• Close Up Of Carving from Baptisty - Parma - Italy
  • Detail of Baptistry Door  - Piazza Del Duomo - Parma Italy.
  • Detail of Baptistry carving - Piazza Del Duomo - Parma Italy.
  • Fiesta near the Baptistry and Duomo - Piazza Del Duomo - Parma Italy.
  • Fiesta near the Baptistry and Duomo - Piazza Del Duomo - Parma Italy.
  • Baptistry and Duomo - Piazza Del Duomo - Parma Italy.
  • Baptistry and Duomo - Piazza Del Duomo - Parma Italy.
  • Baptistry and Duomo - Piazza Del Duomo - Parma Italy.
  • Baptistry and Duomo - Piazza Del Duomo - Parma Italy.
  • Fiesta near the Baptistry and Duomo - Piazza Del Duomo - Parma Italy.
  • Full length tree quarter view of the Riace bronze Greek statue B cast about 460 - 450 BC. statue B was probably sculpted by Phidias. There is a sense of movement in the statues their legs being bent as if they are about to take a step. Their heads are turned which accentuates a sense of anticipation as if they are looking for something. The anatomical detail is extraordinary which gives a startling realism to the statue and demonstarte the high level of skill of the Greek sculptors of this peiod. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Upper torso of the Riace bronze Greek statue B cast about 460 - 450 BC. statue B was probably sculpted by Phidias. There is a sense of movement in the statues their legs being bent as if they are about to take a step. Their heads are turned which accentuates a sense of anticipation as if they are looking for something. The anatomical detail is extraordinary which gives a startling realism to the statue and demonstarte the high level of skill of the Greek sculptors of this peiod. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Full length face on view of the Riace bronze Greek statue B cast about 460 - 450 BC. statue B was probably sculpted by Phidias. There is a sense of movement in the statues their legs being bent as if they are about to take a step. Their heads are turned which accentuates a sense of anticipation as if they are looking for something. The anatomical detail is extraordinary which gives a startling realism to the statue and demonstarte the high level of skill of the Greek sculptors of this peiod. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Full length side view of the Riace bronze Greek statue B cast about 460 - 450 BC. statue B was probably sculpted by Phidias. There is a sense of movement in the statues their legs being bent as if they are about to take a step. Their heads are turned which accentuates a sense of anticipation as if they are looking for something. The anatomical detail is extraordinary which gives a startling realism to the statue and demonstarte the high level of skill of the Greek sculptors of this peiod. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Torso of the Riace bronze Greek statue B cast about 460 - 450 BC. statue B was probably sculpted by Phidias. There is a sense of movement in the statues their legs being bent as if they are about to take a step. Their heads are turned which accentuates a sense of anticipation as if they are looking for something. The anatomical detail is extraordinary which gives a startling realism to the statue and demonstarte the high level of skill of the Greek sculptors of this period. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • low full length view of the  Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. statue A was probably sculpted by Myron. The style of the Riace statues straddles the archaic period and heralds the start of the classical period. Both statues depict strong young naked warriors who stand calmly but exuding great power. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Full length view of the Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. statue A was probably sculpted by Myron. The style of the Riace statues straddles the archaic period and heralds the start of the classical period. Both statues depict strong young naked warriors who stand calmly but exuding great power. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Torso face on view of the Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. statue A was probably sculpted by Myron. The style of the Riace statues straddles the archaic period and heralds the start of the classical period. Both statues depict strong young naked warriors who stand calmly but exuding great power. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Torso three quarter of the Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. statue A was probably sculpted by Myron. The style of the Riace statues straddles the archaic period and heralds the start of the classical period. Both statues depict strong young naked warriors who stand calmly but exuding great power. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Torso of the Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. statue A was probably sculpted by Myron. The style of the Riace statues straddles the archaic period and heralds the start of the classical period. Both statues depict strong young naked warriors who stand calmly but exuding great power. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue head cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statues cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • The Riace bronze Greek statue A cast about 460 BC. Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia,  Reggio Calabria, Italy.
  • Fruit & Vegetable Stall -Fresh Borlotti Beans -  Market - Chioggia - Venice Italy
  • Fruit & Vegetable Stall -Fresh Borlotti Beans -  Market - Chioggia - Venice Italy
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic view of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Vew of "la Gravina" ravine and the Sassi of Matera, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic ew of "la Gravina" ravine and the Sassi of Matera, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic ew of "la Gravina" ravine and the Sassi of Matera, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic view of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • View of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Vew of "la Gravina" ravine and the Sassi of Matera, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • View of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • View of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • View of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • View of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Vew of "la Gravina" ravine and the Sassi of Matera, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • View of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • View of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • View of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • View of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • View of the ancient Sassi of Matera area exterior, Basilicata, Italy. <br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Vew of "la Gravina" ravine and the Sassi of Matera, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
<br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Panoramic long view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera at sunrise, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.<br />
<br />
The area of Matera has been occupied since the Palaeolithic (10th millennium BC) making it one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. <br />
The town of Matera was founded by the Roman Lucius Caecilius Metellus in 251 BC and remained a Roman town until  was conquered by the Lombards In AD 664 becoming part of the Duchy of Benevento.  Matera was subject to the power struggles of southern Italy coming under the rule of the Byzantine Roman, the Germans and finally Matera was ruled by the Normans from 1043 until the Aragonese took possession in the 15th century. <br />
<br />
At the ancient heart of Matera are cave dwellings known as Sassi. As the fortunes of Matera failed the sassy became slum dwelling and the appalling living conditions became be the disgrace of Italy. From the 1970’s families were forcibly removed from the Sassi and rehoused in the new town of Matera. Today tourism has regenerated Matera and the sassi have been modernised and are lived in again making them probably the longest inhabited houses in the world dating back 9000 years.
  • Picture of the stone sculpture of a widow covering the face of a lying corpse sculpted in a Borgeoise realistic style. Section D no 2, the monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture of the stone sculpture of a women in Art Nouveau style. The G.B. Susto Family Tomb sculpted by L Beltrami in 1904. The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture of the stone sculpture of a women in Art Nouveau style. The G.B. Susto Family Tomb sculpted by L Beltrami in 1904. The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture of the stone sculpture bas relief of the Orsini Tomb sculpted by L  Bistolfi 1906-07. Section A, no 20, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture of the stone sculpture bas relief of the Orsini Tomb sculpted by L  Bistolfi 1906-07. Section A, no 20, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture of the Art Deco stone sculpture women of the Masnata tomb sculpted by E de Albertis 1935. Section A, no 22, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture of the Art Deco stone sculpture women of the Masnata tomb sculpted by E de Albertis 1935. Section A, no 22, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture of the Art Deco stone sculpture women of the Masnata tomb sculpted by E de Albertis 1935. Section A, no 22, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Sunset picture of the 14th century Tuscan Gothic style facade of the Cathedral of Orvieto, designed by Maitani, Umbria, Italy
  • Fresh Finferle and Finfirli Italian chanterelle mushrooms - Rialto Market Venice
  • Fresh Finferle and Finfirli Italian chanterelle mushrooms - Rialto Market Venice
  • Fresh Finferle and Finfirli Italian chanterelle mushrooms - Rialto Market Venice
  • Fresh Finferle and Finfirli Italian chanterelle mushrooms - Rialto Market Venice
  • Fresh Finferle and Finfirli Italian chanterelle mushrooms - Rialto Market Venice
  • Chianti vineyards and vines of San Gimignano at sunrise, Tuscany Italy
  • The hill town  of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini ,  Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • The hill town  of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini ,  Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • The hill town  of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini ,  Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • The hill town  of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini ,  Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • Sheep on the Piano Grande, Gret Plain, of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini ,  Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • Sunset on the Piano Grande, Great Plain, of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini ,  Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • Piano Grande, Great Plain, of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini , Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • The hill town  of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini ,  Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • The hill town  of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini ,  Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • The hill town  of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini ,  Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • The hill town  of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini ,  Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • Sheep on the Piano Grande, Gret Plain, of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini ,  Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • The hill town  of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini ,  Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • The hill town  of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini ,  Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • Sheep on the Piano Grande, Gret Plain, of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini ,  Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • The hill town  of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini ,  Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • The hill town  of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini ,  Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • The hill town  of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini ,  Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • The hill town  of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini ,  Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • The hill town  of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini ,  Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • The hill town  of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini ,  Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • The hill town  of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini ,  Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • The hill town  of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini ,  Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • Horses on the Piano Grande, Great Plain, of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini , Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • The hill town  of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini ,  Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • Sheep on the Piano Grande, Gret Plain, of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini ,  Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • The hill town  of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini ,  Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • Lentils growing on the Piano Grande, Great Plain, of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini , Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • Sheep on the Piano Grande, Gret Plain, of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini ,  Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • Piano Grande, Great Plain, of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini , Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • Sheep on the Piano Grande, Gret Plain, of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini ,  Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • Piano Grande, Great Plain, of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini , Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • Sheep on the Piano Grande, Gret Plain, of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini ,  Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • Piano Grande, Great Plain, of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini , Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • Piano Grande, Great Plain, of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini , Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • Piano Grande, Great Plain, of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini , Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • Piano Grande, Great Plain, of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini , Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • Sheep on the Piano Grande, Gret Plain, of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini ,  Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • The hill town  of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini ,  Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • The hill town  of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini ,  Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • Horses on the Piano Grande, Great Plain, of Castelluccio di Norcia, Parco Nazionale dei Monti Sibillini , Apennine Mountains,  Umbria, Italy.
  • Matera view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera from inside a Sassi cave, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.
  • Matera view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera from inside a Sassi cave, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.
  • Matera view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera from inside a Sassi cave, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.
  • Matera view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera from inside a Sassi cave, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.
  • Matera view across "la Gravina" ravine to the Sassi of Matera from inside a Sassi cave, Basilicata, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage site.
  • Rock cave Christian church of St Agnes and its altar fresco dating from 11th century. Matera, Basilicata, Italy
  • Mountains and pastures of the Sella plateau near Colfosco, 1,645 m (5,396 ft),  at the foot of the Sella group (Grup dl Sela) and Mount Sassongher, the Dolomite mountains, Alta Badia, Italy
  • Mountains and pastures of the Sella plateau near Colfosco, 1,645 m (5,396 ft),  at the foot of the Sella group (Grup dl Sela) and Mount Sassongher, the Dolomite mountains, Alta Badia, Italy
  • Mountains and pastures of the Sella plateau near Colfosco, 1,645 m (5,396 ft),  at the foot of the Sella group (Grup dl Sela) and Mount Sassongher, the Dolomite mountains, Alta Badia, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculptures of angels and a Sister of Charity. in memory of the surgeon Luigi Pastorini, the sculptor Navone has conceived a complex allegory, in which a feminine winged figure, representing the Medicine, distributes some wealth to a Sister of Charity who holds an ill baby. She is helped by another winged figure, the Munificence, whose regard is turned towards the deceased. The “Cappellone” Sisters – they are so named because of their large head covering – were so committed to provide aid to the poor that they have become the symbol of the assistance to the needy. Navone has succeeded in harmonizing the Medicine allegory and its delicacy with the raw representation of the poor people: in fact, as from the middle years of the bourgeois realism, the poor were portrayed in a very realistic way, without any idealization. Sculpted by G. Navone 1902. Section A, no 28,  The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculptures of angels and a Sister of Charity. in memory of the surgeon Luigi Pastorini, the sculptor Navone has conceived a complex allegory, in which a feminine winged figure, representing the Medicine, distributes some wealth to a Sister of Charity who holds an ill baby. She is helped by another winged figure, the Munificence, whose regard is turned towards the deceased. The “Cappellone” Sisters – they are so named because of their large head covering – were so committed to provide aid to the poor that they have become the symbol of the assistance to the needy. Navone has succeeded in harmonizing the Medicine allegory and its delicacy with the raw representation of the poor people: in fact, as from the middle years of the bourgeois realism, the poor were portrayed in a very realistic way, without any idealization. Sculpted by G. Navone 1902. Section A, no 28,  The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of a  mourning widow who is bringing a crown and knocking on a sepulcher’s bronze door, which holds the bas relief of an hourglass, a classic symbol of the passing of time. This theme of the sorrowful survivor in front of the sepulcher’s door comes from the Monument dedicated to Maria Christina, Duchess of Teschen, Maria Theresa of Austria’s daughter, a neoclassical sculpture. In this version the widow is wearing fashionable clothes, which have been accurately represented, and her openwork shawl. Sculptor G. B. Cevasco 1875. Section A, no 38, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of a  mourning widow who is bringing a crown and knocking on a sepulcher’s bronze door, which holds the bas relief of an hourglass, a classic symbol of the passing of time. This theme of the sorrowful survivor in front of the sepulcher’s door comes from the Monument dedicated to Maria Christina, Duchess of Teschen, Maria Theresa of Austria’s daughter, a neoclassical sculpture. In this version the widow is wearing fashionable clothes, which have been accurately represented, and her openwork shawl. Sculptor G. B. Cevasco 1875. Section A, no 38, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image  of the stone sculptures of two young siblings at the doors of heaven through which their mother had to go before them by Sculptor A. Rota 1882. The theme of the monument is sorrow but also of hope as an angel guides the sould of the mouring siblings mother to heaven. As is tytpical of the Borgeois realistic style everday clothes, hairstyle and natural gestures are used in the sulpture. Section A, no 42, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image  of the stone sculptures of two young siblings at the doors of heaven through which their mother had to go before them by Sculptor A. Rota 1882. The theme of the monument is sorrow but also of hope as an angel guides the sould of the mouring siblings mother to heaven. As is tytpical of the Borgeois realistic style everday clothes, hairstyle and natural gestures are used in the sulpture. Section A, no 42, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of a women on the tomb of ship builder Giovanni Battista Piaggio by  Sculptor G. Benetti 1873. Giovanni Battista Piaggio, who is buried here, was a rich ship-owner, whose important role in society is expressed by the professional symbols -the anchor, the ropes, the sand-glass, the globe, the chart that the sculptor Giuseppe Benetti put on the sides of the deceased's bust hosted in the lunette, which surmounts the architecture in Renaissance style of the monument. As a representative of the upper middle class he couldn't die without leaving memories of his social role: Benetti, in order to meet this requirement, represented the widow coming out of the chapel with a prayer-book in her hand. Bringing the mourning in an everyday-life dimension Benetti created a work in accordance with the dictates of the Realism bourgeois. Section A, no 47, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of a women on the tomb of ship builder Giovanni Battista Piaggio by  Sculptor G. Benetti 1873. Giovanni Battista Piaggio, who is buried here, was a rich ship-owner, whose important role in society is expressed by the professional symbols -the anchor, the ropes, the sand-glass, the globe, the chart that the sculptor Giuseppe Benetti put on the sides of the deceased's bust hosted in the lunette, which surmounts the architecture in Renaissance style of the monument. As a representative of the upper middle class he couldn't die without leaving memories of his social role: Benetti, in order to meet this requirement, represented the widow coming out of the chapel with a prayer-book in her hand. Bringing the mourning in an everyday-life dimension Benetti created a work in accordance with the dictates of the Realism bourgeois. Section A, no 47, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of a Job (Giobbe) on the steps of the Parthenon by  G Benetti 1872. The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of a Job (Giobbe) on the steps of the Parthenon by  G Benetti 1872. The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of an angel at the doors of the Pallavicino Family tomb, sculpted by A Rivalta 1896. Section D no 27, the monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of 2 mourning sisters at the door of their mothers pyramid shaped tomb, The Rossi Tomb sculpted by G Benetti in 1878. Section D, no 24, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of an agel in thought at the door of the tomb of the Mantero family. Art Nouveau style sculpted by L Orengo 1895. Section B, no 04, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of an agel in thought at the door of the tomb of the Mantero family. Art Nouveau style sculpted by L Orengo 1895. Section B, no 04, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of an agel in thought at the door of the tomb of the Mantero family. Art Nouveau style sculpted by L Orengo 1895. Section B, no 04, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculptures of angels and a Sister of Charity. in memory of the surgeon Luigi Pastorini, the sculptor Navone has conceived a complex allegory, in which a feminine winged figure, representing the Medicine, distributes some wealth to a Sister of Charity who holds an ill baby. She is helped by another winged figure, the Munificence, whose regard is turned towards the deceased. The “Cappellone” Sisters – they are so named because of their large head covering – were so committed to provide aid to the poor that they have become the symbol of the assistance to the needy. Navone has succeeded in harmonizing the Medicine allegory and its delicacy with the raw representation of the poor people: in fact, as from the middle years of the bourgeois realism, the poor were portrayed in a very realistic way, without any idealization. Sculpted by G. Navone 1902. Section A, no 28,  The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of a  mourning widow who is bringing a crown and knocking on a sepulcher’s bronze door, which holds the bas relief of an hourglass, a classic symbol of the passing of time. This theme of the sorrowful survivor in front of the sepulcher’s door comes from the Monument dedicated to Maria Christina, Duchess of Teschen, Maria Theresa of Austria’s daughter, a neoclassical sculpture. In this version the widow is wearing fashionable clothes, which have been accurately represented, and her openwork shawl. Sculptor G. B. Cevasco 1875. Section A, no 38, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of a  mourning widow who is bringing a crown and knocking on a sepulcher’s bronze door, which holds the bas relief of an hourglass, a classic symbol of the passing of time. This theme of the sorrowful survivor in front of the sepulcher’s door comes from the Monument dedicated to Maria Christina, Duchess of Teschen, Maria Theresa of Austria’s daughter, a neoclassical sculpture. In this version the widow is wearing fashionable clothes, which have been accurately represented, and her openwork shawl. Sculptor G. B. Cevasco 1875. Section A, no 38, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of a  mourning widow who is bringing a crown and knocking on a sepulcher’s bronze door, which holds the bas relief of an hourglass, a classic symbol of the passing of time. This theme of the sorrowful survivor in front of the sepulcher’s door comes from the Monument dedicated to Maria Christina, Duchess of Teschen, Maria Theresa of Austria’s daughter, a neoclassical sculpture. In this version the widow is wearing fashionable clothes, which have been accurately represented, and her openwork shawl. Sculptor G. B. Cevasco 1875. Section A, no 38, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of a  mourning widow who is bringing a crown and knocking on a sepulcher’s bronze door, which holds the bas relief of an hourglass, a classic symbol of the passing of time. This theme of the sorrowful survivor in front of the sepulcher’s door comes from the Monument dedicated to Maria Christina, Duchess of Teschen, Maria Theresa of Austria’s daughter, a neoclassical sculpture. In this version the widow is wearing fashionable clothes, which have been accurately represented, and her openwork shawl. Sculptor G. B. Cevasco 1875. The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of a women on the tomb of ship builder Giovanni Battista Piaggio by  Sculptor G. Benetti 1873. Giovanni Battista Piaggio, who is buried here, was a rich ship-owner, whose important role in society is expressed by the professional symbols -the anchor, the ropes, the sand-glass, the globe, the chart that the sculptor Giuseppe Benetti put on the sides of the deceased's bust hosted in the lunette, which surmounts the architecture in Renaissance style of the monument. As a representative of the upper middle class he couldn't die without leaving memories of his social role: Benetti, in order to meet this requirement, represented the widow coming out of the chapel with a prayer-book in her hand. Bringing the mourning in an everyday-life dimension Benetti created a work in accordance with the dictates of the Realism bourgeois. Section A, no 47, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the late borgeoise realistic style stone sculpture of the Gallino tomb sculpted by  G. Moreno 1894.  In the tomb, the bust that portrays the deceased Carolina receives the kiss of a child, probably the niece, supported by a young woman - the mother, or perhaps the elder sister - whose face is marked by pain; on the right an older man, presumably her husband, stands aside, almost absent, looking down at the ground. The most intimate tones and psychological introspection are grafted here in the language of bourgeois Realism: with undoubted technical virtuosity Moreno offers a rigorous "quantitative" description of reality, dwelling on every single detail of faces, clothing, accessories and hairstyles . Section A, no 54, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the late borgeoise realistic style stone sculpture of the Gallino tomb sculpted by  G. Moreno 1894.  In the tomb, the bust that portrays the deceased Carolina receives the kiss of a child, probably the niece, supported by a young woman - the mother, or perhaps the elder sister - whose face is marked by pain; on the right an older man, presumably her husband, stands aside, almost absent, looking down at the ground. The most intimate tones and psychological introspection are grafted here in the language of bourgeois Realism: with undoubted technical virtuosity Moreno offers a rigorous "quantitative" description of reality, dwelling on every single detail of faces, clothing, accessories and hairstyles . Section A, no 54, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the late borgeoise realistic style stone sculpture of the Gallino tomb sculpted by  G. Moreno 1894.  In the tomb, the bust that portrays the deceased Carolina receives the kiss of a child, probably the niece, supported by a young woman - the mother, or perhaps the elder sister - whose face is marked by pain; on the right an older man, presumably her husband, stands aside, almost absent, looking down at the ground. The most intimate tones and psychological introspection are grafted here in the language of bourgeois Realism: with undoubted technical virtuosity Moreno offers a rigorous "quantitative" description of reality, dwelling on every single detail of faces, clothing, accessories and hairstyles . Section A, no 54, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the late borgeoise realistic style stone sculpture of the Gallino tomb sculpted by  G. Moreno 1894.  In the tomb, the bust that portrays the deceased Carolina receives the kiss of a child, probably the niece, supported by a young woman - the mother, or perhaps the elder sister - whose face is marked by pain; on the right an older man, presumably her husband, stands aside, almost absent, looking down at the ground. The most intimate tones and psychological introspection are grafted here in the language of bourgeois Realism: with undoubted technical virtuosity Moreno offers a rigorous "quantitative" description of reality, dwelling on every single detail of faces, clothing, accessories and hairstyles . Section A, no 54, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the late borgeoise realistic style stone sculpture of the Gallino tomb sculpted by  G. Moreno 1894.  In the tomb, the bust that portrays the deceased Carolina receives the kiss of a child, probably the niece, supported by a young woman - the mother, or perhaps the elder sister - whose face is marked by pain; on the right an older man, presumably her husband, stands aside, almost absent, looking down at the ground. The most intimate tones and psychological introspection are grafted here in the language of bourgeois Realism: with undoubted technical virtuosity Moreno offers a rigorous "quantitative" description of reality, dwelling on every single detail of faces, clothing, accessories and hairstyles . Section A, no 54, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the late borgeoise realistic style stone sculpture of the Gallino tomb sculpted by  G. Moreno 1894.  In the tomb, the bust that portrays the deceased Carolina receives the kiss of a child, probably the niece, supported by a young woman - the mother, or perhaps the elder sister - whose face is marked by pain; on the right an older man, presumably her husband, stands aside, almost absent, looking down at the ground. The most intimate tones and psychological introspection are grafted here in the language of bourgeois Realism: with undoubted technical virtuosity Moreno offers a rigorous "quantitative" description of reality, dwelling on every single detail of faces, clothing, accessories and hairstyles . Section A, no 54, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of an enigmatic angels face in a realistic style. One of the best know csulptures of Staglieno. The Oneto family tomb sculpted by G Monteverde. Section D no 13, the monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of an enigmatic angels face in a realistic style. One of the best know csulptures of Staglieno. The Oneto family tomb sculpted by G Monteverde. Section D no 13, the monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of an enigmatic angels face in a realistic style. One of the best know csulptures of Staglieno. The Oneto family tomb sculpted by G Monteverde. Section D no 13, the monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of an enigmatic angels face in a realistic style. One of the best know csulptures of Staglieno. The Oneto family tomb sculpted by G Monteverde. Section D no 13, the monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of an enigmatic angels face in a realistic style. One of the best know csulptures of Staglieno. The Oneto family tomb sculpted by G Monteverde. Section D no 13, the monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of an enigmatic angels face in a realistic style. One of the best know csulptures of Staglieno. The Oneto family tomb sculpted by G Monteverde. Section D no 13, the monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of an enigmatic angels face in a realistic style. One of the best know csulptures of Staglieno. The Oneto family tomb sculpted by G Monteverde. Section D no 13, the monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of an enigmatic angels face in a realistic style. One of the best know csulptures of Staglieno. The Oneto family tomb sculpted by G Monteverde. Section D no 13, the monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of a young women grieving in the Borgosie Realistic style. The Gatti Tomb sculpted by G Benetti 1875. Section D no 5, the monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of a young women filling a candle stick with oil in an art Nouveau style. Family Tomb Montanari sculpted by G B Villa 1888. Section D no 31 the monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of a young women filling a candle stick with oil in an art Nouveau style. Family Tomb Montanari sculpted by G B Villa 1888. Section D no 31 the monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of an angel at the doors of the Pallavicino Family tomb, sculpted by A Rivalta 1896. Section D no 27, the monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of an angel at the doors of the Pallavicino Family tomb, sculpted by A Rivalta 1896. Section D no 27, the monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of an angel at the doors of the Pallavicino Family tomb, sculpted by A Rivalta 1896. Section D no 27, the monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of an angel at the doors of the Pallavicino Family tomb, sculpted by A Rivalta 1896. Section D no 27, the monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of 2 mourning sisters at the door of their mothers pyramid shaped tomb, The Rossi Tomb sculpted by G Benetti in 1878. Section D, no 24, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of 2 mourning sisters at the door of their mothers pyramid shaped tomb, The Rossi Tomb sculpted by G Benetti in 1878. Section D, no 24, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of 2 mourning sisters at the door of their mothers pyramid shaped tomb, The Rossi Tomb sculpted by G Benetti in 1878. Section D, no 24, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of 2 mourning sisters at the door of their mothers pyramid shaped tomb, The Rossi Tomb sculpted by G Benetti in 1878. Section D, no 24, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of 2 mourning sisters at the door of their mothers pyramid shaped tomb, The Rossi Tomb sculpted by G Benetti in 1878. Section D, no 24, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of 2 mourning sisters at the door of their mothers pyramid shaped tomb, The Rossi Tomb sculpted by G Benetti in 1878. Section D, no 24, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of a nude looking at a skull on a crucifix.  Sculpted in an art Nouveau style the sculture is a reminder that beauty and life is transient. The Lavarello tomb sculpted by Demetrio Paernio 1914. The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of a nude looking at a skull on a crucifix.  Sculpted in an art Nouveau style the sculture is a reminder that beauty and life is transient. The Lavarello tomb sculpted by Demetrio Paernio 1914. The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of Margherita Capurro ascending to heaven while her husband grieves, 1901.  The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of a Jannet Duff and her gireving son. Sculpted by L Beltrami 1894. The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of an angel over the sarcophagus of Salvatore and Rosa Queirolo, sculpted by G Navone, 1901. Section A, no 16, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of an angel over the sarcophagus of Salvatore and Rosa Queirolo, sculpted by G Navone, 1901. Section A, no 16, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image  of the stone sculpture  of a young couple and an angel. The Pietrafraccia Tomb sculped by G. Navone 1909. Section A, no 17, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of an angel standing by a stone sarcophagus. The Croce Tomb sculpted by G Moreno 1889. Section A, no 23, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture ”L’Angelo Nocchiero” (the Helmsman Angel). The sculpture depicts an angel, standing astride a small boat, beginning to secure the sails at the end of a journey. His garments are streaming behind him, suggesting a strong wind. The prow of the boat is the stoic face of a woman, and under the prow the water swirls. The Giacomo Carpaneto tomb  sculpted by Giovanni Scanzi in 1886. Section A, no 25, monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of a grieving father and son standing at the doors of a tomb. Piccollo Tomb sculpted by G Moreno 1891. Section A, no 26, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture ”L’Angelo Nocchiero” (the Helmsman Angel). The sculpture depicts an angel, standing astride a small boat, beginning to secure the sails at the end of a journey. His garments are streaming behind him, suggesting a strong wind. The prow of the boat is the stoic face of a woman, and under the prow the water swirls. The Giacomo Carpaneto tomb  sculpted by Giovanni Scanzi in 1886. Section A, no 25, monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of a grieving father and son standing at the doors of a tomb. Piccollo Tomb sculpted by G Moreno 1891. Section A, no 26, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of a grieving father and son standing at the doors of a tomb. Piccollo Tomb sculpted by G Moreno 1891. Section A, no 26, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of a grieving father and son standing at the doors of a tomb. Piccollo Tomb sculpted by G Moreno 1891. Section A, no 26, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of a nude on the Taramiso tomb. The  monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of an angel blessing the deceased lying on a chez longue. Bonini Tomb sculpted by D Carli 1891. Section A, no 27, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture in Borgeoise Realistic style of the Rossi family tomb. The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture in Borgeoise Realistic style of the Rossi family tomb. The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image  of the Bronze sculpture of the Gallino Tomb by G Bennetti 1903. Section A, no 29, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of a stone sculpture of Giuseppe Recagno in a Borgeois Realistic style. The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture commissioned by Luigi Parpaglioni, a rich trader coming from the Lombardy, because of his daughter’s death. The funery monument depicts  flying angel going before the soul who is rising up to the sky.  This romantic style is typical of the pre raphilites and although realistic the style is a little stilted. The Papaglioni tomb became popular and was copied by sculptors in many other countries.  Tomb Parpaglioni sculptor F. Fabiani 1884. Section A, no 35, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture commissioned by Luigi Parpaglioni, a rich trader coming from the Lombardy, because of his daughter’s death. The funery monument depicts  flying angel going before the soul who is rising up to the sky.  This romantic style is typical of the pre raphilites and although realistic the style is a little stilted. The Papaglioni tomb became popular and was copied by sculptors in many other countries.  Tomb Parpaglioni sculptor F. Fabiani 1884. Section A, no 35, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy

FunkyStock Picture Library Resource

Picture The Past

ABOUT

FunkyStock Picture Library free resource for professional editorial picture editors, picture researchers, historical scholars and students and enthusiasts who want to browse some of the best pictures and images of historic countries, historical places, archaeological sites and the very best museum antiquities and artefacts exhibits in Europe and the Middle East.

Pictures and Images can be downloaded or bought as stock photos or photo art prints.

COUNTRIES

Browse travel pictures and images of historic places and archaeological sites of countries in Europe and the Middle East.

VIEW COUNTRIES INDEX....

HISTORICAL

Explore the past through pictures and images of its historic places. See the great palaces, castles and cities of antiquity as well as the great archaeological sites where our ancestors made history.

EXPLORE HISTORICAL PLACES...

MUSEUMS

Browse pictures & images the treasured artefacts and antiquities exhibits from the great Museum of Europe and the Middle East. See the art and objects made by our ancestors.

SEE MUESEUM ANTIQUITIES....