• Theatre Tea Room (Teåtrum) - ( Gy?r )  Gyor Hungary
  • selection of natural hand made scented soap bars piled on an aluminium dish.
  • Bars of  coloured hand made scented soaps piled in a modern metal soap dish.
  • 4 bars of scented hand made soap piled on an aluminium soap dish with water droplets
  • Bars of  coloured hand made scented soaps piled in a a soap dish.
  • 4 bars of scented hand made soaps piled on an aluminium background with water droplets
  • Bars of  coloured hand made scented soaps piled in a a soap dish.
  • Bars of  coloured hand made scented soaps piled in a a soap dish.
  • Bars of  coloured hand made scented soaps piled in a a soap dish.
  • 3 bars of scented soap piled on a white face towel
  • modern designed white chocolate cake with a sponge case and strawberry filling, covered with pink white chocolate powder
  • A modern cakes with a pattered choclate cases, filled with chestnut puree and Kirch sponge
  • A modern fruit cake with redcurrants, wild strawberries, blacberry and creme patisserie in a light sponge case in a designer dish.
  • A modern designed cake with a sponge case and chocolate filling
  • modern designed white chocolate cake with a sponge case and strawberry filling, covered with pink white chocolate powder
  • modern designed chocolate cake with a sponge case and chocolate filling, covered with cocoa powder
  • Traditional chocolate Swiss roll or log.
  • A modern fruit cake with redcurrants, wild strawberries, blacberry and creme patisserie in a light sponge case in a designer dish.
  • A modern square chocolate cake filled with chocolate truffle and topped with fresh raspberries
  • A modern Japanese cake with a pattered chocolate case and piped chestnut puree with cumquat sauce, in a modern designer dish
  • A modern Japanese cake with a pattered choclate case and mint cream, in a modern designer dish
  • A modern Japanese cake with a pattered choclate case and mint cream, in a modern designer dish
  • A modern designed cake with a sponge case and chocolate filling in a Traditionl black Japanese tea setting
  • A modern Japanese cake with a pattered chocolate case and piped chestnut puree with cumquat sauce, in a modern designer dish
  • A modern square chocolate cake filled with chocolate truffle and topped with fresh raspberries
  • modern designed chocolate cake with a sponge case and chocolate filling, covered with cocoa powder
  • modern designed chocolate cakes with a sponge case and chocolate filling, covered with cocoa powder
  • A modern designed cake with a sponge case and chocolate filling
  • modern designed white chocolate cake with a sponge case and strawberry filling, covered with pink white chocolate powder
  • modern designed white chocolate cake with a sponge case and strawberry filling, covered with pink white chocolate powder
  • A modern Japanese cake with a pattered chocolate case and piped chestnut puree with cumquat sauce, in a modern designer dish
  • A modern square chocolate cake filled with chocolate truffle and topped with fresh raspberries
  • modern designed chocolate cakes with a sponge case and chocolate filling, covered with cocoa powder
  • A modern designed cake with a sponge case and chocolate filling
  • A modern Japanese cake with a pattered chocolate case and piped chestnut puree with cumquat sauce, in a modern designer dish
  • Traditional Sherry trifle  dessert.
  • modern designed white chocolate cake with a sponge case and strawberry filling, covered with pink white chocolate powder in a  Traditionl black Japanese tea setting
  • A modern fruit cake with redcurrants, wild strawberries, blacberry and creme patisserie in a light sponge case Traditionl black Japanese tea setting
  • A modern fruit cake with redcurrants, wild strawberries, blacberry and creme patisserie in a light sponge case in a designer dish.
  • A modern designed cake with a sponge case and chocolate filling
  • modern designed chocolate cake with a sponge case and chocolate filling, covered with cocoa powder
  • A modern Japanese cake with a pattered chocolate case and piped chestnut puree with cumquat sauce, in a modern designer dish
  • St Georges Castle with suckling pig roasting over open fire & Dragon above
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar of Ez Zahra and its adobe mud ghorfas or storage rooms, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar of Ez Zahra and its adobe mud ghorfas or storage rooms, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar of Ez Zahra and its adobe mud ghorfas or storage rooms, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar of Ez Zahra and its adobe mud ghorfas or storage rooms, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar of Ez Zahra and its adobe mud ghorfas or storage rooms, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar of Ez Zahra and its adobe mud ghorfas or storage rooms, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar of Ez Zahra and its adobe mud ghorfas or storage rooms, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar of Ez Zahra and its adobe mud ghorfas or storage rooms, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar of Ez Zahra and its adobe mud ghorfas or storage rooms, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar of Ez Zahra and its adobe mud ghorfas or storage rooms, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar of Ez Zahra and its adobe mud ghorfas or storage rooms, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar of Ez Zahra and its adobe mud ghorfas or storage rooms, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar of Ez Zahra and its adobe mud ghorfas or storage rooms, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar of Ez Zahra and its adobe mud ghorfas or storage rooms, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar of Ez Zahra and its adobe mud ghorfas or storage rooms, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar of Ez Zahra and its adobe mud ghorfas or storage rooms, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar of Ez Zahra and its adobe mud ghorfas or storage rooms, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar of Ez Zahra and its adobe mud ghorfas or storage rooms, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar of Ez Zahra and its adobe mud ghorfas or storage rooms, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar of Ez Zahra and its adobe mud ghorfas or storage rooms, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar of Ez Zahra and its adobe mud ghorfas or storage rooms, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar of Ez Zahra and its adobe mud ghorfas or storage rooms, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar of Ez Zahra and its adobe mud ghorfas or storage rooms, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar of Ez Zahra and its adobe mud ghorfas or storage rooms, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar of Ez Zahra and its adobe mud ghorfas or storage rooms, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar of Ez Zahra and its adobe mud ghorfas or storage rooms, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar of Ez Zahra and its adobe mud ghorfas or storage rooms, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar of Ez Zahra and its adobe mud ghorfas or storage rooms, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar of Ez Zahra and its adobe mud ghorfas or storage rooms, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar of Ez Zahra and its adobe mud ghorfas or storage rooms, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar of Ez Zahra and its adobe mud ghorfas or storage rooms, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar of Ez Zahra and its adobe mud ghorfas or storage rooms, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar El Mguebl and its adobe mud ghorfas graneries, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar El Mguebl and its adobe mud ghorfas graneries, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar El Mguebl and its adobe mud ghorfas graneries, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar El Mguebl and its adobe mud ghorfas graneries, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar El Mguebl and its adobe mud ghorfas graneries, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar El Mguebl and its adobe mud ghorfas graneries, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar El Mguebl and its adobe mud ghorfas graneries, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar El Mguebl and its adobe mud ghorfas graneries, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar El Mguebl and its adobe mud ghorfas graneries, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar El Mguebl and its adobe mud ghorfas graneries, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar El Mguebl and its adobe mud ghorfas graneries, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar El Mguebl and its adobe mud ghorfas graneries, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar El Mguebl and its adobe mud ghorfas graneries, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar El Mguebl and its adobe mud ghorfas graneries, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar El Mguebl and its adobe mud ghorfas graneries, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar El Mguebl and its adobe mud ghorfas graneries, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar El Mguebl and its adobe mud ghorfas graneries, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar El Mguebl and its adobe mud ghorfas graneries, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar El Mguebl and its adobe mud ghorfas graneries, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar El Mguebl and its adobe mud ghorfas graneries, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar El Mguebl and its adobe mud ghorfas graneries, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar El Mguebl and its adobe mud ghorfas graneries, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar El Mguebl and its adobe mud ghorfas graneries, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar El Mguebl and its adobe mud ghorfas graneries, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar El Mguebl and its adobe mud ghorfas graneries, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar El Mguebl and its adobe mud ghorfas graneries, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar El Mguebl and its adobe mud ghorfas graneries, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar El Mguebl and its adobe mud ghorfas graneries, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar El Mguebl and its adobe mud ghorfas graneries, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar El Mguebl and its adobe mud ghorfas graneries, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The traditional north Sahara fortified Berber Ksar El Mguebl and its adobe mud ghorfas graneries, near Tataouine, Tunisia
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • The northern Sahara ghorfa storage graneries of the traditional Berber mud brick fortified Ksar of Hedada or Hadada, near Tetouin, Tunisia, the setting of Mos Espa's Slave Quarters in Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of the Triclinium C, Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
In the center of the dining room was a table, with three couches (klinai in Greek, hence the name "triclinium") on which the diners reclined as they ate. The southern exposure of the room and its main color suggest it was meant to be used in the winter. The architect Vitruvius, writing in the 1st century after Christ, recommends a dark background that will absorb heat to make the rooms warmer in cold weather. The black color (atramentum), made from a mixture of charcoal and glue, was resistant to smoke from the fire and soot from the lamps. On the dark background delicate landscapes are painted in light colors: cityscapes with buildings, arches, and gateways, and rural scenes showing huts, animals, and rustic shrines. The lavish decoration is broken up by slender columns festooned with ivy. The capitals are crowned by graceful female figures (caryatids). A frieze at eye level has scenes in which the same figures keep reappearing: popular tales depicted in a lively fashion. The scenes of the frieze start with the rear of the right wall. Also on this wall, near the doorway. can be seen a restoration made in antiquity to close off another entrance. We can identify a part of the polychrome mosaic pavement of this room. with meanders and stacked cubes rendered in perspective. The modem arrangement does not reproduce the or final. but is intended to suggest the effect of the pavement in the room
  • Close up picture of the Roman mosaics of the Room with Star Shaped Decorations depicting an octagonal rosette geometric mosaic patterns, room no 22 at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Close up picture of the Roman mosaics of the Room with Star Shaped Decorations depicting an octagonal rosette geometric mosaic patterns, room no 22 at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Close up picture of the Roman mosaics of the Room with Star Shaped Decorations depicting a braid geometric mosaic patterns, room no 18 at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Close up picture of the Roman mosaics of the Interlying Utility Room depicting geometric mosaic patterns, room no 18 at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Close up picture of the Roman mosaics of the Interlying Utility Room depicting geometric mosaic patterns, room no 18 at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of  Room E10 0f La Domus, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano, 130-140AD ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
 The white-ground central panel had a figured decoration, already obliterated by repairs carried out in antiquity. In the squares to the sides of the upper area, swathes of white fabric bordered by green leaves and berries are depicted against a purplish red background. The side walls are decorated in a similar symmetrical way; in the squares there are various decorative elements, a stag in flight with a quiver nearby (perhaps an allusion to the myth of Actaeon who was transformed into a stag by Artemis, or, more simply, to hunting), a small head (gorgoneion) contained between volutes.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of  Room E10 0f La Domus, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano, 130-140AD ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
 The white-ground central panel had a figured decoration, already obliterated by repairs carried out in antiquity. In the squares to the sides of the upper area, swathes of white fabric bordered by green leaves and berries are depicted against a purplish red background. The side walls are decorated in a similar symmetrical way; in the squares there are various decorative elements, a stag in flight with a quiver nearby (perhaps an allusion to the myth of Actaeon who was transformed into a stag by Artemis, or, more simply, to hunting), a small head (gorgoneion) contained between volutes.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of  Room E10 0f La Domus, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano, 130-140AD ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
 The white-ground central panel had a figured decoration, already obliterated by repairs carried out in antiquity. In the squares to the sides of the upper area, swathes of white fabric bordered by green leaves and berries are depicted against a purplish red background. The side walls are decorated in a similar symmetrical way; in the squares there are various decorative elements, a stag in flight with a quiver nearby (perhaps an allusion to the myth of Actaeon who was transformed into a stag by Artemis, or, more simply, to hunting), a small head (gorgoneion) contained between volutes.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of  Room E10 0f La Domus, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano, 130-140AD ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against an art background.<br />
<br />
 The white-ground central panel had a figured decoration, already obliterated by repairs carried out in antiquity. In the squares to the sides of the upper area, swathes of white fabric bordered by green leaves and berries are depicted against a purplish red background. The side walls are decorated in a similar symmetrical way; in the squares there are various decorative elements, a stag in flight with a quiver nearby (perhaps an allusion to the myth of Actaeon who was transformed into a stag by Artemis, or, more simply, to hunting), a small head (gorgoneion) contained between volutes.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of  Room E10 0f La Domus, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano, 130-140AD ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
 The white-ground central panel had a figured decoration, already obliterated by repairs carried out in antiquity. In the squares to the sides of the upper area, swathes of white fabric bordered by green leaves and berries are depicted against a purplish red background. The side walls are decorated in a similar symmetrical way; in the squares there are various decorative elements, a stag in flight with a quiver nearby (perhaps an allusion to the myth of Actaeon who was transformed into a stag by Artemis, or, more simply, to hunting), a small head (gorgoneion) contained between volutes.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of  Room E10 0f La Domus, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano, 130-140AD ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
 The white-ground central panel had a figured decoration, already obliterated by repairs carried out in antiquity. In the squares to the sides of the upper area, swathes of white fabric bordered by green leaves and berries are depicted against a purplish red background. The side walls are decorated in a similar symmetrical way; in the squares there are various decorative elements, a stag in flight with a quiver nearby (perhaps an allusion to the myth of Actaeon who was transformed into a stag by Artemis, or, more simply, to hunting), a small head (gorgoneion) contained between volutes.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of  Room E10 0f La Domus, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano, 130-140AD ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
 The white-ground central panel had a figured decoration, already obliterated by repairs carried out in antiquity. In the squares to the sides of the upper area, swathes of white fabric bordered by green leaves and berries are depicted against a purplish red background. The side walls are decorated in a similar symmetrical way; in the squares there are various decorative elements, a stag in flight with a quiver nearby (perhaps an allusion to the myth of Actaeon who was transformed into a stag by Artemis, or, more simply, to hunting), a small head (gorgoneion) contained between volutes.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of  Room E10 0f La Domus, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano, 130-140AD ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
 The white-ground central panel had a figured decoration, already obliterated by repairs carried out in antiquity. In the squares to the sides of the upper area, swathes of white fabric bordered by green leaves and berries are depicted against a purplish red background. The side walls are decorated in a similar symmetrical way; in the squares there are various decorative elements, a stag in flight with a quiver nearby (perhaps an allusion to the myth of Actaeon who was transformed into a stag by Artemis, or, more simply, to hunting), a small head (gorgoneion) contained between volutes.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of  Room E10 0f La Domus, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano, 130-140AD ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against an art background.<br />
<br />
 The white-ground central panel had a figured decoration, already obliterated by repairs carried out in antiquity. In the squares to the sides of the upper area, swathes of white fabric bordered by green leaves and berries are depicted against a purplish red background. The side walls are decorated in a similar symmetrical way; in the squares there are various decorative elements, a stag in flight with a quiver nearby (perhaps an allusion to the myth of Actaeon who was transformed into a stag by Artemis, or, more simply, to hunting), a small head (gorgoneion) contained between volutes.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of  Room E10 0f La Domus, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano, 130-140AD ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
 The white-ground central panel had a figured decoration, already obliterated by repairs carried out in antiquity. In the squares to the sides of the upper area, swathes of white fabric bordered by green leaves and berries are depicted against a purplish red background. The side walls are decorated in a similar symmetrical way; in the squares there are various decorative elements, a stag in flight with a quiver nearby (perhaps an allusion to the myth of Actaeon who was transformed into a stag by Artemis, or, more simply, to hunting), a small head (gorgoneion) contained between volutes.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of  Room E9, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano, 130-140AD( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against a white background.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of  Room E9, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano, 130-140AD( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against a grey background.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of  Room E9, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano, 130-140AD( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against a black background.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of  Room E9, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano, 130-140AD( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against an art background.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of  Room E9, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano, 130-140AD( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.
  • Arthur Evans reconstruction of the the so-called Throne Room or Little Throne Room, Knossos Minoan archaeological site
  • Arthur Evans reconstruction of the the so-called Throne Room or Little Throne Room, Knossos Minoan archaeological site
  • Arthur Evans reconstruction of the the so-called Throne Room or Little Throne Room, Knossos Minoan archaeological site
  • Arthur Evans reconstruction of the the so-called Throne Room or Little Throne Room, Knossos Minoan archaeological site
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of  Vestibule of a Rome Villa, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
A large fresco covered the curving wall of the vestibule E 5 was positioned at the entrance of the house onto the street. Vitruvius claims that the vestibulum was a room which was not needed by common people, but which was essential in a house worthy of respect, because it served to welcome guests and the people who came to be received by the owners of the house. The frescoed decoration of this wall, which was entirely detached, shows a division into panels, architectural perspectives and pavilions among which are figures and decorative elements, above a band of skirting. Numerous panels have been detached from the corridor E 3 E 11 which connected all the areas of the house, but it has not been possible to reconstruct the sequence of the walls. Inside the frames, against a white background, different decorative elements are arranged, along with hanging female and male figures, hippogriffs and other fantastical animals, vases, garlands and vegetation.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of  Vestibule of a Rome Villa, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
A large fresco covered the curving wall of the vestibule E 5 was positioned at the entrance of the house onto the street. Vitruvius claims that the vestibulum was a room which was not needed by common people, but which was essential in a house worthy of respect, because it served to welcome guests and the people who came to be received by the owners of the house. The frescoed decoration of this wall, which was entirely detached, shows a division into panels, architectural perspectives and pavilions among which are figures and decorative elements, above a band of skirting. Numerous panels have been detached from the corridor E 3 E 11 which connected all the areas of the house, but it has not been possible to reconstruct the sequence of the walls. Inside the frames, against a white background, different decorative elements are arranged, along with hanging female and male figures, hippogriffs and other fantastical animals, vases, garlands and vegetation.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of  Vestibule of a Rome Villa, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
A large fresco covered the curving wall of the vestibule E 5 was positioned at the entrance of the house onto the street. Vitruvius claims that the vestibulum was a room which was not needed by common people, but which was essential in a house worthy of respect, because it served to welcome guests and the people who came to be received by the owners of the house. The frescoed decoration of this wall, which was entirely detached, shows a division into panels, architectural perspectives and pavilions among which are figures and decorative elements, above a band of skirting. Numerous panels have been detached from the corridor E 3 E 11 which connected all the areas of the house, but it has not been possible to reconstruct the sequence of the walls. Inside the frames, against a white background, different decorative elements are arranged, along with hanging female and male figures, hippogriffs and other fantastical animals, vases, garlands and vegetation.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of  Vestibule of a Rome Villa, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against an art background.<br />
<br />
A large fresco covered the curving wall of the vestibule E 5 was positioned at the entrance of the house onto the street. Vitruvius claims that the vestibulum was a room which was not needed by common people, but which was essential in a house worthy of respect, because it served to welcome guests and the people who came to be received by the owners of the house. The frescoed decoration of this wall, which was entirely detached, shows a division into panels, architectural perspectives and pavilions among which are figures and decorative elements, above a band of skirting. Numerous panels have been detached from the corridor E 3 E 11 which connected all the areas of the house, but it has not been possible to reconstruct the sequence of the walls. Inside the frames, against a white background, different decorative elements are arranged, along with hanging female and male figures, hippogriffs and other fantastical animals, vases, garlands and vegetation.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of  Vestibule of a Rome Villa, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
A large fresco covered the curving wall of the vestibule E 5 was positioned at the entrance of the house onto the street. Vitruvius claims that the vestibulum was a room which was not needed by common people, but which was essential in a house worthy of respect, because it served to welcome guests and the people who came to be received by the owners of the house. The frescoed decoration of this wall, which was entirely detached, shows a division into panels, architectural perspectives and pavilions among which are figures and decorative elements, above a band of skirting. Numerous panels have been detached from the corridor E 3 E 11 which connected all the areas of the house, but it has not been possible to reconstruct the sequence of the walls. Inside the frames, against a white background, different decorative elements are arranged, along with hanging female and male figures, hippogriffs and other fantastical animals, vases, garlands and vegetation.
  • Roman mosaic of a young women exercising with a ball from  the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Roman mosaic of young Roman women in Bikinis exercising from the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Roman mosaic detail of a young women exercising with weights from the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Roman mosaics a girl dancing with a drum from the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Close up detail picture of the Roman mosaics of the Room of Fishing Cupids depicting cupids a cupid swimming with a dolphin, room no 24  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Fishing cupids room was a dining room for guests of the Villa Romana del Casale. The mosaic floor represents a sea scene with four boats from which cupids are busy fishing. The mosaic depicts sea around the boats abounds with marine life. The mosaic show several Roman fishing techniques using nets, fishing lines, harpoon and fish traps.
  • Close up detail picture of the Roman mosaics of the Room of Fishing Cupids depicting cupids fishing from boats using a harpoon and a rod and line, room no 24  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Fishing cupids room was a dining room for guests of the Villa Romana del Casale. The mosaic floor represents a sea scene with four boats from which cupids are busy fishing. The mosaic depicts sea around the boats abounds with marine life. The mosaic show several Roman fishing techniques using nets, fishing lines, harpoon and fish traps.
  • Mosaic detail of a women with a red bikini playing with a ball, from the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30 at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Close up detail picture of the Roman mosaics of the Room of Fishing Cupids depicting cupids fishing from boats, room no 24  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Fishing cupids room was a dining room for guests of the Villa Romana del Casale. The mosaic floor represents a sea scene with four boats from which cupids are busy fishing. The mosaic depicts sea around the boats abounds with marine life. The mosaic show several Roman fishing techniques using nets, fishing lines, harpoon and fish traps.
  • Close up detail picture of the Roman mosaics of the Room of Fishing Cupids depicting cupids fishing from boats, room no 24  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Fishing cupids room was a dining room for guests of the Villa Romana del Casale. The mosaic floor represents a sea scene with four boats from which cupids are busy fishing. The mosaic depicts sea around the boats abounds with marine life. The mosaic show several Roman fishing techniques using nets, fishing lines, harpoon and fish traps.
  • Close up detail picture of the Roman mosaics of the Room of Fishing Cupids depicting cupids fishing from boats using a fishing trap and a rod and line, room no 24  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Fishing cupids room was a dining room for guests of the Villa Romana del Casale. The mosaic floor represents a sea scene with four boats from which cupids are busy fishing. The mosaic depicts sea around the boats abounds with marine life. The mosaic show several Roman fishing techniques using nets, fishing lines, harpoon and fish traps.
  • Close up detail picture of the Roman mosaics of the Room of Fishing Cupids depicting cupids fishing from boats using a fishing trap and a rod and line, room no 24  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Fishing cupids room was a dining room for guests of the Villa Romana del Casale. The mosaic floor represents a sea scene with four boats from which cupids are busy fishing. The mosaic depicts sea around the boats abounds with marine life. The mosaic show several Roman fishing techniques using nets, fishing lines, harpoon and fish traps.
  • Close up detail picture of the Roman mosaics of the Room of Fishing Cupids depicting cupids fishing from boats using a harpoon and a rod and line, room no 24  at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Fishing cupids room was a dining room for guests of the Villa Romana del Casale. The mosaic floor represents a sea scene with four boats from which cupids are busy fishing. The mosaic depicts sea around the boats abounds with marine life. The mosaic show several Roman fishing techniques using nets, fishing lines, harpoon and fish traps.
  • Mosaic detail of a women running with a blue bikini, from the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Coloured glazed brick panels depicting Lions stiding from the facade of the Throne Room dating from 604-562 BC. Babylon (present day Iraq). The throne room is situated in the third courtyard of the complex of the royal palace. Its 56 meters wide facade was decorated with coloured glazed bricks. A tentative reconstruction shows the composition of the upper part of the facade, including the stylised palms and geometric patterned registers. Two original sections are displayed on the left next to the Ishtar Gate. The lower part f the facade with representations of the striding lions was predominantly reconstructed from the original baked brick fragments. The frieze of lions was presumably arranged symmetrically so the animals faced towards the central main entrance to the Throne room. The throne room was excavated by Robert Koldewey between 1899 and 1917. It was used as an official reception room. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Wide picture of the Roman mosaics of Circus Maximus from the Palaestra depicting a chariot race at the Circus Maximus, room no 15 at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The room of the  Circus Maximus was used as an excersise room and the rooms to the baths of the Villa Romana del Casale run off this room.
  • Wide picture of the Roman mosaics of Circus Maximus from the Palaestra depicting a chariot race at the Circus Maximus, room no 15 at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The room of the  Circus Maximus was used as an excersise room and the rooms to the baths of the Villa Romana del Casale run off this room.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Byzantine Martyrion of St Philip church and healing centre. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.<br />
<br />
Martyrion of St Philip. This church with an octagonal core was built at the beginning of the 5th century on the summit of the hill. This is probably where, according to tradition, the Apostlie was martyred. The building has an eight-sided central room surmounted by a wooden cupola. From each of the eight sides of the central space there was access to a rectangular room through three arches supported by marble columns with capitals decorated with acanthus leaves The shape of the central room is a reference to the number eight which symbolists eternity. The church is situated inside a square composed of 28 rooms for housing pilgrims which were accessed from the outside. As in other Byzantine sanctuaries associated with heating powers (eg that of Saints Cosmas and Damian in Constantinople), in these rooms incubation rites were practised: during sleep, the Saint cured the sick and made prophecies concerning the future.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Byzantine Martyrion of St Philip church and healing centre. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.<br />
<br />
Martyrion of St Philip. This church with an octagonal core was built at the beginning of the 5th century on the summit of the hill. This is probably where, according to tradition, the Apostlie was martyred. The building has an eight-sided central room surmounted by a wooden cupola. From each of the eight sides of the central space there was access to a rectangular room through three arches supported by marble columns with capitals decorated with acanthus leaves The shape of the central room is a reference to the number eight which symbolists eternity. The church is situated inside a square composed of 28 rooms for housing pilgrims which were accessed from the outside. As in other Byzantine sanctuaries associated with heating powers (eg that of Saints Cosmas and Damian in Constantinople), in these rooms incubation rites were practised: during sleep, the Saint cured the sick and made prophecies concerning the future.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Byzantine Martyrion of St Philip church and healing centre. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.<br />
<br />
Martyrion of St Philip. This church with an octagonal core was built at the beginning of the 5th century on the summit of the hill. This is probably where, according to tradition, the Apostlie was martyred. The building has an eight-sided central room surmounted by a wooden cupola. From each of the eight sides of the central space there was access to a rectangular room through three arches supported by marble columns with capitals decorated with acanthus leaves The shape of the central room is a reference to the number eight which symbolists eternity. The church is situated inside a square composed of 28 rooms for housing pilgrims which were accessed from the outside. As in other Byzantine sanctuaries associated with heating powers (eg that of Saints Cosmas and Damian in Constantinople), in these rooms incubation rites were practised: during sleep, the Saint cured the sick and made prophecies concerning the future.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Byzantine Martyrion of St Philip church and healing centre. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.<br />
<br />
Martyrion of St Philip. This church with an octagonal core was built at the beginning of the 5th century on the summit of the hill. This is probably where, according to tradition, the Apostlie was martyred. The building has an eight-sided central room surmounted by a wooden cupola. From each of the eight sides of the central space there was access to a rectangular room through three arches supported by marble columns with capitals decorated with acanthus leaves The shape of the central room is a reference to the number eight which symbolists eternity. The church is situated inside a square composed of 28 rooms for housing pilgrims which were accessed from the outside. As in other Byzantine sanctuaries associated with heating powers (eg that of Saints Cosmas and Damian in Constantinople), in these rooms incubation rites were practised: during sleep, the Saint cured the sick and made prophecies concerning the future.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Byzantine Martyrion of St Philip church and healing centre. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.<br />
<br />
Martyrion of St Philip. This church with an octagonal core was built at the beginning of the 5th century on the summit of the hill. This is probably where, according to tradition, the Apostlie was martyred. The building has an eight-sided central room surmounted by a wooden cupola. From each of the eight sides of the central space there was access to a rectangular room through three arches supported by marble columns with capitals decorated with acanthus leaves The shape of the central room is a reference to the number eight which symbolists eternity. The church is situated inside a square composed of 28 rooms for housing pilgrims which were accessed from the outside. As in other Byzantine sanctuaries associated with heating powers (eg that of Saints Cosmas and Damian in Constantinople), in these rooms incubation rites were practised: during sleep, the Saint cured the sick and made prophecies concerning the future.
  • Mosaic detail fron the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic detail fron the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic detail fron the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic detail fron the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic detail fron the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic detail fron the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic detail fron the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic detail fron the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic detail fron the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Detail of a Roman Mosaic from the Room of The Fishing Cupids, room 24, at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Detail of a Roman Mosaic from the Room of The Fishing Cupids, room 24, at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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