• The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Pizza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal and Leaning Tower - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Bas relief feeze above the door of the Baptistry of Pisa Duomo, Italy
  • Catherderal and Leaning Tower - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Pizza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo & Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo & Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo & Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo & Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo & Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo & Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo & Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy
  • The Duomo & Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Pizza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Pizza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Pizza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Pizza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Pizza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Bas relief feeze above the door of the Baptistry of Pisa Duomo, Italy
  • Catherderal and Leaning Tower - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal and Leaning Tower - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Leaning Tower of Pisa - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Benedictine Abbey and Church on Lake Balaton.  Tihany Balaton Hungary
  • Benedictine Abbey and Church on Lake Balaton.  Tihany Balaton Hungary
  • Benedictine Abbey and Church on Lake Balaton.  Tihany Balaton Hungary
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Catherderal - Piazza  del Miracoli - Pisa - Italy
  • Farm houses at Morbish - am - see, Neusiedler See, Austria
  • Farm houses at Morbish - am - see, Neusiedler See, Austria
  • Farm houses at Morbish - am - see, Neusiedler See, Austria
  • Lake cruiser at Morbish - am - see, Neusiedler See, Austria
  • Corn drying outside a farm house at Morbish - am - see, Neusiedler See, Austria
  • Farm houses at Morbish - am - see, Neusiedler See, Austria
  • Farm houses at Morbish - am - see, Neusiedler See, Austria
  • Farm houses at Morbish - am - see, Neusiedler See, Austria
  • Farm houses at Morbish - am - see, Neusiedler See, Austria
  • Farm houses at Morbish - am - see, Neusiedler See, Austria
  • Farm houses at Morbish - am - see, Neusiedler See, Austria
  • Corn drying outside a farm house at Morbish - am - see, Neusiedler See, Austria
  • Corn drying outside a farm house at Morbish - am - see, Neusiedler See, Austria
  • the Neusiedler See, Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) , Burgenland, Austria
  • Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Hotel Burgerhauz - Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Hotel Burgerhauz - Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Well in the main square, Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Well in the main square, Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Buildings on the main square, Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Buildings on the main square, Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Buildings on the main square, Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Buildings on the main square, Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Buildings on the main square, Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Buildings on the main square, Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Buildings on the main square, Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Buildings on the main square, Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Buildings on the main square, Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Buildings on the main square, Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Buildings on the main square, Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Buildings on the main square, Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Buildings on the main square, Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Buildings on the main square, Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Buildings on the main square, Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Buildings on the main square, Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Buildings on the main square, Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Autumn descoartions outside the Burgerhaus Hotel, Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Autumn descoartions outside the Burgerhaus Hotel, Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Autumn descoartions outside the Burgerhaus Hotel, Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Autumn descoartions outside the Burgerhaus Hotel, Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Autumn descoartions outside the Burgerhaus Hotel, Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Autumn descoartions outside the Burgerhaus Hotel, Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Autumn descoartions outside the Burgerhaus Hotel, Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Fine Art Black and White Pictures Wall Art Prints Polaroid Photos " Children Of The Revolution” by photographer Paul Williams depict the harrowing images of children at war in an abstract fine art photography prints series.<br />
<br />
"When the Balkan war broke out it was not long before we saw photos of white kids being caught up in battle. In my life time I have become immune to seeing black and asian kids with guns and it was a shock to see children that could have been mine at war. So as a protest I made the photo series "Children Of The Revolution" with my kids to remind myself that it is always better to talk and understand than fight." Paul Williams
  • Fine Art Black and White Pictures Wall Art Prints Polaroid Photos " Children Of The Revolution” by photographer Paul Williams depict the harrowing images of children at war in an abstract fine art photography prints series.<br />
<br />
"When the Balkan war broke out it was not long before we saw photos of white kids being caught up in battle. In my life time I have become immune to seeing black and asian kids with guns and it was a shock to see children that could have been mine at war. So as a protest I made the photo series "Children Of The Revolution" with my kids to remind myself that it is always better to talk and understand than fight." Paul Williams
  • Fine Art Black and White Pictures Wall Art Prints Polaroid Photos " Children Of The Revolution” by photographer Paul Williams depict the harrowing images of children at war in an abstract fine art photography prints series.<br />
<br />
"When the Balkan war broke out it was not long before we saw photos of white kids being caught up in battle. In my life time I have become immune to seeing black and asian kids with guns and it was a shock to see children that could have been mine at war. So as a protest I made the photo series "Children Of The Revolution" with my kids to remind myself that it is always better to talk and understand than fight." Paul Williams
  • Fine Art Black and White Pictures Wall Art Prints Polaroid Photos " Children Of The Revolution” by photographer Paul Williams depict the harrowing images of children at war in an abstract fine art photography prints series.<br />
<br />
"When the Balkan war broke out it was not long before we saw photos of white kids being caught up in battle. In my life time I have become immune to seeing black and asian kids with guns and it was a shock to see children that could have been mine at war. So as a protest I made the photo series "Children Of The Revolution" with my kids to remind myself that it is always better to talk and understand than fight." Paul Williams
  • Fine Art Black and White Pictures Wall Art Prints Polaroid Photos " Children Of The Revolution” by photographer Paul Williams depict the harrowing images of children at war in an abstract fine art photography prints series.<br />
<br />
"When the Balkan war broke out it was not long before we saw photos of white kids being caught up in battle. In my life time I have become immune to seeing black and asian kids with guns and it was a shock to see children that could have been mine at war. So as a protest I made the photo series "Children Of The Revolution" with my kids to remind myself that it is always better to talk and understand than fight." Paul Williams
  • Fine Art Black and White Pictures Wall Art Prints Polaroid Photos " Children Of The Revolution” by photographer Paul Williams depict the harrowing images of children at war in an abstract fine art photography prints series.<br />
<br />
"When the Balkan war broke out it was not long before we saw photos of white kids being caught up in battle. In my life time I have become immune to seeing black and asian kids with guns and it was a shock to see children that could have been mine at war. So as a protest I made the photo series "Children Of The Revolution" with my kids to remind myself that it is always better to talk and understand than fight." Paul Williams
  • Underground Etruscan tomb Known as "Tomba della Caccia e della Pesca". A double chamber with double sloping ceiling. In the tsecond chamber can be see a scene of hunting and fishing in the style of the "little Ionic masters" . 520-510 BC. Excavated 1873 , Etruscan Necropolis of Monterozzi, Monte del Calvario, Tarquinia, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Roman mosaics - Metiochus and Parthenope Mosaic.  2nd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Metiochus and Parthenope, famous with their legendary love for eat: torn apart and then unified after years, they seem to represent the According to the myth, Parthenope is the sister of Polycrat e Ki taken an oath of virginity upon the Heraion which symbolizes the Metiochus is invited to the royal court and meets Parthenope Burin fails in love with Metiochus but in order to keep the oath she has taken, she and chooses to go exile. In this mosaic, we see the two figures sfttngsitting upon an In compliance with the story, the face of Metiochus is directed towards Part e whom he fell in love and the eyes of Parthenope stares at an indeterminate area due to the love she feels yet sees impossible. The mosaic is surrounded by triangular, double mesh ttke, and pyramidal borders. The piece was discovered during the rescue excavation conducted. in 1993. When exposed, it was understood that the main figures used to be at the middle of the mosaic were stolen the tomb-robbers. <br />
<br />
The mosaic was brought to Gaziantep Museum with a question mark labeled on it saying "Who knows where? In which country?" and began to be displayed temporarily after restoration. From the photographs sent by the Canadian Archaeologist Sheila Campbell, it was found out that the stolen parts were in the Merin collection in Houston USA and with the initiatives of the Ministry of Culture, the missing parts were brought In 2000 and the mosaic was put on display following the restoration. Those two eternal lovers, who were torn apart by traffickers of historical artefacts and kidnapped separately, have been unified after years.
  • Roman mosaics - Metiochus and Parthenope Mosaic.  2nd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Metiochus and Parthenope, famous with their legendary love for eat: torn apart and then unified after years, they seem to represent the According to the myth, Parthenope is the sister of Polycrat e Ki taken an oath of virginity upon the Heraion which symbolizes the Metiochus is invited to the royal court and meets Parthenope Burin fails in love with Metiochus but in order to keep the oath she has taken, she and chooses to go exile. In this mosaic, we see the two figures sfttngsitting upon an In compliance with the story, the face of Metiochus is directed towards Part e whom he fell in love and the eyes of Parthenope stares at an indeterminate area due to the love she feels yet sees impossible. The mosaic is surrounded by triangular, double mesh ttke, and pyramidal borders. The piece was discovered during the rescue excavation conducted. in 1993. When exposed, it was understood that the main figures used to be at the middle of the mosaic were stolen the tomb-robbers. <br />
<br />
The mosaic was brought to Gaziantep Museum with a question mark labeled on it saying "Who knows where? In which country?" and began to be displayed temporarily after restoration. From the photographs sent by the Canadian Archaeologist Sheila Campbell, it was found out that the stolen parts were in the Merin collection in Houston USA and with the initiatives of the Ministry of Culture, the missing parts were brought In 2000 and the mosaic was put on display following the restoration. Those two eternal lovers, who were torn apart by traffickers of historical artefacts and kidnapped separately, have been unified after years.
  • Roman mosaics - Metiochus and Parthenope Mosaic.  2nd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Metiochus and Parthenope, famous with their legendary love for eat: torn apart and then unified after years, they seem to represent the According to the myth, Parthenope is the sister of Polycrat e Ki taken an oath of virginity upon the Heraion which symbolizes the Metiochus is invited to the royal court and meets Parthenope Burin fails in love with Metiochus but in order to keep the oath she has taken, she and chooses to go exile. In this mosaic, we see the two figures sfttngsitting upon an In compliance with the story, the face of Metiochus is directed towards Part e whom he fell in love and the eyes of Parthenope stares at an indeterminate area due to the love she feels yet sees impossible. The mosaic is surrounded by triangular, double mesh ttke, and pyramidal borders. The piece was discovered during the rescue excavation conducted. in 1993. When exposed, it was understood that the main figures used to be at the middle of the mosaic were stolen the tomb-robbers. <br />
<br />
The mosaic was brought to Gaziantep Museum with a question mark labeled on it saying "Who knows where? In which country?" and began to be displayed temporarily after restoration. From the photographs sent by the Canadian Archaeologist Sheila Campbell, it was found out that the stolen parts were in the Merin collection in Houston USA and with the initiatives of the Ministry of Culture, the missing parts were brought In 2000 and the mosaic was put on display following the restoration. Those two eternal lovers, who were torn apart by traffickers of historical artefacts and kidnapped separately, have been unified after years.
  • Roman mosaics - Metiochus and Parthenope Mosaic.  2nd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Metiochus and Parthenope, famous with their legendary love for eat: torn apart and then unified after years, they seem to represent the According to the myth, Parthenope is the sister of Polycrat e Ki taken an oath of virginity upon the Heraion which symbolizes the Metiochus is invited to the royal court and meets Parthenope Burin fails in love with Metiochus but in order to keep the oath she has taken, she and chooses to go exile. In this mosaic, we see the two figures sfttngsitting upon an In compliance with the story, the face of Metiochus is directed towards Part e whom he fell in love and the eyes of Parthenope stares at an indeterminate area due to the love she feels yet sees impossible. The mosaic is surrounded by triangular, double mesh ttke, and pyramidal borders. The piece was discovered during the rescue excavation conducted. in 1993. When exposed, it was understood that the main figures used to be at the middle of the mosaic were stolen the tomb-robbers. <br />
<br />
The mosaic was brought to Gaziantep Museum with a question mark labeled on it saying "Who knows where? In which country?" and began to be displayed temporarily after restoration. From the photographs sent by the Canadian Archaeologist Sheila Campbell, it was found out that the stolen parts were in the Merin collection in Houston USA and with the initiatives of the Ministry of Culture, the missing parts were brought In 2000 and the mosaic was put on display following the restoration. Those two eternal lovers, who were torn apart by traffickers of historical artefacts and kidnapped separately, have been unified after years.
  • Roman mosaics - Metiochus and Parthenope Mosaic.  2nd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Metiochus and Parthenope, famous with their legendary love for eat: torn apart and then unified after years, they seem to represent the According to the myth, Parthenope is the sister of Polycrat e Ki taken an oath of virginity upon the Heraion which symbolizes the Metiochus is invited to the royal court and meets Parthenope Burin fails in love with Metiochus but in order to keep the oath she has taken, she and chooses to go exile. In this mosaic, we see the two figures sfttngsitting upon an In compliance with the story, the face of Metiochus is directed towards Part e whom he fell in love and the eyes of Parthenope stares at an indeterminate area due to the love she feels yet sees impossible. The mosaic is surrounded by triangular, double mesh ttke, and pyramidal borders. The piece was discovered during the rescue excavation conducted. in 1993. When exposed, it was understood that the main figures used to be at the middle of the mosaic were stolen the tomb-robbers. <br />
<br />
The mosaic was brought to Gaziantep Museum with a question mark labeled on it saying "Who knows where? In which country?" and began to be displayed temporarily after restoration. From the photographs sent by the Canadian Archaeologist Sheila Campbell, it was found out that the stolen parts were in the Merin collection in Houston USA and with the initiatives of the Ministry of Culture, the missing parts were brought In 2000 and the mosaic was put on display following the restoration. Those two eternal lovers, who were torn apart by traffickers of historical artefacts and kidnapped separately, have been unified after years.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Herakles or Hercules, Nessos and Deianira Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The centaur Nessos agreed to carry Herakles’ (Hercules) wife Deianira across the river Euenos in Aitolia but tried to rape her in mid-stream. I the struggle that followed we see Herakles about to deliver a crushing blow with his club. Nessos has been beaten to her knees but is still fighting. Behind the centaur is the partly disrobed figure of Deianira
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Herakles or Hercules, Nessos and Deianira Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The centaur Nessos agreed to carry Herakles’ (Hercules) wife Deianira across the river Euenos in Aitolia but tried to rape her in mid-stream. I the struggle that followed we see Herakles about to deliver a crushing blow with his club. Nessos has been beaten to her knees but is still fighting. Behind the centaur is the partly disrobed figure of Deianira
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Herakles or Hercules, Nessos and Deianira Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The centaur Nessos agreed to carry Herakles’ (Hercules) wife Deianira across the river Euenos in Aitolia but tried to rape her in mid-stream. I the struggle that followed we see Herakles about to deliver a crushing blow with his club. Nessos has been beaten to her knees but is still fighting. Behind the centaur is the partly disrobed figure of Deianira
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Herakles or Hercules, Nessos and Deianira Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The centaur Nessos agreed to carry Herakles’ (Hercules) wife Deianira across the river Euenos in Aitolia but tried to rape her in mid-stream. I the struggle that followed we see Herakles about to deliver a crushing blow with his club. Nessos has been beaten to her knees but is still fighting. Behind the centaur is the partly disrobed figure of Deianira
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Herakles or Hercules, Nessos and Deianira Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The centaur Nessos agreed to carry Herakles’ (Hercules) wife Deianira across the river Euenos in Aitolia but tried to rape her in mid-stream. I the struggle that followed we see Herakles about to deliver a crushing blow with his club. Nessos has been beaten to her knees but is still fighting. Behind the centaur is the partly disrobed figure of Deianira
  • Painted Domestic Pine in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia. <br />
<br />
Domestic pine: present in the mystery rites of Cybele, Attis and Dionysus. Laurel: sacred to Apollo, symbol of triumph, it recalls the famous prodigy associated with Livia Drusilla.
  • Painted Domestic Pine in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia. <br />
<br />
Domestic pine: present in the mystery rites of Cybele, Attis and Dionysus. Laurel: sacred to Apollo, symbol of triumph, it recalls the famous prodigy associated with Livia Drusilla.
  • Painted Domestic Pine in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia. <br />
<br />
Domestic pine: present in the mystery rites of Cybele, Attis and Dionysus. Laurel: sacred to Apollo, symbol of triumph, it recalls the famous prodigy associated with Livia Drusilla.
  • Painted Domestic Pine in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia. <br />
<br />
Domestic pine: present in the mystery rites of Cybele, Attis and Dionysus. Laurel: sacred to Apollo, symbol of triumph, it recalls the famous prodigy associated with Livia Drusilla.
  • Painted Fruit Tress in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.
  • Painted Fruit Tress in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.
  • Painted Domestic Pine in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia. <br />
<br />
Domestic pine: present in the mystery rites of Cybele, Attis and Dionysus. Laurel: sacred to Apollo, symbol of triumph, it recalls the famous prodigy associated with Livia Drusilla.
  • Painted Domestic Pine in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia. <br />
<br />
Domestic pine: present in the mystery rites of Cybele, Attis and Dionysus. Laurel: sacred to Apollo, symbol of triumph, it recalls the famous prodigy associated with Livia Drusilla.
  • Painted Fruit Tress in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.
  • Painted Fruit Tress in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.
  • Painted Fruit Tress in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.
  • Painted Fruit Tress in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.
  • Painted Fruit Tress in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.
  • Painted Fruit Tress in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.
  • Painted Fruit Tress in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.
  • Painted Fruit Tress in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.
  • Painted Fruit Tress in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.
  • Painted Fruit Tress in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.
  • Painted Roma fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.
  • Painted Fruit Tress in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.
  • Painted Fruit Tress in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.
  • Painted Bird from the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia, Rome (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.
  • The Church of San Vigilio in Pinzolo and its fresco paintings “Dance of Death” painted by Simone Baschenis of Averaria in1539, Pinzolo, Trentino, Italy.<br />
<br />
The Mural depicts the living who have been pierced with arrows from skeletons waiting to see if they will go to heaven or to Purgatory of Hell
  • The Church of San Vigilio in Pinzolo and its fresco paintings “Dance of Death” painted by Simone Baschenis of Averaria in1539, Pinzolo, Trentino, Italy<br />
<br />
The Mural depicts the living who have been pierced with arrows from skeletons waiting to see if they will go to heaven or to Purgatory of Hell
  • 5th century Roman mosaic panel of the ceremonial dressing of a lady. The lady was of the landed gentry from inland Carthage. She is sitting on a high backed armchair and is surrounded by two ornatrix, maids, whoa re helping her to apply make up and style her hair. Items related to bathing and grooming are depicted on the background of the mosaic. The maid hold a mirror for the lady in which we see her reflection The scene is an allegory of the myth of ‘Venus at her toilet’.<br />
<br />
From the floor of the changing room of the private baths of the Sidi Ghraib villa, Borj El Amre region, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 5th century Roman mosaic panel of the ceremonial dressing of a lady. The lady was of the landed gentry from inland Carthage. She is sitting on a high backed armchair and is surrounded by two ornatrix, maids, whoa re helping her to apply make up and style her hair. Items related to bathing and grooming are depicted on the background of the mosaic. The maid hold a mirror for the lady in which we see her reflection The scene is an allegory of the myth of ‘Venus at her toilet’.<br />
<br />
From the floor of the changing room of the private baths of the Sidi Ghraib villa, Borj El Amre region, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 5th century Roman mosaic panel of the ceremonial dressing of a lady. The lady was of the landed gentry from inland Carthage. She is sitting on a high backed armchair and is surrounded by two ornatrix, maids, whoa re helping her to apply make up and style her hair. Items related to bathing and grooming are depicted on the background of the mosaic. The maid hold a mirror for the lady in which we see her reflection The scene is an allegory of the myth of ‘Venus at her toilet’.<br />
<br />
From the floor of the changing room of the private baths of the Sidi Ghraib villa, Borj El Amre region, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 5th century Roman mosaic panel of the ceremonial dressing of a lady. The lady was of the landed gentry from inland Carthage. She is sitting on a high backed armchair and is surrounded by two ornatrix, maids, whoa re helping her to apply make up and style her hair. Items related to bathing and grooming are depicted on the background of the mosaic. The maid hold a mirror for the lady in which we see her reflection The scene is an allegory of the myth of ‘Venus at her toilet’.<br />
<br />
From the floor of the changing room of the private baths of the Sidi Ghraib villa, Borj El Amre region, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • 5th century Roman mosaic panel of the ceremonial dressing of a lady. The lady was of the landed gentry from inland Carthage. She is sitting on a high backed armchair and is surrounded by two ornatrix, maids, whoa re helping her to apply make up and style her hair. Items related to bathing and grooming are depicted on the background of the mosaic. The maid hold a mirror for the lady in which we see her reflection The scene is an allegory of the myth of ‘Venus at her toilet’.<br />
<br />
From the floor of the changing room of the private baths of the Sidi Ghraib villa, Borj El Amre region, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Black background
  • 5th century Roman mosaic panel of the ceremonial dressing of a lady. The lady was of the landed gentry from inland Carthage. She is sitting on a high backed armchair and is surrounded by two ornatrix, maids, whoa re helping her to apply make up and style her hair. Items related to bathing and grooming are depicted on the background of the mosaic. The maid hold a mirror for the lady in which we see her reflection The scene is an allegory of the myth of ‘Venus at her toilet’.<br />
<br />
From the floor of the changing room of the private baths of the Sidi Ghraib villa, Borj El Amre region, Tunisia. The Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. White background
  • The Etruscan bench with the inscription "you who have travelled the world wishing to see great stupendous marvels, come here, where there are horrendous faces, elephants, lions, bears, orcs and dragons", commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • The Etruscan bench with the inscription "you who have travelled the world wishing to see great stupendous marvels, come here, where there are horrendous faces, elephants, lions, bears, orcs and dragons", commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • West Facade, Left Portal archivolts c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France. Gothic sculpture of the archivolts on which are the Signs of the Zodiac, this one is Scorpio the crab . See Fassler, pp 507-10.. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • West Facade, Left Portal archivolts c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France. Gothic statues of the archivolts on which are the Signs of the Zodiac and the Labors of the Months. See Fassler, pp 507-10.. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • West Facade, Left Portal archivolts c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France. Gothic statues of the archivolts on which are the Signs of the Zodiac and the Labors of the Months. See Fassler, pp 507-10.. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • West Facade, right Royal Portal - General View of Tympanum c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . Tympanum - Virgin and Child enthroned, flanked by angels..Upper Lintel - the Presentation at the Temple.Lower Lintel - Nativity Scenes (The Annunciation to the Virgin, the Visitation, the Nativity, Annunciation to the Shepherds).Inner archivolt - angels..Outer archivolts - Liberal Arts and their associated scribes. (See discussion in Katzenellenbogen, pp. 15-21 and in Kidson, pp. 20-1). On the bottom left are the Zodiac signs of Pisces and Gemini . A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • West Facade, right Royal Portal - General View of Tympanum c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . Tympanum - Virgin and Child enthroned, flanked by angels..Upper Lintel - the Presentation at the Temple.Lower Lintel - Nativity Scenes (The Annunciation to the Virgin, the Visitation, the Nativity, Annunciation to the Shepherds).Inner archivolt - angels..Outer archivolts - Liberal Arts and their associated scribes. (See discussion in Katzenellenbogen, pp. 15-21 and in Kidson, pp. 20-1). On the bottom left are the Zodiac signs of Pisces and Gemini . A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • West Facade, right Royal Portal - General View of Tympanum c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . Tympanum - Virgin and Child enthroned, flanked by angels..Upper Lintel - the Presentation at the Temple.Lower Lintel - Nativity Scenes (The Annunciation to the Virgin, the Visitation, the Nativity, Annunciation to the Shepherds).Inner archivolt - angels..Outer archivolts - Liberal Arts and their associated scribes. (See discussion in Katzenellenbogen, pp. 15-21 and in Kidson, pp. 20-1). On the bottom left are the Zodiac signs of Pisces and Gemini . A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • West Facade, right Royal Portal - General View of Tympanum c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . Tympanum - Virgin and Child enthroned, flanked by angels..Upper Lintel - the Presentation at the Temple.Lower Lintel - Nativity Scenes (The Annunciation to the Virgin, the Visitation, the Nativity, Annunciation to the Shepherds).Inner archivolt - angels..Outer archivolts - Liberal Arts and their associated scribes. (See discussion in Katzenellenbogen, pp. 15-21 and in Kidson, pp. 20-1). On the bottom left are the Zodiac signs of Pisces and Gemini . A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the Good Samaritan .  Bottom central panel shows A bandit prepares to attack the pilgrim , below left -The pilgrim leaving Jerusalem, right -  The pilgrim is beaten, robbed and stripped , above - A Priest and a Levite see the injured man but walk on past. Central oval panel - The Samaritan leading the Pilgrim to an inn, left of this - A Samaritan binds the injured man's wounds, right of centre - An innkeeper welcoming the Samaritan. Top central panel shows Adam dwelling in Paradise, below - At the inn, the Samaritan nurses the injured man back to health, left - God breathing life into Adam, above - God warning Adam and Eve not to eat from the tree of knowledge, right - God creates Eve out of Adam's rib . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the Good Samaritan .  Bottom central panel shows A bandit prepares to attack the pilgrim , below left -The pilgrim leaving Jerusalem, right -  The pilgrim is beaten, robbed and stripped , above - A Priest and a Levite see the injured man but walk on past. Central oval panel - The Samaritan leading the Pilgrim to an inn, left of this - A Samaritan binds the injured man's wounds, right of centre - An innkeeper welcoming the Samaritan. Top central panel shows Adam dwelling in Paradise, below - At the inn, the Samaritan nurses the injured man back to health, left - God breathing life into Adam, above - God warning Adam and Eve not to eat from the tree of knowledge, right - God creates Eve out of Adam's rib . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the Good Samaritan .  Bottom central panel shows A bandit prepares to attack the pilgrim , below left -The pilgrim leaving Jerusalem, right -  The pilgrim is beaten, robbed and stripped , above - A Priest and a Levite see the injured man but walk on past. Central oval panel - The Samaritan leading the Pilgrim to an inn, left of this - A Samaritan binds the injured man's wounds, right of centre - An innkeeper welcoming the Samaritan. Top central panel shows Adam dwelling in Paradise, below - At the inn, the Samaritan nurses the injured man back to health, left - God breathing life into Adam, above - God warning Adam and Eve not to eat from the tree of knowledge, right - God creates Eve out of Adam's rib . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the Good Samaritan .  Bottom central panel shows A bandit prepares to attack the pilgrim , below left -The pilgrim leaving Jerusalem, right -  The pilgrim is beaten, robbed and stripped , above - A Priest and a Levite see the injured man but walk on past. Central oval panel - The Samaritan leading the Pilgrim to an inn, left of this - A Samaritan binds the injured man's wounds, right of centre - An innkeeper welcoming the Samaritan. Top central panel shows Adam dwelling in Paradise, below - At the inn, the Samaritan nurses the injured man back to health, left - God breathing life into Adam, above - God warning Adam and Eve not to eat from the tree of knowledge, right - God creates Eve out of Adam's rib . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the lGood Samaritan . Central panel shows A bandit prepares to attack the pilgrim , below  - Christ telling the parable to a couple of Pharisees, left -The pilgrim leaving Jerusalem, right -  The pilgrim is beaten, robbed and stripped , above - A Priest and a Levite see the injured man but walk on past. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the lGood Samaritan . Central panel shows A bandit prepares to attack the pilgrim , below  - Christ telling the parable to a couple of Pharisees, left -The pilgrim leaving Jerusalem, right -  The pilgrim is beaten, robbed and stripped , above - A Priest and a Levite see the injured man but walk on past. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the lGood Samaritan . Central panel shows A bandit prepares to attack the pilgrim , below  - Christ telling the parable to a couple of Pharisees, left -The pilgrim leaving Jerusalem, right -  The pilgrim is beaten, robbed and stripped , above - A Priest and a Levite see the injured man but walk on past. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the lGood Samaritan . Central panel shows A bandit prepares to attack the pilgrim , below  - Christ telling the parable to a couple of Pharisees, left -The pilgrim leaving Jerusalem, right -  The pilgrim is beaten, robbed and stripped , above - A Priest and a Levite see the injured man but walk on past. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the lGood Samaritan . Central panel shows A bandit prepares to attack the pilgrim , below  - Christ telling the parable to a couple of Pharisees, left -The pilgrim leaving Jerusalem, right -  The pilgrim is beaten, robbed and stripped , above - A Priest and a Levite see the injured man but walk on past. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Defensive tower of the  fortified Saxon churchof Biertan , the see of the Lutheran Evangelical Bishop in Transylvania between 1572 and 1867. Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Defensive tower of the  fortified Saxon churchof Biertan , the see of the Lutheran Evangelical Bishop in Transylvania between 1572 and 1867. Unesco World Heritage Site
  • The fortified Saxon churchof Biertan , the see of the Lutheran Evangelical Bishop in Transylvania between 1572 and 1867. Unesco World Heritage Site
  • The fortified Saxon churchof Biertan , the see of the Lutheran Evangelical Bishop in Transylvania between 1572 and 1867. Unesco World Heritage Site
  • The fortified Saxon churchof Biertan , the see of the Lutheran Evangelical Bishop in Transylvania between 1572 and 1867. Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Gothic church in the main square, Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Gothic church in the main square, Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Buildings on the main street Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Buildings on the main street Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Buildings on the main street Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Gothic church in the main square, Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Buildings on the main street Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Buildings on the main street Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Buildings on the main street Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Buildings on the main street Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Buildings on the main street Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Buildings on the main street Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Buildings on the main street Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Buildings on the main street Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Buildings on the main street Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Buildings on the main square, Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Buildings on the main square, Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria

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