• 18th Century Ottoman architecture of the Ishak Pasha Palace (Turkish: İshak Paşa Sarayı) ,  Ağrı province of eastern Turkey.
  • 18th Century Ottoman architecture of the Ishak Pasha Palace (Turkish: İshak Paşa Sarayı) ,  Ağrı province of eastern Turkey.
  • Aerial view of the Romanesque Duomo of Pisa
  • View of the Romanesque Leaning Tower of Pisa, the Bell tower, Piazza del Miracoli , Pisa, Italy
  • View of the Romanesque Leaning Tower of Pisa, the Bell tower, Piazza del Miracoli , Pisa, Italy
  • Venice gondola trip on the venetian grand canal at sunset
  • View of the Romanesque Leaning Tower of Pisa, the Bell tower, Piazza del Miracoli , Pisa, Italy
  • View of top of the astrological clock tower of Torre dell' Orologio, Saint Marks Square, San Marco, Venice,
  • Sunset view of gondolas at St Mark's Square with the island of San Giorgio Maggiore behind , with its church front designed by Andrea Palladio and begun in 1566.  Venice Italy
  • The 14th Century Gothic style eastern facade of The Doge's Palace on St Marks Square, Palazzo Ducale, Venice Italy
  • The Doges Palace  and Campinale of St Mark from the Saint Mark's Basin Venice
  • Arial view form St Mark's Campinale of St Mark's Square and the Doges with the island of San Giorgio Maggiore behind , with its church front designed by Andrea Palladio and begun in 1566.  Venice Italy
  • Arial view form St Mark's Campinale of St Mark's Square and the Doges with the island of San Giorgio Maggiore behind , with its church front designed by Andrea Palladio and begun in 1566.  Venice Italy
  • Venice gondola trip on the venetian grand canal at sunset
  • Venice gondola trip on the venetian grand canal at sunset
  • Venice gondola trip on the venetian grand canal at sunset
  • Venice gondola trip on the venetian grand canal at sunset
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • The Grand Canal from Ponte dell'Accademia at sunset; in the foreground Palazzo Cavalli-Franchetti
  • Venice gondola trip on the venetian grand canal at sunset
  • View of the Romanesque Leaning Tower of Pisa, the Bell tower, Piazza del Miracoli , Pisa, Italy
  • View of the Romanesque Leaning Tower of Pisa, the Bell tower, Piazza del Miracoli , Pisa, Italy
  • View of the Romanesque Leaning Tower of Pisa, the Bell tower, Piazza del Miracoli , Pisa, Italy
  • View of the Romanesque Leaning Tower of Pisa, the Bell tower, Piazza del Miracoli , Pisa, Italy
  • View of the Romanesque Leaning Tower of Pisa, the Bell tower, Piazza del Miracoli , Pisa, Italy
  • Aerial view of the Romanesque Duomo of Pisa
  • Aerial view of the Romanesque Duomo of Pisa
  • Exterior view of the Bapristry and Duomo cathedral of Pisa, Italy
  • Exterior view of the Bapristry and Duomo cathedral of Pisa, Italy
  • View of the Romanesque Leaning Tower of Pisa, the Bell tower, Piazza del Miracoli , Pisa, Italy
  • View of the Romanesque Leaning Tower of Pisa, the Bell tower, Piazza del Miracoli , Pisa, Italy
  • View of the Romanesque Leaning Tower of Pisa, the Bell tower, Piazza del Miracoli , Pisa, Italy
  • View of the Romanesque Leaning Tower of Pisa, the Bell tower, Piazza del Miracoli , Pisa, Italy
  • View of the Romanesque Leaning Tower of Pisa, the Bell tower, Piazza del Miracoli , Pisa, Italy
  • View of the Romanesque Leaning Tower of Pisa, the Bell tower, Piazza del Miracoli , Pisa, Italy
  • View of the Romanesque Leaning Tower of Pisa, the Bell tower, Piazza del Miracoli , Pisa, Italy
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • Minoan 'Sacred Knot" fresco wall art depicting the religious apotropaic symbol, Nirou Chani 1600-1450 BC . Heraklion Archaeological Museum.,grey background
  • Hadrians Wall near Houseteads Roman Fort, Vercovicium, A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Northumberland, England, UK
  • Hadrians Wall near Houseteads Roman Fort, Vercovicium, A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Northumberland, England, UK
  • Sahara sand dunes of erg Chebbi, Morocco, Africa
  • The remains of the grain stores showing underground heating piers,  Houseteads Roman Fort, Veronicum, Hadrians Wall, A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Northumberland, England, UK
  • Mosaic depicting Empress Theodora and attendants. Byzantine Roman mosaics of the Basilica of San Vitale in Ravenna, Italy. Mosaic decoration paid for by Emperor Justinian I in 547. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Mosaic depicting Empress Theodora and attendants. Byzantine Roman mosaics of the Basilica of San Vitale in Ravenna, Italy. Mosaic decoration paid for by Emperor Justinian I in 547. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Mosaic depicting Emperor Justinian I. Byzantine Roman mosaics of the Basilica of San Vitale in Ravenna, Italy. Mosaic decoration paid for by Emperor Justinian I in 547. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Mosaic depicting Emperor Justinian I. Byzantine Roman mosaics of the Basilica of San Vitale in Ravenna, Italy. Mosaic decoration paid for by Emperor Justinian I in 547. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Mosaic depicting Emperor Justinian I. Byzantine Roman mosaics of the Basilica of San Vitale in Ravenna, Italy. Mosaic decoration paid for by Emperor Justinian I in 547. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Mosaic depicting Emperor Justinian I. Byzantine Roman mosaics of the Basilica of San Vitale in Ravenna, Italy. Mosaic decoration paid for by Emperor Justinian I in 547. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Mosaic depicting Emperor Justinian I. Byzantine Roman mosaics of the Basilica of San Vitale in Ravenna, Italy. Mosaic decoration paid for by Emperor Justinian I in 547. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Chun or Chûn, Quoit is a megalithic burial dolmen from the Neolithic period, circa 2400 BC, near Morvah on the Chun Nature Reserve, Penwith peninsula, Cornwall, England
  • Chun or Chûn, Quoit is a megalithic burial dolmen from the Neolithic period, circa 2400 BC, near Morvah on the Chun Nature Reserve, Penwith peninsula, Cornwall, England
  • Chun or Chûn, Quoit is a megalithic burial dolmen from the Neolithic period, circa 2400 BC, near Morvah on the Chun Nature Reserve, Penwith peninsula, Cornwall, England
  • Chun or Chûn, Quoit is a megalithic burial dolmen from the Neolithic period, circa 2400 BC, near Morvah on the Chun Nature Reserve, Penwith peninsula, Cornwall, England
  • Chun or Chûn, Quoit is a megalithic burial dolmen from the Neolithic period, circa 2400 BC, near Morvah on the Chun Nature Reserve, Penwith peninsula, Cornwall, England
  • Chun or Chûn, Quoit is a megalithic burial dolmen from the Neolithic period, circa 2400 BC, near Morvah on the Chun Nature Reserve, Penwith peninsula, Cornwall, England
  • Chun or Chûn, Quoit is a megalithic burial dolmen from the Neolithic period, circa 2400 BC, near Morvah on the Chun Nature Reserve, Penwith peninsula, Cornwall, England
  • Chun or Chûn, Quoit is a megalithic burial dolmen from the Neolithic period, circa 2400 BC, near Morvah on the Chun Nature Reserve, Penwith peninsula, Cornwall, England
  • Chun or Chûn, Quoit is a megalithic burial dolmen from the Neolithic period, circa 2400 BC, near Morvah on the Chun Nature Reserve, Penwith peninsula, Cornwall, England
  • Pentre Ifan a Neolithic megalitic stone burial chamber dolmen built about 3500 BC in the parish of Nevern, Pembrokeshire, Wales.
  • Lanyon Quoit is a megalithic burial dolmen from the Neolithic period, circa 4000 to 3000 BC, near Morvah on the Penwith peninsula, Cornwall, England
  • Pentre Ifan a Neolithic megalitic stone burial chamber dolmen built about 3500 BC in the parish of Nevern, Pembrokeshire, Wales.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • Stonehenge Neolithic ancient standing stone circle monument, A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Wilshire, England
  • Stonehenge Neolithic ancient standing stone circle monument, A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Wilshire, England
  • The 12th century medieval Norman ruins of Goodrich Castle fortifications, Goodrich, Herefordshire, England
  • The 12th century medieval Norman ruins of Goodrich Castle fortifications, Goodrich, Herefordshire, England
  • The 12th century medieval Norman ruins of Goodrich Castle fortifications, Goodrich, Herefordshire, England
  • The 12th century medieval Norman ruins of Goodrich Castle fortifications, Goodrich, Herefordshire, England
  • The south tower and great hall of the  finest fortified medieval manor house in England built in the 1280s, Stokesay Castle, Shropshire, England
  • The 12th century medieval Norman ruins of Goodrich Castle fortifications, Goodrich, Herefordshire, England
  • The 12th century medieval Norman ruins of Goodrich Castle fortifications, Goodrich, Herefordshire, England
  • The half timbered north tower built in the 1280s, the  finest fortified medieval manor house in England, Stokesay Castle, Shropshire, England
  • The south tower and great hall of the  finest fortified medieval manor house in England built in the 1280s, Stokesay Castle, Shropshire, England
  • The half timbered gate house  of the  finest fortified medieval manor house in England built in the 1280s, Stokesay Castle, Shropshire, England
  • The half timbered north tower built in the 1280s, the  finest fortified medieval manor house in England, Stokesay Castle, Shropshire, England
  • The half timbered north tower built in the 1280s, the  finest fortified medieval manor house in England, Stokesay Castle, Shropshire, England
  • The Parthenon Temple ancient greek temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Erechtheum ancient Greek temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple ancient greek temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • A milecastle fort on Hadrians Wall near Houseteads Roman Fort, Vercovicium, A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Northumberland, England, UK
  • The Erechtheum ancient Greek temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Porch of the Caryatids.  The Erechtheum, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • Hadrians Wall near Houseteads Roman Fort, Vercovicium, A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Northumberland, England, UK
  • Hadrians Wall near Houseteads Roman Fort, Vercovicium, A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Northumberland, England, UK
  • Avebury Neolithic standing stone Circle the largest in England, Wiltshire, England, Europe
  • Avebury Neolithic standing stone Circle the largest in England, Wiltshire, England, Europe
  • Avebury Neolithic standing stone Circle the largest in England, Wiltshire, England, Europe
  • Avebury Neolithic standing stone Circle the largest in England, Wiltshire, England, Europe
  • Avebury Neolithic standing stone Circle the largest in England at sunset, Wiltshire, England, Europe
  • Avebury Neolithic standing stone Circle the largest in England at sunset, Wiltshire, England, Europe
  • Avebury Neolithic standing stone Circle the largest in England at sunset, Wiltshire, England, Europe
  • Avebury Neolithic standing stone Circle the largest in England at sunset, Wiltshire, England, Europe
  • Avebury Neolithic standing stone Circle the largest in England, Wiltshire, England, Europe
  • Avebury Neolithic standing stone Circle the largest in England at sunset, Wiltshire, England, Europe
  • The Anglo Saxon Romanesque Lindisfarne Abbey ruins at sunset,  Holy Island, Lindisfarne, Northumbria, England
  • Lindisfarne Castle at sunset- 16th Century castle, Holy Island, Lindisfarne, Northumberland, England
  • Lindisfarne Castle & Lobster Pots, fishing boat - 16th Century castle, Holy Island, Lindisfarne, Northumberland, England
  • Lindisfarne Castle &  fishing boat - 16th Century castle, Holy Island, Lindisfarne, Northumberland, England
  • Lindisfarne Castle & Lobster Pots, fishing boat - 16th Century castle, Holy Island, Lindisfarne, Northumberland, England
  • The Anglo Saxon Romanesque Lindisfarne Abbey ruins looking to Lidisfarne Castle,  Holy Island, Lindisfarne, Northumbria, England
  • The Anglo Saxon Romanesque Lindisfarne Abbey ruins,  Holy Island, Lindisfarne, Northumbria, England
  • The Anglo Saxon Romanesque Lindisfarne Abbey ruins looking to Lidisfarne Castle,  Holy Island, Lindisfarne, Northumbria, England
  • The Anglo Saxon Romanesque Lindisfarne Abbey ruins,  Holy Island, Lindisfarne, Northumbria, England
  • The Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Sultanahmet Camii) or Blue Mosque, Istanbul, Turkey at sunset. Built from 1609 to 1616 during the rule of Ahmed I.
  • The fairy chimney rock early Christian  church of Pasabag Valley,  monks valley, near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • The fairy chimney rock early Christian  church of Pasabag Valley,  monks valley, near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • The fairy chimney rock formations and rock pillars of “love Valley” near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Tlos acropolis and Lycian house and temple-type rock-cut tombs. Tlos is where the mythological hero Bellerophon winged flying horse Pegasus lived. Anatolia, Turkey
  • Tlos acropolis and Lycian house and temple-type rock-cut tombs. Tlos is where the mythological hero Bellerophon winged flying horse Pegasus lived. Anatolia, Turkey
  • Photo & Image  of Pamukkale Travetine Terrace, Turkey. Picture of the white Calcium carbonate rock formations. Buy as stock photos or as photo art prints. 5
  • 18th Century Ottoman architecture of the Ishak Pasha Palace (Turkish: İshak Paşa Sarayı) ,  Ağrı province of eastern Turkey.
  • Courtyard of the 18th Century Ottoman architecture of the Ishak Pasha Palace (Turkish: İshak Paşa Sarayı) ,  Ağrı province of eastern Turkey.
  • St Mawes Castel defensive Tudor coastal fortresses (1540) built  for King Henry VIII, Falmouth, Cornwall, England
  • St Mawes Castel defensive Tudor coastal fortresses (1540) built  for King Henry VIII, Falmouth, Cornwall, England
  • Pendennis Castle one of Henry VIII's Device Forts, built between 1539 - 1545 Falmouth, Cornwall, England
  • St Mawes Castel defensive Tudor coastal fortresses (1540) built  for King Henry VIII, Falmouth, Cornwall, England
  • The fairy chimney rock early Christian  church of Pasabag Valley,  monks valley, near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • The fairy chimney rock early Christian  church of Pasabag Valley,  monks valley, near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey
  • Ancient Egyptian head of a Thutmosid Thutmose king, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty (1550-1292 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. White background<br />
The Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt  is classified as the first dynasty of the New Kingdom of Egypt, the era in which ancient Egypt achieved the peak of its power. This dynasty is also known as the Thutmosid Dynasty for the four pharaohs named Thutmose. Founded by Ahmose I who was suceeded by Thutmose I, Thutmose II, Thutmose III
  • Ancient Egyptian head of a Thutmosid Thutmose king, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty (1550-1292 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Black background.<br />
<br />
The Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt  is classified as the first dynasty of the New Kingdom of Egypt, the era in which ancient Egypt achieved the peak of its power. This dynasty is also known as the Thutmosid Dynasty for the four pharaohs named Thutmose. Founded by Ahmose I who was suceeded by Thutmose I, Thutmose II, Thutmose III
  • Ancient Egyptian head of a Thutmosid Thutmose king, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty (1550-1292 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.<br />
<br />
The Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt  is classified as the first dynasty of the New Kingdom of Egypt, the era in which ancient Egypt achieved the peak of its power. This dynasty is also known as the Thutmosid Dynasty for the four pharaohs named Thutmose. Founded by Ahmose I who was suceeded by Thutmose I, Thutmose II, Thutmose III
  • Ancient Egyptian head of a Thutmosid Thutmose king, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty (1550-1292 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. <br />
<br />
The Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt  is classified as the first dynasty of the New Kingdom of Egypt, the era in which ancient Egypt achieved the peak of its power. This dynasty is also known as the Thutmosid Dynasty for the four pharaohs named Thutmose. Founded by Ahmose I who was suceeded by Thutmose I, Thutmose II, Thutmose III
  • Ancient Egyptian head of a Thutmosid Thutmose king, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty (1550-1292 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.<br />
<br />
The Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt  is classified as the first dynasty of the New Kingdom of Egypt, the era in which ancient Egypt achieved the peak of its power. This dynasty is also known as the Thutmosid Dynasty for the four pharaohs named Thutmose. Founded by Ahmose I who was suceeded by Thutmose I, Thutmose II, Thutmose III
  • Ancient Egyptian head of a Thutmosid Thutmose king, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty (1550-1292 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. White background<br />
The Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt  is classified as the first dynasty of the New Kingdom of Egypt, the era in which ancient Egypt achieved the peak of its power. This dynasty is also known as the Thutmosid Dynasty for the four pharaohs named Thutmose. Founded by Ahmose I who was suceeded by Thutmose I, Thutmose II, Thutmose III
  • Ancient Egyptian head of a Thutmosid Thutmose king, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty (1550-1292 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.<br />
<br />
The Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt  is classified as the first dynasty of the New Kingdom of Egypt, the era in which ancient Egypt achieved the peak of its power. This dynasty is also known as the Thutmosid Dynasty for the four pharaohs named Thutmose. Founded by Ahmose I who was suceeded by Thutmose I, Thutmose II, Thutmose III
  • Ancient Egyptian head of a Thutmosid Thutmose king, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty (1550-1292 BC), Thebes. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.<br />
<br />
The Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt  is classified as the first dynasty of the New Kingdom of Egypt, the era in which ancient Egypt achieved the peak of its power. This dynasty is also known as the Thutmosid Dynasty for the four pharaohs named Thutmose. Founded by Ahmose I who was suceeded by Thutmose I, Thutmose II, Thutmose III
  • Ancient Egyptian shabtis doll, New Kingdom,. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.
  • Ancient Egyptian shabtis doll, New Kingdom,. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.
  • Ancient Egyptian shabtis doll, New Kingdom,. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.
  • Ancient Egyptian shabtis doll, New Kingdom,. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.
  • Ancient Egyptian shabtis doll, New Kingdom,. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.
  • Ancient Egyptian fragments of a small wooded glass inlayed box depicting Egyptian Pharaohs , Ptolemaic Period, (322-30BC) BC, Tebtynis. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Cat 18155.  Grey background.
  • Ancient Egyptian fragments of a small wooded glass inlayed box depicting Egyptian Pharaohs , Ptolemaic Period, (322-30BC) BC, Tebtynis. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Cat 18155.
  • Ancient Egyptian fragments of a small wooded glass inlayed box depicting Egyptian Pharaohs , Ptolemaic Period, (322-30BC) BC, Tebtynis. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Cat 18155.  Grey background.
  • Ancient Egyptian Protodynatic burial vessel with skeleton, Circa 3000 BC. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Black background,<br />
<br />
With the begining of the sop called "Protodynastic" period coffins began to be used for burials. The wealthy had wood coffins which were expensive as trees are rare in Egypt. Pooer people were buried in baskets or clay coffins.
  • Ancient Egyptian Protodynatic burial vessel with skeleton, Circa 3000 BC. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.<br />
<br />
With the begining of the sop called "Protodynastic" period coffins began to be used for burials. The wealthy had wood coffins which were expensive as trees are rare in Egypt. Pooer people were buried in baskets or clay coffins.
  • Ancient Egyptian Protodynatic burial vessel with skeleton, Circa 3000 BC. Egyptian Museum, Turin.<br />
<br />
With the begining of the sop called "Protodynastic" period coffins began to be used for burials. The wealthy had wood coffins which were expensive as trees are rare in Egypt. Pooer people were buried in baskets or clay coffins.
  • Ancient Egyptian Predynastic burial pit with deceased skeleton lying on side, Circa 3100 BC. Egyptian Museum, Turin.
  • Ancient Egyptian Protodynatic burial vessel with skeleton, Circa 3000 BC. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.<br />
<br />
With the begining of the sop called "Protodynastic" period coffins began to be used for burials. The wealthy had wood coffins which were expensive as trees are rare in Egypt. Pooer people were buried in baskets or clay coffins.
  • Ancient Egyptian head rest for sleeping on, type 1 . Egyptian Museum, Turin. White background.<br />
<br />
Ancient egyptian headrests were used to raise the head whist sleeping. Padding was laid over the wooden headrest to make it more comfortable.
  • Ancient Egyptian head rest for sleeping on, type 1 . Egyptian Museum, Turin. <br />
<br />
Ancient egyptian headrests were used to raise the head whist sleeping. Padding was laid over the wooden headrest to make it more comfortable.
  • Ancient Egyptian head rest for sleeping on, type 1 . Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background<br />
<br />
Ancient egyptian headrests were used to raise the head whist sleeping. Padding was laid over the wooden headrest to make it more comfortable.
  • Ancient Egyptian bed delonging to Kha , tomb of Kha, Theban Tomb 8 , mid-18th dynasty (1550 to 1292 BC), Turin Egyptian Museum. <br />
<br />
According to excavator Shciaparelli " the beds were found in Kcha's tomb also. The larger one, his own, was found in the antechamber." Egyptians believed that in the Afterlife they would require the same comforts as they enjoyed in life so beds and many other worldly requirements were put into their tombs.
  • Ancient Egyptian bed delonging to Kha , tomb of Kha, Theban Tomb 8 , mid-18th dynasty (1550 to 1292 BC), Turin Egyptian Museum. <br />
<br />
According to excavator Shciaparelli " the beds were found in Kcha's tomb also. The larger one, his own, was found in the antechamber." Egyptians believed that in the Afterlife they would require the same comforts as they enjoyed in life so beds and many other worldly requirements were put into their tombs.
  • Ancient Egyptian bed delonging to Kha , tomb of Kha, Theban Tomb 8 , mid-18th dynasty (1550 to 1292 BC), Turin Egyptian Museum. <br />
<br />
According to excavator Shciaparelli " the beds were found in Kcha's tomb also. The larger one, his own, was found in the antechamber." Egyptians believed that in the Afterlife they would require the same comforts as they enjoyed in life so beds and many other worldly requirements were put into their tombs.
  • Ancient Egyptian bed delonging to Kha , tomb of Kha, Theban Tomb 8 , mid-18th dynasty (1550 to 1292 BC), Turin Egyptian Museum. <br />
<br />
According to excavator Shciaparelli " the beds were found in Kcha's tomb also. The larger one, his own, was found in the antechamber." Egyptians believed that in the Afterlife they would require the same comforts as they enjoyed in life so beds and many other worldly requirements were put into their tombs.
  • Ancient Egyptian fragment of blue pigment,  19-20th Dynasty (1292-1076 BC, Deir el-Medina. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Schiaparelli Cat 9929.  Black background,
  • Ancient Egyptian fragment of blue pigment,  19-20th Dynasty (1292-1076 BC, Deir el-Medina. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Schiaparelli Cat 9929.
  • Ancient Egyptian fragment of blue pigment,  19-20th Dynasty (1292-1076 BC, Deir el-Medina. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Schiaparelli Cat 9929. Grey background
  • Ancient Egyptian fragment of blue pigment,  19-20th Dynasty (1292-1076 BC, Deir el-Medina. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Schiaparelli Cat 9929. Grey background
  • Egyptian Roman mummy portrait or Fayum mummy portrait painted panel of a man, Roman Period, 1st to 3rd cent AD, Egypt. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Black background,<br />
<br />
Mummy portraits or Fayum mummy portraits (also Faiyum mummy portraits) are a type of naturalistic painted portrait on wooden boards attached to Upper class mummies from Roman Egypt. They belong to the tradition of panel painting, one of the most highly regarded forms of art in the Classical world. he portraits covered the faces of bodies that were mummified for burial. Extant examples indicate that they were mounted into the bands of cloth that were used to wrap the bodies.
  • Egyptian Roman mummy portrait or Fayum mummy portrait painted panel of a man, Roman Period, 1st to 3rd cent AD, Egypt. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background;<br />
<br />
Mummy portraits or Fayum mummy portraits (also Faiyum mummy portraits) are a type of naturalistic painted portrait on wooden boards attached to Upper class mummies from Roman Egypt. They belong to the tradition of panel painting, one of the most highly regarded forms of art in the Classical world. he portraits covered the faces of bodies that were mummified for burial. Extant examples indicate that they were mounted into the bands of cloth that were used to wrap the bodies.
  • Egyptian Roman mummy portrait or Fayum mummy portrait painted panel of a man, Roman Period, 1st to 3rd cent AD, Egypt. Egyptian Museum, Turin. <br />
<br />
Mummy portraits or Fayum mummy portraits (also Faiyum mummy portraits) are a type of naturalistic painted portrait on wooden boards attached to Upper class mummies from Roman Egypt. They belong to the tradition of panel painting, one of the most highly regarded forms of art in the Classical world. he portraits covered the faces of bodies that were mummified for burial. Extant examples indicate that they were mounted into the bands of cloth that were used to wrap the bodies.
  • Egyptian Roman mummy portrait or Fayum mummy portrait painted panel of a man, Roman Period, 1st to 3rd cent AD, Egypt. Egyptian Museum, Turin. White background.<br />
<br />
Mummy portraits or Fayum mummy portraits (also Faiyum mummy portraits) are a type of naturalistic painted portrait on wooden boards attached to Upper class mummies from Roman Egypt. They belong to the tradition of panel painting, one of the most highly regarded forms of art in the Classical world. he portraits covered the faces of bodies that were mummified for burial. Extant examples indicate that they were mounted into the bands of cloth that were used to wrap the bodies.
  • Egyptian Roman mummy portrait or Fayum mummy portrait painted panel of a man, Roman Period, 1st to 3rd cent AD, Egypt. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Black background,<br />
<br />
Mummy portraits or Fayum mummy portraits (also Faiyum mummy portraits) are a type of naturalistic painted portrait on wooden boards attached to Upper class mummies from Roman Egypt. They belong to the tradition of panel painting, one of the most highly regarded forms of art in the Classical world. he portraits covered the faces of bodies that were mummified for burial. Extant examples indicate that they were mounted into the bands of cloth that were used to wrap the bodies.
  • Egyptian Roman mummy portrait or Fayum mummy portrait painted panel of a man, Roman Period, 1st to 3rd cent AD, Egypt. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background;<br />
<br />
Mummy portraits or Fayum mummy portraits (also Faiyum mummy portraits) are a type of naturalistic painted portrait on wooden boards attached to Upper class mummies from Roman Egypt. They belong to the tradition of panel painting, one of the most highly regarded forms of art in the Classical world. he portraits covered the faces of bodies that were mummified for burial. Extant examples indicate that they were mounted into the bands of cloth that were used to wrap the bodies.
  • Egyptian Roman mummy portrait or Fayum mummy portrait painted panel of a man, Roman Period, 1st to 3rd cent AD, Egypt. Egyptian Museum, Turin. <br />
<br />
Mummy portraits or Fayum mummy portraits (also Faiyum mummy portraits) are a type of naturalistic painted portrait on wooden boards attached to Upper class mummies from Roman Egypt. They belong to the tradition of panel painting, one of the most highly regarded forms of art in the Classical world. he portraits covered the faces of bodies that were mummified for burial. Extant examples indicate that they were mounted into the bands of cloth that were used to wrap the bodies.
  • Egyptian Roman mummy portrait or Fayum mummy portrait painted panel of a man, Roman Period, 1st to 3rd cent AD, Egypt. Egyptian Museum, Turin. White background.<br />
<br />
Mummy portraits or Fayum mummy portraits (also Faiyum mummy portraits) are a type of naturalistic painted portrait on wooden boards attached to Upper class mummies from Roman Egypt. They belong to the tradition of panel painting, one of the most highly regarded forms of art in the Classical world. he portraits covered the faces of bodies that were mummified for burial. Extant examples indicate that they were mounted into the bands of cloth that were used to wrap the bodies.
  • Egyptian Roman mummy portrait or Fayum mummy portrait painted panel of a man, Roman Period, 1st to 3rd cent AD, Egypt. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background;<br />
<br />
Mummy portraits or Fayum mummy portraits (also Faiyum mummy portraits) are a type of naturalistic painted portrait on wooden boards attached to Upper class mummies from Roman Egypt. They belong to the tradition of panel painting, one of the most highly regarded forms of art in the Classical world. he portraits covered the faces of bodies that were mummified for burial. Extant examples indicate that they were mounted into the bands of cloth that were used to wrap the bodies.

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