• "Harghita No 14"- Fine Art abstract nude photography picture wall art prints, by photographer Paul E Williams.
  • "Harghita No 10"- Fine Art abstract nude photography picture wall art prints, by photographer Paul E Williams.
  • "Harghita No 11"- Fine Art abstract nude photography picture wall art prints, by photographer Paul E Williams.
  • "Harghita No 7"- Fine Art abstract nude photography picture wall art prints, by photographer Paul E Williams.
  • "Harghita No 9"- Fine Art abstract nude photography picture wall art prints, by photographer Paul E Williams.
  • "Harghita No 8"- Fine Art abstract nude photography picture wall art prints, by photographer Paul E Williams.
  • "Harghita No 6"- Fine Art abstract nude photography picture wall art prints, by photographer Paul E Williams.
  • "Harghita No 5"- Fine Art abstract nude photography picture wall art prints, by photographer Paul E Williams.
  • "Harghita No 1"- Fine Art abstract nude photography picture wall art prints, by photographer Paul E Williams.
  • "Harghita No 4"- Fine Art abstract nude photography picture wall art prints, by photographer Paul E Williams.
  • "Harghita No 2"- Fine Art abstract nude photography picture wall art prints, by photographer Paul E Williams.
  • "Harghita No 3"- Fine Art abstract nude photography picture wall art prints, by photographer Paul E Williams.
  • "Manakins no 14", Piran, Slovenia. An abstract  street nude art photo from a art photography series by photographer Paul E Williams
  • "Manakins no 12", Piran, Slovenia. An abstract  street nude art photo from a art photography series by photographer Paul E Williams
  • "Manakins no 10", Piran, Slovenia. An abstract  street nude art photo from a art photography series by photographer Paul E Williams
  • "Manakins no 11", Lille France. An abstract  street nude art photo from a art photography series by photographer Paul E Williams
  • "Manakins no 8", Venice, Italy. An abstract  street nude art photo from a art photography series by photographer Paul E Williams
  • "Manakins no 7", Gyor, Hungary. An abstract  street nude art photo from a art photography series by photographer Paul E Williams
  • "Manakins no  9", Piz Gloria, Switzerland. An abstract  street nude art photo from a art photography series by photographer Paul E Williams
  • "Manakins no 6", Lake Balaton, Hungary. An abstract  street nude art photo from a art photography series by photographer Paul E Williams
  • "Manakins no 5", Lake Balaton, Hungary. An abstract  street nude art photo from a art photography series by photographer Paul E Williams
  • "Manakins no 4", Lake Balaton, Hungary. An abstract  street nude art photo from a art photography series by photographer Paul E Williams
  • "Manakins no 2", South Bank, London, England. An abstract  street nude art photo from a art photography series by photographer Paul E Williams
  • "Manakins no 1", Lake Balaton, Hungary. An abstract  street nude art photo from a art photography series by photographer Paul E Williams
  • "Manakins no 2", Southampton, England. An abstract  street nude art photo from a art photography series by photographer Paul E Williams
  • Aristotelous Square,   or Aristotle Square, The main square of Thessaloniki designed by French architect Ernest Hébrard in 1918, Greece
  • Aristotelous Square,   or Aristotle Square, The main square of Thessaloniki designed by French architect Ernest Hébrard in 1918, Greece
  • Maggie Hambling shell scupture to those who drowned at sea. Aldeburgh, Suffolk, England, UK.
  • Eyes  - Shifty Eyes -  Fine art Polarids prints series
  • Eyes  -  Artistic Eye -  Fine art Polarids prints series
  • Eyes  - their Eyes Met -  Fine art Polarids prints series
  • Eyes  - Wandering Eyes -. Fine art Polarids prints series
  • Eyes - The apple of your eye -  Fine art Polarids prints series
  • Eyes  - Plank In His Eye - Fine art Polarids prints series
  • Vodafone & Morgan Stanley headquarters in the Buisness park next to the National Theatre, Lachner Odon Fasor, Budapest, Hungary
  • Vodafone & Morgan Stanley headquarters in the Buisness park next to the National Theatre, Lachner Odon Fasor, Budapest, Hungary
  • Vodafone & Morgan Stanley headquarters in the Buisness park next to the National Theatre, Lachner Odon Fasor, Budapest, Hungary
  • Vodafone & Morgan Stanley headquarters in the Buisness park next to the National Theatre, Lachner Odon Fasor, Budapest, Hungary
  • Vodafone & Morgan Stanley headquarters in the Buisness park next to the National Theatre, Lachner Odon Fasor, Budapest, Hungary
  • Vodafone & Morgan Stanley headquarters in the Buisness park next to the National Theatre, Lachner Odon Fasor, Budapest, Hungary
  • Vodafone & Morgan Stanley headquarters in the Buisness park next to the National Theatre, Lachner Odon Fasor, Budapest, Hungary
  • Buisness park next to the National Theatre, Lachner Odon Fasor, Budapest, Hungary
  • Vodafone & Morgan Stanley headquarters in the Buisness park next to the National Theatre, Lachner Odon Fasor, Budapest, Hungary
  • "The Awakening" a 70 ft sculpture aluminuim sculpture by Seward Johnson - Duomo square, Siracusa, Sicily.
  • "The Awakening" a 70 ft sculpture aluminuim sculpture by Seward Johnson - Duomo square, Siracusa, Sicily.
  • "The Awakening" a 70 ft sculpture aluminuim sculpture by Seward Johnson - Duomo square, Syracuse ( Siracusa) , Sicily
  • "The Awakening" a 70 ft sculpture aluminuim sculpture by Seward Johnson - Duomo square, Syracuse ( Siracusa) , Sicily
  • "The Awakening" a 70 ft sculpture aluminuim sculpture by Seward Johnson - Duomo square, Syracuse ( Siracusa) , Sicily
  • "The Awakening" a 70 ft sculpture aluminuim sculpture by Seward Johnson - Duomo square, Syracuse ( Siracusa) , Sicily
  • "The Awakening" a 70 ft sculpture aluminuim sculpture by Seward Johnson - Duomo square, Syracuse ( Siracusa) , Sicily
  • "The Awakening" a 70 ft sculpture aluminuim sculpture by Seward Johnson - Duomo square, Syracuse ( Siracusa) , Sicily
  • "The Awakening" a 70 ft sculpture aluminuim sculpture by Seward Johnson - Duomo square, Syracuse ( Siracusa) , Sicily
  • "The Awakening" a 70 ft sculpture aluminuim sculpture by Seward Johnson - Duomo square, Syracuse ( Siracusa) , Sicily
  • "The Awakening" a 70 ft sculpture aluminuim sculpture by Seward Johnson - Duomo square, Syracuse ( Siracusa) , Sicily
  • The church of San Giovanni Battista is located in the alpine village of Mogno. The new church was designed by the Swiss architect Mario Botta who used marble and granite from the valleys of the area.
  • The church of San Giovanni Battista is located in the alpine village of Mogno. The new church was designed by the Swiss architect Mario Botta who used marble and granite from the valleys of the area.
  • The church of San Giovanni Battista is located in the alpine village of Mogno. The new church was designed by the Swiss architect Mario Botta who used marble and granite from the valleys of the area.
  • The church of San Giovanni Battista is located in the alpine village of Mogno. The new church was designed by the Swiss architect Mario Botta who used marble and granite from the valleys of the area.
  • The church of San Giovanni Battista is located in the alpine village of Mogno. The new church was designed by the Swiss architect Mario Botta who used marble and granite from the valleys of the area.
  • The church of San Giovanni Battista is located in the alpine village of Mogno. The new church was designed by the Swiss architect Mario Botta who used marble and granite from the valleys of the area.
  • The church of San Giovanni Battista is located in the alpine village of Mogno. The new church was designed by the Swiss architect Mario Botta who used marble and granite from the valleys of the area.
  • The church of San Giovanni Battista is located in the alpine village of Mogno. The new church was designed by the Swiss architect Mario Botta who used marble and granite from the valleys of the area.
  • The church of San Giovanni Battista is located in the alpine village of Mogno. The new church was designed by the Swiss architect Mario Botta who used marble and granite from the valleys of the area.
  • The church of San Giovanni Battista is located in the alpine village of Mogno. The new church was designed by the Swiss architect Mario Botta who used marble and granite from the valleys of the area.
  • The church of San Giovanni Battista is located in the alpine village of Mogno. The new church was designed by the Swiss architect Mario Botta who used marble and granite from the valleys of the area.
  • The church of San Giovanni Battista is located in the alpine village of Mogno. The new church was designed by the Swiss architect Mario Botta who used marble and granite from the valleys of the area.
  • The church of San Giovanni Battista is located in the alpine village of Mogno. The new church was designed by the Swiss architect Mario Botta who used marble and granite from the valleys of the area.
  • The church of San Giovanni Battista is located in the alpine village of Mogno. The new church was designed by the Swiss architect Mario Botta who used marble and granite from the valleys of the area.
  • Maggie Hambling shell scupture to those who drowned at sea. Aldeburgh, Suffolk, England, UK.
  • 4 bars of scented hand made soap piled on an aluminium soap dish with water droplets
  • Meat Balls on spghetti with a tomato, basil & shalott sauce with a green salad in a table setting.
  • Deep fried camembert in bread crumbs with salad
  • Deep fried camembert in bread crumbs with salad
  • Deep fried camembert in bread crumbs with salad
  • Deep fried camembert in bread crumbs with salad
  • Traditional oriental satay with chilli dipping sauce
  • Traditional oriental satay with chilli dipping sauce
  • Traditional oriental satay with chilli dipping sauce
  • Traditional oriental satay with chilli dipping sauce
  • Traditional oriental satay with chilli dipping sauce
  • Traditional oriental satay with chilli dipping sauce
  • Traditional chinese samosas
  • Traditional chinese samosas
  • Traditional chinese samosas
  • Traditional chinese samosas
  • Traditional chinese spring rolls
  • Traditional chinese spring rolls
  • Traditional chinese spring rolls
  • Traditional chinese dim sum with a chilli dipping sauce
  • Traditional chinese dim sum with a chilli dipping sauce
  • Traditional chinese dim sum with a chilli dipping sauce
  • Traditional chinese Spring rolls, samosas and dim sum
  • Traditional chinese Spring rolls, samosas and dim sum
  • chinese starters - deep fried breaded prawns. spring rolls, dim sum, and samosas
  • chinese starters - deep fried breaded prawns. spring rolls, dim sum, and samosas
  • chinese starters - deep fried breaded prawns. spring rolls, dim sum, and samosas
  • chinese starters - deep fried breaded prawns. spring rolls, dim sum, and samosas
  • chinese starters - deep fried breaded prawns. spring rolls, dim sum, and samosas
  • chinese starters - deep fried breaded prawns. spring rolls, dim sum, and samosas
  • chinese starters - deep fried breaded prawns. spring rolls, dim sum, and samosas
  • Mini rosti topped with cheese and salsa in a party stting
  • Mini rosti topped with cheese and salsa in a party stting
  • Mini rosti topped with cheese and salsa in a party stting
  • Mini rosti topped with cheese and salsa in a party stting
  • Mini rosti topped with cheese and salsa in a party stting
  • Mini rosti topped with cheese and salsa in a party stting
  • Mini rosti topped with cheese and salsa in a party stting
  • Deep Fried battered onion rings with a chilli sauce & salad
  • Statue of Antinous - a 2nd century Roman sculpture in marble from Italy. The statue is a montage of a more modern head of Antinous with an older body in the style of Hercules. Inv No. MR 74 (Usual No Ma 2243), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • A modern Japanese cake with a pattered choclate case and mint cream, in a modern designer dish
  • Venus and Cupid - a its or 2nd Roman statue restored in the 17th century by Alessandro l’Algarde. The statue was acquired in Rome in 1630 by Cardinal Richelieu. Restored by Alessandro l’Algarde the modern head is a copy of the Medici Venus or Aphrodite in Florence.  The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 386 (Usual No Ma 2287), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus and Cupid - a its or 2nd Roman statue restored in the 17th century by Alessandro l’Algarde. The statue was acquired in Rome in 1630 by Cardinal Richelieu. Restored by Alessandro l’Algarde the modern head is a copy of the Medici Venus or Aphrodite in Florence.  The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 386 (Usual No Ma 2287), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus and Cupid - a its or 2nd Roman statue restored in the 17th century by Alessandro l’Algarde. The statue was acquired in Rome in 1630 by Cardinal Richelieu. Restored by Alessandro l’Algarde the modern head is a copy of the Medici Venus or Aphrodite in Florence.  The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 386 (Usual No Ma 2287), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus and Cupid - a its or 2nd Roman statue restored in the 17th century by Alessandro l’Algarde. The statue was acquired in Rome in 1630 by Cardinal Richelieu. Restored by Alessandro l’Algarde the modern head is a copy of the Medici Venus or Aphrodite in Florence.  The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 386 (Usual No Ma 2287), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 33  -  sculpture of.very modern cartoon like hound and a hare. In the Bestiary dogs are like preachers who put men back on the right course of righteousness and the hare represents men who fear God and put their trust in the creator . The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Statue of Antinous - a 2nd century Roman sculpture in marble from Italy. The statue is a montage of a more modern head of Antinous with an older body in the style of Hercules. Inv No. MR 74 (Usual No Ma 2243), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Antinous - a 2nd century Roman sculpture in marble from Italy. The statue is a montage of a more modern head of Antinous with an older body in the style of Hercules. Inv No. MR 74 (Usual No Ma 2243), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Statue of Antinous - a 2nd century Roman sculpture in marble from Italy. The statue is a montage of a more modern head of Antinous with an older body in the style of Hercules. Inv No. MR 74 (Usual No Ma 2243), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus and Cupid - a its or 2nd Roman statue restored in the 17th century by Alessandro l’Algarde. The statue was acquired in Rome in 1630 by Cardinal Richelieu. Restored by Alessandro l’Algarde the modern head is a copy of the Medici Venus or Aphrodite in Florence.  The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 386 (Usual No Ma 2287), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus and Cupid - a its or 2nd Roman statue restored in the 17th century by Alessandro l’Algarde. The statue was acquired in Rome in 1630 by Cardinal Richelieu. Restored by Alessandro l’Algarde the modern head is a copy of the Medici Venus or Aphrodite in Florence.  The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 386 (Usual No Ma 2287), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus and Cupid - a its or 2nd Roman statue restored in the 17th century by Alessandro l’Algarde. The statue was acquired in Rome in 1630 by Cardinal Richelieu. Restored by Alessandro l’Algarde the modern head is a copy of the Medici Venus or Aphrodite in Florence.  The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 386 (Usual No Ma 2287), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Venus and Cupid - a its or 2nd Roman statue restored in the 17th century by Alessandro l’Algarde. The statue was acquired in Rome in 1630 by Cardinal Richelieu. Restored by Alessandro l’Algarde the modern head is a copy of the Medici Venus or Aphrodite in Florence.  The Richelieu Collection, Inv No. MR 386 (Usual No Ma 2287), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • A modern Japanese cake with a pattered choclate case and mint cream, in a modern designer dish
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos of the Dacians Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The Dacians are shown as a captive Barbarian woman. Her arms are crossed in submission, her thick dress slips off the shoulder slightly partly revealing her breast. The forepart of a small bull stands in profile behind. Dacia (modern Romania) was claimed by Augustus as a conquest in 1BC to 4AD
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos of the Dacians Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The Dacians are shown as a captive Barbarian woman. Her arms are crossed in submission, her thick dress slips off the shoulder slightly partly revealing her breast. The forepart of a small bull stands in profile behind. Dacia (modern Romania) was claimed by Augustus as a conquest in 1BC to 4AD
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos of the Dacians Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The Dacians are shown as a captive Barbarian woman. Her arms are crossed in submission, her thick dress slips off the shoulder slightly partly revealing her breast. The forepart of a small bull stands in profile behind. Dacia (modern Romania) was claimed by Augustus as a conquest in 1BC to 4AD
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos of the Dacians Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The Dacians are shown as a captive Barbarian woman. Her arms are crossed in submission, her thick dress slips off the shoulder slightly partly revealing her breast. The forepart of a small bull stands in profile behind. Dacia (modern Romania) was claimed by Augustus as a conquest in 1BC to 4AD
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos of the Dacians Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The Dacians are shown as a captive Barbarian woman. Her arms are crossed in submission, her thick dress slips off the shoulder slightly partly revealing her breast. The forepart of a small bull stands in profile behind. Dacia (modern Romania) was claimed by Augustus as a conquest in 1BC to 4AD
  • Picture of an architectural relief detail from the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of a  column frieze from the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of an architectural relief detail from the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of an architectural relief detail from the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of an architectural relief detail from the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of an architectural relief detail from the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of an architectural relief detail from the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of an architectural relief detail from the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of an architectural relief detail from the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of an architectural relief detail from the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of a Griffin Frieze from the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of a Griffin Frieze from the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of a Medusa relief frieze from the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the freize around a column base of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of column bases from the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of a close up of a column base at the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the Ionian columns of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the Ionian columns of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the steps & columns of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the steps & columns of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Ancient Ionian Greek  Didyma Temple of Apollo & home to the Oracle of Apollo.  Also known as the Didymaion completed circa 550 BC. modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of cryptoporticus A  of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
The paintings in the long corridor, which got light only from small high-placed windows, are on a white background. The illusionistic decoration shows a row of columns on a high socle decorated with "grottesche". In the background, pictures alternating theatrical scenes, scenes of worship, and landscapes seem to hang on a wall divided by pilasters. Some of the scenes are probably later restorations of the originals. <br />
In the upper part a loggia holding sphinxes and statues of divinities rests on caryatids (architectural supports in the form of female figures). <br />
Because there was limited time for excavation, only the more important decorative elements were removed from the walls. A drawing on the modern base on which the fragments are inserted gives an idea of the effect of the whole, which is known to us from a watercolor done at the time.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of cryptoporticus A  of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
The paintings in the long corridor, which got light only from small high-placed windows, are on a white background. The illusionistic decoration shows a row of columns on a high socle decorated with "grottesche". In the background, pictures alternating theatrical scenes, scenes of worship, and landscapes seem to hang on a wall divided by pilasters. Some of the scenes are probably later restorations of the originals. <br />
In the upper part a loggia holding sphinxes and statues of divinities rests on caryatids (architectural supports in the form of female figures). <br />
Because there was limited time for excavation, only the more important decorative elements were removed from the walls. A drawing on the modern base on which the fragments are inserted gives an idea of the effect of the whole, which is known to us from a watercolor done at the time.
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 33  -  sculpture of.very modern cartoon like hound and a hare. In the Bestiary dogs are like preachers who put men back on the right course of righteousness and the hare represents men who fear God and put their trust in the creator . The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Norman Romanesque exterior corbel no 33  -  sculpture of.very modern cartoon like hound and a hare. In the Bestiary dogs are like preachers who put men back on the right course of righteousness and the hare represents men who fear God and put their trust in the creator . The Norman Romanesque Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck Herefordshire, England. Built around 1140
  • Late Hittite Basalt Portal Lion sculpture from 9th Cent B.C, excavated from Palace Building P Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) located at Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey's Gaziantep Province. Istanbul Archaeological Museum inv. No 7777.
  • Late Hittite Basalt Portal Lion sculpture from 9th Cent B.C, excavated from Palace Building P Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) located at Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey's Gaziantep Province. Istanbul Archaeological Museum inv. No 7777.
  • Late Hittite (Aramaean)  Basalt relief sculpture of a Bull from 9th Cent B.C, excavated from the west side of the citadel gate of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) located at Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey's Gaziantep Province. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. No 7709.
  • Late Hittite Basalt Portal Lion sculpture from 9th Cent B.C, excavated from Palace Building P Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) located at Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey's Gaziantep Province. Istanbul Archaeological Museum inv. No 7777.
  • Late Hittite Basalt Portal Lion sculpture from 9th Cent B.C, excavated from Palace Building P Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) located at Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey's Gaziantep Province. Istanbul Archaeological Museum inv. No 7777.
  • Late Hittite (Aramaean)  Basalt relief sculpture of a Bull from 9th Cent B.C, excavated from the west side of the citadel gate of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) located at Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey's Gaziantep Province. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. No 7709.
  • Late Hittite (Aramaean)  Basalt relief sculpture of a Bull from 9th Cent B.C, excavated from the west side of the citadel gate of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) located at Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey's Gaziantep Province. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. No 7709.
  • Late Hittite (Aramaean)  Basalt relief sculpture of a Bull from 9th Cent B.C, excavated from the west side of the citadel gate of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) located at Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey's Gaziantep Province. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. No 7709.
  • Late Hittite (Aramaean)  Basalt relief sculpture of a Male with Axe  from 9th Cent B.C, excavated from the west side of the citadel gate of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) located at Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey's Gaziantep Province. Istanbul Archaeological Museum  Inv No. 7727.
  • Late Hittite (Aramaean)  Basalt relief sculptures  from 9th Cent B.C, excavated from the west side of the citadel gate of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) located at Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey's Gaziantep Province. Left Deer Buck, Inv no 7712, Middle Winged Lion inv no. 7706, Left Male with Axe Inv No. 7727. Istanbul Archaeological Museum.
  • Late Hittite (Aramaean)  Basalt relief sculptures  from 9th Cent B.C, excavated from the west side of the citadel gate of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) located at Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey's Gaziantep Province. Left Deer Buck, Inv no 7712, Middle Winged Lion inv no. 7706, Left Male with Axe Inv No. 7727. Istanbul Archaeological Museum.
  • Late Hittite (Aramaean)  Basalt relief sculptures  from 9th Cent B.C, excavated from the west side of the citadel gate of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) located at Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey's Gaziantep Province. Left Deer Buck, Inv no 7712, Middle Winged Lion inv no. 7706, Left Male with Axe Inv No. 7727. Istanbul Archaeological Museum.
  • Late Hittite (Aramaean)  Basalt relief sculptures  from 9th Cent B.C, excavated from the west side of the citadel gate of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) located at Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey's Gaziantep Province. Left Deer Buck, Inv no 7712, Middle Winged Lion inv no. 7706, Left Male with Axe Inv No. 7727. Istanbul Archaeological Museum.
  • Late Hittite (Aramaean)  Basalt relief sculpture of an Aslan Lion from 9th Cent B.C, excavated from the west side of the citadel gate of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) located at Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey's Gaziantep Province. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. No 7727.
  • Late Hittite (Aramaean)  Basalt relief sculpture of an Aslan Lion from 9th Cent B.C, excavated from the west side of the citadel gate of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) located at Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey's Gaziantep Province. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. No 7727.
  • Late Hittite (Aramaean)  Basalt relief sculpture of an Aslan Lion from 9th Cent B.C, excavated from the west side of the citadel gate of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) located at Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey's Gaziantep Province. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. No 7727.
  • Late Hittite (Aramaean)  Basalt relief sculpture of an Aslan Lion from 9th Cent B.C, excavated from the west side of the citadel gate of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) located at Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey's Gaziantep Province. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. No 7727.
  • Late Hittite (Aramaean)  Basalt Double Sphinx  sculpture from 9th Cent B.C, excavated from the entrance of Palace III Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) located at Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey's Gaziantep Province. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. No 7731.
  • Late Hittite (Aramaean)  Basalt Double Sphinx  sculpture from 9th Cent B.C, excavated from the entrance of Palace III Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) located at Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey's Gaziantep Province. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. No 7731.
  • Late Hittite (Aramaean)  Basalt Double Sphinx  sculpture from 9th Cent B.C, excavated from the entrance of Palace III Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) located at Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey's Gaziantep Province. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. No 7731.
  • Late Hittite Basalt Portal Lion sculpture from 9th Cent B.C, excavated from Palace Building P Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) located at Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey's Gaziantep Province. Istanbul Archaeological Museum inv. No 7777.
  • Late Hittite (Aramaean)  Basalt Double Sphinx  sculpture from 9th Cent B.C, excavated from the entrance of Palace III Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) located at Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey's Gaziantep Province. Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. No 7731.
  • Late Hittite Basalt Portal Lion sculpture from 9th Cent B.C, excavated from Palace Building P Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) located at Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey's Gaziantep Province. Istanbul Archaeological Museum inv. No 7777.
  • Late Hittite Basalt Portal Lion sculpture from 9th Cent B.C, excavated from Palace Building P Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) located at Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey's Gaziantep Province. Istanbul Archaeological Museum inv. No 7777.
  • Late Hittite Basalt Portal Lion sculpture from 9th Cent B.C, excavated from Palace Building P Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) located at Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey's Gaziantep Province. Istanbul Archaeological Museum inv. No 7777.
  • Roman portrait bust of a young charioteer from the age of Domitian, 81-96AD. This statue of a young charioteer, with Oriental eastern Mediterranean features, is wearing a tunic stopped on the right shoulder by a flattened circular fibula (clasp). The hairstyle, with its ’S’ shaped curls, was made artificially with an iron (calamistrum). This style was inspired by official portrayts of a young Domitian, who emulated Neronian style during the last years of his reign. The bust was rounded to be inserted onto a modern pillar. . Inv 276, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Gordian III made between 238 and 244 AD and excavated from Ostia. At the age of 13, he became the youngest sole legal Roman emperor throughout the existence of the united Roman Empire. Gordian was the son of Antonia Gordiana and an unnamed Roman Senator who died before 238. When the Persians under Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia, the young emperor opened the doors of the Temple of Janus for the last time in Roman history, and sent a large army to the East. The Sassanids were driven back over the Euphrates and defeated in the Battle of Resaena (243AD). In the beginning of 244, the Persians counter-attacked. Persian sources claim that a battle was fought (Battle of Misiche) near modern Fallujah (Iraq) and resulted in a major Roman defeat and the death of Gordian III. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Gordian III made between 238 and 244 AD and excavated from Ostia. At the age of 13, he became the youngest sole legal Roman emperor throughout the existence of the united Roman Empire. Gordian was the son of Antonia Gordiana and an unnamed Roman Senator who died before 238. When the Persians under Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia, the young emperor opened the doors of the Temple of Janus for the last time in Roman history, and sent a large army to the East. The Sassanids were driven back over the Euphrates and defeated in the Battle of Resaena (243AD). In the beginning of 244, the Persians counter-attacked. Persian sources claim that a battle was fought (Battle of Misiche) near modern Fallujah (Iraq) and resulted in a major Roman defeat and the death of Gordian III. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Gordian III made between 238 and 244 AD and excavated from Ostia. At the age of 13, he became the youngest sole legal Roman emperor throughout the existence of the united Roman Empire. Gordian was the son of Antonia Gordiana and an unnamed Roman Senator who died before 238. When the Persians under Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia, the young emperor opened the doors of the Temple of Janus for the last time in Roman history, and sent a large army to the East. The Sassanids were driven back over the Euphrates and defeated in the Battle of Resaena (243AD). In the beginning of 244, the Persians counter-attacked. Persian sources claim that a battle was fought (Battle of Misiche) near modern Fallujah (Iraq) and resulted in a major Roman defeat and the death of Gordian III. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Gordian III made between 238 and 244 AD and excavated from Ostia. At the age of 13, he became the youngest sole legal Roman emperor throughout the existence of the united Roman Empire. Gordian was the son of Antonia Gordiana and an unnamed Roman Senator who died before 238. When the Persians under Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia, the young emperor opened the doors of the Temple of Janus for the last time in Roman history, and sent a large army to the East. The Sassanids were driven back over the Euphrates and defeated in the Battle of Resaena (243AD). In the beginning of 244, the Persians counter-attacked. Persian sources claim that a battle was fought (Battle of Misiche) near modern Fallujah (Iraq) and resulted in a major Roman defeat and the death of Gordian III. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman sculpture bust of  Gordian III made between 238 and 244 AD and excavated from Ostia. At the age of 13, he became the youngest sole legal Roman emperor throughout the existence of the united Roman Empire. Gordian was the son of Antonia Gordiana and an unnamed Roman Senator who died before 238. When the Persians under Shapur I invaded Mesopotamia, the young emperor opened the doors of the Temple of Janus for the last time in Roman history, and sent a large army to the East. The Sassanids were driven back over the Euphrates and defeated in the Battle of Resaena (243AD). In the beginning of 244, the Persians counter-attacked. Persian sources claim that a battle was fought (Battle of Misiche) near modern Fallujah (Iraq) and resulted in a major Roman defeat and the death of Gordian III. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 10th - 8th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from the city of Sam'al (Hittite: Yadiya) near Zincirli Höyük in the Anti-Taurus Mountains of modern Turkey. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin

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