• The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestum  built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestum  built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestum  built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestum  built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestum  built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestum  built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestum  built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestum  built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestum  built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestum  built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestum  built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestum  built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestum  built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestum  built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestum  built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestum  built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestum  built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestum  built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestum  built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestum  built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestum  built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • Doric column drums - Greek Dorik Temple ruins of Temple F at Selinunte, Sicily photography, pictures, photos, images & fotos. 28 Greek Dorik Temple columns of the ruins of the Temple of Hera, Temple E, Selinunte, Sicily
  • Greek Dorik Temple ruins of Temple F at Selinunte, Sicily photography, pictures, photos, images & fotos. 15 Greek Dorik Temple columns of the ruins of the Temple of Hera, Temple E, Selinunte, Sicily
  • 1 Greek Dorik Temple ruins of Temple F at Selinunte, Sicily  1 Greek Dorik Temple columns of the ruins of the Temple of Hera, Temple E, Selinunte, Sicily
  • Greek Dorik columns at the  ruins of Temple F at Selinunte, Sicily photography, pictures, photos, images & fotos. 52 Greek Dorik Temple columns of the ruins of the Temple of Hera, Temple E, Selinunte, Sicily
  • Greek Dorik columns at the  ruins of Temple F at Selinunte, Sicily photography, pictures, photos, images & fotos. 69 Greek Dorik Temple columns of the ruins of the Temple of Hera, Temple E, Selinunte, Sicily
  • Greek Dorik Temple ruins of Temple F at Selinunte, Sicily photography, pictures, photos, images & fotos. Greek Dorik Temple columns of the ruins of the Temple of Hera, Temple E, Selinunte, Sicily
  • Greek Dorik Temple ruins of Temple F at Selinunte, Sicily photography, pictures, photos, images & fotos. Greek Dorik Temple columns of the ruins of the Temple of Hera, Temple E, Selinunte, Sicily
  • Greek Dorik Temple ruins of Temple F at Selinunte, Sicily photography, pictures, photos, images & fotos. Greek Dorik Temple columns of the ruins of the Temple of Hera, Temple E, Selinunte, Sicily
  • Greek Dorik columns at the  ruins of Temple F at Selinunte, Sicily  photography, pictures, photos, images & fotos. Greek Dorik Temple columns of the ruins of the Temple of Hera, Temple E, Selinunte, Sicily
  • Greek Dorik columns at the  ruins of Temple F at Selinunte, Sicily photography, pictures, photos, images & fotos. Greek Dorik Temple columns of the ruins of the Temple of Hera, Temple E, Selinunte, Sicily
  • Greek Dorik columns at the  ruins of Temple F at Selinunte, Sicily photography, pictures, photos, images & fotos. Greek Dorik Temple columns of the ruins of the Temple of Hera, Temple E, Selinunte, Sicily
  • The ancient Doric Greek  temple of Athena of Pastum built in about 500 BC.  Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek  temple of Athena of Pastum built in about 500 BC.  Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek  temple of Athena of Pastum built in about 500 BC.  Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek  temple of Athena of Pastum built in about 500 BC.  Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • Close up of the ancient Doric Greek capitals & columns of the  Temple of Hera of Paestum built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestum  built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestum  built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestum  built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestum  built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestum  built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek  temple of Athena of Pastum built in about 500 BC.  Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek  temple of Athena of Pastum built in about 500 BC.  Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek  temple of Athena of Pastum built in about 500 BC.  Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek  temple of Athena of Pastum built in about 500 BC.  Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek  temple of Athena of Pastum built in about 500 BC.  Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek  temple of Athena of Pastum built in about 500 BC.  Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek  temple of Athena of Pastum built in about 500 BC.  Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek  temple of Athena of Pastum built in about 500 BC.  Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek  temple of Athena of Pastum built in about 500 BC.  Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • Close up of the ancient Doric Greek capitals & columns of the  Temple of Hera of Paestum built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • Close up of the ancient Doric Greek capitals & columns of the  Temple of Hera of Paestum built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestum  built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestum  built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestum  built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestum  built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestum  built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestrum  built in about 460-450 BC. Paestrum archaeological site, Italy.
  • Close up of the ancient Doric Greek capitals & columns of the  Temple of Hera of Paestum built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • Close up of the ancient Doric Greek capitals & columns of the  Temple of Hera of Paestrum built in about 460-450 BC. Paestrum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek  temple of Athena of Pastrum built in about 500 BC.  Paestrum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestrum  built in about 460-450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The ancient Doric Greek Temple of Hera of Paestum  built in about 460–450 BC. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • Base of a Roman Temple ( 200 BC) in  Paestum dedicated to the Capitoline Triad, Jupiter, Juno and Minerva, in the Roman Forum. Paestum archaeological site, Italy.
  • Base of a Roman Temple ( 200 BC) in  Paestrum dedicated to the Capitoline Triad, Jupiter, Juno and Minerva, in the Roman Forum. Paestrum archaeological site, Italy.
  • Ancient Greek walls of Agrigento, sicily
  • Ancient Greek walls of Agrigento, sicily
  • Ancient Greek walls of Agrigento, sicily
  • Ancient Greek walls of Agrigento, sicily
  • Ancient Greek walls of Agrigento, sicily
  • Ancient Greek walls of Agrigento, sicily
  • Ancient Greek walls of Agrigento, sicily
  • Ancient Greek walls of Agrigento, sicily
  • Ancient Greek walls of Agrigento, sicily
  • Ancient Greek walls of Agrigento, sicily
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Erechtheum Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Erechtheum Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Erechtheum Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Erechtheum Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Erechtheum Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Erechtheum Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Erechtheum Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Erechtheum Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Erechtheum Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Erechtheum Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Erechtheum Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Erechtheum Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Erechtheum Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Erechtheum Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Erechtheum Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Erechtheum Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Erechtheum Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Erechtheum Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Parthenon Temple, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • Sculpture of Lapiths and  Centaurs battling from the Metope of the Parthenon on the Acropolis of Athens. South Metope no II. Also known as the Elgin marbles. British Museum London. The Lapith holds a Centaur by the throat. The diagnal of the Lapiths body across the Centaur is often used in Greek Classical art to depict strife.
  • Sculpture of Lapiths and  Centaurs battling from the Metope of the Parthenon on the Acropolis of Athens. South Metope no II. Also known as the Elgin marbles. British Museum London. The Lapith holds a Centaur by the throat. The diagnal of the Lapiths body across the Centaur is often used in Greek Classical art to depict strife.
  • Sculpture of Lapiths and  Centaurs battling from the Metope of the Parthenon on the Acropolis of Athens. South Metope no II. Also known as the Elgin marbles. British Museum London. The Lapith holds a Centaur by the throat. The diagnal of the Lapiths body across the Centaur is often used in Greek Classical art to depict strife.
  • The omphalos (center) of the earth. This sacred object was located in the Adyton of the Temple of Apollo, and was viewed only by the priests and priestess who had access to the chamber. Delphi Archaeological Museum.
  • The ancient Doric Greek  temple of Athena of Pastrum built in about 500 BC.  Paestrum archaeological site, Italy.
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • The Greek Doric Temple of Aphaia (500BC).  Aegina, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Greek Temple of Dimitras - Naxos Cylcades Islands, Greece
  • Greek Temple of Dimitras - Naxos Cylcades Islands, Greece
  • Greek Temple of Dimitras - Naxos Cylcades Islands, Greece
  • Greek Temple of Dimitras - Naxos Cylcades Islands, Greece
  • Greek Temple of Dimitras - Naxos Cylcades Islands, Greece
  • Greek Temple of Dimitras - Naxos Cylcades Islands, Greece
  • Greek Temple of Dimitras - Naxos Cylcades Islands, Greece
  • Greek Temple of Dimitras - Naxos Cylcades Islands, Greece
  • Greek Temple of Dimitras - Naxos Cylcades Islands, Greece
  • Column from the temple of Apollo, the Greek archaeological site of Ancient Aegina, Kolna, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Column from the temple of Apollo, the Greek archaeological site of Ancient Aegina, Kolna, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Column from the temple of Apollo, the Greek archaeological site of Ancient Aegina, Kolna, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Column from the temple of Apollo, the Greek archaeological site of Ancient Aegina, Kolna, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Column from the temple of Apollo, the Greek archaeological site of Ancient Aegina, Kolna, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Column from the temple of Apollo, the Greek archaeological site of Ancient Aegina, Kolna, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • The Porch of the Caryatids.  The Erechtheum, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Porch of the Caryatids.  The Erechtheum, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Porch of the Caryatids.  The Erechtheum, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Porch of the Caryatids.  The Erechtheum, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Porch of the Caryatids.  The Erechtheum, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Porch of the Caryatids.  The Erechtheum, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Porch of the Caryatids.  The Erechtheum, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • The Porch of the Caryatids.  The Erechtheum, the Acropolis of Athens in Greece.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.  A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Ionic pillar base of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.
  • Ionic capital of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Ionic capital of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Excavations of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.  A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Ionic capital of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.
  • Ancient Temple of Demeters, Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.  A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.  A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.  A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Ionic capital of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Excavations of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Excavations of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Ionic capital of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.
  • Excavations of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Ionic pillar base of the Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.
  • Temple of Artimis Sardis, originally the fourth largest Ionic temple when it was originally built in 300 B.C. In 150 AD under Roman rule when the worship  of the Emperor required all Roman cities to have a Temple dedicated to the Imperial family. The temple of Artimis was split into two sections with one half for Artemis and the Empress Faustina and the other for Zeus and Emperor Antoninus Pius and the present construction shows elements of Greek and Roman styles. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.  A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Doorway of the ruins of the Temple of Apollo. Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Doorway of the ruins of the Temple of Apollo. Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Doorway of the ruins of the Temple of Apollo. Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Doric Columns of the Temple of Poseidon The ruins of the Greek city of Delos, the birthplace of the twin gods Apollo and Artemis. Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Doric Columns of the Temple of Poseidon The ruins of the Greek city of Delos, the birthplace of the twin gods Apollo and Artemis. Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Column with phallus at the Stoivadeion in the Temple of Dionysus at the ruins of the Greek city of Delos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Column with phallus at the Stoivadeion in the Temple of Dionysus at the ruins of the Greek city of Delos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Classical Sphinx attributed to Greek Sculptor Kalamis from the temple of apollo, The Greek archaeological site of Ancient Aegina, Kolna, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Ionic capital of the Temple of Artimis with the crane brought to Sardis in 1911 by the Howard Crosby Expedition used to lift fallen architectural blocks of the Temple of Artimis. Made by Dorman & Long Middlesborough, England. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.
  • The crane brought to Sardis in 1911 by the Howard Crosby Expedition used to lift fallen architectural blocks of the Temple of Artimis. Made by Dorman & Long Middlesborough, England. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.
  • The ruins of the 4th century BC Temple of Apollo , a peripteral Doric building.  Delphi, archaeological site, Greece,
  • The ruins of the 4th century BC Temple of Apollo , a peripteral Doric building.  Delphi, archaeological site, Greece,
  • The ruins of the 4th century BC Temple of Apollo , a peripteral Doric building.  Delphi, archaeological site, Greece,
  • The ruins of the 4th century BC Temple of Apollo , a peripteral Doric building.  Delphi, archaeological site, Greece,
  • The crane brought to Sardis in 1911 by the Howard Crosby Expedition used to lift fallen architectural blocks of the Temple of Artimis. Made by Dorman & Long Middlesborough, England. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey.
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Portrait statue of the so-called General Tivoli a Roman commander circa 70-70BC made in Greek marble and found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules, Tivoli, Italy. A masterpiece of hoary sculpture from the late Republican period, this statue portrays an elderly person with a young, nude body. The cape (paludamentum) which covers part of the stomach and legs, and the cuirass embossed with the head of Medusa (lorica) which functions as a support, identify it as a high-ranking soldier. It can be presumed that the right arm is raised, as suggested by the chest muscles holdingg the shoulder, and that the figure was leaning on a lance. The style derives from Hellenistic designs pf ‘hero nudity’ (effigies schilleae) used, starting in the 2nd century BC, by members of the Roman ruling class which has a strong political need of self-representation. The authoritarian, imposing stance together with the marked realism of the facial features, is one of the best examples of Hellenistic bravura combined with realistic Italic tradition. Stylistic considerations and the fact that the statue was found in the excavation of the Temple of Hercules which was built during the dictatorship of Cornelius Sulla, date the statue to between 90 and 70 BC. Its commemoration in Tivoli leads us to believe that it may have been someone from the area, probably a lieutenant of Sulla who paid for the portrait himself, or that it was a public honour, in the most important shrine in the city, dedicated to the god-hero called ‘Victor’, i.e, the protector of military expeditions. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy

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