• Picture and image  of the stone sculptures of two young siblings at the doors of heaven through which their mother had to go before them by Sculptor A. Rota 1882. The theme of the monument is sorrow but also of hope as an angel guides the sould of the mouring siblings mother to heaven. As is tytpical of the Borgeois realistic style everday clothes, hairstyle and natural gestures are used in the sulpture. Section A, no 42, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of a mouring women in the Bourgeois Realistic style. Badaracco Tomb sculpted by G Moreno 1878. Section A, no 44, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of a mouring women in the Bourgeois Realistic style. Badaracco Tomb sculpted by G Moreno 1878. The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of a mourning women  stone sculpture in the realistic borgeois style. The tomb of the Stefano family Tsculpted by by G Benetti 1877. The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of a mourning women  stone sculpture in the realistic borgeois style. The tomb of the Stefano family Tsculpted by by G Benetti 1877. The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of an angel guiding a women to heaven stone sculpture on the Piaggio tomb sulpted by Fabian Federico 1876. Section A, no 45, The  monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of an angel sitting on a sarcophagus. Piaggio Tomb sculpted by S Saccomanno 1876. Section A, no 46, The  monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of a women on the tomb of ship builder Giovanni Battista Piaggio by  Sculptor G. Benetti 1873. Giovanni Battista Piaggio, who is buried here, was a rich ship-owner, whose important role in society is expressed by the professional symbols -the anchor, the ropes, the sand-glass, the globe, the chart that the sculptor Giuseppe Benetti put on the sides of the deceased's bust hosted in the lunette, which surmounts the architecture in Renaissance style of the monument. As a representative of the upper middle class he couldn't die without leaving memories of his social role: Benetti, in order to meet this requirement, represented the widow coming out of the chapel with a prayer-book in her hand. Bringing the mourning in an everyday-life dimension Benetti created a work in accordance with the dictates of the Realism bourgeois. Section A, no 47, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of a women on the tomb of ship builder Giovanni Battista Piaggio by  Sculptor G. Benetti 1873. Giovanni Battista Piaggio, who is buried here, was a rich ship-owner, whose important role in society is expressed by the professional symbols -the anchor, the ropes, the sand-glass, the globe, the chart that the sculptor Giuseppe Benetti put on the sides of the deceased's bust hosted in the lunette, which surmounts the architecture in Renaissance style of the monument. As a representative of the upper middle class he couldn't die without leaving memories of his social role: Benetti, in order to meet this requirement, represented the widow coming out of the chapel with a prayer-book in her hand. Bringing the mourning in an everyday-life dimension Benetti created a work in accordance with the dictates of the Realism bourgeois. Section A, no 47, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image  of the stone sculptured monumental tombs depicting a flying angel and the deceased in the Borgeois Realistic style, by sculptor A Allegro 1872.  Section A, no 49, The Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image  of the stone sculptured monumental tombs depicting a flying angel and the deceased in the Borgeois Realistic style, by sculptor A Allegro 1872.  Section A, no 49, The Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Pictures of the stone sculptured monumental tomb for the Celesia Family by sculptor D. Paernio 1899.  An adolescent angel with delicate features is examining some sheets while sitting, representing so the Study.  Sculpted in the bourgeois Realism style this gigantic statue of the worker follows Michelangelo’s heroic style, which was an obsession to many European and Italian sculptors between the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century,  Section A, no 51, The Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the Neo Gothic Erba stone tomb sculpture of a female figure, with her eyes closed and some poppy seeds in her hands, which are a pagan symbol with a funeral meaning because of their narcotic properties. The garment, stretching along her arm, leaves one shoulder undressed, thus giving the sleeper a touch of sensuality that did not fail to arouse some controversy among the contemporaries. By Sculptor Sculptor S. Saccomanno 1883.  Section A, no 50, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of a stone sculpture of Charity with an angel to her left, by Sculptor V. Lavezzari 1897 on the Repetto tomb.  Section A, no 52, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image  of the Realistic young grieving girl stone funary monument sculpture  commissioned by Enrico Amerigo for his sisters memory. beside the pedestal on which the sculptor set the deceased’s bust he placed, on the left, the figure of an old blind man, kneeling down and leaning on a stick; on the right he placed the figure of a young orphan girl, recognizable as such by her kindergarten uniform, portrayed in the act of making the sign of the cross. This work belongs to the Realism, a trend which was typical during the 1880s and 1890s, according to which the orphans, the poor, the sick and all those who benefited from somebody’s generosity had to be portrayed in a concrete fashion. Sculptor G Moreno 1890. Section A, no 53, The Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the Realistic blind man stone funary monument sculpture commissioned by Enrico Amerigo for his sisters memory. beside the pedestal on which the sculptor set the deceased’s bust he placed, on the left, the figure of an old blind man, kneeling down and leaning on a stick; on the right he placed the figure of a young orphan girl, recognizable as such by her kindergarten uniform, portrayed in the act of making the sign of the cross. This work belongs to the Realism, a trend which was typical during the 1880s and 1890s, according to which the orphans, the poor, the sick and all those who benefited from somebody’s generosity had to be portrayed in a concrete fashion. Sculptor G Moreno 1890. Section A, no 53, The Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the late borgeoise realistic style stone sculpture of the Gallino tomb sculpted by  G. Moreno 1894.  In the tomb, the bust that portrays the deceased Carolina receives the kiss of a child, probably the niece, supported by a young woman - the mother, or perhaps the elder sister - whose face is marked by pain; on the right an older man, presumably her husband, stands aside, almost absent, looking down at the ground. The most intimate tones and psychological introspection are grafted here in the language of bourgeois Realism: with undoubted technical virtuosity Moreno offers a rigorous "quantitative" description of reality, dwelling on every single detail of faces, clothing, accessories and hairstyles . Section A, no 54, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the realistic stone sculpture of a women praying at the monumental tomb of Luigi Priario by sculptor Paernio 1880,  the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculptured  funeral monument of Caterina Campodonico, also called "The Peanuts Seller" carrying a string of peanuts and donuts that she sold on the streets of Genoa. Completed while she was still alve by sculptor Lorenzo Orengo, who was the most important artist of the Bourgeois Realism, greatly sought after by the member of the middle class. The Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Pictures and image of a realistic style  stone sculpture of a priest, monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Pictures of the classical stone sculptured monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Pictures of a bronze sculptured angel,  monumental De Bernardi tomb, Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Pictures of the stone sculptured of a young girl, monumental Pelegrini tomb of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Pictures of the stone sculptured monumental tombs of the lower arcade of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and imabe in the Realistic Beorgeous style of a young man. The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Pictures of a son and his dying father, In memory of a Portuguese patrician Battista Noli Da Costa. Sculpted in a realistic style by Risorgimento sculptor S Saccomanno in 1887, Section A, no 3, Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Pictures of a son and his dying father, In memory of a Portuguese patrician Battista Noli Da Costa. Sculpted in a realistic style by Risorgimento sculptor S Saccomanno in 1887, Section A, no 3, Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • Roman sculptural decorations  on  The Arch Of Constantine built to celebrate victory over Maxentius . Rome. Rome
  • Statue of Aphrodite, a 2nd century Roman Copy. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style or Dresden-Capitoline type and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy
  • 1st Century BC statue of Aphordite by Menophantos. The casket of the sculpture is inscribed “ of the Aphrodite which is situated in the Troad (Troy) Menophantos made it”. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • 1st Century BC statue of Aphordite by Menophantos. The casket of the sculpture is inscribed “ of the Aphrodite which is situated in the Troad (Troy) Menophantos made it”. This sculpture depicts Aphrodite in the typical pose known as the Modest Aphrodite style and is a copy of a lost 4th century BC Aphrodite of Cnidos sculpture by Athenian sculpture Praxiteles. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite 2nd - 1st century BC Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Marine Venus' Type with a dolphin, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6296, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy, white background
  • Ancient Egyptian house altar relief sculpture of Akhenaten, Nefrertiti and their three daughters. 18th Dynasty 1345 BC . Neues Museum Berlin AM 14145.
  • Osztyapenko Statue in the Memento Sculpture Park - Communist Sculptures museum - Budapest - Hungary
  • Hittite bas relief sculpture orthostat panels from the Sphinx Gate of Alaca Hoyuk Archaeological site, Turkey.
  • Hittite bas relief sculpture orthostat panels from the Sphinx Gate of Alaca Hoyuk Archaeological site, Turkey.
  • Picture of the Sphinx gate Hittite sculpture, Alaca Hoyuk (Alacahoyuk) Hittite archaeological site Alaca, Corum Province, Turkey,
  • Pictures & Images of the Sphinx gate Hittite sculpture, Alaca Hoyuk (Alacahoyuk) Hittite archaeological site Alaca, Çorum Province, Turkey, Also known as Alacahüyük, Aladja-Hoyuk, Euyuk, or Evuk
  • Pictures & Images of the Sphinx gate Hittite sculpture, Alaca Hoyuk (Alacahoyuk) Hittite archaeological site  Alaca, Çorum Province, Turkey,
  • Pictures & Images of the Sphinx gate Hittite sculpture, Alaca Hoyuk (Alacahoyuk) Hittite archaeological site Alaca, Çorum Province, Turkey, Also known as Alacahüyük, Aladja-Hoyuk, Euyuk, or Evuk
  • Pictures & Images of the Sphinx gate Hittite sculpture, Alaca Hoyuk (Alacahoyuk) Hittite archaeological site Alaca, Çorum Province, Turkey, Also known as Alacahüyük, Aladja-Hoyuk, Euyuk, or Evuk
  • Pictures & Images of the Sphinx gate Hittite sculpture, Alaca Hoyuk (Alacahoyuk) Hittite archaeological site  Alaca, Çorum Province, Turkey,
  • Picture of the Sphinx gate Hittite sculpture, Alaca Hoyuk (Alacahoyuk) Hittite archaeological site Alaca, Corum Province, Turkey,
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble statue of the Esquiline Venus or Aphrodite dated to the 1st cent. It was found in 1874 in Piazza Dante on the Esquiline Hill in Rome, probably part of the site of the Horti Lamiani, one of the imperial gardens, rich archaeological sources of classical sculpture. The Esquiline Venus is an example of the Pasitelean “eclectic" style of the Neo-Attic school. It combines elements from a variety of other previous schools - a Praxitelean idea of the nude female form; a face, muscular torso, and small high breasts in the fifth-century BC severe style; and pressed-together thighs typical of Hellenistic sculptures. Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 39  -  sculpture of.an Angus Dei, the symbol of Jesus Christ as the Lamb of God. Strangely the creature holding the cross is a horse not a sheep. The sculpture is place in the centre of the Eastern Apse, symbolically the most important part of the church. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 8  -  sculpture of.an Angus Dei directly above the south door, the symbol of Jesus Christ as the Lamb of God. Strangely the creature holding the cross is a horse not a sheep. The sculpture is placed at the entrance of the church showing the importance of its iconography. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 39  -  sculpture of.an Angus Dei, the symbol of Jesus Christ as the Lamb of God. Strangely the creature holding the cross is a horse not a sheep. The sculpture is place in the centre of the Eastern Apse, symbolically the most important part of the church. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 28 (similar style to No 44) - sculpture of a female exhibitionist known as a Sheela-na-gig. The sculpture shows a female with a huge round head and puny body with her hand holding open a grossly enlarged vulva. It seems unlikely that this image is of a pornographic nature because it is on a church, and is more likely a warning against the temptations of women. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 28 (similar style to No 44) - sculpture of a female exhibitionist known as a Sheela-na-gig. The sculpture shows a female with a huge round head and puny body with her hand holding open a grossly enlarged vulva. It seems unlikely that this image is of a pornographic nature because it is on a church, and is more likely a warning against the temptations of women. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 39  -  sculpture of.an Angus Dei, the symbol of Jesus Christ as the Lamb of God. Strangely the creature holding the cross is a horse not a sheep. The sculpture is place in the centre of the Eastern Apse, symbolically the most important part of the church. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Osztyapenko Statue in the Memento Sculpture Park - Communist Sculptures museum - Budapest - Hungary
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 28 (similar style to No 44) - sculpture of a female exhibitionist known as a Sheela-na-gig. The sculpture shows a female with a huge round head and puny body with her hand holding open a grossly enlarged vulva. It seems unlikely that this image is of a pornographic nature because it is on a church, and is more likely a warning against the temptations of women. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 28 (similar style to No 44) - sculpture of a female exhibitionist known as a Sheela-na-gig. The sculpture shows a female with a huge round head and puny body with her hand holding open a grossly enlarged vulva. It seems unlikely that this image is of a pornographic nature because it is on a church, and is more likely a warning against the temptations of women. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Roman sculpture bust of Marcus Aurelius Severus Antoninus Augustus better known as Caracalla, made between 210 and 213 AD and excavated from the via Cassia, Rome. The realism of this  sculpture of Caracalla captures cruelty of the most notorious and unpleasant of emperors because of the massacres and persecutions he authorized and instigated throughout the Roman Empire. The eldest son of Septimius Severus, he reigned jointly with his father from 198 until Severus' death in 211. For a short time he then ruled jointly with his younger brother Geta until he had him murdered later in 211. Caracalla's reign was also notable for the Constitutio Antoniniana  granting Roman citizenship to all freemen throughout the Roman Empire. While travelling from Edessa to continue the war with Parthia, he was assassinated while urinating at a roadside near Carrhae on 8 April 217, by Julius Martialis, an officer of his personal bodyguard who was possibly resentful at not being promoted to the rank of centurion.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel sculptures from the Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 46 - sculpture of head, half man half pig. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 14 - sculpture of head, half man half lion. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 4 - sculpture of four intertwined serpents forming a geometric panel. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 50  -  sculpture of.a curious scene. A beaked headed creature holds down a man below its body and is pushing its beak into the mans mouth, The beaked creature seems to be holding something in its right hand which it is eating The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 47  - sculpture of a a bald dancing female dressed in a tight filling tunic. The image is probably a warning against the sexual senses that can be aroused by dancing. The figure has her legs crossed and appears to be recoiling from an impending violation. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque sculptures on the chancel arch from the interior of the Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 35  -  sculpture of.a curious scene. A beaked headed creature holds down a man below its body and is pushing its beak into the mans mouth, The beaked creature seems to be holding something in its right hand which it is eating The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • West Facade, Central Portal Tympanum - General View c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . The tympanum shows gothic sculptures of Christ in Majesty surrounded by the four Evangelist Symbols. The inner archivolt contains angels. On the two outer archivolts are the twenty-four elders of the Apocalypse. On the lintel are the twelve Apostles flanked by two other figures holding scrolls (Elisha and Enoch?). A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • West Facade, Central Portal Tympanum - General View c. 1145. Cathedral of Chartres, France . The tympanum shows gothic sculptures of Christ in Majesty surrounded by the four Evangelist Symbols. The inner archivolt contains angels. On the two outer archivolts are the twenty-four elders of the Apocalypse. On the lintel are the twelve Apostles flanked by two other figures holding scrolls (Elisha and Enoch?). A UNESCO World Heritage Site. .
  • Medieval Gothic Sculptures of the South portal  of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. The portal shaows the Last Judgement and the small figures represent "The blessed". A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval Gothic Sculptures of the South portal  of the Cathedral of Chartres, France. The portal shaows the Last Judgement and the small figures represent "The blessed". A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Memento Sculpture Park ( Szobaopark ) Budapest, Hungary
  • Republic of Councils Monument - Memento Sculpture Park ( Szobaopark ) Budapest, Hungary
  • Lenin Statue - Memento Sculpture Park ( Szobaopark ) Budapest, Hungary
  • Memento Sculpture Park ( Szobaopark ) Budapest, Hungary
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Aphrodite (Venus), ‘Dresden Capitoline Type, copied from a Hellanistic Greek original,  inv 6238, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy, black background
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel sculptures from the Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 37 - sculpture of a grotesque head with interlocking teeth. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 44 - sculpture of a fiddle or rebeck player, similar style to corbel no 28. Its style is also associated with a corbel on the apse at Courpiac ( Gironde). The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of a Green Man with decorative columns from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140.
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 50  -  sculpture of.a curious scene. A beaked headed creature holds down a man below its body and is pushing its beak into the mans mouth, The beaked creature seems to be holding something in its right hand which it is eating The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel sculptures from the Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 12 - sculpture of the head of an animal with a lions mane and big fanged teeth. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 61 - sculpture of  a human head with curly hair and beard. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel  sculpture from the Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel  sculpture from the Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 14 - sculpture of a head, half man half lion. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 21 - sculpture of an animal with a long snout and pointed ears. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 23 - sculpture of a grotesque head with either a huge swollen tongue of something in its mouth. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel  sculpture from the Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 64 - sculpture of  an animal with a cat like head biting the underside of a bowl. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 54 - sculpture of a male stylised simple round head. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 27 - sculpture of a pigs head. Pigs signify sinners, the unclean and heretics as well as carnal feelings, it is therefore a morality figure. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 38 - sculpture of a head, half man half lion with a mouth like a theatrical mask. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 43 - sculpture of an animal head, maybe a cat. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 88 - sculpture of a male with curly hair and theatrical style mouth. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 21 - sculpture of an animal with a long snout and pointed ears. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 52 - sculpture of a featureless human. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 61 - sculpture of  a human head with curly hair and beard. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 37 - sculpture of a grotesque head with interlocking teeth. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 30 - sculpture of of a muzzled bears head with two humans in its mouth, their heads poking out either side of its head.  The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel  sculpture from the Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 78 - sculpture of mans head with elongated face from the outside of the west knave. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 23 - sculpture of a grotesque head with either a huge swollen tongue of something in its mouth. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 27 - sculpture of a pigs head. Pigs signify sinners, the unclean and heretics as well as carnal feelings, it is therefore a morality figure. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 82 - sculpture of mans head with a moustache and beard similar to no 79. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 3 - sculpture of a head, half man half lion. The wide mouth is the same style as theatrical masks. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 89 - sculpture of a male with curly hair and theatrical style mouth. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 31 - sculpture of a man with a goatee beard. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 40 - sculpture of a mans head.  The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 17 - sculpture of the head of an animal with a lions mane and beak shaped wide mouth. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 70 - sculpture of two fish swimming upwards. A fish was used by early Christians to symbolise Jesus Christ . The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 31 - sculpture of a man with a goatee beard. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 38 - sculpture of a head, half man half lion with a mouth like a theatrical mask. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 41 - sculpture of a grotesque stylised creatures head with bulging eyes. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 40 - sculpture of a mans head.  The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 16 - sculpture of a rams head that symbolise the Apostles of the church. Apostles are like rams because they have strong foreheads which toss = evil out of the way. .  The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 16 - sculpture of a rams head that symbolise the Apostles of the church. Apostles are like rams because they have strong foreheads which toss = evil out of the way. .  The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 30 - sculpture of of a muzzled bears head with two humans in its mouth, their heads poking out either side of its head.  The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 41 - sculpture of a grotesque stylised creatures head with bulging eyes. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 30 - sculpture of of a muzzled bears head with two humans in its mouth, their heads poking out either side of its head.  The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 36 - sculpture of two fledgling birds both biting a serpent. Possibly an allegory of the original sin man is born with due to Adam taking the apple from a serpent in the garden of Eden.  The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 36 - sculpture of two fledgling birds both biting a serpent. Possibly an allegory of the original sin man is born with due to Adam taking the apple from a serpent in the garden of Eden.  The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 32 - sculpture of an inverted head of a creature that is a cross between the ibex with a pigs snout. In the bestiary the strength of the Ibex horns will save it if it falls from a mountain and lands on them. This is an allegory of learned men who understand the harmony of the New and Old Testaments which are the two horns that give them strength if they fall.  The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 56 - sculpture of a stylised head of a human. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 56 - sculpture of a stylised head of a human. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 58 - sculpture of a stylised head of a human. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 62 - sculpture of a large bird of prey. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 62 - sculpture of a large bird of prey. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 48  -  sculpture of.a grotesque creature with a long snout and fierce teeth. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 29  -  sculpture of.a creature with a rounded head, pointed ears and a beaked nose. In its huge mouth it is biting on a rod . The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 48  -  sculpture of.a grotesque creature with a long snout and fierce teeth. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 33  -  sculpture of.very modern cartoon like hound and a hare. In the Bestiary dogs are like preachers who put men back on the right course of righteousness and the hare represents men who fear God and put their trust in the creator . The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 29  -  sculpture of.a creature with a rounded head, pointed ears and a beaked nose. In its huge mouth it is biting on a rod . The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 35  -  sculpture of.a curious scene. A beaked headed creature holds down a man below its body and is pushing its beak into the mans mouth, The beaked creature seems to be holding something in its right hand which it is eating The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 45  - sculpture of what is probably a morality tale. A man and women are grasping each other. The women seems to be clutching the mans buttocks and he has clasped her hand as if resisting. He also seems to be resisting an embrace. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 49  - sculpture of  an alien like chinless bald headed figure. Its perfectly round mouth is filled with a ball like object and may be a moral warning about talking too much. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 45  - sculpture of what is probably a morality tale. A man and women are grasping each other. The women seems to be clutching the mans buttocks and he has clasped her hand as if resisting. He also seems to be resisting an embrace. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque sculptures on the chancel arch from the interior of the Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque sculptures on the chancel arch from the interior of the Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 44 - sculpture of a fiddle or rebeck player, similar style to corbel no 28. Its style is also associated with a corbel on the apse at Courpiac ( Gironde). The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque sculptures on the chancel arch from the interior of the Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque sculptures on the chancel arch from the interior of the Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque sculptures on the chancel arch from the interior of the Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque sculptures on the chancel arch from the interior of the Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque sculptures on the chancel arch from the interior of the Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of mythical dragon and a man from the south doorway of the Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of mythical dragon from the south doorway of the Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of fish the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 1 - sculpture of a quail that it has just killed its young. This is based on a  bestiary story that tells of a Pelican that kills its young. It then pecks its breast to draw blood and sits on its dead offspring and the blood brings the young bird back to life. This is an allegory of Christ giving his blood on the cross for mankind. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 33  -  sculpture of.very modern cartoon like hound and a hare. In the Bestiary dogs are like preachers who put men back on the right course of righteousness and the hare represents men who fear God and put their trust in the creator . The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 35  -  sculpture of.a curious scene. A beaked headed creature holds down a man below its body and is pushing its beak into the mans mouth, The beaked creature seems to be holding something in its right hand which it is eating The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 49  - sculpture of  an alien like chinless bald headed figure. Its perfectly round mouth is filled with a ball like object and may be a moral warning about talking too much. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 47  - sculpture of a a bald dancing female dressed in a tight filling tunic. The image is probably a warning against the sexual senses that can be aroused by dancing. The figure has her legs crossed and appears to be recoiling from an impending violation. The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of mythical dragon from the south doorway of the Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of fish the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of mythical dragon from the south doorway of the Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of mythical dragon from the south doorway of the Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of a Green Man with decorative columns from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140.
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Roman relief sculpture on the Christian sarcophagus side od Marcus Claudianus depicting scenes from  the new testament , circa 330 - 335 AD from the via della Lungara near S.Giacomo in Settimiana, Rome, Italy. National Roman Musuem, Rome.
  • Roman relief sculpture on a sarcophagus side showing a married couple with pagan deities, circa 270 - 280 AD from the via Latina, Rome, Italy. National Roman Musuem, Rome.
  • Roman relief sculpture on a sarcophagus side depiction the Muses, circa 280 - 290 AD from the Villa Celimontana. National Roman Musuem, Rome.
  • Roman relief sculpture panel decorated on both sides with masks from the second half of the 1st cent. AD excavated from the Valle Giardino, Nemi, Italy. The panel is sculpted on both sides; the front side depicts the half moon shaped face of a deity wearing a crown.  Inv 112158, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Gordian III made between 238 and 244 AD and excavated from Ostia. At the age of 13, he became the youngest sole legal Roman emperor throughout the existence of the united Roman Empire. Gordian was the son of Antonia Gordiana and an unnamed Roman Senator who died before 238. When the Persians under Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia, the young emperor opened the doors of the Temple of Janus for the last time in Roman history, and sent a large army to the East. The Sassanids were driven back over the Euphrates and defeated in the Battle of Resaena (243AD). In the beginning of 244, the Persians counter-attacked. Persian sources claim that a battle was fought (Battle of Misiche) near modern Fallujah (Iraq) and resulted in a major Roman defeat and the death of Gordian III. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Alexander Severus made between 222 and 235 AD and excavated from Ostia. Roman Emperor from 222 to 235. Alexander was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. As emperor, Alexander's peace time reign was prosperous. However militarily Rome was confronted with the rising Sassanid Empire. He managed to check the threat of the Sassanids, but when campaigning against Germanic tribes of Germania, Alexander attempted to bring peace by engaging in diplomacy and bribery. This alienated many in the legions and led to a conspiracy to assassinate and replace him. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Septimius Severus made between 196 and 197 AD and excavated from Ostia. Severus became Roman emperor in 193 AD After deposing and killing the incumbent emperor Didius Julianus. In 202, he campaigned in Africa and Mauretania against the Garamantes; capturing their capital Garama and expanding the Limes Tripolitanus along the southern frontier of the empire. Late in his reign he travelled to Britain, strengthening Hadrian's Wall and reoccupying the Antonine Wall. Severus died in early 211 at Eboracum (today York, England), succeeded by his sons Caracalla and Geta who fought constantly until Caracalla had Geta murdered. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of Publius Septimius Antoninus Geta better known as Geta brother of Caracalla, made between 209 and 212 AD and excavated from the via XX Septembre, Rome. Geta was the younger son of Septimius Severus by his second wife Julia Domna. Geta  was a Roman emperor who ruled with his father Septimius Severus and his older brother Caracalla from 209 until his death, when he was murdered on Caracalla's orders.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture of a Discus Thrower, Paros marble made in the mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Villa Palombara, Esquilino, Rome. The Disus Thrower statue is almost the only fully preserved example of its type, the statue is a faithful copy of one of the most admired works of antiquity; the bronze discobolus by Greek sculptor Myron circa 450 BC. The statue depicts the moment preceding the release of the discus, the athlete appears to move in the surrounding space with a complex action, exemplifying the Hellenistic experimentation of the plastic reprentation of the human body. Inv 126371, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture head of Hercules, mid 2nd cent AD excavated from the Vale Giardino, Nemi. The head was probably made separately for the insertion onto a statue, probably depicting the gold seated. The work is a copy of a Greek original of the late Hellenistic period, inspired by a statue by the Greek sculptor Lysippos of Sicyon known as the ‘Herakles Epitapezios’ sculpted around 300 BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman head sculpture in the ‘Italic cubism ‘ style, 2nd - 3rd century BC, found in the foundations of the Ministery of Finance on the via XX Septembre, Rome. The head, the back of which was not completed, shows markedly realistic, clear features. The style, a blend of Greek art and Italic traditions, is traceable to Etruscan portraiture of the so called ‘Italic cubism’ of the 3rd century BC, and local stone used was well suited to this genre. It is believed to be the only known example of this style and has been roughly dated to between the 3rd and 2nd century BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Athena (Roman Minerva) Sitting - from the Augustan period circa 63-43 BC the statue is a copy of a  5th century BC Greek  original, found in a palace on the Via Marmorato off the piazza dell’Emporio, Rome. The statue represents the goddess Minerva, dressed in chiton and himation which covers her head. The face and neck, now lost, have been substituted by a plaster cast of the Athena Carpegna. The aegis with the gorge emblem on her breast have enabled the goddess to be identified as Athena, the Roman Minerva, genially depicted in the guise of a helmeted female warrior. Its remarkable size suggests that this was a cult image, although a hypothesis remains linking it to the temple of Minerva on the Aventine. The sculpture bears the hallmark of a second of the 5th century BC Hellenistic Greek statue  made by Phidias. but uses different materials from the original which would have been in gold and ivory .National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of an Amazon on horseback, a 2nd century AD copy from an original 2nd century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6407 Farnese Collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of an Amazon on horseback, a 2nd century AD copy from an original 2nd century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6407 Farnese Collection, Naples , Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of an Amazon on horseback, a 2nd century AD copy from an original 2nd century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6407 Farnese Collection, Naples Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman marble sculpture of an Amazon on horseback, a 2nd century AD copy from an original 2nd century BC Hellanistic Greek original, inv 6407 Farnese Collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman bronze sculpture of Dinoysus - Plato, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman bronze sculpture of Dinoysus - Plato, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman bronze sculpture of Dinoysus - Plato, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman bronze sculpture of Dinoysus - Plato, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Roman bronze sculpture of Dinoysus - Plato, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel sculptures from the Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 50  -  sculpture of.a curious scene. A beaked headed creature holds down a man below its body and is pushing its beak into the mans mouth, The beaked creature seems to be holding something in its right hand which it is eating The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque relief sculptures of dragons and mythical creatures depicting the struggle between good and evil, from the South doorway of Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herifordshire, England. Built around 1140

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