• The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Archaic ancient Greek sculpture of a Sphinx originally on top of the column of Naxos, 570-560 BC, Delphi National Archaeological Museum.  Against white.
  • Archaic ancient Greek sculpture of a Sphinx originally on top of the column of Naxos, 570-560 BC, Delphi National Archaeological Museum.   Against black
  • Archaic ancient Greek sculpture of a Sphinx originally on top of the column of Naxos, 570-560 BC, Delphi National Archaeological Museum.
  • Archaic ancient Greek sculpture of a Sphinx originally on top of the column of Naxos, 570-560 BC, Delphi National Archaeological Museum.   Against grey.
  • Archaic ancient Greek sculpture of a Sphinx originally on top of the column of Naxos, 570-560 BC, Delphi National Archaeological Museum.   Against grey.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Roman Statue of Venus (Aphrodite), a 2nd - 3rd century AD marble statue from Italy.  This Roman statue of Aphrodite is the result of a fit between the bottom of an ancient body, a torso of the XVI century and an ancient face and top of head. The statue follows the style of a modest Aphrodite, known by other Roman replicas are copies of 3rd century BC Hellanistic Greek statues now lost.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 279 (Usual No Ma 369), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic statue torso fragment: Canonical spedos variety , Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase 2800-2300 BC. Cycladic Museum of Art, Athens.   Against black<br />
<br />
Arrtibuted to 'Goulandris Master'.  A very rare unique example of a canonical Spedos variety Cycladic statue of a male. The genetals are carved in the round in a naturalistic manner and unusually the forearms dont touch as in the female figures. This is a totaly unique example of a Cycladic canonical male figure of monumental dimensions.
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic statue torso fragment: Canonical spedos variety , Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase 2800-2300 BC. Cycladic Museum of Art, Athens.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
Arrtibuted to 'Goulandris Master'.  A very rare unique example of a canonical Spedos variety Cycladic statue of a male. The genetals are carved in the round in a naturalistic manner and unusually the forearms dont touch as in the female figures. This is a totaly unique example of a Cycladic canonical male figure of monumental dimensions.
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic statue torso fragment: Canonical spedos variety , Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase 2800-2300 BC. Cycladic Museum of Art, Athens. <br />
<br />
Arrtibuted to 'Goulandris Master'.  A very rare unique example of a canonical Spedos variety Cycladic statue of a male. The genetals are carved in the round in a naturalistic manner and unusually the forearms dont touch as in the female figures. This is a totaly unique example of a Cycladic canonical male figure of monumental dimensions.
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic statue torso fragment: Canonical spedos variety , Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase 2800-2300 BC. Cycladic Museum of Art, Athens.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
Arrtibuted to 'Goulandris Master'.  A very rare unique example of a canonical Spedos variety Cycladic statue of a male. The genetals are carved in the round in a naturalistic manner and unusually the forearms dont touch as in the female figures. This is a totaly unique example of a Cycladic canonical male figure of monumental dimensions.
  • Statue of Thetsis - a 2nd century AD Roman statue found in the city of Lavinia, Italy. Thetis (/ˈθɛtɪs/; Ancient Greek: Θέτις, [tʰétis]), is encountered in Greek mythology mostly as a sea nymph or known as the goddess of water, one of the fifty Nereids, daughters of the ancient sea god Nereus. he statue belonged to a set of ten divinities formerly presented in the portico hemicycle of the city. The Albani Collection Inv No. LL 19 (Usual No Ma 2244), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic statue torso fragment: Canonical spedos variety , Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase 2800-2300 BC. Cycladic Museum of Art, Athens. Female figurine statuette : Cycladic Canonical type, Kapsala variety. Against white.<br />
<br />
Arrtibuted to 'Goulandris Master'.  A very rare unique example of a canonical Spedos variety Cycladic statue of a male. The genetals are carved in the round in a naturalistic manner and unusually the forearms dont touch as in the female figures. This is a totaly unique example of a Cycladic canonical male figure of monumental dimensions.
  • Large Female Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase , 1.4m high (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against Grey Background. <br />
<br />
This impressive Cycladic statue is distinguished by its clear outlines and perfect proportions as well as plasticity of form. A sense of movement is introduced into the staue by its left hip being raised and a slight inclination of the head to the right. This movement gives the statue an air of mysetery and makes it a precursor of the later Archaic statue forms. This sense of movement also sets this Cycladic statue apart from other of the period. It was probably a cult statue and stood at the shrine of a cult goddess.
  • Large Female Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase , 1.4m high (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against white.<br />
<br />
This impressive Cycladic statue is distinguished by its clear outlines and perfect proportions as well as plasticity of form. A sense of movement is introduced into the staue by its left hip being raised and a slight inclination of the head to the right. This movement gives the statue an air of mysetery and makes it a precursor of the later Archaic statue forms. This sense of movement also sets this Cycladic statue apart from other of the period. It was probably a cult statue and stood at the shrine of a cult goddess.
  • Large Female Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase , 1.4m high (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, <br />
<br />
This impressive Cycladic statue is distinguished by its clear outlines and perfect proportions as well as plasticity of form. A sense of movement is introduced into the staue by its left hip being raised and a slight inclination of the head to the right. This movement gives the statue an air of mysetery and makes it a precursor of the later Archaic statue forms. This sense of movement also sets this Cycladic statue apart from other of the period. It was probably a cult statue and stood at the shrine of a cult goddess.
  • Large Female Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase , 1.4m high (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against black<br />
<br />
This impressive Cycladic statue is distinguished by its clear outlines and perfect proportions as well as plasticity of form. A sense of movement is introduced into the staue by its left hip being raised and a slight inclination of the head to the right. This movement gives the statue an air of mysetery and makes it a precursor of the later Archaic statue forms. This sense of movement also sets this Cycladic statue apart from other of the period. It was probably a cult statue and stood at the shrine of a cult goddess.
  • Large Female Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette. Early Cycladic Period II from Syros phase , 1.4m high (2800-2300 BC). Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against Grey Background. <br />
<br />
This impressive Cycladic statue is distinguished by its clear outlines and perfect proportions as well as plasticity of form. A sense of movement is introduced into the staue by its left hip being raised and a slight inclination of the head to the right. This movement gives the statue an air of mysetery and makes it a precursor of the later Archaic statue forms. This sense of movement also sets this Cycladic statue apart from other of the period. It was probably a cult statue and stood at the shrine of a cult goddess.
  • Diomedes - A 2nd or 3rd century AD Roman copy of a Greek classical sculpture from about 430-370 BC. This Roman statue represent Diomede, one of the Greek hero of the Trojan War. This statue belongs to a series of ancient replicas (Naples, Munich), which copy the original Greek statue from the school of Polykleitos, attributed to the sculptor Naucydes or Cresilas who worked in Athens to 440-430 BC. From the Cardinal Richelieu Collection  Inv MR 265   (or Ma 890), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Cycladic statue figurine of the naturalistic 'Plastira' type of Paros. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Gray background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This type of Cycladic figurine stand with feet lat to the ground with detailed facial features and ears to make a more realistic statue. This statue is of a hunter or warrior as it bears an incised weapon strap across its chest and holds a knife.
  • Cycladic statue figurine of the naturalistic 'Plastira' type of Paros. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   White background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This type of Cycladic figurine stand with feet lat to the ground with detailed facial features and ears to make a more realistic statue. This statue is of a hunter or warrior as it bears an incised weapon strap across its chest and holds a knife.
  • Cycladic statue figurine of the naturalistic 'Plastira' type of Paros. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Black background.<br />
This type of Cycladic figurine stand with feet lat to the ground with detailed facial features and ears to make a more realistic statue. This statue is of a hunter or warrior as it bears an incised weapon strap across its chest and holds a knife.
  • Cycladic statue figurine of the naturalistic 'Plastira' type of Paros. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Grey background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This type of Cycladic figurine stand with feet lat to the ground with detailed facial features and ears to make a more realistic statue. This statue is of a hunter or warrior as it bears an incised weapon strap across its chest and holds a knife.
  • Cycladic statue figurine of the naturalistic 'Plastira' type of Paros. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens. <br />
<br />
This type of Cycladic figurine stand with feet lat to the ground with detailed facial features and ears to make a more realistic statue. This statue is of a hunter or warrior as it bears an incised weapon strap across its chest and holds a knife.
  • Statue of Narcissus known as The Marazin Hermaphrodite or The Genie at Eternal Rest - a 3rd century AD Roman marble statue. The restoration combines an ancient  funeral head with another ancient Roman statue. The Mazarin Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Narcissus known as The Marazin Hermaphrodite or The Genie at Eternal Rest - a 3rd century AD Roman marble statue. The restoration combines an ancient  funeral head with another ancient Roman statue. The Mazarin Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Marble female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-2300 BC) from Stavros cemetery, Amorgos, grave 5, Cat No 4719. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   White background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This Cycladic statue figurine is of the Spedos type standing on tip tie with bended knees and arms folded under the breasts with head raiised.
  • Marble female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-2300 BC) from Stavros cemetery, Amorgos, grave 5, Cat No 4719. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. <br />
<br />
This Cycladic statue figurine is of the Spedos type standing on tip tie with bended knees and arms folded under the breasts with head raiised.
  • Marble female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-2300 BC) from Stavros cemetery, Amorgos, grave 5, Cat No 4719. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Grey background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This Cycladic statue figurine is of the Spedos type standing on tip tie with bended knees and arms folded under the breasts with head raiised.
  • Marble female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-2300 BC) from Stavros cemetery, Amorgos, grave 5, Cat No 4719. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. <br />
<br />
This Cycladic statue figurine is of the Spedos type standing on tip tie with bended knees and arms folded under the breasts with head raiised.
  • Marble female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-2300 BC) from Naxos, Cat No 6195. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Grey background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This Cycladic statue figurine is of the Spedos type standing on tip tie with bended knees and arms folded under the breasts with head raiised.
  • Marble female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-2300 BC) from Naxos, Cat No 6195. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Black background.<br />
<br />
This Cycladic statue figurine is of the Spedos type standing on tip tie with bended knees and arms folded under the breasts with head raiised.
  • Marble female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-2300 BC) from Naxos, Cat No 6195. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Gray background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This Cycladic statue figurine is of the Spedos type standing on tip tie with bended knees and arms folded under the breasts with head raiised.
  • Marble female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-2300 BC) from Naxos, Cat No 6195. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Black background.<br />
<br />
This Cycladic statue figurine is of the Spedos type standing on tip tie with bended knees and arms folded under the breasts with head raiised.
  • Marble female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-2300 BC) from Naxos, Cat No 6195. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Gray background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This Cycladic statue figurine is of the Spedos type standing on tip tie with bended knees and arms folded under the breasts with head raiised.
  • Cycladic statue figurine of the naturalistic 'Plastira' type of Paros from Glypha cemetery, grave 23, Cat no 4762. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens. <br />
<br />
This type of Cycladic figurine stand with feet lat to the ground with detailed facial features and ears to make a more realistic statue.
  • Cycladic statue figurine of the naturalistic 'Plastira' type of Paros from Glypha cemetery, grave 23, Cat no 4762. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens. <br />
<br />
This type of Cycladic figurine stand with feet lat to the ground with detailed facial features and ears to make a more realistic statue.
  • Cycladic statue figurine of the naturalistic 'Plastira' type of Paros. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   White background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This type of Cycladic figurine stand with feet lat to the ground with detailed facial features and ears to make a more realistic statue.
  • Cycladic statue figurine of the naturalistic 'Plastira' type of Paros. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Grey background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This type of Cycladic figurine stand with feet lat to the ground with detailed facial features and ears to make a more realistic statue.
  • Cycladic statue figurine of the naturalistic 'Plastira' type of Paros. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens. <br />
<br />
This type of Cycladic figurine stand with feet lat to the ground with detailed facial features and ears to make a more realistic statue.
  • Female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos and Dokathismata type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-3200) from Naxos. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Black background.<br />
<br />
This Cycladic statue figurine is of the Spedos type standing on tip tie with bended knees and arms folded under the breasts with head raiised.
  • Female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos and Dokathismata type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-3200) from Naxos. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Grey background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This Cycladic statue figurine is of the Spedos type standing on tip tie with bended knees and arms folded under the breasts with head raiised.
  • Female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos and Dokathismata type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-3200) from Amorgos. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   White background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This Cycladic statue figurine is of the Spedos type standing on tip tie with bended knees and arms folded under the breasts with head raiised. This staue belongs to the Dokathismata type of Amorgos with an angular face, wide chest and slender outline.
  • Female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos and Dokathismata type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-3200) from Amorgos. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Black background.<br />
<br />
This Cycladic statue figurine is of the Spedos type standing on tip tie with bended knees and arms folded under the breasts with head raiised. This staue belongs to the Dokathismata type of Amorgos with an angular face, wide chest and slender outline.
  • Female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos and Dokathismata type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-3200) from Amorgos. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. <br />
<br />
This Cycladic statue figurine is of the Spedos type standing on tip tie with bended knees and arms folded under the breasts with head raiised. This staue belongs to the Dokathismata type of Amorgos with an angular face, wide chest and slender outline.
  • Female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos and Dokathismata type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-3200) from Amorgos. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Grey background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This Cycladic statue figurine is of the Spedos type standing on tip tie with bended knees and arms folded under the breasts with head raiised. This staue belongs to the Dokathismata type of Amorgos with an angular face, wide chest and slender outline.
  • Marble female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-2300 BC) from Stavros cemetery, Amorgos, grave 5, Cat No 4719. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Gray background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This Cycladic statue figurine is of the Spedos type standing on tip tie with bended knees and arms folded under the breasts with head raiised.
  • Marble female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-2300 BC) from Naxos, Cat No 6195. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   White background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This Cycladic statue figurine is of the Spedos type standing on tip tie with bended knees and arms folded under the breasts with head raiised.
  • Marble female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-2300 BC) from Naxos, Cat No 6195. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. <br />
<br />
This Cycladic statue figurine is of the Spedos type standing on tip tie with bended knees and arms folded under the breasts with head raiised.
  • Marble female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-2300 BC) from Naxos, Cat No 6195. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   White background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This Cycladic statue figurine is of the Spedos type standing on tip tie with bended knees and arms folded under the breasts with head raiised.
  • Marble female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-2300 BC) from Naxos, Cat No 6195. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. <br />
<br />
This Cycladic statue figurine is of the Spedos type standing on tip tie with bended knees and arms folded under the breasts with head raiised.
  • Marble female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-2300 BC) from Naxos, Cat No 6195. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Grey background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This Cycladic statue figurine is of the Spedos type standing on tip tie with bended knees and arms folded under the breasts with head raiised.
  • Cycladic statue figurine of the naturalistic 'Plastira' type of Paros from Glypha cemetery, grave 23, Cat no 4762. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   White background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This type of Cycladic figurine stand with feet lat to the ground with detailed facial features and ears to make a more realistic statue.
  • Cycladic statue figurine of the naturalistic 'Plastira' type of Paros from Glypha cemetery, grave 23, Cat no 4762. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Black background.<br />
<br />
This type of Cycladic figurine stand with feet lat to the ground with detailed facial features and ears to make a more realistic statue.
  • Cycladic statue figurine of the naturalistic 'Plastira' type of Paros from Glypha cemetery, grave 23, Cat no 4762. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Gray background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This type of Cycladic figurine stand with feet lat to the ground with detailed facial features and ears to make a more realistic statue.
  • Cycladic statue figurine of the naturalistic 'Plastira' type of Paros. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Black background.<br />
<br />
This type of Cycladic figurine stand with feet lat to the ground with detailed facial features and ears to make a more realistic statue.
  • Cycladic statue figurine of the naturalistic 'Plastira' type of Paros. Early Cycladic Period I (Grotta-Pelos Phase 3200-2800 BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Gray background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This type of Cycladic figurine stand with feet lat to the ground with detailed facial features and ears to make a more realistic statue.
  • Female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos and Dokathismata type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-3200) from Naxos. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   White background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This Cycladic statue figurine is of the Spedos type standing on tip tie with bended knees and arms folded under the breasts with head raiised.
  • Female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos and Dokathismata type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-3200) from Naxos. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. <br />
<br />
This Cycladic statue figurine is of the Spedos type standing on tip tie with bended knees and arms folded under the breasts with head raiised.
  • Female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos and Dokathismata type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-3200) from Naxos. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Gray background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This Cycladic statue figurine is of the Spedos type standing on tip tie with bended knees and arms folded under the breasts with head raiised.
  • Female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos and Dokathismata type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-3200) from Amorgos. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. <br />
<br />
This Cycladic statue figurine is of the Spedos type standing on tip tie with bended knees and arms folded under the breasts with head raiised. This staue belongs to the Dokathismata type of Amorgos with an angular face, wide chest and slender outline.
  • Female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos and Dokathismata type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-3200) from Amorgos. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Gray background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This Cycladic statue figurine is of the Spedos type standing on tip tie with bended knees and arms folded under the breasts with head raiised. This staue belongs to the Dokathismata type of Amorgos with an angular face, wide chest and slender outline.
  • Statue known as Antonius as Aristaeus. Antinous was the young Bithynian favoured by the emperor Hadrian who was deified after drowning under mysterious circumstances in the waters of the Nile circa 130AD. Thanks to the promotion of the cult Antinous portraits can be found throughout the Empire in the places most frequented by Hadrian. This statue was part of the collection of ancient sculptors bought in Rome by Cardinal Richelieu (1585-1642) for his chateau in Poitou. The favourite of the Emperor Hadrian (117-138 AD) Antonius  is depicted here as Aristaeus, a minor Greek God of fruit trees and bee keeping. The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 73 or Ma 5781, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Marble female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-3200) from Naxos, Cat No 20934. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Grey background.<br />
<br />
<br />
One of the largest known Cycladic statues at 89CM tall this figurine still has traces of a colour on the hair and eyes.
  • Marble female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-3200) from Naxos, Cat No 20934. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   White background.<br />
<br />
<br />
One of the largest known Cycladic statues at 89CM tall this figurine still has traces of a colour on the hair and eyes.
  • Marble female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-3200) from Naxos, Cat No 20934. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Black background.<br />
<br />
One of the largest known Cycladic statues at 89CM tall this figurine still has traces of a colour on the hair and eyes.
  • Marble female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-3200) from Naxos, Cat No 20934. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. <br />
<br />
One of the largest known Cycladic statues at 89CM tall this figurine still has traces of a colour on the hair and eyes.
  • Marble female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms of the Spedos type. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-3200) from Naxos, Cat No 20934. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Gray background.<br />
<br />
<br />
One of the largest known Cycladic statues at 89CM tall this figurine still has traces of a colour on the hair and eyes.
  • 2nd century Roman marble torso copy of the statue of Aphrodite of Cnidus by Praixitele. Many Roman replicas exist of the Aphrodite of Cnidus which is one of the most famous statues of antiquity. The statue depicts the goddess bathing with a vase of water beside her. The lost original is a Hellenistic Greek sculpture made in 360-350 BC which is attributed to Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Tradition has it that the model for the original was the lover of sculptor Phryne. The original is the oldest known female nude in Greek sculpture.  Inv Ma 2184 Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Statue of Eros known as The Genie of Borghese - a  Roman copy of a 4th century BC Greek original from Rome, Monte Cavallo. The statue belonged to Domenico Biondo, employee of Pope Paul V Borghese. The statue joined in 1608 in the collection of Scipio Borghese. Wings, arms and legs of Eros, formerly called Genie Borghese, are modern. In the 18th century it was much admired, especially in France, as one of the seven most important parts of the collection Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 207 or Ma 435, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Bacchante or Ariadne, a Roman marble statue of circa 150 - 200 AD. The bunch of grapes wrapped in the folds of her garment suggest that the statue depicts either Bacchante or Ariadne both  companions of Dionysus. The statue belongs to a very limited series of replicas (Florence, Venice, Rome, Cyrene) reproducing a Greek original lost year circa 300 BC made by the school from Rhodes. The Borghese collection inv MR 102 ( or Ma 676), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Nymph with a shell ( Nymphe a la coquille ) a 1st century marble statue from Italy which was part of the Borghese collection . Louvre Museum, Paris Cat No MR 309. <br />
The Nymph with a shell statue was much admired in the 17th century and influenced such art its as Velasquez. The statue symbolises a carefree childhood and the fact that terracotta versions have been found in tombs suggests that the statue was associated with the injustice of death or of a rebirth.
  • Nymph with a shell ( Nymphe a la coquille ) a 1st century marble statue from Italy which was part of the Borghese collection . Louvre Museum, Paris Cat No MR 309. <br />
The Nymph with a shell statue was much admired in the 17th century and influenced such art its as Velasquez. The statue symbolises a carefree childhood and the fact that terracotta versions have been found in tombs suggests that the statue was associated with the injustice of death or of a rebirth.
  • Cyclades spedos type stone statue figurine with folded arms, Archanes Phourni, 2300-1700 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
These voitive atatues were buried with the dead all over the Ctcladic Islands of Greece
  • Cyclades spedos type stone statue figurine with folded arms, Archanes Phourni, 2300-1700 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background.<br />
<br />
These voitive atatues were buried with the dead all over the Ctcladic Islands of Greece
  • Cyclades spedos type stone statue figurine with folded arms, Archanes Phourni, 2300-1700 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
These voitive atatues were buried with the dead all over the Ctcladic Islands of Greece
  • Cyclades spedos type stone statue figurine with folded arms, Archanes Phourni, 2300-1700 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background.<br />
<br />
These voitive atatues were buried with the dead all over the Ctcladic Islands of Greece
  • Rare male Cycladic statue of a seated warrior or hunter holding a cup. Early Cycladic Period II, (2800-2300 BC), Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,   Against black<br />
<br />
Male Cycladic figures are rare and are usually of musicians or hunters and warriors.
  • Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette from Naxos or Keros. Early Cycladic Period II, (2800-2300 BC), 'Goulandris Master'.  Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,   Against black<br />
<br />
The 'Goulandris Master' was named because of the N.P Goulandris collection which had a significat number of Cycladic figureines attributed to one sculptor. The characteristic traits of his work are : statues of 32 to 98 cm tall, precise incisions demarcating the neck, the abdomen and pubic triangle asv well as knees and spinal column, the statues have a rounded outline. Traces of colour were found on the statue.
  • Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette from Naxos or Keros. Early Cycladic Period II, (2800-2300 BC), 'Goulandris Master'.  Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, <br />
<br />
The 'Goulandris Master' was named because of the N.P Goulandris collection which had a significat number of Cycladic figureines attributed to one sculptor. The characteristic traits of his work are : statues of 32 to 98 cm tall, precise incisions demarcating the neck, the abdomen and pubic triangle asv well as knees and spinal column, the statues have a rounded outline. Traces of colour were found on the statue.
  • Marble female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-2300 BC) from Chalandriani, Syros. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Grey background.
  • Marble female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-2300 BC) from Chalandriani, Syros. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Gray background.
  • Head of a Cycladic statue with remnants of painted eyes and right cheek, Parian Marble, Amorgos, Early Cycladic II period (2800-3200BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Black background.
  • Head of a Cycladic statue with remnants of painted eyes and right cheek, Parian Marble, Amorgos, Early Cycladic II period (2800-3200BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.
  • Cyclades spedos type stone statue figurine with folded arms, Archanes Phourni, 2300-1700 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum, white background.<br />
<br />
These voitive atatues were buried with the dead all over the Ctcladic Islands of Greece
  • Cyclades spedos type stone statue figurine with folded arms, Archanes Phourni, 2300-1700 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background.<br />
<br />
These voitive atatues were buried with the dead all over the Ctcladic Islands of Greece
  • Cyclades spedos type stone statue figurine with folded arms, Archanes Phourni, 2300-1700 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum, black background.<br />
<br />
These voitive atatues were buried with the dead all over the Ctcladic Islands of Greece
  • Cyclades spedos type stone statue figurine with folded arms, Archanes Phourni, 2300-1700 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum, black background.<br />
<br />
These voitive atatues were buried with the dead all over the Ctcladic Islands of Greece
  • Cyclades spedos type stone statue figurine with folded arms, Archanes Phourni, 2300-1700 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum, white background.<br />
<br />
These voitive atatues were buried with the dead all over the Ctcladic Islands of Greece
  • Cyclades spedos type stone statue figurine with folded arms, Archanes Phourni, 2300-1700 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum, grey background.<br />
<br />
These voitive atatues were buried with the dead all over the Ctcladic Islands of Greece
  • Rare male Cycladic statue of a seated warrior or hunter holding a cup. Early Cycladic Period II, (2800-2300 BC), Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against white.<br />
<br />
Male Cycladic figures are rare and are usually of musicians or hunters and warriors.
  • Rare male Cycladic statue of a seated warrior or hunter holding a cup. Early Cycladic Period II, (2800-2300 BC), Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, <br />
<br />
Male Cycladic figures are rare and are usually of musicians or hunters and warriors.
  • Rare male Cycladic statue of a seated warrior or hunter holding a cup. Early Cycladic Period II, (2800-2300 BC), Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against Grey Background. <br />
<br />
Male Cycladic figures are rare and are usually of musicians or hunters and warriors.
  • Rare male Cycladic statue of a seated warrior or hunter holding a cup. Early Cycladic Period II, (2800-2300 BC), Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against Grey Background. <br />
<br />
Male Cycladic figures are rare and are usually of musicians or hunters and warriors.
  • Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette from Naxos or Keros. Early Cycladic Period II, (2800-2300 BC), 'Goulandris Master'.  Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against Grey Background. <br />
<br />
<br />
The 'Goulandris Master' was named because of the N.P Goulandris collection which had a significat number of Cycladic figureines attributed to one sculptor. The characteristic traits of his work are : statues of 32 to 98 cm tall, precise incisions demarcating the neck, the abdomen and pubic triangle asv well as knees and spinal column, the statues have a rounded outline. Traces of colour were found on the statue.
  • Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette from Naxos or Keros. Early Cycladic Period II, (2800-2300 BC), 'Goulandris Master'.  Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against Grey Background. <br />
<br />
The 'Goulandris Master' was named because of the N.P Goulandris collection which had a significat number of Cycladic figureines attributed to one sculptor. The characteristic traits of his work are : statues of 32 to 98 cm tall, precise incisions demarcating the neck, the abdomen and pubic triangle asv well as knees and spinal column, the statues have a rounded outline. Traces of colour were found on the statue.
  • Marble female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-2300 BC) from Chalandriani, Syros. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   White background.
  • Marble female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-2300 BC) from Chalandriani, Syros. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Black background.
  • Marble female Cycladic statue figurine with folded arms. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-2300 BC) from Chalandriani, Syros. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.
  • Head of a Cycladic statue with remnants of painted eyes and right cheek, Parian Marble, Amorgos, Early Cycladic II period (2800-3200BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   White background.
  • Head of a Cycladic statue with remnants of painted eyes and right cheek, Parian Marble, Amorgos, Early Cycladic II period (2800-3200BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Gray background.
  • Head of a Cycladic statue with remnants of painted eyes and right cheek, Parian Marble, Amorgos, Early Cycladic II period (2800-3200BC). National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Grey background.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Cycladic Canonical type, Spedos variety female figurine statuette from Naxos or Keros. Early Cycladic Period II, (2800-2300 BC), 'Goulandris Master'.  Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against white.<br />
<br />
The 'Goulandris Master' was named because of the N.P Goulandris collection which had a significat number of Cycladic figureines attributed to one sculptor. The characteristic traits of his work are : statues of 32 to 98 cm tall, precise incisions demarcating the neck, the abdomen and pubic triangle asv well as knees and spinal column, the statues have a rounded outline. Traces of colour were found on the statue.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. Restored by Pietro Benini brother of Bernin. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 331 or Ma 1385, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a Captive Barbarian - a 2nd century Ad Roman sculpture made in Porphyry and white marble from Rome, Italy. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The statue was from the facade of the Villa Borghese. The Borghese Collection Inv No. MR 332 or Ma 1381, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite- type known as the Venus of Arles. A Roman statue in marble of the 1st - 2nd century AD in marble from Rome. The statue is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) and is  probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae a lost bronze sculpture by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . From the Royal collection Inv MR 366 ( or Ma 437), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite- type known as the Venus of Arles. A Roman statue in marble of the 1st - 2nd century AD in marble from Rome. The statue is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) and is  probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae a lost bronze sculpture by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . From the Royal collection Inv MR 366 ( or Ma 437), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite- type known as the Venus of Arles. A Roman statue in marble of the 1st - 2nd century AD in marble from Rome. The statue is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) and is  probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae a lost bronze sculpture by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . From the Royal collection Inv MR 366 ( or Ma 437), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The Ares Borghese is a Roman marble statue of the imperial era, 1st or 2nd century AD. This statue possibly preserves some features of an original work in bronze, now lost, of the 5th century BC by Alcamenes, an Athenian sculptor, or the statue may not be a copy of Alcamenes's, but instead a Roman creation according to a classicising or Neo-Attic type. Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus (Aphrodite) in Arms. A 2nd century AD marble Roman statue completed in the 16th century. The so called Venus in Arms shows Venus with a sword and armour accompanied by a cupid that is about to try on her oversized helmet. The statue belonged to the collection of Tiberio Ceuli, purchased by Cardinal Scipione Borghese (1576-1623) in 1607. The Roman head does not seem to belong to the statue. It graced one niche of the living room of the Villa Borghese.<br />
Borghese collection, Inv No. MR. 373 (Usual No Ma 370), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Centaur with Eros on its back, a 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Tradition has it that a centaur be a monstrous half-man half-horse mythical creature. In this Roman statue the old centaur is being ridden by Eros (Cupid), the Greek god of Love represented in the form of a young wing child. The sculpture is a copy of a Greek original  attributed to school sculpture of Aphrodisias (Turkey) can be dating in the 2nd century BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 122 ( or Ma 562 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Ariadne sleeping a 2nd century AD Marble Roman statue from Italy. The girl is lying asleep on a rock and is a variation of the famous Sleeping Ariadne of the Vatican museum whose composition is reversed. in Greek mythology Ariadne was the daughter of Minos, King of Crete  and his queen Pasiphaë, daughter of Helios . When Thesius was sent to Crete to be sacrificed to the Minateur Ariadne fell in love at first sight, and helped him by giving him a sword and a ball of thread, so that he could find his way out of the Minotaur's labyrinth. She eloped with Theseus after he achieved his goal, and in most accounts of the myth, Theseus abandoned Ariadne sleeping on Naxos, and Dionysus rediscovered and wedded her. This Roman  Sculpture was inspired  by a Greek original of the 2nd century AD. inv MR 311 ( or Ma 340 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Satatue known as the Sitting captive - a Roman sculpture of the 1st or 2nd century SAD made out of  Green Breche stone from the Wadi Hammamat, Egypt. The head and hands do not belong to the statue. The head is wearing a hat Phyrigian hat and recalls the same style as the famous Farnese Prisoners statues who were defeated Dacians from the Forum of Trajan (98-117 AD). The body can be dated  to the 1st century AD and is probably from the near east. The recomposed statue , named the defeated barbarian king, was the centre piece of a room in the Villa Albani (1692-1779) in Rome.  The Albani Collection, Inv No. LL 17 or Ma 1383, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Statue of Juno known as La Providence, a 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Rome, Italy. Juno is an ancient Roman goddess, the protector and special counselor of the state. As the patron goddess of Rome and the Roman Empire, Juno was called Regina ("Queen") and, together with Jupiter and Minerva, was worshipped as a triad on the Capitol (Juno Capitolina) in Rome. The Royal Collection Inv No. MR 333 or Ma 485, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Female statue known as the Muse de Louveciennes, a Roman statue of the 3rd century AD from Rome. The Royal Collection Inv No. MR 354 or Ma 170, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Adonis - Tis antique statue was completely restored in the 16th century by Francois Du Quesnoy for the collection of Cardinal Mazarin. The Mazarin Collection Inv No. MR 239, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • A Roman statue of the Parthenon Athena, a Roman copy of the great statue from the Parthenon in Athens.  Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of a male divinity known as Jupiter de Smyrne, a 2nd Roman statue from Smyrne, Izmir present day Turkey. The Royal Collection Inv No. MR 255 or Ma 13, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Antinous - a 2nd century Roman sculpture in marble from Italy. The statue is a montage of a more modern head of Antinous with an older body in the style of Hercules. Inv No. MR 74 (Usual No Ma 2243), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus and Cupid - a its or 2nd Roman statue restored in the 17th century by Alessandro l’Algarde. The statue was acquired in Rome in 1630 by Cardinal Richelieu. Restored by Alessandro l’Algarde the modern head is a copy of the Medici Venus or Aphrodite in Florence.  The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 386 (Usual No Ma 2287), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of  Atalanta a 2nd century Roman sculpture restored in the 17th century. Atalanta  is a character in Greek mythology, a virgin huntress, unwilling to marry, and loved by the hero Meleager.. The Mazarin Collection  Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The 'Harpist of Keros' a seated parian marble female Cycladic figurine. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-2300 BC) from Keros, Cat no 3908. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   White background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This elaborate three dimesional Cyladic statue known as the 'Harpist of Keros' depicts a seated figure plaung a harp. Its execution required an experienced workshop that could file away the parian marble with gronze tools.
  • The 'Harpist of Keros' a seated parian marble female Cycladic figurine. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-2300 BC) from Keros, Cat no 3908. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Grey background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This elaborate three dimesional Cyladic statue known as the 'Harpist of Keros' depicts a seated figure plaung a harp. Its execution required an experienced workshop that could file away the parian marble with gronze tools.
  • The 'Harpist of Keros' a seated parian marble female Cycladic figurine. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-2300 BC) from Keros, Cat no 3908. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Black background.<br />
<br />
This elaborate three dimesional Cyladic statue known as the 'Harpist of Keros' depicts a seated figure plaung a harp. Its execution required an experienced workshop that could file away the parian marble with gronze tools.
  • The 'Harpist of Keros' a seated parian marble female Cycladic figurine. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-2300 BC) from Keros, Cat no 3908. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Grey background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This elaborate three dimesional Cyladic statue known as the 'Harpist of Keros' depicts a seated figure plaung a harp. Its execution required an experienced workshop that could file away the parian marble with gronze tools.
  • The 'Harpist of Keros' a seated parian marble female Cycladic figurine. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-2300 BC) from Keros, Cat no 3908. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Black background.<br />
<br />
This elaborate three dimesional Cyladic statue known as the 'Harpist of Keros' depicts a seated figure plaung a harp. Its execution required an experienced workshop that could file away the parian marble with gronze tools.
  • The 'Harpist of Keros' a seated parian marble female Cycladic figurine. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-2300 BC) from Keros, Cat no 3908. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. <br />
<br />
This elaborate three dimesional Cyladic statue known as the 'Harpist of Keros' depicts a seated figure plaung a harp. Its execution required an experienced workshop that could file away the parian marble with gronze tools.
  • The 'Harpist of Keros' a seated parian marble female Cycladic figurine. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-2300 BC) from Keros, Cat no 3908. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   Gray background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This elaborate three dimesional Cyladic statue known as the 'Harpist of Keros' depicts a seated figure plaung a harp. Its execution required an experienced workshop that could file away the parian marble with gronze tools.
  • The 'Harpist of Keros' a seated parian marble female Cycladic figurine. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-2300 BC) from Keros, Cat no 3908. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.   White background.<br />
<br />
<br />
This elaborate three dimesional Cyladic statue known as the 'Harpist of Keros' depicts a seated figure plaung a harp. Its execution required an experienced workshop that could file away the parian marble with gronze tools.
  • The 'Harpist of Keros' a seated parian marble female Cycladic figurine. Early Cycladic Period II (2800-2300 BC) from Keros, Cat no 3908. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. <br />
<br />
This elaborate three dimesional Cyladic statue known as the 'Harpist of Keros' depicts a seated figure plaung a harp. Its execution required an experienced workshop that could file away the parian marble with gronze tools.
  • Roman bust of Greek philosopher Aristolte. 1st - 2nd century AD from Italy made of Pentilic Marble from Athens Greece. Aristotle lived around 384-322 BC and became the tutor of Alexander The Great. This bust was copied from a lost Greek bronze original by Lysippe (370-300BC) , sculptor to Alexander The Great. Traces of the original paint can be seen on the beard. From the Borghese collection Inv Mr or Ma 80 ,  Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Esculape or Asclepius - a second century AD Roman sculpture. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, his daughters included Hygieia, ”Hygiene” the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation as well as Iaso, the goddess of recuperation from illness and Aceso the goddess of the healing process.  The Albani Collection, Inv No.  Ma 929, Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • “ Silenus Drunk “ - A 2nd century AD Roman sculpture made from marble from Paros. Silenus was described as the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, the god of wine. When intoxicated, Silenus was said to possess special knowledge and the power of prophecy. From the Ancient Royal Collection of France inv MR 343 (or MA 291) previously held at Versailles. Louvre Museum Paris.
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic female figurine of the canonical type, Dokathismata and Spedos variety, Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase, 2800-2300 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens. Grey Background. <br />
<br />
Considered to be an intermediate or transitional form between the Dokathismata and Spedos varieties/
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic female figurine of the canonical type, Dokathismata and Spedos variety, Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase, 2800-2300 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens. Against white.<br />
<br />
Considered to be an intermediate or transitional form between the Dokathismata and Spedos varieties/
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic female figurine of the canonical type, Dokathismata and Spedos variety, Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase, 2800-2300 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens.<br />
<br />
Considered to be an intermediate or transitional form between the Dokathismata and Spedos varieties/
  • Post canonical female ancient Greek Cycladic figurine, Late Ccladic priod II to Cycladic period III (2500-2000 BC)Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 312.   Against black
  • Post canonical ancient Greek Cycladic warrior or hunter figurine, Late Ccladic prioc II to Cycladic period II (2500-2000 BC)Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 308.<br />
<br />
The relif of a baldric crossing the body left to righ suggest the figure was of a warrior or hunter. A small triangular dagger is incised as if hanging from the baldric.
  • Anchyrrhoe Nymph - a 2nd century Roman sculpture from Iatly. The Anchyrrhoe Nymph is an allegory of Fortune and was desd in the gardens of the chateau d’Ecouen in the 17th century. The style is copied from a Hellanistic Greek original and also reprints the dance as a muse. Inv No. MR 310 (Usual No Ma 868), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Pan removing a thorn from the foot of a satyr. 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Pan (Faunus to the Romans) , the Greek god of shepherds, is recognisable as a hybrid of half-man half-goat. This group, of which several Roman versions exist, dates from circa 50 BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 193 ( or Ma 320 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic female figurine of the canonical type, Dokathismata and Spedos variety, Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase, 2800-2300 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens.   Against black<br />
<br />
Considered to be an intermediate or transitional form between the Dokathismata and Spedos varieties/
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic female figurine of the canonical type, Dokathismata and Spedos variety, Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase, 2800-2300 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens. Grey Background. <br />
<br />
Considered to be an intermediate or transitional form between the Dokathismata and Spedos varieties/
  • Post canonical female ancient Greek Cycladic figurine, Late Ccladic priod  II to Cycladic period III (2500-2000 BC)Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 312,  Against white.
  • Post canonical female ancient Greek Cycladic figurine, Late Ccladic priod II to Cycladic period III (2500-2000 BC)Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 312.  Grey Background.
  • Post canonical female ancient Greek Cycladic figurine, Late Ccladic priod II to Cycladic period III (2500-2000 BC)Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 312.  Grey Background.
  • Post canonical female ancient Greek Cycladic figurine, Late Ccladic priod II to Cycladic period III (2500-2000 BC)Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 312
  • Marble ancient Greek Cycladic figurine wearing a conical pilos, early Plastiras type, Early Cycladic Period I, circal 2800 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 1111.  Against white.
  • Marble ancient Greek Cycladic figurine wearing a conical pilos, early Plastiras type, Early Cycladic Period I, circal 2800 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 1111.   Against black
  • Marble ancient Greek Cycladic figurine wearing a conical pilos, early Plastiras type, Early Cycladic Period I, circal 2800 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 1111.  Grey Background.
  • Marble ancient Greek Cycladic figurine wearing a conical pilos, early Plastiras type, Early Cycladic Period I, circal 2800 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 1111
  • Marble ancient Greek Cycladic figurine wearing a conical pilos, early Plastiras type, Early Cycladic Period I, circal 2800 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 1111.  Against Grey Background.
  • Post canonical ancient Greek Cycladic warrior or hunter figurine, Late Ccladic prioc II to Cycladic period II (2500-2000 BC)Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 308. Against white.<br />
<br />
The relif of a baldric crossing the body left to righ suggest the figure was of a warrior or hunter. A small triangular dagger is incised as if hanging from the baldric.
  • Post canonical ancient Greek Cycladic warrior or hunter figurine, Late Ccladic prioc II to Cycladic period II (2500-2000 BC)Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 308.  Against black<br />
<br />
The relif of a baldric crossing the body left to righ suggest the figure was of a warrior or hunter. A small triangular dagger is incised as if hanging from the baldric.
  • Post canonical ancient Greek Cycladic warrior or hunter figurine, Late Ccladic prioc II to Cycladic period II (2500-2000 BC)Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 308. Against Grey Background. <br />
<br />
The relif of a baldric crossing the body left to righ suggest the figure was of a warrior or hunter. A small triangular dagger is incised as if hanging from the baldric.
  • Post canonical ancient Greek Cycladic warrior or hunter figurine, Late Ccladic prioc II to Cycladic period II (2500-2000 BC)Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 308. Against Grey Background. <br />
<br />
The relif of a baldric crossing the body left to righ suggest the figure was of a warrior or hunter. A small triangular dagger is incised as if hanging from the baldric.
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic female figurine of the canonical type, Dokathismata variety, Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase, 2800-2300 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens. Against white.<br />
<br />
Attributed to the 'Ashmolean Museum Master'
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic female figurine of the canonical type, Dokathismata variety, Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase, 2800-2300 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens. Grey Background. <br />
<br />
Attributed to the 'Ashmolean Museum Master'
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic female figurine of the canonical type, Dokathismata variety, Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase, 2800-2300 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens.  Against black<br />
<br />
Attributed to the 'Ashmolean Museum Master'
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic female figurine of the canonical type, Dokathismata variety, Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase, 2800-2300 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens. Grey Background. <br />
<br />
Attributed to the 'Ashmolean Museum Master'
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic figurine, Kilia type ('stargazer'). Kilia, Gallipoli, Turkey, Circa 4360-3500 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against white.
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic figurine, Kilia type ('stargazer'). Kilia, Gallipoli, Turkey, Circa 4360-3500 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic figurine, Kilia type ('stargazer'). Kilia, Gallipoli, Turkey, Circa 4360-3500 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Grey Background.
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic female figurine of the canonical type, Dokathismata variety, Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase, 2800-2300 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens.<br />
<br />
Attributed to the 'Ashmolean Museum Master'
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic figurine, Kilia type ('stargazer'). Kilia, Gallipoli, Turkey, Circa 4360-3500 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Grey Background.
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic figurine, Kilia type ('stargazer'). Kilia, Gallipoli, Turkey, Circa 4360-3500 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,   Against black
  • Ancient spade shaped schematic figure from the Pelos phase,   probably from Asia Minor. Early Cycladic period I 3200-2800 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Cat no 333.  Against white.
  • Ancient violin shaped schematic figure from the Pelos phase,  'Kusura type', probably from Asia Minor. Early Cycladic period I 3200-2800 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Cat no 961.  Against white.
  • Ancient violin shaped schematic figure from the Pelos phase,  'Kusura type', probably from Asia Minor. Early Cycladic period I 3200-2800 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Cat no 961.   Against black
  • Ancient violin shaped schematic figure from the Pelos phase,  'Kusura type', probably from Asia Minor. Early Cycladic period I 3200-2800 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Cat no 961. Grey Background.
  • Ancient violin shaped schematic figure from the Pelos phase,  'Kusura type', probably from Asia Minor. Early Cycladic period I 3200-2800 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Cat no 961
  • Ancient violin shaped schematic figure from the Pelos phase,  'Kusura type', probably from Asia Minor. Early Cycladic period I 3200-2800 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Cat no 961. Grey Background.
  • Ancient spade shaped schematic figure from the Pelos phase,   probably from Asia Minor. Early Cycladic period I 3200-2800 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Cat no 333. Grey Background.
  • Ancient spade shaped schematic figure from the Pelos phase,   probably from Asia Minor. Early Cycladic period I 3200-2800 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Cat no 333
  • Ancient spade shaped schematic figure from the Pelos phase,   probably from Asia Minor. Early Cycladic period I 3200-2800 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Cat no 333
  • Ancient spade shaped schematic figure from the Pelos phase,   probably from Asia Minor. Early Cycladic period I 3200-2800 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Cat no 333. Grey Background.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • "Charioteer of Delphi" 470 BC. The "Charioteer of Delphi" is one of the best known ancient Greek statues, and one of the best preserved examples of classical bronze casts. It is considered a fine example of the "Severe" style. Delphi Archaeological Museum.

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