• Roman theatre of Aphrodisias dedicated to Aphrodite and the people of the city by Julius Zoilos in the  2nd half of 1st century BC. Seats over 8000 people. Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman theatre of Aphrodisias dedicated to Aphrodite and the people of the city by Julius Zoilos in the  2nd half of 1st century BC. Seats over 8000 people. Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman theatre of Aphrodisias dedicated to Aphrodite and the people of the city by Julius Zoilos in the  2nd half of 1st century BC. Seats over 8000 people. Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman theatre of Aphrodisias dedicated to Aphrodite and the people of the city by Julius Zoilos in the  2nd half of 1st century BC. Seats over 8000 people. Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman theatre of Aphrodisias dedicated to Aphrodite and the people of the city by Julius Zoilos in the  2nd half of 1st century BC. Seats over 8000 people. Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman theatre of Aphrodisias dedicated to Aphrodite and the people of the city by Julius Zoilos in the  2nd half of 1st century BC. Seats over 8000 people. Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman theatre of Aphrodisias dedicated to Aphrodite and the people of the city by Julius Zoilos in the  2nd half of 1st century BC. Seats over 8000 people. Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman theatre of Aphrodisias dedicated to Aphrodite and the people of the city by Julius Zoilos in the  2nd half of 1st century BC. Seats over 8000 people. Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman sculpted frieze blocks with garland relief sculptures, North Portico, Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman sculpted frieze blocks with garland relief sculptures, North Portico, Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman sculpted frieze blocks with garland relief sculptures, North Portico, Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman ruins of the circus stadium of Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman sculpted frieze blocks with garland relief sculptures, North Portico, Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman theatre of Aphrodisias dedicated to Aphrodite and the people of the city by Julius Zoilos in the  2nd half of 1st century BC. Seats over 8000 people. Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman ruins of the circus stadium of Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman ruins of the circus stadium of Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman sculpted frieze blocks with garland relief sculptures, North Portico, Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The exterior of the 6th century Byzantine (Eastern Roman) Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) built by Emperor Justinian. The size of the dome was un-surpassed until the 16th century, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The exterior of the 6th century Byzantine (Eastern Roman) Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) built by Emperor Justinian. The size of the dome was un-surpassed until the 16th century, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The exterior of the 6th century Byzantine (Eastern Roman) Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) built by Emperor Justinian. The size of the dome was un-surpassed until the 16th century, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The exterior of the 6th century Byzantine (Eastern Roman) Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) built by Emperor Justinian. The size of the dome was un-surpassed until the 16th century, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The exterior of the 6th century Byzantine (Eastern Roman) Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) built by Emperor Justinian. The size of the dome was un-surpassed until the 16th century, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The exterior of the 6th century Byzantine (Eastern Roman) Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) built by Emperor Justinian. The size of the dome was un-surpassed until the 16th century, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The exterior of the 6th century Byzantine (Eastern Roman) Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) at sunset, built by Emperor Justinian. The size of the dome was un-surpassed until the 16th century, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The exterior of the 6th century Byzantine (Eastern Roman) Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) built by Emperor Justinian. The size of the dome was un-surpassed until the 16th century, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The exterior of the 6th century Byzantine (Eastern Roman) Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) built by Emperor Justinian. The size of the dome was un-surpassed until the 16th century, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The exterior of the 6th century Byzantine (Eastern Roman) Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) built by Emperor Justinian. The size of the dome was un-surpassed until the 16th century, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The exterior of the 6th century Byzantine (Eastern Roman) Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) at sunset, built by Emperor Justinian. The size of the dome was un-surpassed until the 16th century, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The entrance to the Temple of Emperor Domitian ( 81-96 AD) . Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Emperor Hadrian on Curetes Street ( 117 - 138 A.D ).  Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Fountain of Emperor Trajan and  Curetes Street constructed between 102 - 114 A.D. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Fountain of Emperor Trajan on Curetes Street constructed between 102 - 114 A.D. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Pillars of The Basilica, 1st Century A.D. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Library of Celsus & the Agora to the right. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Statue on  Curetes Street looking towards the Library of Celsus. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Rhodian Peristyle built in the time of Emperor Augustus ( 27 B.C. -A.D. 14) and dedicated to Julius Caesar  and the goddess Roma then Augustus & Artemis. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The entrance to the Temple of Emperor Domitian ( 81-96 AD) . Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Library of Celsus & the Agora to the right. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Fountain of Emperor Trajan on Curetes Street constructed between 102 - 114 A.D. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Entrance to the Odeion (Small Thaetre) that was built as a council chamber in 2nd century A.D. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Workshop Banner showing Mercury with a massive phalus. Erotic Fresco from Pompeii, Naples Archaeological Museum 1st cent AD
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Pillars of The Basilica, 1st Century A.D. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Fountain of Emperor Trajan and  Curetes Street constructed between 102 - 114 A.D. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • The Temple of Emperor Hadrian on Curetes Street ( 117 - 138 A.D ).  Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Heracles Gate at the begining of Curetes Street , showing Heracles wrapped in a Nemea Lion skin. Probably made in the 2nc century A.D. and moved to Ephesus in the 5th century A.D. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Fountain of Emperor Trajan on Curetes Street constructed between 102 - 114 A.D. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Library of Celsus & the Agora to the right. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Curetes Street (Priest Street)  that runs through the centre of Ephesus. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Statue on  Curetes Street looking towards the Library of Celsus. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Theatre of Ephesus on the slopes of Panayir Dagi ( mount) was built during the reign of Alexander the Great successor, Lysimachos, between 306 - 281 B.C. The building was altered many times by the time St Paul was famously found guilty of preaching against Artemis & Diana and banished from the city after a 3 year stay.  Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Fountain of Emperor Trajan on Curetes Street constructed between 102 - 114 A.D. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Mazeus Mithridates Gate to the Agora of Ephesus takes its name from the 2 Freed slave of  Emperor Augustus who paid for its contruction. It is dedicated to Emperor Augustus, his wife Livia , his daughter Julia and her husband Agrippa. Built in 4 or 3 B.C. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Memmius Monument was built in the 1st century B.C. to honour Mmmius, the grandson of Emperor Sulla and son of Caicus whose sculptures can be seen on the monument. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The entrance to the Temple of Emperor Domitian ( 81-96 AD) . Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • The Temple of Emperor Hadrian on Curetes Street ( 117 - 138 A.D ).  Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Fountain of Emperor Trajan and  Curetes Street constructed between 102 - 114 A.D. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Statue on  Curetes Street looking towards the Library of Celsus. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Fountain of Emperor Trajan and  Curetes Street constructed between 102 - 114 A.D. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Curetes Street (Priest Street)  that runs through the centre of Ephesus. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Library of Celsus & the Agora to the right. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Emperor Hadrian on Curetes Street ( 117 - 138 A.D ).  Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Fountain of Emperor Trajan and  Curetes Street constructed between 102 - 114 A.D. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Fountain of Emperor Trajan on Curetes Street constructed between 102 - 114 A.D. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Rhodian Peristyle built in the time of Emperor Augustus ( 27 B.C. -A.D. 14) and dedicated to Julius Caesar  and the goddess Roma then Augustus & Artemis. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Entrance to the Odeion (Small Thaetre) that was built as a council chamber in 2nd century A.D. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The entrance to the Temple of Emperor Domitian ( 81-96 AD) . Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Roman statue of Augustus as Pontifex Maximus, circa 17-14 BC.  This statue of Augustus was typical of the approved style that Augustus used to control his public image. As Pontifex Maximus the statue emphasises the piety of the ruler and his reverence for the gods and traditions of Rome. Augustus thus revitalised the role and function of the most ancient Roman priesthoods and exalted the myths that narrated the origins of Rome. The statue is part of the political propaganda that Augustus used to cement his position of first amongst equals to the very conservative Romans.  National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Curetes Street (Priest Street)  that runs through the centre of Ephesus. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Fountain of Emperor Trajan and  Curetes Street constructed between 102 - 114 A.D. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Mazeus Mithridates Gate to the Agora of Ephesus takes its name from the 2 Freed slave of  Emperor Augustus who paid for its contruction. It is dedicated to Emperor Augustus, his wife Livia , his daughter Julia and her husband Agrippa. Built in 4 or 3 B.C. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Theatre of Ephesus on the slopes of Panayir Dagi ( mount) was built during the reign of Alexander the Great successor, Lysimachos, between 306 - 281 B.C. The building was altered many times by the time St Paul was famously found guilty of preaching against Artemis & Diana and banished from the city after a 3 year stay.  Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Emperor Hadrian on Curetes Street ( 117 - 138 A.D ).  Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Fountain of Emperor Trajan and  Curetes Street constructed between 102 - 114 A.D. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Heracles Gate at the begining of Curetes Street , showing Heracles wrapped in a Nemea Lion skin. Probably made in the 2nc century A.D. and moved to Ephesus in the 5th century A.D. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Theatre of Ephesus on the slopes of Panayir Dagi ( mount) was built during the reign of Alexander the Great successor, Lysimachos, between 306 - 281 B.C. The building was altered many times by the time St Paul was famously found guilty of preaching against Artemis & Diana and banished from the city after a 3 year stay.  Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Memmius Monument was built in the 1st century B.C. to honour Mmmius, the grandson of Emperor Sulla and son of Caicus whose sculptures can be seen on the monument. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Statue of a female inj the Small Herculaneum Style, Athens Archaeological Museum, Cat no 242. Pentelic marble.  Against grey<br />
<br />
Copy of earlier famous Greek statue dated 300 BC. The women is depicted wearing a full length chiton and a himation that covers her entire body.
  • Statue of a female inj the Small Herculaneum Style, Athens Archaeological Museum, Cat no 242. Pentelic marble.  Against white, <br />
<br />
Copy of earlier famous Greek statue dated 300 BC. The women is depicted wearing a full length chiton and a himation that covers her entire body.
  • Statue of a female inj the Small Herculaneum Style, Athens Archaeological Museum, Cat no 242. Pentelic marble. Against black<br />
<br />
Copy of earlier famous Greek statue dated 300 BC. The women is depicted wearing a full length chiton and a himation that covers her entire body.
  • Statue of a female inj the Small Herculaneum Style, Athens Archaeological Museum, Cat no 242. Pentelic marble. <br />
<br />
Copy of earlier famous Greek statue dated 300 BC. The women is depicted wearing a full length chiton and a himation that covers her entire body.
  • Marble statue of Pan found in Sparta, Pelopenese, 1st Cent AD copy of 4th Cent BC Greek original. Athens Archaeological Museum Cat No 252. Against grey<br />
<br />
Pan, the goat footed god wears an animal pelt from which protrude only his jhairy legs. In his left hand he is holding pan pipes. The expression on his bestial featured face is softened by a broad smile.
  • Statue of a female inj the Small Herculaneum Style, Athens Archaeological Museum, Cat no 242. Pentelic marble. Against grey<br />
<br />
Copy of earlier famous Greek statue dated 300 BC. The women is depicted wearing a full length chiton and a himation that covers her entire body.
  • Marble statue of Pan found in Sparta, Pelopenese, 1st Cent AD copy of 4th Cent BC Greek original. Athens Archaeological Museum Cat No 252. Against white, <br />
<br />
Pan, the goat footed god wears an animal pelt from which protrude only his jhairy legs. In his left hand he is holding pan pipes. The expression on his bestial featured face is softened by a broad smile.
  • Marble statue of Pan found in Sparta, Pelopenese, 1st Cent AD copy of 4th Cent BC Greek original. Athens Archaeological Museum Cat No 252. Against black<br />
<br />
Pan, the goat footed god wears an animal pelt from which protrude only his jhairy legs. In his left hand he is holding pan pipes. The expression on his bestial featured face is softened by a broad smile.
  • Marble statue of Pan found in Sparta, Pelopenese, 1st Cent AD copy of 4th Cent BC Greek original. Athens Archaeological Museum Cat No 252. Against grey<br />
<br />
Pan, the goat footed god wears an animal pelt from which protrude only his jhairy legs. In his left hand he is holding pan pipes. The expression on his bestial featured face is softened by a broad smile.
  • Marble statue of Pan found in Sparta, Pelopenese, 1st Cent AD copy of 4th Cent BC Greek original. Athens Archaeological Museum Cat No 252.<br />
<br />
Pan, the goat footed god wears an animal pelt from which protrude only his jhairy legs. In his left hand he is holding pan pipes. The expression on his bestial featured face is softened by a broad smile.
  • Tetrapylon monumental gateway to  the Temple of Aphrodite. The Tetrapylon consisted of four rows of four columns and It connects the major street to the sacred way heading toward the sanctuary of Aphrodite. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Sebasteion sanctuary building ruins and relief panels,  Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Close up of the pediments of the Tetrapylon monumental gateway to  the Temple of Aphrodite. The Tetrapylon consisted of four rows of four columns and It connects the major street to the sacred way heading toward the sanctuary of Aphrodite. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Sebasteion sanctuary building ruins and relief panels,  Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Sebasteion sanctuary building ruins and relief panels,  Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Sebasteion sanctuary building ruins and relief panels,  Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Sebasteion sanctuary building ruins and relief panels,  Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Odeon (Concert-hall) seating  around 1700 people. It was used also as the Bouleuterion for the meetings of the Senate and remained in this form until the early fifth century.<br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Close up of the pediments of the Tetrapylon monumental gateway to  the Temple of Aphrodite. The Tetrapylon consisted of four rows of four columns and It connects the major street to the sacred way heading toward the sanctuary of Aphrodite. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Tetrapylon monumental gateway to  the Temple of Aphrodite. The Tetrapylon consisted of four rows of four columns and It connects the major street to the sacred way heading toward the sanctuary of Aphrodite. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Tetrapylon monumental gateway to  the Temple of Aphrodite. The Tetrapylon consisted of four rows of four columns and It connects the major street to the sacred way heading toward the sanctuary of Aphrodite. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Tetrapylon monumental gateway to  the Temple of Aphrodite. The Tetrapylon consisted of four rows of four columns and It connects the major street to the sacred way heading toward the sanctuary of Aphrodite. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Tetrapylon monumental gateway to  the Temple of Aphrodite. The Tetrapylon consisted of four rows of four columns and It connects the major street to the sacred way heading toward the sanctuary of Aphrodite. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Tetrapylon monumental gateway to  the Temple of Aphrodite. The Tetrapylon consisted of four rows of four columns and It connects the major street to the sacred way heading toward the sanctuary of Aphrodite. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Tetrapylon monumental gateway to  the Temple of Aphrodite. The Tetrapylon consisted of four rows of four columns and It connects the major street to the sacred way heading toward the sanctuary of Aphrodite. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Sebasteion sanctuary building ruins and relief panels,  Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Theatre colonade of Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Odeon (Concert-hall) seating  around 1700 people. It was used also as the Bouleuterion for the meetings of the Senate and remained in this form until the early fifth century.<br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Tetrapylon monumental gateway to  the Temple of Aphrodite. The Tetrapylon consisted of four rows of four columns and It connects the major street to the sacred way heading toward the sanctuary of Aphrodite. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Virgin Mary between Emperor  Justinian to the left presenting a model of the Hagia Sophia and Emperor Constantine presenting a model of Constantinople.  Hagia Sophia, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Byzantine mosaic of the Virgin and Child was the first of the post-iconoclastic mosaics inaugurated on 29 March 867 by Patriarch Photius and the emperors Michael III and Basil I.  Hagia Sophia, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Byzantine mosaic of the Virgin and Child was the first of the post-iconoclastic mosaics inaugurated on 29 March 867 by Patriarch Photius and the emperors Michael III and Basil I.  Hagia Sophia, Istanbul, Turkey
  • 12th Century Byzantine mosaic of  Empress Irene  (Eirene) making an offering as symbolised by the scroll. Hagia Sophia, Istanbul, Turkey
  • 11th Century Byzantine mosaic of Christ Pantocrator with (left) Emperor Constantine IX Monmachus making an offering of money and (right) Empress Zoe. Hagia Sophia, Istanbul, Turkey
  • 11th Century Byzantine mosaic of  Emperor Constantine IX Monmachus making an offering of money . Hagia Sophia, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Byzantine Mosaic of an Angel, Hagia, Sophia, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Byzantine Deësis ( Entreaty) mosaic , 1261, in which John The Virgin Mary shown in three-quarters profile, are imploring the intercession of Christ Pantocrator for humanity on Judgment Day.   Hagia Sophia, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Byzantine Deësis ( Entreaty) mosaic , 1261, in which John The Baptist,  both shown in three-quarters profile, are imploring the intercession of Christ Pantocrator for humanity on Judgment Day.   Hagia Sophia, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Byzantine Deësis ( Entreaty) mosaic , 1261, detail of Christ Pantocrator for humanity on Judgment Day.   Hagia Sophia, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Byzantine Deësis ( Entreaty) mosaic , 1261, in which the Virgin Mary & John The Baptist,  both shown in three-quarters profile, are imploring the intercession of Christ Pantocrator for humanity on Judgment Day.   Hagia Sophia, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Islamic decoration on the domes of the interior of Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) , Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Islamic decoration on the domes of the interior of Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) , Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Islamic decoration on the domes of the interior of Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) , Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Islamic decoration on the domes of the interior of Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) , Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Islamic decoration on the domes of the interior of Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) , Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Virgin Mary between Emperor  Justinian to the left presenting a model of the Hagia Sophia and Emperor Constantine presenting a model of Constantinople.  Hagia Sophia, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Byzantine mosaic of the Virgin and Child was the first of the post-iconoclastic mosaics inaugurated on 29 March 867 by Patriarch Photius and the emperors Michael III and Basil I.  Hagia Sophia, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Byzantine mosaic of the Virgin and Child was the first of the post-iconoclastic mosaics inaugurated on 29 March 867 by Patriarch Photius and the emperors Michael III and Basil I.  Hagia Sophia, Istanbul, Turkey
  • 12th Century Byzantine mosaic of  The Madonna & Child,  Hagia Sophia, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Islamic decoration on the domes of the interior of Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) , Istanbul, Turkey
  • Byzantine Mosaic of an Angel, Hagia, Sophia, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Byzantine Deësis ( Entreaty) mosaic , 1261, in which John The Virgin Mary shown in three-quarters profile, are imploring the intercession of Christ Pantocrator for humanity on Judgment Day.   Hagia Sophia, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Byzantine Deësis ( Entreaty) mosaic , 1261, detail of Christ Pantocrator for humanity on Judgment Day.   Hagia Sophia, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Byzantine Deësis ( Entreaty) mosaic , 1261, detail of Christ Pantocrator for humanity on Judgment Day.   Hagia Sophia, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Byzantine Deësis ( Entreaty) mosaic , 1261, detail of Christ Pantocrator for humanity on Judgment Day.   Hagia Sophia, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Ornate Byzantine column capital in the Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) , Istanbul, Turkey
  • Islamic writings in the Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) , Istanbul, Turkey
  • Islamic writings in the Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) , Istanbul, Turkey
  • Islamic writings in the Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) , Istanbul, Turkey
  • The 19th century Mihrap (Mihrab), the niche in a mosque that indicated the direction of Mecca, Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) , Istanbul, Turkey
  • The 19th century minbar (mimbar or mimber)  pulpit  where the imam  stood to deliver sermons or in the Hussainia where the speaker sits and lectures the congregation. Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) , Istanbul, Turkey
  • The 19th century minbar (mimbar or mimber)  pulpit  where the imam  stood to deliver sermons or in the Hussainia where the speaker sits and lectures the congregation. Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) , Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Islamic decoration on the domes of the interior of Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) , Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Islamic decoration on the domes of the interior of Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) , Istanbul, Turkey
  • Byzantine Deësis ( Entreaty) mosaic , 1261, detail of Christ Pantocrator for humanity on Judgment Day.   Hagia Sophia, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Ornate Byzantine column capital in the Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) , Istanbul, Turkey
  • Ornate Byzantine column capital in the Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) , Istanbul, Turkey
  • Islamic writings in the Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) , Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Islamic decoration on the domes of the interior of Hagia Sophia ( Ayasofya ) , Istanbul, Turkey
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Silenus (Faune to the Romans) and The Child ( Dionysus, Bacchus to the Romans). A 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble discovered in the gardens of the Salluste in Rome, Italy. Silenus was ordered by Zeus to take his illegitimate son son Dionysus away from the wrath of Hera to the nymphs. This staue is a Roman copy of a lost bronze Greek original by the 4th century BC Greek sculptor  Lysippos.  From the Borghese collection, Inv MR 346   (or Ma 922), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Pan removing a thorn from the foot of a satyr. 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Pan (Faunus to the Romans) , the Greek god of shepherds, is recognisable as a hybrid of half-man half-goat. This group, of which several Roman versions exist, dates from circa 50 BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 193 ( or Ma 320 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Pan removing a thorn from the foot of a satyr. 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Pan (Faunus to the Romans) , the Greek god of shepherds, is recognisable as a hybrid of half-man half-goat. This group, of which several Roman versions exist, dates from circa 50 BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 193 ( or Ma 320 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Painted colour verion of Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Pan removing a thorn from the foot of a satyr. 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Pan (Faunus to the Romans) , the Greek god of shepherds, is recognisable as a hybrid of half-man half-goat. This group, of which several Roman versions exist, dates from circa 50 BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 193 ( or Ma 320 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Pan removing a thorn from the foot of a satyr. 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Pan (Faunus to the Romans) , the Greek god of shepherds, is recognisable as a hybrid of half-man half-goat. This group, of which several Roman versions exist, dates from circa 50 BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 193 ( or Ma 320 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Pan removing a thorn from the foot of a satyr. 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Pan (Faunus to the Romans) , the Greek god of shepherds, is recognisable as a hybrid of half-man half-goat. This group, of which several Roman versions exist, dates from circa 50 BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 193 ( or Ma 320 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Painted colour verion of Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Pan removing a thorn from the foot of a satyr. 1st - 2nd AD Roman sculpture in marble. Pan (Faunus to the Romans) , the Greek god of shepherds, is recognisable as a hybrid of half-man half-goat. This group, of which several Roman versions exist, dates from circa 50 BC. The Borghese Collection inv MR 193 ( or Ma 320 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) “Capitoline Type”. 2nd centuryAD Roman statue in marble discovered at the Acqua Traversa near Rome.  The statue belong to a series of Roman replicas of a Greek original that reproduce a famous picture of goddess Aphrodite (Venus) and the best known copy is in the Capitoline Museums in Rome. The now lost, the Greek original dates from the 2nd century or 3rd BC and is known as the "Aphrodite of Knidos” in which Aphrodite accompanied by a cupid is surprised while bathing.  Inv MR 369   (or Ma 335), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Painted colour verion of Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Painted colour verion of Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Painted colour verion of Artemis and a deer, known as "Diana of Versailles”, a 1st - 2nd century Roman statue in marble probably from Italy.  Artemis, Diana to the Romans, is goddess of the hunt, is accompanied by a deer.  The Diana of Versailles, similar to other Roman replicas was found in Libya or Turkey and was copied from a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 BC .  First the statue was at Fontainbleau then the Louvre ancient hall and finally it went to Versailles. From the collection of Louis XIV, Pope Paul IV and Henry II (1556) . Inv MR 152 ( or Ma 589), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Statue of the Emperor Titus - an end of the 1st century AD Roman statue probably from Rome. Titus was Emperor of the Romans fom 79 to 81 AD. The statue looks like it may have recieved some restoration especially around the eyes and the style of changes points to the sculptor Girardon in 1685. From the French Royal Collection  Inv MR 358   (or Ma 1067), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Statue of the Emperor Titus - an end of the 1st century AD Roman statue probably from Rome. Titus was Emperor of the Romans fom 79 to 81 AD. The statue looks like it may have recieved some restoration especially around the eyes and the style of changes points to the sculptor Girardon in 1685. From the French Royal Collection  Inv MR 358   (or Ma 1067), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Statue of the Emperor Titus - an end of the 1st century AD Roman statue probably from Rome. Titus was Emperor of the Romans fom 79 to 81 AD. The statue looks like it may have recieved some restoration especially around the eyes and the style of changes points to the sculptor Girardon in 1685. From the French Royal Collection  Inv MR 358   (or Ma 1067), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Statue of the Emperor Titus - an end of the 1st century AD Roman statue probably from Rome. Titus was Emperor of the Romans fom 79 to 81 AD. The statue looks like it may have recieved some restoration especially around the eyes and the style of changes points to the sculptor Girardon in 1685. From the French Royal Collection  Inv MR 358   (or Ma 1067), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Statue of the Emperor Titus - an end of the 1st century AD Roman statue probably from Rome. Titus was Emperor of the Romans fom 79 to 81 AD. The statue looks like it may have recieved some restoration especially around the eyes and the style of changes points to the sculptor Girardon in 1685. From the French Royal Collection  Inv MR 358   (or Ma 1067), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Statue of the Emperor Titus - an end of the 1st century AD Roman statue probably from Rome. Titus was Emperor of the Romans fom 79 to 81 AD. The statue looks like it may have recieved some restoration especially around the eyes and the style of changes points to the sculptor Girardon in 1685. From the French Royal Collection  Inv MR 358   (or Ma 1067), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Statue of the Emperor Titus - an end of the 1st century AD Roman statue probably from Rome. Titus was Emperor of the Romans fom 79 to 81 AD. The statue looks like it may have recieved some restoration especially around the eyes and the style of changes points to the sculptor Girardon in 1685. From the French Royal Collection  Inv MR 358   (or Ma 1067), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Statue of the Emperor Titus - an end of the 1st century AD Roman statue probably from Rome. Titus was Emperor of the Romans fom 79 to 81 AD. The statue looks like it may have recieved some restoration especially around the eyes and the style of changes points to the sculptor Girardon in 1685. From the French Royal Collection  Inv MR 358   (or Ma 1067), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Statue of the Emperor Titus - an end of the 1st century AD Roman statue probably from Rome. Titus was Emperor of the Romans fom 79 to 81 AD. The statue looks like it may have recieved some restoration especially around the eyes and the style of changes points to the sculptor Girardon in 1685. From the French Royal Collection  Inv MR 358   (or Ma 1067), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Ampitheatre of Xanthos that has been modified by the Romans with a wall around what would have been the stage to make a pit for Gladitorial & animal events. Xanthos UNESCO World Heritage Archaeological Site, Turkey
  • Painted Fruit Tress in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  Against a grey background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Painted Fruit Tress in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia.

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