• Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. In this variant of the style she is accompanied by Eros, traces of whose feet and hand survive, and a swan. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. In this variant of the style she is accompanied by Eros, traces of whose feet and hand survive, and a swan. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. In this variant of the style she is accompanied by Eros, traces of whose feet and hand survive, and a swan. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. In this variant of the style she is accompanied by Eros, traces of whose feet and hand survive, and a swan. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • 1st Century BC statue of Aphordite by Menophantos. The casket of the sculpture is inscribed “ of the Aphrodite which is situated in the Troad (Troy) Menophantos made it”. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • 1st Century BC statue of Aphordite by Menophantos. The casket of the sculpture is inscribed “ of the Aphrodite which is situated in the Troad (Troy) Menophantos made it”. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • 1st Century BC statue of Aphordite by Menophantos. The casket of the sculpture is inscribed “ of the Aphrodite which is situated in the Troad (Troy) Menophantos made it”. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • 1st Century BC statue of Aphordite by Menophantos. The casket of the sculpture is inscribed “ of the Aphrodite which is situated in the Troad (Troy) Menophantos made it”. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • 1st Century BC statue of Aphordite by Menophantos. The casket of the sculpture is inscribed “ of the Aphrodite which is situated in the Troad (Troy) Menophantos made it”. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • 1st Century BC statue of Aphordite by Menophantos. The casket of the sculpture is inscribed “ of the Aphrodite which is situated in the Troad (Troy) Menophantos made it”. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • 1st Century BC statue of Aphordite by Menophantos. The casket of the sculpture is inscribed “ of the Aphrodite which is situated in the Troad (Troy) Menophantos made it”. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • 1st Century BC statue of Aphordite by Menophantos. The casket of the sculpture is inscribed “ of the Aphrodite which is situated in the Troad (Troy) Menophantos made it”. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 2nd century Roman Copy. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 1st century Roman Copy with a portrait head. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 1st century Roman Copy with a portrait head. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 2nd century Roman Copy. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238 Farnese Collection, Naples  Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238  Farnese Collection, Naples  Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238 Farnese Collection, Naples  Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Bronze Hellanistic original from the mid 3rd century BC  attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia,  inv 6283, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Bronze Hellanistic original from the mid 3rd century BC  attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia,  inv 6283  Farnese Collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238 Farnese Collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238  Farnese Collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6283 - Farnese Collection, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238  Farnese Collection, Naples  Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238 Farnese Collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Bronze Hellanistic original from the mid 3rd century BC  attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia,  inv 6283, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Bronze Hellanistic original from the mid 3rd century BC  attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia,  inv 6283 Farnese Collection, Naples  Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Bronze Hellanistic original from the mid 3rd century BC  attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia,  inv 6283  Farnese Collection, Naples  Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6283 - Farnese Collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Bronze Hellanistic original from the mid 3rd century BC  attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia,  inv 6283, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Bronze Hellanistic original from the mid 3rd century BC  attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia,  inv 6283, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Bronze Hellanistic original from the mid 3rd century BC  attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia,  inv 6293, Farnese Collection - Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Bronze Hellanistic original from the mid 3rd century BC  attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia,  inv 6283 Farnese Collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238  Farnese Collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 1st century Roman Copy with a portrait head. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 2nd century Roman Copy. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. In this variant of the style she is accompanied by Eros, traces of whose feet and hand survive, and a swan. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • 1st Century BC statue of Aphordite by Menophantos. The casket of the sculpture is inscribed “ of the Aphrodite which is situated in the Troad (Troy) Menophantos made it”. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • 1st Century BC statue of Aphordite by Menophantos. The casket of the sculpture is inscribed “ of the Aphrodite which is situated in the Troad (Troy) Menophantos made it”. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy, black background
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 2nd century Roman Copy. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Dresden-Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 2nd century Roman Copy. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Dresden-Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 2nd century Roman Copy. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Dresden-Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. In this variant of the style she is accompanied by Eros, traces of whose feet and hand survive, and a swan. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. In this variant of the style she is accompanied by Eros, traces of whose feet and hand survive, and a swan. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Aphrodite Crouching whilst bathing. The Goddess of love Aphrodite, Venus to the Romans is depicted crouching whilst bathing, she looks to one side as if surprised by something. In this style of Aphrodite statue her arms stretch across in front of her and her right hand gently touches her right shoulder. In this variant of the style she is accompanied by Eros, traces of whose feet and hand survive, and a swan. This statue is a  2nd century Roman copy of a lost Greek. Hellanistic original of the mid 3rd century BC attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia. This version of Aphrodite Bathing made around AD 117-138 is the most artistically successful version know. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • 1st Century BC statue of Aphordite by Menophantos. The casket of the sculpture is inscribed “ of the Aphrodite which is situated in the Troad (Troy) Menophantos made it”. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • 1st Century BC statue of Aphordite by Menophantos. The casket of the sculpture is inscribed “ of the Aphrodite which is situated in the Troad (Troy) Menophantos made it”. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • 1st Century BC statue of Aphordite by Menophantos. The casket of the sculpture is inscribed “ of the Aphrodite which is situated in the Troad (Troy) Menophantos made it”. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • 1st Century BC statue of Aphordite by Menophantos. The casket of the sculpture is inscribed “ of the Aphrodite which is situated in the Troad (Troy) Menophantos made it”. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • 1st Century BC statue of Aphordite by Menophantos. The casket of the sculpture is inscribed “ of the Aphrodite which is situated in the Troad (Troy) Menophantos made it”. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • 1st Century BC statue of Aphordite by Menophantos. The casket of the sculpture is inscribed “ of the Aphrodite which is situated in the Troad (Troy) Menophantos made it”. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 1st century Roman Copy with a portrait head. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 2nd century Roman Copy. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 2nd century Roman Copy. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 2nd century Roman Copy. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 1st century Roman Copy with a portrait head. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 1st century Roman Copy with a portrait head. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 2nd century Roman Copy. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, white background
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, black background
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline' Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6296, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, grey background
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline' Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6296, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, black background
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, grey background
  • Full length frontal view of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, black background
  • Close up  tree quarter view of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, black background
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, black background
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, grey background
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, black background
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Bronze Hellanistic original from the mid 3rd century BC  attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia,  inv 6283, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Bronze Hellanistic original from the mid 3rd century BC  attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia,  inv 6283, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Bronze Hellanistic original from the mid 3rd century BC  attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia,  inv 6283, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Bronze Hellanistic original from the mid 3rd century BC  attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia,  inv 6283, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Full length frontal view of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline' Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6296, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline' Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6296, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, black background
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline' Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6296, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, white background
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, white background
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, white background
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, black background
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, grey background
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, black background
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, grey art background
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, grey background
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, grey art background
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Bronze Hellanistic original from the mid 3rd century BC  attributed to the Greek sculptor Doldalsas of Bethynia,  inv 6283, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline' Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6296, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, grey art background
  • Full length three quarter view of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, black background
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Museum of Archaeology, Italy, grey art background
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 2nd century Roman Copy. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Dresden-Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 2nd century Roman Copy. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Dresden-Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Farnese Collection, Naples  National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 2nd century Roman Copy. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Dresden-Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 2nd century Roman Copy. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Dresden-Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Inv 6283 - Farnese Collection. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 2nd century Roman Copy. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Dresden-Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 2nd century Roman Copy. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Dresden-Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 2nd century Roman Copy. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Dresden-Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 2nd century Roman Copy. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Dresden-Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy

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