• Early Christian Byzantine Basin with Crosses in the Byzantine shop area next to the gymnasium of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Forecourt of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis, over 50 m long and large enough for 1000 worshipers, with 4th cent. AD mosaic floors & walls.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Early Christian Byzantine Basin with Crosses in the Byzantine shop area next to the gymnasium of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Main hall of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis, over 50 m long and large enough for 1000 worshipers, with 4th cent. AD mosaic floors & walls. The Greco Roman Bath Gymnasium stands behind.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric wall mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Corinthian columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • The Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Corinthian columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.  A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Ionic  columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • The Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Architectural detail of The Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Ionic capital of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Forecourt of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis, over 50 m long and large enough for 1000 worshipers, with 4th cent. AD mosaic floors & walls.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Main hall of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis, over 50 m long and large enough for 1000 worshipers, with 4th cent. AD mosaic floors & walls. The Greco Roman Bath Gymnasium stands behind.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Excavations of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Main hall of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis, over 50 m long and large enough for 1000 worshipers, with 4th cent. AD mosaic floors & walls. The Greco Roman Bath Gymnasium stands behind.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Portico & Ionic columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.  A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Early Christian Byzantine Basin with Crosses in the Byzantine shop area next to the gymnasium of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD eagle decorated column base of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Main hall of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis, over 50 m long and large enough for 1000 worshipers, with 4th cent. AD mosaic floors & walls. The Greco Roman Bath Gymnasium stands behind.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric wall mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Corinthian columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • The Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Portico & Ionic columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th Century Byzantine Christian chapel next to the 3rd cent. B.C Temple of Artimis. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.  A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Portico & Ionic columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Forecourt of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis, over 50 m long and large enough for 1000 worshipers, with 4th cent. AD mosaic floors & walls.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric wall mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Portico & Ionic columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th Century Byzantine Christian chapel next to the 3rd cent. B.C Temple of Artimis. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.
  • The crane brought to Sardis in 1911 by the Howard Crosby Expedition used to lift fallen architectural blocks of the Temple of Artimis. Made by Dorman & Long Middlesborough, England. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.
  • Architectural detail of The Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Excavations of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Architectural detail of The Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th Century Byzantine Christian chapel next to the 3rd cent. B.C Temple of Artimis. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.
  • Ionic capital of the Temple of Artimis with the crane brought to Sardis in 1911 by the Howard Crosby Expedition used to lift fallen architectural blocks of the Temple of Artimis. Made by Dorman & Long Middlesborough, England. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.
  • Ionic capital of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Excavations of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Ionic pillar base of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.  A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Ionic capital of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Ionic capital of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Excavations of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Early Christian Byzantine Basin with Crosses in the Byzantine shop area next to the gymnasium of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Early Christian Byzantine Basin with Crosses in the Byzantine shop area next to the gymnasium of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Early Christian Byzantine Basin with Crosses in the Byzantine shop area next to the gymnasium of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD eagle decorated column base of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Forecourt of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis, over 50 m long and large enough for 1000 worshipers, with 4th cent. AD mosaic floors & walls.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th cent. AD geometric floor mosaics of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Main hall of the late Roman period Jewish synagogue of Sardis, over 50 m long and large enough for 1000 worshipers, with 4th cent. AD mosaic floors & walls. The Greco Roman Bath Gymnasium stands behind.  Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. Discovered in 1962 as part of an on going  Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Portico & Ionic columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Ionic  columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Architectural detail of The Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.  A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Corinthian columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Corinthian columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Portico & Ionic columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • The Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • The Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • The Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • 4th Century Byzantine Christian chapel next to the 3rd cent. B.C Temple of Artimis. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.  A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • The crane brought to Sardis in 1911 by the Howard Crosby Expedition used to lift fallen architectural blocks of the Temple of Artimis. Made by Dorman & Long Middlesborough, England. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Ionic capital of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.
  • Ionic pillar base of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.

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