have been found in tombs suggests that the statue was associated with the injustice of death or of a rebirth.
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • The Three Graces (  Les Trois Grâces ) A 1.19 metres high 2nd century Imperial Roman copy of a circa 330 BC Hellanistic Greek statue.  Found in the Villa Cornovaglia in Rome. Louvre Museum, Paris. Catalogue Number: Louvre Ma 287.<br />
The Three Graces are three nude females that in classic Hellanistic art they are depicted with two facing forward and the middle one facing away. The Three Graces, or Three Charities, of Greek mythology were Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. They were the goddesses who symbolised joy, pleasure, grace, beauty, festivity, adornment, dance, and song. Daughters of Zeus and the sea-nymph Eurynome, they were also the attendants, or handmaidens, of Aphrodite and Hera and protectors of vegetation.

  • The Venus of Arles (  Greek Goddess Aphrodite) is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) marble sculpture of Venus probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • 2nd century Roman marble torso copy of the statue of Aphrodite of Cnidus by Praixitele. Many Roman replicas exist of the Aphrodite of Cnidus which is one of the most famous statues of antiquity. The statue depicts the goddess bathing with a vase of water beside her. The lost original is a Hellenistic Greek sculpture made in 360-350 BC which is attributed to Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Tradition has it that the model for the original was the lover of sculptor Phryne. The original is the oldest known female nude in Greek sculpture. Louvre Museum, Paris. Usual No 2184
  • Nymph with a shell ( Nymphe a la coquille ) a 1st century marble statue from Italy which was part of the Borghese collection . Louvre Museum, Paris Cat No MR 309. <br />
The Nymph with a shell statue was much admired in the 17th century and influenced such art its as Velasquez. The statue symbolises a carefree childhood and the fact that terracotta versions have been found in tombs suggests that the statue was associated with the injustice of death or of a rebirth.
  • The Venus of Arles (  Greek Goddess Aphrodite) is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) marble sculpture of Venus probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The style of the Venus of Arles, like the Venus de Milo, is not a fully nude figure both having draped clothes from the waist down. The first known example of a totally nude Venus is the 4th century BC  Aphrodite of Cnidus by.Praxiteles  The Venus of Arles was probably an earlier statue by Praxiteles known as the Aphrodite of Thespiae . <br />
The venus of Arles was found in 1651 by workmen digging a well in Arles. In 1681 it was given to Louis XIV to decorate the Galerie des Glaces of Versailles. The statue was moved to the Musée du Louvre after the French Revolution.
  • Aphrodite, Roman Venus, of Vienne Goddess of Love. This 1st to 2nd century Roman marble copy of a lost Greek original attributed to attibuee Doidalsas Bithynia around 250BC, is of the crouching Venus style. Excavated from the Palace of Mirrors in Saint Romain en Gal (Isere France). The Crouching Venus is a Hellenistic model of Venus surprised at her bath. Venus crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. Louvre Museum, Inv No MNB 1292 ( Usual No Ma 2240)
  • Sculpture of Lapiths and  Centaurs battling from the Metope of the Parthenon on the Acropolis of Athens. South Metope no II. Also known as the Elgin marbles. British Museum London. The Lapith holds a Centaur by the throat. The diagnal of the Lapiths body across the Centaur is often used in Greek Classical art to depict strife.
  • Sculpture of Lapiths and  Centaurs battling from the Metope of the Parthenon on the Acropolis of Athens. South Metope no II. Also known as the Elgin marbles. British Museum London. The Lapith holds a Centaur by the throat. The diagnal of the Lapiths body across the Centaur is often used in Greek Classical art to depict strife.
  • Sculpture of Lapiths and  Centaurs battling from the Metope of the Parthenon on the Acropolis of Athens. South Metope no II. Also known as the Elgin marbles. British Museum London. The Lapith holds a Centaur by the throat. The diagnal of the Lapiths body across the Centaur is often used in Greek Classical art to depict strife.
  • Reconstruction of  the inside of the Greek Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore] from the Greek city of Poseidonia which became Roman Paestum. .   The rear panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables on which goblets have been placed.  The abondon experienced at the Synposium was one way in which the dead could access the next world .  The fresco on the lid of the tomb and shows a  diving from a column into water. The column represents the border of thye known world and therefore the limit of man's knowledge.  The dive represents the passage form this world to the next. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Reconstruction of  the inside of the Greek Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore] from the Greek city of Poseidonia which became Roman Paestum. .   The rear panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables on which goblets have been placed.  The abondon experienced at the Synposium was one way in which the dead could access the next world .  The fresco on the lid of the tomb and shows a  diving from a column into water. The column represents the border of thye known world and therefore the limit of man's knowledge.  The dive represents the passage form this world to the next. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore] from the Greek city of Poseidonia which became Roman Paestum. This panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables.  The men on the couches are playing the song of Eros the liar and the flute to distract the deceased from worldly thoughts so he can enter the next world. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore] from the Greek city of Poseidonia which became Roman Paestum. This panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables.  The men on the couches are playing the song of Eros the liar and the flute to distract the deceased from worldly thoughts so he can enter the next world. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Reconstruction of  the inside of the Greek Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. The rear panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables.  The men on the couches are playing the song of Eros the liar and the flute to distract the deceased from worldly thoughts so he can enter the next world. The fresco on the lid of the tomb and shows a  diving from a column into water. The column represents the border of thye known world and therefore the limit of man's knowledge.  The dive represents the passage form this world to the next. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Reconstruction of  the inside of the Greek Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. The rear panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables.  The men on the couches are playing the song of Eros the liar and the flute to distract the deceased from worldly thoughts so he can enter the next world. The fresco on the lid of the tomb and shows a  diving from a column into water. The column represents the border of thye known world and therefore the limit of man's knowledge.  The dive represents the passage form this world to the next. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. This panel is from the lid of the tomb and shows a  diving from a column into water. The column represents the border of thye known world and therefore the limit of man's knowledge.  The dive represents the passage form this world to the next. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety.  Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. This panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables on which goblets have been placed.  The abondon experienced at the Synposium was one way in which the dead could access the next world . The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. This panel is from one of the long sides of the tomb and shows a symposium of men lying on couches facing low tables on which goblets have been placed.  The abondon experienced at the Synposium was one way in which the dead could access the next world . The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. The dead man is depicted listenening to the flute of Eros which causes him to be distracted from the real world so being able to enter the next The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety .Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. The dead man is depicted listenening to the flute of Eros which causes him to be distracted from the real world so being able to enter the next The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety .Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. This panel from the short side of the tomb shows a man with a wreathed wine crater . Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. This panel from the short side of the tomb shows a man with a wreathed wine crater . Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • Greek Fresco on the inside of Tomb of  the Diver  [La Tomba del Truffatore]. The tomb is painted with the true fresco technique and its importance lies in being "the only example of Greek painting with figured scenes dating from the Orientalizing, Archaic, or Classical periods to survive in its entirety. This panel from the short side of the tomb shows a man with a wreathed wine crater . Paestrum, Andriuolo.  (480-470 BC  )
  • The Roman Theatre of Aspendos, Turkey.  Built in 155 AD during the rule of Marcus Aurelius, Aspendos Theatre is the best preserved ancient theatre in Asia Minor. 96 metres in diameter it can seat 7000 the csaenae frond or backdrop wall is still intact. Following Hellenistic traditions the theatre is built into the hillside below the Acropolis.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Torso of the Riace bronze Greek statue B cast about 460 - 450 BC. statue B was probably sculpted by Phidias. There is a sense of movement in the statues their legs being bent as if they are about to take a step. Their heads are turned which accentuates a sense of anticipation as if they are looking for something. The anatomical detail is extraordinary which gives a startling realism to the statue and demonstarte the high level of skill of the Greek sculptors of this period. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • low full length view of the  Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. statue A was probably sculpted by Myron. The style of the Riace statues straddles the archaic period and heralds the start of the classical period. Both statues depict strong young naked warriors who stand calmly but exuding great power. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Full length view of the Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. statue A was probably sculpted by Myron. The style of the Riace statues straddles the archaic period and heralds the start of the classical period. Both statues depict strong young naked warriors who stand calmly but exuding great power. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Torso face on view of the Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. statue A was probably sculpted by Myron. The style of the Riace statues straddles the archaic period and heralds the start of the classical period. Both statues depict strong young naked warriors who stand calmly but exuding great power. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Full length tree quarter view of the Riace bronze Greek statue B cast about 460 - 450 BC. statue B was probably sculpted by Phidias. There is a sense of movement in the statues their legs being bent as if they are about to take a step. Their heads are turned which accentuates a sense of anticipation as if they are looking for something. The anatomical detail is extraordinary which gives a startling realism to the statue and demonstarte the high level of skill of the Greek sculptors of this peiod. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Torso three quarter of the Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. statue A was probably sculpted by Myron. The style of the Riace statues straddles the archaic period and heralds the start of the classical period. Both statues depict strong young naked warriors who stand calmly but exuding great power. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Torso of the Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. statue A was probably sculpted by Myron. The style of the Riace statues straddles the archaic period and heralds the start of the classical period. Both statues depict strong young naked warriors who stand calmly but exuding great power. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Upper torso of the Riace bronze Greek statue B cast about 460 - 450 BC. statue B was probably sculpted by Phidias. There is a sense of movement in the statues their legs being bent as if they are about to take a step. Their heads are turned which accentuates a sense of anticipation as if they are looking for something. The anatomical detail is extraordinary which gives a startling realism to the statue and demonstarte the high level of skill of the Greek sculptors of this peiod. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Full length face on view of the Riace bronze Greek statue B cast about 460 - 450 BC. statue B was probably sculpted by Phidias. There is a sense of movement in the statues their legs being bent as if they are about to take a step. Their heads are turned which accentuates a sense of anticipation as if they are looking for something. The anatomical detail is extraordinary which gives a startling realism to the statue and demonstarte the high level of skill of the Greek sculptors of this peiod. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Full length side view of the Riace bronze Greek statue B cast about 460 - 450 BC. statue B was probably sculpted by Phidias. There is a sense of movement in the statues their legs being bent as if they are about to take a step. Their heads are turned which accentuates a sense of anticipation as if they are looking for something. The anatomical detail is extraordinary which gives a startling realism to the statue and demonstarte the high level of skill of the Greek sculptors of this peiod. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Greek Classical Period Statue of Aphrodite made of Parian marble. Restored by the famous Italian Sculptor A. Canova ( 1757 - 1822 ), Aphrodite is standing nude apart from a richly draped himation which she retains with her left hand in front of her pudenda. 4th c. BC. Athens National Archaeological Museum cat No 3524, from the collection of Lord Hope, donated by M. Embeirikos in 1924.<br />
<br />
This statue of Aphrodite is a variant of the Aphrodite (Venus) of Cnidus and is a copy of a 2nd century AD copy of a 4th century  original by the ancient Greek sculptor Praxiteles of Athens. As with the Capitaline Venus, Aphrodite is rising from bathing and is covering her breasts with her right hand, unlike the other known variants of this pose the Aphrodite of the Athens museum is covered from the waste down with a drape.
  • Erotic 5th cnetury BC attica style anfora of two men, black against an potrange background, Caolina Murat Collection inv no 27670, Secret Museum or Secret Cabinet, Naples National Archaeological Museum , grey art background
  • Late  Greek Archaic relief sculpture in Proconnesian Marble of a charioteer ( Last quarter 6th Cent. B.C) From Cyzicus, ( Erdek formerly Artàke, Αρτάκη in Greek) on the southern shore of the sea of Marmara, Turkey. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 2813T Cat. Bursa M.1.
  • Late  Greek Archaic relief sculpture in Proconnesian Marble of a charioteer ( Last quarter 6th Cent. B.C) From Cyzicus, ( Erdek formerly Artàke, Αρτάκη in Greek) on the southern shore of the sea of Marmara, Turkey. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 2813T Cat. Bursa M.1.
  • Late  Greek Archaic relief sculpture in Proconnesian Marble of a charioteer ( Last quarter 6th Cent. B.C) From Cyzicus, ( Erdek formerly Artàke, Αρτάκη in Greek) on the southern shore of the sea of Marmara, Turkey. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 2813T Cat. Bursa M.1.
  • Late  Greek Archaic relief sculpture in Proconnesian Marble of a charioteer ( Last quarter 6th Cent. B.C) From Cyzicus, ( Erdek formerly Artàke, Αρτάκη in Greek) on the southern shore of the sea of Marmara, Turkey. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 2813T Cat. Bursa M.1.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Sarcophagus of The Mourning Women, 4th cent. B.C Greek from the Royal Necropolis of Sidon , Chamber no I, Lebanon, Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 386T  Cat. Mendel 10.
  • Sarcophagus of The Mourning Women, 4th cent. B.C Greek from the Royal Necropolis of Sidon , Chamber no I, Lebanon, Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 386T  Cat. Mendel 10.
  • Sarcophagus of The Mourning Women, 4th cent. B.C Greek from the Royal Necropolis of Sidon , Chamber no I, Lebanon, Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 386T  Cat. Mendel 10.
  • Sarcophagus of The Mourning Women, 4th cent. B.C Greek from the Royal Necropolis of Sidon , Chamber no I, Lebanon, Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 386T  Cat. Mendel 10.
  • Sarcophagus of The Mourning Women, 4th cent. B.C Greek from the Royal Necropolis of Sidon , Chamber no I, Lebanon, Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 386T  Cat. Mendel 10.
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Statue of Thetsis - a 2nd century AD Roman statue found in the city of Lavinia, Italy. Thetis (/ˈθɛtɪs/; Ancient Greek: Θέτις, [tʰétis]), is encountered in Greek mythology mostly as a sea nymph or known as the goddess of water, one of the fifty Nereids, daughters of the ancient sea god Nereus. he statue belonged to a set of ten divinities formerly presented in the portico hemicycle of the city. The Albani Collection Inv No. LL 19 (Usual No Ma 2244), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The 'figure of eight shield'  Mycenaean fresco wall painting, Mycenae, Greece Cat No 11672. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.  Grey art Background <br />
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The Mycenaean 'figure of eight shield' were originaly made of cows hide and was the symbol of a goddess of war.
  • The 'figure of eight shield'  Mycenaean fresco wall painting, Mycenae Acropolis, Greece Cat No 11671. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Grey art Background <br />
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12th-14th cent BC.<br />
<br />
The Mycenaean 'figure of eight shield' were originaly made of cows hide and was the symbol of a goddess of war.
  • Mycenaean fresco wall painting of a marine scape. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 5844. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
The Mycenaean fresco fragments depict a marine scape with flying fish diving and swimming with sponges attached to rocks.
  • Mycenaean fresco wall painting of three women, Ramp House, Mycenae Acropolis, Greece Cat No 1015. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
This 14th Cent BC Mycenaean fresco fragment depicts three women looking out of a window. The scene is festive and the veneration gestures of the women suggest that they are watching a religiuos procession through the window.
  • Mycenaean fresco wall painting of hunting demons, Mycenae Acropolis, Greece Cat No 2665. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
The Mycenaean fresco fragment depicts three animal demons with donkey heads holding a wooden pole over their shoulders from which hangs the prey thay have been hunting. This type of demon originated in Egypt.
  • Mycenaean Fresco wall painting of a Mycanaean Women bearing offerings, Later Palace,  Tiryns, Greece.  Athens Archaeological Museum. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
14th  Cent BC. Cat No 15883. The Mycenaean fresco fragments depict a women in a procession bearing offerings for a deity. Their facial characteristic and elaborate hairstyles and rich garments are clearly visible.
  • Mycenaean Fresco wall painting of a Mycanaean Women bearing offerings, Later Palace,  Tiryns, Greece.  Athens Archaeological Museum. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
14th  Cent BC. Cat No 15883. The Mycenaean fresco fragments depict a women in a procession bearing offerings for a deity. Their facial characteristic and elaborate hairstyles and rich garments are clearly visible.
  • Mycenaean Fresco wall painting of a Mycanaean chariot, Later Palace,  Tiryns, Greece.  Athens Archaeological Museum. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
14th  Cent BC. Cat No 5879. Mycanaean chariots were use for hunting as well as battle.
  • Mycenaean Fresco wall painting of a Mycanaean acrobat leaping over a bull, Early Palace,  Tiryns, Greece.  Athens Archaeological Museum. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
14th  Cent BC.. Cat No 1595. The Mycenaean Fresco depicts an acrobat leaping over a charging bull whilst holding onto its horns. This ritual symbolised the struggle of domination of man over wild nature.
  • Mycenaean Fresco wall painting of a Mycanaean footman leading a horse & hunting dog,  Tiryns, Greece. 14th - 13th Century BC. Athens Archaeological Museum. Cat No 5878.  Grey art Background
  • Mycenaean Fresco wall painting of a Wild Boar Hunt from the Tiryns, Greece. 14th - 13th Century BC. Athens Archaeological Museum. Grey art Background
  • The 'Mycenaean Lady' fresco wall painting depicting a women in a procession, Mycenae, Greece Cat No 11670. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
The 'Mycenaean Lady' fresco depicts a women with a serious and pensive expression of a goddess in a solemn moment during which she accepts a gift of a necklace which she hold tightly in her right hand. she wears a short sleeved bodice over a sheer blouse which deliniates her bosom. She has an  intricate hairstyle and wears rich jewellery.
  • Mycenaean fresco wall painting of a women in a procession, Mycenae, Greece Cat No 11651. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
The Mycenaean fresco fragment depicts a women in a procession. Her head is in profile and her body is depicted frontally. She holds a lily as a gift to a goddess.
  • Mycenaean Fresco wall painting of a Wild Boar Hunt from the Tiryns, Greece. 14th - 13th Century BC. Athens Archaeological Museum. Grey art Background
  • Mycenaean pots and vases depicting octopuses and Mycenaean chariots, National Archaeological Museum Athens. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
Left: Three handled Palace Style Mycenaean amphora with octpuses and marinescape decorations motifs, Mycenaean cemetery, Argive Prosymna, tomb 2, 15 cnt BC,  Cat no 6725. <br />
<br />
Middle: Mycenaean three handled styrup jar with painted zig zag  and double axesdesigns, Tholos tomb 2 , Myrsinochori, Messenia, 15th cent BC. Cat No 8376.<br />
<br />
Right:Mycenaean pictorial Krater decorated with a horse and chariot, Tiryns Acropolis - 12-14th cent BC.  Cat No 115.
  • Mycenaean gold death mask, Mask of Agamemnon, Grave Cicle A, Mycenae, Greece.National Archaeological Museum of Athens.   Grey Art Background<br />
<br />
The mask from Grave V depicts an imposing face of a bearded man descovered by  Heinrich Schliemann who believed it was the body of Agamemnon, this is unproven to date.  The Mycenaean death mask belonged to a warrior and made of gold leaf it cocered the dead mans face held on by cord threaded tgrough the two sides of the mask.  The mask of Agamemnon was created from a single thick gold sheet, heated and hammered against a wooden background with the details chased on later with a sharp tool. The artifact dates from the 16th century BC.
  • Mycenaean gold death mask, Grave Cicle A, Mycenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens.  Grey Art Background<br />
<br />
 This death mask is typical of the other Mycenaean gold death masks fround in Grave V. made from a sigle sheet of gold the shape of the face would have been hammered ot against wood. two holes either side of the gold mask allowed it to be held over the dead mans face. As weapons were found in the graves of Grave Circle A at Mycenae, those buried here wer warriors and maybe kings as the grave goods buried with them were of great value. 16th century BC
  • Mycenaean gold death mask, Grave Cicle A, Mycenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens.   Grey Art Background<br />
<br />
This death mask is typical of the other Mycenaean gold death masks fround in Grave V. made from a sigle sheet of gold the shape of the face would have been hammered ot against wood. two holes either side of the gold mask allowed it to be held over the dead mans face. As weapons were found in the graves of Grave Circle A at Mycenae, those buried here wer warriors and maybe kings as the grave goods buried with them were of great value. 16th century BC
  • Mycenaean Funerary Stele made of Porus stone with a relief of a chariot scene, Mycenae Grave Circle A, Grave V, Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 1428.16th Cent BC. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
The upper panel of this Mycenaean Funerary Stele has spiral reliefs that may represent waves suggesting that the scene below is set at a coastal location. This scene shows a charioteer pulling on the reins of his chariot while a second figure in front of the chaiot hold what may be a sword.
  • Mycenaean ovoid rhython with spiral design , Grave II, Grave Circle A, Mycenae 16-15 Cent BC. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 221. Grey art Background
  • Body shaped Mycenaean gold cut outs from Grave III, 'Grave of a Women', Grave Circle A, Myenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Grey art Background <br />
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Cat No 146. 16th century BC.<br />
<br />
A unique gold body covering and face of an infant child mad out of pieces of gold foll<br />
<br />
Shaft Grave III, the so-called 'Grave of the Women,' contained three female and two infant interments. The women were literally covered in gold jewelry and wore massive gold diadems, while the infants were overlaid with gold foil.
  • Mycenaean Funerary Stele made of Porus stone with a chariot relief, Mycenae Grave Circle A, Grave V, Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 1429.16th Cent BC.  Grey art Background <br />
<br />
The upper register of the Mycenaean Funerary Stele are filled with spiral reliefs while the central register panel has a relief of galloping horses driven by a charioteer. In front of the galloping horse stands a man with a spear who appears to attacking the chariot.
  • Mycenaean Funerary Stele made of Porus stone with a relief of a chariot scene, Mycenae Grave Circle A, Grave V, Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 1428.16th Cent BC. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
The upper panel of this Mycenaean Funerary Stele has spiral reliefs that may represent waves suggesting that the scene below is set at a coastal location. This scene shows a charioteer pulling on the reins of his chariot while a second figure in front of the chaiot hold what may be a sword.
  • Mycenaean Funerary Stele with painted scenes of Mycenaean warriors, Mycenae Chamber Tomb Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 3256.12th Cent BC. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
In this Mycenaean Funerary Stele the main panel depicts Mycenaean warriors marching armed with spears and shields. In the lower panel are depictions of 4 deer and a hedgehog. In the upper panel is a badly damaged seated figure
  • Mycenaean female figurines  from Mycenae tombs, Archaeological Museum Athens.  Grey art Background <br />
<br />
Left: Seated Mycenaean female figurine with raies arms, from Mycenae tomb 91,  Cat No 3193. <br />
<br />
Middle: Hollow Mycenaean female figurine, adorant, wearing a necklace, from Mycenae tomb 40,  Cat No 2494. <br />
<br />
Right: Upper part of a Mycenaean female figurine with stylised arms wearing a necklace, from Mycenae tomb 101,  Cat No 4690
  • Seated Mycenaean female figurine with raies arms, from Mycenae tomb 91, Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 3193.  Grey art Background <br />
<br />
Stylised female figurines were common in the Mycenaean world and may have represented deities , divine nurses or worshipers. these Mycenaean female figurines were probably used as voitive offering and maybe as childrens toys.
  • Hollow Mycenaean female figurine, adorant, wearing a necklace, from Mycenae tomb 40, Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 2494.  Grey art Background <br />
<br />
Stylised female figurines were common in the Mycenaean world and may have represented deities , divine nurses or worshipers. these Mycenaean female figurines were probably used as voitive offering and maybe as childrens toys.
  • Upper part of a Mycenaean female figurine with stylised arms wearing a necklace, from Mycenae tomb 101, Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 4690.  Grey art Background <br />
<br />
Stylised female figurines were common in the Mycenaean world and may have represented deities , divine nurses or worshipers. these Mycenaean female figurines were probably used as voitive offering and maybe as childrens toys.
  • Mycenaean Gold circular buttons from Grave IV, Grave Circle A, Myenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum Athens. 16th Cent BC. Grey art Background
  • Mycenaean Gold circular buttons from Grave IV, Grave Circle A, Myenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum Athens. 16th Cent BC. Grey art Background
  • Mycenaean Gold decrated bands  from Grave IV, Grave Circle A, Myenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum Athens. 16th Cent BC. Grey art Background
  • Mycenaean Gold breat plate from Grave IV, Grave Circle A, Myenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum Athens. 16th Cent BC. Cat No 626, 625. Grey art Background
  • Top leaf shapes of a Mycenaean gold diadem from Grave III, 'Grave of a Women', Grave Circle A, Myenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
Cat No 3,5. 16th century BC.<br />
<br />
Shaft Grave III, the so-called 'Grave of the Women,' contained three female and two infant interments. The women were literally covered in gold jewelry and wore massive gold diadems, while the infants were overlaid with gold foil.
  • Mycenaean bull figurine from from Mycenae tomb 65 , Archaeological Museum Athens. cat no 3032.  Grey art Background
  • 'House of Warriors Vase' : Pictoral Mycenaean Krater depicting Mycenaean soldiers in full armour, Mycenae Acropolis, 12th Cent BC.  National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat no 1426.  Grey art Background <br />
<br />
This large pictoral Mycenaean Krater depicts Mycenaean soldiers full armed with helmet, cuirass, greaves, shield and spaer as they depart for war. This is a superb example of Mycenaean pictoral pottery
  • 'House of Warriors Vase' : Pictoral Mycenaean Krater depicting Mycenaean soldiers in full armour, Mycenae Acropolis, 12th Cent BC.  National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat no 1426.  Grey art Background <br />
<br />
This large pictoral Mycenaean Krater depicts Mycenaean soldiers full armed with helmet, cuirass, greaves, shield and spaer as they depart for war. This is a superb example of Mycenaean pictoral pottery
  • Mycenaean gold cup with ivy leaf decoration from the Mycenaean cemetery of Midea tomb 10, Dendra, Greece. National Archaeological Museum Athens Cat no 8743.  Grey art Background
  • Mycenaean silver cup from the Tomb 78 of the Mycenae chamber tombs, Greece. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
This Mycenaean silver cup has a repousse  scale pattern with wish bone handles. Cat No 3121. 16th Cent BC
  • Mycenaean ring shaped Kernos with painted serpentine bands , Mycenae Acropolis, 12th Cent BC.  National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat no 5437.  Grey art Background <br />
<br />
This Mycenaean ring shaped Kernos was a ritual vessel with a conical rhtyhon for pouring liquids. A bovine head adorns the base of the rhython while a serpentine band and painted rosettes decorate the body
  • Mycenaean Gold diadems and cut outs from Grave IV, Grave Circle A, Myenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum Athens. 16th Cent BC. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
Top: Mycenaean Gold diadem with repousse circles and rosettes Cat No 234<br />
<br />
Bottom . Gold cut outs depicting tripartite shrines crowned with horns of consecration and birds. Cat No 242-244
  • Mycenaean Gold diadems from Grave IV, Grave Circle A, Myenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum Athens. 16th Cent BC. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
Top: Mycenaean Gold diadem with repousse circles and rosettes Cat No 232<br />
<br />
Bottom: Elegant Mycenaean gold daidem with fastening loops and dotted decoration. Three diamond shaped pendant hung from chains. Cat no 236.
  • Mycenaean Gold diadem from Grave III, 'Grave of a Women', Grave Circle A, Myenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
An impressive Mycenaean gold diadem with repousse rosettes and thin sheets applied to the top. .Cat No 1. 16th century BC.<br />
<br />
Shaft Grave III, the so-called 'Grave of the Women,' contained three female and two infant interments. The women were literally covered in gold jewelry and wore massive gold diadems, while the infants were overlaid with gold foil.
  • Gold Mycenaean diadem with leaf shaped plates from Grave I, Grave Circle A, Myenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 184, 185. 16th century BC.  Grey art Background
  • Mycenaean pottery funiture decorations from Grave IV, Circle Grave A, Mycenae, 16th cent BC. National Archaeological Museum Athens.  Grey art Background
  • Mycenaean pottery sacral knots from Grave IV, Circle Grave A, Mycenae, 16th cent BC. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 569.  Grey art Background <br />
<br />
These pottery sacral knots were a religious symnol of Minoan Crete
  • Mycenaean pottery sacral knots from Grave IV, Circle Grave A, Mycenae, 16th cent BC. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 553.  Grey art Background <br />
<br />
These pottery sacral knots were a religious symnol of Minoan Crete
  • Top leaf shapes of a gold diadem from Grave III, 'Grave of a Women', Grave Circle A, Myenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
Shaft Grave III, the so-called 'Grave of the Women,' contained three female and two infant interments. The women were literally covered in gold jewelry and wore massive gold diadems, while the infants were overlaid with gold foil.
  • Mycenaean gold necklaces from the Mycenae chamber tombs, Greece. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
From top to bottom: <br />
<br />
Top four  necklaces in the shape of papyrus flowers .<br />
<br />
Fifth necklace down in the shape of Ivy leaves from tomb 91 Cat No 3186
  • Mycenaean gold necklaces from the Mycenae chamber tombs, Greece. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
From top to bottom: <br />
<br />
Top four  necklaces in the shape of papyrus flowers .<br />
<br />
Fifth necklace down in the shape of Ivy leaves from tomb 91 Cat No 3186<br />
<br />
<br />
Bottom necklace with beads in the shape of hangimng scrolls from tomb 25 Cat No 2478.
  • Mycenaean gold necklace from the Mycenaean cemetery of Midea tholos tomb , Dendra, Greece. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
Inside mycenaean necklace has gold ivy leaf beads, Cat No 7354. The outer mycenaean necklace has rosette shaped gold beads, Cat No 7342. 15th-14th century BC.
  • Mycenaean gold cup depicting octupuses in a marinescape from the Mycenaean cemetery of Midea, Dendra, Greece. National Archaeological Museum Athens Cat no 7341.  Grey art Background
  • Mycenaean gold goblet with two handles ening with a dogs head biting the rim,  Acropolis Treasure of Mycenae, Greece, National Archaeological Museum of Athens.  Grey art Background <br />
<br />
This goblet was found as part of a hoard looted in antiquity from Grave Circle A and buried outside the enclosure. 15th century BC
  • Mycenaean gold goblet with two handles ening with a dogs head biting the rim,  Acropolis Treasure of Mycenae, Greece, National Archaeological Museum of Athens.  <br />
<br />
 Grey art Background This goblet was found as part of a hoard looted in antiquity from Grave Circle A and buried outside the enclosure. 15th century BC
  • Small Mycenaean amphora decorated with large ivy leaves, Grave VI, Grave Circle A, Mycenae 16-15 Cent BC. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 192,  Grey art Background
  • Mycenaean metal rhyhon hammered into the shape of a lions head, Grave IV, Grave Circle A, Mycenae, Greece, Cat no 273, National Archaeological Museum Athens .  Grey art Background <br />
<br />
Rytha (Rhython singular) were ritual vessels used to drink libations to the gods during religious ceremonies. 16th century BC
  • Two handled Mycenaean gold bowl cup from the Kakovatos tholos tomb, Trifylia, Greece. National Archaeological Museum Athens.  Grey art Background <br />
<br />
Kakovatos is a significant site of the early Mycenaean period of Greece (c. 16th to 15th century BC) on the west coast of the Peloponnese (Zacharo, Nomos Elis) and became widely known through the excavations of three large tholos tombs by Wilhelm Dörpfeld in 1907–1908.
  • Vapheio type Mycenaean gold cup depicting a wild bull hunt , Vapheio Tholos Tomb, Lakonia, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens.   Grey Art Background<br />
<br />
 Two masterpieces of Creto - Mycenaean gold metalwork were excavated from a tholos tomb near Lakonia in Sparta in 1988. Made in the 15th century BC, the gold cups are heavily influenced by the Minoan style that was predominant in the Agean at the time. The bull hunt was popular with  Mycenaean  and Minoan artists and symolised power and fertility. The distinctive shape of the cup is kown as 'Vapheio type'.
  • Mycenaean gold cup with arches decoration, Grave V, Grave Circle A Mycenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens.  Grey Art Background<br />
<br />
An elegant precious gold cup hammered from thick gold to created a simple elegant design. This Mycenaean gold cup demonstrates how advance Mycenaean metalworking was in the 16th century BC. The value of the cup would have been extermely high so must have graced the table of a Mycenaean noble perhaps even a v king.
  • Mycenaean gold cup with horizontal grroves, Grave IV, Grave Circle A, Mycenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens.   Grey Art Background<br />
<br />
An elegant precious gold cup hammered from thick gold to created a simple elegant design. This Mycenaean gold cup demonstrates how advance Mycenaean metalworking was in the 16th century BC. The value of the cup would have been extermely high so must have graced the table of a Mycenaean noble perhaps even a v king.
  • Mycenaean gold cup with spiral decorations, Grave V, Grave Circle A,  Mycenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens.   Grey Art Background<br />
<br />
An elegant precious gold cup hammered from thick gold to created a simple elegant design. This Mycenaean gold cup demonstrates how advance Mycenaean metalworking was in the 16th century BC. The value of the cup would have been extermely high so must have graced the table of a Mycenaean noble perhaps even a v king.
  • 'House of Warriors Vase' : Pictoral Mycenaean Krater depicting Mycenaean soldiers in full armour, Mycenae Acropolis, 12th Cent BC.  National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat no 1426.  Grey art Background <br />
<br />
This large pictoral Mycenaean Krater depicts Mycenaean soldiers full armed with helmet, cuirass, greaves, shield and spaer as they depart for war. This is a superb example of Mycenaean pictoral pottery
  • 'House of Warriors Vase' : Pictoral Mycenaean Krater depicting Mycenaean soldiers in full armour, Mycenae Acropolis, 12th Cent BC.  National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat no 1426.  Grey art Background <br />
<br />
This large pictoral Mycenaean Krater depicts Mycenaean soldiers full armed with helmet, cuirass, greaves, shield and spaer as they depart for war. This is a superb example of Mycenaean pictoral pottery
  • painted Mycenaean stirrup jars fro perfume, Mycenae Chamber Tomb 80, 14th-13th Cent BC.  National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat no 3106. Grey art Background
  • painted Mycenaean two handled jug with a tall neck, Mycenae Chamber Tomb 80, 14th-13th Cent BC.  National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat no 3228.  Grey art Background
  • Mycenaean stirrup jar with painted octopus designs, Mycenae Chamner Tombs, 14th-13th Cent BC.  National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat no 2772.  Grey art Background
  • Three handled Palace Style pictoral Mycenaean amphora with aquatic bird motifs, Mycenaean cemetery, Argive Deiras, 15 cnt BC, National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat no 5650.  Grey art Background <br />
<br />
This Mycenaean vase is one of the first examples of Mycenaean pictoral pottery created from Minoan influences.
  • Three handled Palace Style Mycenaean amphora with octpuses and marinescape decorations motifs, Mycenaean cemetery, Argive Prosymna, tomb 2, 15 cnt BC, National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat no 6725.  Grey art Background <br />
<br />
This Mycenaean vase is an imitation of the Minoan Marine Style
  • Three handled Palace Style  Mycenaean amphora with palm tree floral motifs, Mycenaean cemetery, Argive Deiras, 15 cnt BC, National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat no 7107.  Grey art Background <br />
<br />
This Mycenaean vase is distinguished by the high quality of clay and paint as well as the naturalistic rendition of the palm tree decorations
  • Mycenaean conical rhython with an octopus design from the House of the oil merchant, Mycenae Acropolis 14-13thj Cent BC. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 7386.  Grey art Background
  • Mycenaean styrup jar from the House of the oil merchant, Mycenae Acropolis 14-13thj Cent BC. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 7626.  Grey art Background
  • Mycenaean pictorial Krater decorated with a horse and chariot, Tiryns Acropolis - 12-14th cent BC. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 115. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
A large Mycenaean Krate decorated with a two horse chariot and two riders. The style is typical of the painting style known as ;painter of the shield bearers' of the Tiryns workshop producing pictorial pottery from the late 13th to 12th century BC
  • Mycenaean jug decorated with ivy leaves , Grave I, Grave Circle A, Mycenae 16-15 Cent BC. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 199.  Grey art Background
  • Mycenaean spouted clay pithos decorated with spirals and bands, Grave VI, Grave Circle A, Mycenae 16-15 Cent BC. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 8580.  Grey art Background
  • Mycenaean pot with cycladic style design , Grave Circle B, Mycenae 17-16thj Cent BC. National Archaeological Museum Athens.  Grey art Background <br />
<br />
Bichromatic Cycladic style depicying circles. Cat No 8614
  • Mycenaean pot with cycladic style design , Grave Circle B, Mycenae 17-16thj Cent BC. National Archaeological Museum Athens.  Grey art Background <br />
<br />
Bichromatic Cycladic style Mycenaean pot depicting birds. Cat No 8615
  • Mycenaean silver rhyhon of a bulls head with gold horns, Grave IV, Grave Circle A, Mycenae, Greece, Cat no 273, National Archaeological Museum Athens .  Grey art Background <br />
<br />
Rytha (Rhython singular) were ritual vessels used to drink libations to the gods during religious ceremonies. 16th century BC
  • Mycenaean gold death mask, Grave Cicle A, Mycenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens.   Grey Art Background<br />
<br />
This death mask is typical of the other Mycenaean gold death masks fround in Grave V. made from a sigle sheet of gold the shape of the face would have been hammered ot against wood. two holes either side of the gold mask allowed it to be held over the dead mans face. As weapons were found in the graves of Grave Circle A at Mycenae, those buried here wer warriors and maybe kings as the grave goods buried with them were of great value. 16th century BC
  • Mycenaean gold death mask, Grave Cicle A, Mycenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens.   Grey Art Background<br />
<br />
 This death mask is typical of the other Mycenaean gold death masks fround in Grave V except in this mask the eyes are open. made from a sigle sheet of gold the shape of the face would have been hammered ot against wood. two holes either side of the gold mask allowed it to be held over the dead mans face. As weapons were found in the graves of Grave Circle A at Mycenae, those buried here wer warriors and maybe kings as the grave goods buried with them were of great value. 16th century BC
  • Mycenaean gold death mask, Mask of Agamemnon, Grave Cicle A, Mycenae, Greece.National Archaeological Museum of Athens.   Grey Art Background<br />
<br />
The mask from Grave V depicts an imposing face of a bearded man descovered by  Heinrich Schliemann who believed it was the body of Agamemnon, this is unproven to date.  The Mycenaean death mask belonged to a warrior and made of gold leaf it cocered the dead mans face held on by cord threaded tgrough the two sides of the mask.  The mask of Agamemnon was created from a single thick gold sheet, heated and hammered against a wooden background with the details chased on later with a sharp tool. The artifact dates from the 16th century BC.
  • Mycenaean pictorial Krater decorated with a two horses and chariot, Tiryns Acropolis - 13-12th cent BC. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 1511. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
This larfe Mycenaean pictorial Krater depicts a two horse Mycenaean chariot with two riders. Two men holding spears and circular shields walk in front of the chariot and a dog scampers under the horse. This style is typical of the 'painter of the shiled bearers' of the Tiryns workshop from the late 13th to 12th cent BC
  • Mycenaean gold death mask, Grave Cicle A, Mycenae, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens.   Grey Art Background<br />
<br />
This death mask is typical of the other Mycenaean gold death masks fround in Grave V. made from a sigle sheet of gold the shape of the face would have been hammered ot against wood. two holes either side of the gold mask allowed it to be held over the dead mans face. As weapons were found in the graves of Grave Circle A at Mycenae, those buried here wer warriors and maybe kings as the grave goods buried with them were of great value. 16th century BC
  • Mycenaean bull figurines from Prosymna and Mycenae, Archaeological Museum Athens.  Grey art Background <br />
<br />
Left: Mycenaean bull figurines from Prosymna cat no 11184<br />
<br />
Right Mycenaean bull figurine from Mycenae tomb 65 cat no 3032
  • Mycenaean three handled styrrup jar with painted zig zag  and double axesdesigns, Tholos tomb 2 , Myrsinochori, Messenia, 15th cent BC. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 8376. Grey art Background
  • Small Mycenaean amphora decorated with double headed axes, Grave VI, Grave Circle A, Mycenae 16-15 Cent BC. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 196.  Grey art Background
  • Two handled Mycenaean gold bowl cup from the Kakovatos tholos tomb, Trifylia, Greece. National Archaeological Museum Athens.  Grey art Background <br />
<br />
Kakovatos is a significant site of the early Mycenaean period of Greece (c. 16th to 15th century BC) on the west coast of the Peloponnese (Zacharo, Nomos Elis) and became widely known through the excavations of three large tholos tombs by Wilhelm Dörpfeld in 1907–1908.
  • Vapheio type Mycenaean gold cup depicting a wild bull hunt side D, Vapheio Tholos Tomb, Lakonia, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens.  Grey Art Background<br />
<br />
 Two masterpieces of Creto - Mycenaean gold metalwork were excavated from a tholos tomb near Lakonia in Sparta in 1988. Made in the 15th century BC, the gold cups are heavily influenced by the Minoan style that was predominant in the Agean at the time. The bull hunt was popular with  Mycenaean  and Minoan artists and symolised power and fertility. The distinctive shape of the cup is kown as 'Vapheio type'.
  • Vapheio type Mycenaean gold cup depicting a wild bull hunt side C , Vapheio Tholos Tomb, Lakonia, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens.   Grey Art Background<br />
<br />
 Two masterpieces of Creto - Mycenaean gold metalwork were excavated from a tholos tomb near Lakonia in Sparta in 1988. Made in the 15th century BC, the gold cups are heavily influenced by the Minoan style that was predominant in the Agean at the time. The bull hunt was popular with  Mycenaean  and Minoan artists and symolised power and fertility. The distinctive shape of the cup is kown as 'Vapheio type'.
  • Vapheio type Mycenaean gold cup depicting a wild bull hunt , Vapheio Tholos Tomb, Lakonia, Greece. National Archaeological Museum of Athens.   Grey Art Background<br />
<br />
 Two masterpieces of Creto - Mycenaean gold metalwork were excavated from a tholos tomb near Lakonia in Sparta in 1988. Made in the 15th century BC, the gold cups are heavily influenced by the Minoan style that was predominant in the Agean at the time. The bull hunt was popular with  Mycenaean  and Minoan artists and symolised power and fertility. The distinctive shape of the cup is kown as 'Vapheio type'.
  • Three handled Palace Style Mycenaean amphora with palm tree floral motifs, Mycenaean cemetery, Argive Deiras, 15 cnt BC, National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat no 7107.  Grey art Background <br />
<br />
This Mycenaean vase is distinguished by the high quality of clay and paint as well as the naturalistic rendition of the palm tree decorations

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