• Corinthian columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Corinthian columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • The Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Corinthian columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • The Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Portico & Ionic columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Portico & Ionic columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Ionic  columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • The Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Portico & Ionic columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Architectural detail of The Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Architectural detail of The Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Architectural detail of The Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Portico & Ionic columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Roman Dionysus mosaic from the house of Oceanos, Zeugma archaeological site. 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the floor (base) mosaic of a room of House of Okeanos. This is among the first pieces of those that excavated from ancient Zeugma city and known for Dionysus Bust and "meeting of Dionysus and Ariadne'. This mosaic is consisted of three panels. On the left side of this partly damaged art work, there has been the bust of god Dionysus. Through the white and black triangles around Dionysus, a virtual perspective had been created to get a focus on the figure.
  • Roman Dionysus mosaic from the house of Oceanos, Zeugma archaeological site. 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the floor (base) mosaic of a room of House of Okeanos. This is among the first pieces of those that excavated from ancient Zeugma city and known for Dionysus Bust and "meeting of Dionysus and Ariadne'. This mosaic is consisted of three panels. On the left side of this partly damaged art work, there has been the bust of god Dionysus. Through the white and black triangles around Dionysus, a virtual perspective had been created to get a focus on the figure.
  • Roman gates & fortifications of Perge, 3rd cent with the older towers of the Hellenistic gates inside. AD. Perge (Perga) archaeological site, Turkey
  • Roman gates & fortifications of Perge, 3rd cent with the older towers of the Hellenistic gates inside. AD. Perge (Perga) archaeological site, Turkey
  • Ionic  columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Architectural detail of The Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Corinthian columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Portico & Ionic columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • The Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Portico & Ionic columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Corinthian columns of the Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • The Bath Gymnasium complex of Sardis, a typical example of the colonnaded palaestra front of a Hellenistic 1st cent. AD Greco Roman baths of the western & southern region of Anatolia. Sardis archaeological site, Hermus valley, Turkey. A Harvard Art Museum excavation project.
  • Roman Mosaic - The Oceanos & Tethys Mosaic, fom The House of Oceanos, Zeugma.  2nd - 3rd century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The Oceanos and Tethys Mosaic is the floor mosaic of the shallow pool of the House of Oceanos. In this mosaic, which belongs to the Early Roman Empire Period, Oceanos, the river god who is the origin of life, and his wife Tethys are represented. At the middle of the mosaic which is surrounded by a geometric triple tress borders there are Oceanos and his wife Tethys. Around them there are Eros figures riding various species of fish and dolphins symbolising the abundance of the sea. The most represented attributes of Oceanos are snake and fish.<br />
<br />
 in the mosaic, Oceanos is seen with chelas. Those chelas are among his most characteristic attributes. Though the tail of an eel is represented as his feet in the figures on ceramics, within the scope of the art of mosaic he is represented as a bust and only with the chelas on his head such as this one. His wife Tethys is right by his side and represented with wings upon her forehead. Between them, there is the dragon called Cetos which is a mythological sea creature. As is seen in the coins of Zeugma, the Euphrates River is expressed as a dragon. Besides these two figures, on the top-right of the mosaic, there is a young male figure which is thought to be Pan, the patron of fishermen and shepherds. The fact that Eros figures and Pan which are the side figures are located outward implies that the pool is built to allow walking around. <br />
<br />
The expression of the Oceanos as not an ocean but a river surrounding the world: By that the water, which vapours with the heat of the sun and then gives life to the nature by becoming rain, and which after being used by the nature reaches again the sea via the rivers is expressed. The water becomes aware of itself and its function by that cycle. This phenomenon is represented in the mosaic panel as the diversification of O
  • Roman mosaics - Rooms of an excavated villa from Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Exterior of Zeugma Roman Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - The Theonoe Mosaic. Kointos Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Seasons  Mosaic. Telete Villa.  2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Seasons mosaic Telete, was unearthed during the rescue excavations y Gaziantep Museum in 1994 when it was about to be stolen by the traffickers. It is the floor mosaic of a villa terrace located on the western skins of Zeugma hill <br />
<br />
The pane% consists of nine parts. At the central panel, Eros, who Is a mythological character and who has a crown on his head, sits side by side with Telete, the daughter of Dionysus. This representation symbolises the preparation of a young woman who is just about to taste the love and to become mature. There are busts of seasonal gods In the square panels at the corners. The crowned head of the Spring Goddess Ear Is slightly towards right. She wears a floral necklace. Her righr shoulder is naked and the crimps of her cloak are seen on her left shoulder. There is the bust of the river god on the top-right of the Telete panel. A kid lying on the grass and a bucket are pictured in the lower rectangular panel. In the western-side rectangular panel, on the other hand, there are four fish going in and out of a game basket. There is a rabbit figure within the rectangular panel on the right. Mythical narrations and natural life are intertwined in this mosaic.
  • Roman mosaics - Persius & Andromeda Mosaic. Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Persius & Andromeda Mosaic. Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a white background.
  • Roman mosaics - Persius & Andromeda Mosaic. Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.
  • Roman mosaics - Achilles Mosaic.  Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a grey background.
  • Roman mosaics - Achilles Mosaic.  Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Geometric Mosaic. Dionysus Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.
  • Roman mosaics - Mousai Mosaic. Euphrates Villa, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Mousai Mosaic. Euphrates Villa, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Metiochus and Parthenope Mosaic.  2nd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Metiochus and Parthenope, famous with their legendary love for eat: torn apart and then unified after years, they seem to represent the According to the myth, Parthenope is the sister of Polycrat e Ki taken an oath of virginity upon the Heraion which symbolizes the Metiochus is invited to the royal court and meets Parthenope Burin fails in love with Metiochus but in order to keep the oath she has taken, she and chooses to go exile. In this mosaic, we see the two figures sfttngsitting upon an In compliance with the story, the face of Metiochus is directed towards Part e whom he fell in love and the eyes of Parthenope stares at an indeterminate area due to the love she feels yet sees impossible. The mosaic is surrounded by triangular, double mesh ttke, and pyramidal borders. The piece was discovered during the rescue excavation conducted. in 1993. When exposed, it was understood that the main figures used to be at the middle of the mosaic were stolen the tomb-robbers. <br />
<br />
The mosaic was brought to Gaziantep Museum with a question mark labeled on it saying "Who knows where? In which country?" and began to be displayed temporarily after restoration. From the photographs sent by the Canadian Archaeologist Sheila Campbell, it was found out that the stolen parts were in the Merin collection in Houston USA and with the initiatives of the Ministry of Culture, the missing parts were brought In 2000 and the mosaic was put on display following the restoration. Those two eternal lovers, who were torn apart by traffickers of historical artefacts and kidnapped separately, have been unified after years.
  • Roman mosaics - Metiochus and Parthenope Mosaic.  2nd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Metiochus and Parthenope, famous with their legendary love for eat: torn apart and then unified after years, they seem to represent the According to the myth, Parthenope is the sister of Polycrat e Ki taken an oath of virginity upon the Heraion which symbolizes the Metiochus is invited to the royal court and meets Parthenope Burin fails in love with Metiochus but in order to keep the oath she has taken, she and chooses to go exile. In this mosaic, we see the two figures sfttngsitting upon an In compliance with the story, the face of Metiochus is directed towards Part e whom he fell in love and the eyes of Parthenope stares at an indeterminate area due to the love she feels yet sees impossible. The mosaic is surrounded by triangular, double mesh ttke, and pyramidal borders. The piece was discovered during the rescue excavation conducted. in 1993. When exposed, it was understood that the main figures used to be at the middle of the mosaic were stolen the tomb-robbers. <br />
<br />
The mosaic was brought to Gaziantep Museum with a question mark labeled on it saying "Who knows where? In which country?" and began to be displayed temporarily after restoration. From the photographs sent by the Canadian Archaeologist Sheila Campbell, it was found out that the stolen parts were in the Merin collection in Houston USA and with the initiatives of the Ministry of Culture, the missing parts were brought In 2000 and the mosaic was put on display following the restoration. Those two eternal lovers, who were torn apart by traffickers of historical artefacts and kidnapped separately, have been unified after years.
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a white background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - Geometric Mosaic. House of Okeanos, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.
  • Roman mosaics - Geometric Mosaic. House of Okeanos, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a grey background.
  • Roman mosaics - Geometric Mosaic. House of Okeanos, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics -  The Bath House. The House of Oceanos, Ancient Zeugama. 3rd Century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a grey background.
  • Roman mosaics - Dionysus Portrait Mosaic. Okeanos Villa, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a white background.
  • Roman mosaics - Geometric Mosaic. The Giyoslu Villa. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Geometric Mosaic. The Giyoslu Villa. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a white background.
  • Roman mosaics - The Poseidon Mosaic. Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Dionysus Mosaic. Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.
  • Roman mosaics - Geometric mosaic with 3d illusion. House of Oceanos, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a white background.
  • Roman mosaics - Geometric mosaic with 3d illusion. House of Oceanos, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.
  • Roman mosaics - Birth of Aphrodite (Venus) Mosaic.  Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.
  • Roman mosaics - Satyros & Antiope Mosaic. Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Satyros & Antiope Mosaic. Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics. The Acratos & Eljprocvne Mosaic from The House of Maenad Zeugma.  2nd - 3rd century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.    Against an art background.
  • Roman mosaics. The Acratos & Eljprocvne Mosaic from The House of Maenad Zeugma.  2nd - 3rd century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a grey background.
  • Roman Mosaic - The Oceanos & Tethys Mosaic, fom The House of Oceanos, Zeugma.  2nd - 3rd century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey. Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The Oceanos and Tethys Mosaic is the floor mosaic of the shallow pool of the House of Oceanos. In this mosaic, which belongs to the Early Roman Empire Period, Oceanos, the river god who is the origin of life, and his wife Tethys are represented. At the middle of the mosaic which is surrounded by a geometric triple tress borders there are Oceanos and his wife Tethys. Around them there are Eros figures riding various species of fish and dolphins symbolising the abundance of the sea. The most represented attributes of Oceanos are snake and fish.<br />
<br />
 in the mosaic, Oceanos is seen with chelas. Those chelas are among his most characteristic attributes. Though the tail of an eel is represented as his feet in the figures on ceramics, within the scope of the art of mosaic he is represented as a bust and only with the chelas on his head such as this one. His wife Tethys is right by his side and represented with wings upon her forehead. Between them, there is the dragon called Cetos which is a mythological sea creature. As is seen in the coins of Zeugma, the Euphrates River is expressed as a dragon. Besides these two figures, on the top-right of the mosaic, there is a young male figure which is thought to be Pan, the patron of fishermen and shepherds. The fact that Eros figures and Pan which are the side figures are located outward implies that the pool is built to allow walking around. <br />
<br />
The expression of the Oceanos as not an ocean but a river surrounding the world: By that the water, which vapours with the heat of the sun and then gives life to the nature by becoming rain, and which after being used by the nature reaches again the sea via the rivers is expressed. The water becomes aware of itself and its function by that cycle. This phenomenon is represented in the mosaic panel as the diversification of Ocen
  • Roman fresco from Zeugma. 2nd - 3rd century AD.  Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman fresco from Zeugma. 2nd - 3rd century AD.  Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman latrine lavatory - Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Women At Breakfast Mosaic. Zosimos Villa, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a black background.
  • Roman mosaics - Women At Breakfast Mosaic. Zosimos Villa, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a grey background.
  • Roman mosaics - Seasons  Mosaic. Telete Villa.  2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Seasons mosaic Telete, was unearthed during the rescue excavations y Gaziantep Museum in 1994 when it was about to be stolen by the traffickers. It is the floor mosaic of a villa terrace located on the western skins of Zeugma hill <br />
<br />
The pane% consists of nine parts. At the central panel, Eros, who Is a mythological character and who has a crown on his head, sits side by side with Telete, the daughter of Dionysus. This representation symbolises the preparation of a young woman who is just about to taste the love and to become mature. There are busts of seasonal gods In the square panels at the corners. The crowned head of the Spring Goddess Ear Is slightly towards right. She wears a floral necklace. Her righr shoulder is naked and the crimps of her cloak are seen on her left shoulder. There is the bust of the river god on the top-right of the Telete panel. A kid lying on the grass and a bucket are pictured in the lower rectangular panel. In the western-side rectangular panel, on the other hand, there are four fish going in and out of a game basket. There is a rabbit figure within the rectangular panel on the right. Mythical narrations and natural life are intertwined in this mosaic.
  • Roman mosaics - Seasons  Mosaic. Telete Villa.  2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Seasons mosaic Telete, was unearthed during the rescue excavations y Gaziantep Museum in 1994 when it was about to be stolen by the traffickers. It is the floor mosaic of a villa terrace located on the western skins of Zeugma hill <br />
<br />
The pane% consists of nine parts. At the central panel, Eros, who Is a mythological character and who has a crown on his head, sits side by side with Telete, the daughter of Dionysus. This representation symbolises the preparation of a young woman who is just about to taste the love and to become mature. There are busts of seasonal gods In the square panels at the corners. The crowned head of the Spring Goddess Ear Is slightly towards right. She wears a floral necklace. Her righr shoulder is naked and the crimps of her cloak are seen on her left shoulder. There is the bust of the river god on the top-right of the Telete panel. A kid lying on the grass and a bucket are pictured in the lower rectangular panel. In the western-side rectangular panel, on the other hand, there are four fish going in and out of a game basket. There is a rabbit figure within the rectangular panel on the right. Mythical narrations and natural life are intertwined in this mosaic.
  • Roman mosaics - Seasons  Mosaic. Telete Villa.  2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Seasons mosaic Telete, was unearthed during the rescue excavations y Gaziantep Museum in 1994 when it was about to be stolen by the traffickers. It is the floor mosaic of a villa terrace located on the western skins of Zeugma hill <br />
<br />
The pane% consists of nine parts. At the central panel, Eros, who Is a mythological character and who has a crown on his head, sits side by side with Telete, the daughter of Dionysus. This representation symbolises the preparation of a young woman who is just about to taste the love and to become mature. There are busts of seasonal gods In the square panels at the corners. The crowned head of the Spring Goddess Ear Is slightly towards right. She wears a floral necklace. Her righr shoulder is naked and the crimps of her cloak are seen on her left shoulder. There is the bust of the river god on the top-right of the Telete panel. A kid lying on the grass and a bucket are pictured in the lower rectangular panel. In the western-side rectangular panel, on the other hand, there are four fish going in and out of a game basket. There is a rabbit figure within the rectangular panel on the right. Mythical narrations and natural life are intertwined in this mosaic.
  • Roman mosaics - Seasons  Mosaic. Telete Villa.  2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Seasons mosaic Telete, was unearthed during the rescue excavations y Gaziantep Museum in 1994 when it was about to be stolen by the traffickers. It is the floor mosaic of a villa terrace located on the western skins of Zeugma hill <br />
<br />
The pane% consists of nine parts. At the central panel, Eros, who Is a mythological character and who has a crown on his head, sits side by side with Telete, the daughter of Dionysus. This representation symbolises the preparation of a young woman who is just about to taste the love and to become mature. There are busts of seasonal gods In the square panels at the corners. The crowned head of the Spring Goddess Ear Is slightly towards right. She wears a floral necklace. Her righr shoulder is naked and the crimps of her cloak are seen on her left shoulder. There is the bust of the river god on the top-right of the Telete panel. A kid lying on the grass and a bucket are pictured in the lower rectangular panel. In the western-side rectangular panel, on the other hand, there are four fish going in and out of a game basket. There is a rabbit figure within the rectangular panel on the right. Mythical narrations and natural life are intertwined in this mosaic.
  • Roman mosaics - Persius & Andromeda Mosaic. Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.
  • Roman mosaics - Persius & Andromeda Mosaic. Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Persius & Andromeda Mosaic. Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a grey background.
  • Roman mosaics - Achilles Mosaic.  Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a white background.
  • Roman mosaics - Achilles Mosaic.  Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.
  • Roman mosaics - Achilles Mosaic.  Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Achilles Mosaic.  Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.
  • Roman mosaics - Geometric Mosaic. Dionysus Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a white background.
  • Roman mosaics - Geometric Mosaic. Dionysus Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Geometric Mosaic. Dionysus Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a grey background.
  • Roman mosaics - Mousai Mosaic. Euphrates Villa, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Mousai Mosaic. Euphrates Villa, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.
  • Roman mosaics - Mousai Mosaic. Euphrates Villa, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.
  • Roman mosaics - Mousai Mosaic. Euphrates Villa, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a grey background.
  • Roman mosaics - Metiochus and Parthenope Mosaic.  2nd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Metiochus and Parthenope, famous with their legendary love for eat: torn apart and then unified after years, they seem to represent the According to the myth, Parthenope is the sister of Polycrat e Ki taken an oath of virginity upon the Heraion which symbolizes the Metiochus is invited to the royal court and meets Parthenope Burin fails in love with Metiochus but in order to keep the oath she has taken, she and chooses to go exile. In this mosaic, we see the two figures sfttngsitting upon an In compliance with the story, the face of Metiochus is directed towards Part e whom he fell in love and the eyes of Parthenope stares at an indeterminate area due to the love she feels yet sees impossible. The mosaic is surrounded by triangular, double mesh ttke, and pyramidal borders. The piece was discovered during the rescue excavation conducted. in 1993. When exposed, it was understood that the main figures used to be at the middle of the mosaic were stolen the tomb-robbers. <br />
<br />
The mosaic was brought to Gaziantep Museum with a question mark labeled on it saying "Who knows where? In which country?" and began to be displayed temporarily after restoration. From the photographs sent by the Canadian Archaeologist Sheila Campbell, it was found out that the stolen parts were in the Merin collection in Houston USA and with the initiatives of the Ministry of Culture, the missing parts were brought In 2000 and the mosaic was put on display following the restoration. Those two eternal lovers, who were torn apart by traffickers of historical artefacts and kidnapped separately, have been unified after years.
  • Roman mosaics - Metiochus and Parthenope Mosaic.  2nd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Metiochus and Parthenope, famous with their legendary love for eat: torn apart and then unified after years, they seem to represent the According to the myth, Parthenope is the sister of Polycrat e Ki taken an oath of virginity upon the Heraion which symbolizes the Metiochus is invited to the royal court and meets Parthenope Burin fails in love with Metiochus but in order to keep the oath she has taken, she and chooses to go exile. In this mosaic, we see the two figures sfttngsitting upon an In compliance with the story, the face of Metiochus is directed towards Part e whom he fell in love and the eyes of Parthenope stares at an indeterminate area due to the love she feels yet sees impossible. The mosaic is surrounded by triangular, double mesh ttke, and pyramidal borders. The piece was discovered during the rescue excavation conducted. in 1993. When exposed, it was understood that the main figures used to be at the middle of the mosaic were stolen the tomb-robbers. <br />
<br />
The mosaic was brought to Gaziantep Museum with a question mark labeled on it saying "Who knows where? In which country?" and began to be displayed temporarily after restoration. From the photographs sent by the Canadian Archaeologist Sheila Campbell, it was found out that the stolen parts were in the Merin collection in Houston USA and with the initiatives of the Ministry of Culture, the missing parts were brought In 2000 and the mosaic was put on display following the restoration. Those two eternal lovers, who were torn apart by traffickers of historical artefacts and kidnapped separately, have been unified after years.
  • Roman mosaics - Metiochus and Parthenope Mosaic.  2nd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Metiochus and Parthenope, famous with their legendary love for eat: torn apart and then unified after years, they seem to represent the According to the myth, Parthenope is the sister of Polycrat e Ki taken an oath of virginity upon the Heraion which symbolizes the Metiochus is invited to the royal court and meets Parthenope Burin fails in love with Metiochus but in order to keep the oath she has taken, she and chooses to go exile. In this mosaic, we see the two figures sfttngsitting upon an In compliance with the story, the face of Metiochus is directed towards Part e whom he fell in love and the eyes of Parthenope stares at an indeterminate area due to the love she feels yet sees impossible. The mosaic is surrounded by triangular, double mesh ttke, and pyramidal borders. The piece was discovered during the rescue excavation conducted. in 1993. When exposed, it was understood that the main figures used to be at the middle of the mosaic were stolen the tomb-robbers. <br />
<br />
The mosaic was brought to Gaziantep Museum with a question mark labeled on it saying "Who knows where? In which country?" and began to be displayed temporarily after restoration. From the photographs sent by the Canadian Archaeologist Sheila Campbell, it was found out that the stolen parts were in the Merin collection in Houston USA and with the initiatives of the Ministry of Culture, the missing parts were brought In 2000 and the mosaic was put on display following the restoration. Those two eternal lovers, who were torn apart by traffickers of historical artefacts and kidnapped separately, have been unified after years.
  • Roman mosaics - Close up of The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a white background.
  • Roman mosaics - Close up of The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.
  • Roman mosaics - Close up of The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Close up of The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a grey background.
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a white background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - Geometric Mosaic. House of Okeanos, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.
  • Roman mosaics - Geometric Mosaic. House of Okeanos, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Geometric Mosaic. House of Okeanos, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a white background.
  • Roman mosaics - Geometric Mosaic. House of Okeanos, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.
  • Roman mosaics - Geometric Mosaic. House of Okeanos, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a grey background.
  • Roman mosaics -  The Bath House. The House of Oceanos, Ancient Zeugama. 3rd Century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics -  The Bath House. The House of Oceanos, Ancient Zeugama. 3rd Century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.
  • Roman mosaics -  The Bath House. The House of Oceanos, Ancient Zeugama. 3rd Century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.
  • Roman mosaics - Oylum Hoyuk  Mosaic. 4th century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - The Duluk Mosaic  Mosaic. 4th century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a white background.<br />
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The mosaic, which was found in the ancient city DOM in Gaziantep and brought to the museum, is dated to 4th century A.D. The mosaic, which is geometric, is a part of a greater mosaic. The remaining parts are destroyed by natural factors. Herbal motifs are pictured within the main panel cross squares. It consists of a wide mesh band on the side and hexagonal and square geometric motifs on the outer border.
  • Roman mosaics - The Duluk Mosaic  Mosaic. 4th century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The mosaic, which was found in the ancient city DOM in Gaziantep and brought to the museum, is dated to 4th century A.D. The mosaic, which is geometric, is a part of a greater mosaic. The remaining parts are destroyed by natural factors. Herbal motifs are pictured within the main panel cross squares. It consists of a wide mesh band on the side and hexagonal and square geometric motifs on the outer border.
  • Roman mosaics - Satyros, Antiope & Galatia Mosaic. Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Satyros, Antiope & Galatia Mosaic. Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Satyros, Antiope & Galatia Mosaic. Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Dionysus Portrait Mosaic. Okeanos Villa, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.
  • Roman mosaics - Dionysus Portrait Mosaic. Okeanos Villa, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.
  • Roman mosaics - Dionysus Portrait Mosaic. Okeanos Villa, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a grey background.
  • Roman mosaics - Geometric Mosaic. The Giyoslu Villa. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.
  • Roman mosaics - Geometric Mosaic. The Giyoslu Villa. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a grey background.
  • Roman mosaics - Geometric Mosaic. The Giyoslu Villa. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Dionysus Mosaic. Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - The Poseidon Mosaic. Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Dionysus Mosaic. Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Dionysus Mosaic. Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.
  • Roman mosaics - Dionysus Mosaic. Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a grey background.
  • Roman mosaics - Close up of the Dionysus Mosaic. Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - The Wedding of Dionysus mosaic. Dionysus Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd  century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
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<br />
The Wedding of Dionysus and Ariadne Mosaic, which belongs to the House of Dionysus, is one of the most special mosaics around the world. In the scene, Dionysus and Ariadne are sitting on a sofa. There are three maenads, musician, the wedding god and two sirens around them. <br />
<br />
The mosaic gives the impression of a painting due to the rich variety of colors and luminous/shadow effects used. The fact that there are many figures within the mosaic and their high pictorial quality, on the other hand, makes the mosaic much more special. <br />
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The House of Dionysus is the villa where a rescue excavation was conducted in 1992 upon the received intelligence telling that traffickers had been digging the area. After the excavations, the mosaic now you behold was unearthed along with some geometric mosaics. In terms of the exactness in the anatomy of the figures, the perspective, and the rich variety of colors it is among the most precious and important mosaic around the world. <br />
<br />
<br />
The Museum had conducted activities in order to display the mosaic where it belongs and in a natural manner. However, such a big portion of the mosaic as two thirds was stolen by the historical artefact traffickers in 1998 from the place of display. The parts of the mosaic are not found yet. After the robbery, the remaining parts were transported to Gaziantep Museum and displayed after restoration. The stolen part of the mosaic was left blank. The searches continue in order to find the missing parts through the Interpol.
  • Roman mosaics - Geometric mosaic with 3d illusion. House of Oceanos, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Geometric mosaic with 3d illusion. House of Oceanos, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.
  • Roman mosaics - Geometric mosaic with 3d illusion. House of Oceanos, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Birth of Aphrodite (Venus) Mosaic.  Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Geometric mosaic with 3d illusion. House of Oceanos, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a grey background.
  • Roman mosaics - Birth of Aphrodite (Venus) Mosaic.  Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Birth of Aphrodite (Venus) Mosaic.  Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Birth of Aphrodite (Venus) Mosaic.  Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a grey background.
  • Roman mosaics - Birth of Aphrodite (Venus) Mosaic.  Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Birth of Aphrodite (Venus) Mosaic.  Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a white background.
  • Roman mosaics - Birth of Aphrodite (Venus) Mosaic.  Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Gaia Mosaic. Euphrates Villa, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - The Euphrates ( River Gods). Euphrates Villa, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - The Euphrates ( River Gods). Euphrates Villa, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - The Euphrates ( River Gods). Euphrates Villa, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - geometric Mosaic. Poseidon & Euphrates Villa, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics. The Acratos & Eljprocvne Mosaic from The House of Maenad Zeugma.  2nd - 3rd century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.
  • Roman mosaics. The Acratos & Eljprocvne Mosaic from The House of Maenad Zeugma.  2nd - 3rd century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics. The Acratos & Eljprocvne Mosaic from The House of Maenad Zeugma.  2nd - 3rd century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a white background.
  • Roman mosaics. The Acratos & Eljprocvne Mosaic from The House of Maenad Zeugma.  2nd - 3rd century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Close up of a dolphin from the  The Poseidon Mosaic . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep.
  • Roman mosaics - The Poseidon Mosaic. Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - The Poseidon Mosaic. Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - The Poseidon Mosaic. Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman geometric mosaics from Zeugma. 2nd-3rd century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a white background.
  • Roman geometric mosaics from Zeugma. 2nd-3rd century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.
  • Roman geometric mosaics from Zeugma. 2nd-3rd century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman geometric mosaics from Zeugma. 2nd-3rd century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a grey background.
  • Roman Mosaic - close up river god Oceanos The Oceanos & Tethys Mosaic, fom The House of Oceanos, Zeugma.  2nd - 3rd century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The Oceanos and Tethys Mosaic is the floor mosaic of the shallow pool of the House of Oceanos. In this mosaic, which belongs to the Early Roman Empire Period, Oceanos, the river god who is the origin of life, and his wife Tethys are represented. At the middle of the mosaic which is surrounded by a geometric triple tress borders there are Oceanos and his wife Tethys. Around them there are Eros figures riding various species of fish and dolphins symbolising the abundance of the sea. The most represented attributes of Oceanos are snake and fish.<br />
<br />
 in the mosaic, Oceanos is seen with chelas. Those chelas are among his most characteristic attributes. Though the tail of an eel is represented as his feet in the figures on ceramics, within the scope of the art of mosaic he is represented as a bust and only with the chelas on his head such as this one. His wife Tethys is right by his side and represented with wings upon her forehead. Between them, there is the dragon called Cetos which is a mythological sea creature. As is seen in the coins of Zeugma, the Euphrates River is expressed as a dragon. Besides these two figures, on the top-right of the mosaic, there is a young male figure which is thought to be Pan, the patron of fishermen and shepherds. The fact that Eros figures and Pan which are the side figures are located outward implies that the pool is built to allow walking around. <br />
<br />
The expression of the Oceanos as not an ocean but a river surrounding the world: By that the water, which vapours with the heat of the sun and then gives life to the nature by becoming rain, and which after being used by the nature reaches again the sea via the rivers is expressed. The water becomes aware of itself and its function by that cycle. This phenomenon is represented in the mosaic panel as the diversification of Ocen
  • Roman Mosaic - close up of Eros riding a dolphin. The Oceanos & Tethys Mosaic, fom The House of Oceanos, Zeugma.  2nd - 3rd century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The Oceanos and Tethys Mosaic is the floor mosaic of the shallow pool of the House of Oceanos. In this mosaic, which belongs to the Early Roman Empire Period, Oceanos, the river god who is the origin of life, and his wife Tethys are represented. At the middle of the mosaic which is surrounded by a geometric triple tress borders there are Oceanos and his wife Tethys. Around them there are Eros figures riding various species of fish and dolphins symbolising the abundance of the sea. The most represented attributes of Oceanos are snake and fish.
  • Roman Mosaic - close up of  Oceanos and his wife Tethys. The Oceanos & Tethys Mosaic, fom The House of Oceanos, Zeugma.  2nd - 3rd century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The Oceanos and Tethys Mosaic is the floor mosaic of the shallow pool of the House of Oceanos. In this mosaic, which belongs to the Early Roman Empire Period, Oceanos, the river god who is the origin of life, and his wife Tethys are represented. At the middle of the mosaic which is surrounded by a geometric triple tress borders there are Oceanos and his wife Tethys. Around them there are Eros figures riding various species of fish and dolphins symbolising the abundance of the sea. The most represented attributes of Oceanos are snake and fish.<br />
<br />
 in the mosaic, Oceanos is seen with chelas. Those chelas are among his most characteristic attributes. Though the tail of an eel is represented as his feet in the figures on ceramics, within the scope of the art of mosaic he is represented as a bust and only with the chelas on his head such as this one. His wife Tethys is right by his side and represented with wings upon her forehead. Between them, there is the dragon called Cetos which is a mythological sea creature. As is seen in the coins of Zeugma, the Euphrates River is expressed as a dragon. Besides these two figures, on the top-right of the mosaic, there is a young male figure which is thought to be Pan, the patron of fishermen and shepherds. The fact that Eros figures and Pan which are the side figures are located outward implies that the pool is built to allow walking around. <br />
<br />
The expression of the Oceanos as not an ocean but a river surrounding the world: By that the water, which vapours with the heat of the sun and then gives life to the nature by becoming rain, and which after being used by the nature reaches again the sea via the rivers is expressed. The water becomes aware of itself and its function by that cycle. This phenomenon is represented in the mosaic panel as the diversif
  • Roman Mosaic - The Oceanos & Tethys Mosaic, fom The House of Oceanos, Zeugma.  2nd - 3rd century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The Oceanos and Tethys Mosaic is the floor mosaic of the shallow pool of the House of Oceanos. In this mosaic, which belongs to the Early Roman Empire Period, Oceanos, the river god who is the origin of life, and his wife Tethys are represented. At the middle of the mosaic which is surrounded by a geometric triple tress borders there are Oceanos and his wife Tethys. Around them there are Eros figures riding various species of fish and dolphins symbolising the abundance of the sea. The most represented attributes of Oceanos are snake and fish.<br />
<br />
 in the mosaic, Oceanos is seen with chelas. Those chelas are among his most characteristic attributes. Though the tail of an eel is represented as his feet in the figures on ceramics, within the scope of the art of mosaic he is represented as a bust and only with the chelas on his head such as this one. His wife Tethys is right by his side and represented with wings upon her forehead. Between them, there is the dragon called Cetos which is a mythological sea creature. As is seen in the coins of Zeugma, the Euphrates River is expressed as a dragon. Besides these two figures, on the top-right of the mosaic, there is a young male figure which is thought to be Pan, the patron of fishermen and shepherds. The fact that Eros figures and Pan which are the side figures are located outward implies that the pool is built to allow walking around. <br />
<br />
The expression of the Oceanos as not an ocean but a river surrounding the world: By that the water, which vapours with the heat of the sun and then gives life to the nature by becoming rain, and which after being used by the nature reaches again the sea via the rivers is expressed. The water becomes aware of itself and its function by that cycle. This phenomenon is represented in the mosaic panel as the diversification of Ocenaos through unification wit
  • Roman Mosaic - The Oceanos & Tethys Mosaic, fom The House of Oceanos, Zeugma.  2nd - 3rd century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The Oceanos and Tethys Mosaic is the floor mosaic of the shallow pool of the House of Oceanos. In this mosaic, which belongs to the Early Roman Empire Period, Oceanos, the river god who is the origin of life, and his wife Tethys are represented. At the middle of the mosaic which is surrounded by a geometric triple tress borders there are Oceanos and his wife Tethys. Around them there are Eros figures riding various species of fish and dolphins symbolising the abundance of the sea. The most represented attributes of Oceanos are snake and fish.<br />
<br />
 in the mosaic, Oceanos is seen with chelas. Those chelas are among his most characteristic attributes. Though the tail of an eel is represented as his feet in the figures on ceramics, within the scope of the art of mosaic he is represented as a bust and only with the chelas on his head such as this one. His wife Tethys is right by his side and represented with wings upon her forehead. Between them, there is the dragon called Cetos which is a mythological sea creature. As is seen in the coins of Zeugma, the Euphrates River is expressed as a dragon. Besides these two figures, on the top-right of the mosaic, there is a young male figure which is thought to be Pan, the patron of fishermen and shepherds. The fact that Eros figures and Pan which are the side figures are located outward implies that the pool is built to allow walking around. <br />
<br />
The expression of the Oceanos as not an ocean but a river surrounding the world: By that the water, which vapours with the heat of the sun and then gives life to the nature by becoming rain, and which after being used by the nature reaches again the sea via the rivers is expressed. The water becomes aware of itself and its function by that cycle. This phenomenon is represented in the mosaic panel as the diversification of O
  • Roman Mosaic - The Oceanos & Tethys Mosaic, fom The House of Oceanos, Zeugma.  2nd - 3rd century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The Oceanos and Tethys Mosaic is the floor mosaic of the shallow pool of the House of Oceanos. In this mosaic, which belongs to the Early Roman Empire Period, Oceanos, the river god who is the origin of life, and his wife Tethys are represented. At the middle of the mosaic which is surrounded by a geometric triple tress borders there are Oceanos and his wife Tethys. Around them there are Eros figures riding various species of fish and dolphins symbolising the abundance of the sea. The most represented attributes of Oceanos are snake and fish.<br />
<br />
 in the mosaic, Oceanos is seen with chelas. Those chelas are among his most characteristic attributes. Though the tail of an eel is represented as his feet in the figures on ceramics, within the scope of the art of mosaic he is represented as a bust and only with the chelas on his head such as this one. His wife Tethys is right by his side and represented with wings upon her forehead. Between them, there is the dragon called Cetos which is a mythological sea creature. As is seen in the coins of Zeugma, the Euphrates River is expressed as a dragon. Besides these two figures, on the top-right of the mosaic, there is a young male figure which is thought to be Pan, the patron of fishermen and shepherds. The fact that Eros figures and Pan which are the side figures are located outward implies that the pool is built to allow walking around. <br />
<br />
The expression of the Oceanos as not an ocean but a river surrounding the world: By that the water, which vapours with the heat of the sun and then gives life to the nature by becoming rain, and which after being used by the nature reaches again the sea via the rivers is expressed. The water becomes aware of itself and its function by that cycle. This phenomenon is represented in the mosaic panel as the diversification of Oc
  • Roman mosaics - Rooms of an excavated villa from Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Women At Breakfast Mosaic. Zosimos Villa, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a white background.
  • Roman mosaics - Women At Breakfast Mosaic. Zosimos Villa, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Women At Breakfast Mosaic. Zosimos Villa, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.
  • Roman mosaics - Bust of Dionysus Mosaic. House of Oceanos, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Persius & Andromeda Mosaic. Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Achilles Mosaic.  Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Geometric Mosaic. Dionysus Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.
  • Roman mosaics - Mousai Mosaic. Euphrates Villa, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Mousai Mosaic. Euphrates Villa, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a white background.
  • Roman mosaics - Geometric Mosaic. The House of Oceanos. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.
  • Roman mosaics - Close up of The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • Roman mosaics - Geometric Mosaic. House of Okeanos, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Geometric Mosaic. House of Okeanos, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.
  • Roman mosaics -  The Bath House. The House of Oceanos, Ancient Zeugama. 3rd Century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a white background.
  • Roman mosaics - The Duluk Mosaic  Mosaic. 4th century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The mosaic, which was found in the ancient city DOM in Gaziantep and brought to the museum, is dated to 4th century A.D. The mosaic, which is geometric, is a part of a greater mosaic. The remaining parts are destroyed by natural factors. Herbal motifs are pictured within the main panel cross squares. It consists of a wide mesh band on the side and hexagonal and square geometric motifs on the outer border.
  • Roman mosaics - The Duluk Mosaic  Mosaic. 4th century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.    Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The mosaic, which was found in the ancient city DOM in Gaziantep and brought to the museum, is dated to 4th century A.D. The mosaic, which is geometric, is a part of a greater mosaic. The remaining parts are destroyed by natural factors. Herbal motifs are pictured within the main panel cross squares. It consists of a wide mesh band on the side and hexagonal and square geometric motifs on the outer border.
  • Roman mosaics - The Duluk Mosaic  Mosaic. 4th century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The mosaic, which was found in the ancient city DOM in Gaziantep and brought to the museum, is dated to 4th century A.D. The mosaic, which is geometric, is a part of a greater mosaic. The remaining parts are destroyed by natural factors. Herbal motifs are pictured within the main panel cross squares. It consists of a wide mesh band on the side and hexagonal and square geometric motifs on the outer border.
  • Roman mosaics - Dionysus Portrait Mosaic. Okeanos Villa, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Dionysus Portrait Mosaic. Okeanos Villa, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - Geometric Mosaic. The Giyoslu Villa. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.
  • Roman mosaics - Dionysus Mosaic. Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.  Against a white background.
  • Roman mosaics - Close up of The Wedding of Dionysus mosaic. Dionysus Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd  century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
<br />
The Wedding of Dionysus and Ariadne Mosaic, which belongs to the House of Dionysus, is one of the most special mosaics around the world. In the scene, Dionysus and Ariadne are sitting on a sofa. There are three maenads, musician, the wedding god and two sirens around them. <br />
<br />
The mosaic gives the impression of a painting due to the rich variety of colors and luminous/shadow effects used. The fact that there are many figures within the mosaic and their high pictorial quality, on the other hand, makes the mosaic much more special. <br />
<br />
The House of Dionysus is the villa where a rescue excavation was conducted in 1992 upon the received intelligence telling that traffickers had been digging the area. After the excavations, the mosaic now you behold was unearthed along with some geometric mosaics. In terms of the exactness in the anatomy of the figures, the perspective, and the rich variety of colors it is among the most precious and important mosaic around the world. <br />
<br />
<br />
The Museum had conducted activities in order to display the mosaic where it belongs and in a natural manner. However, such a big portion of the mosaic as two thirds was stolen by the historical artefact traffickers in 1998 from the place of display. The parts of the mosaic are not found yet. After the robbery, the remaining parts were transported to Gaziantep Museum and displayed after restoration. The stolen part of the mosaic was left blank. The searches continue in order to find the missing parts through the Interpol.
  • Roman mosaics - Birth of Aphrodite (Venus) Mosaic.  Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.
  • Roman mosaics - Birth of Aphrodite (Venus) Mosaic.  Poseidon Villa Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - The Euphrates ( River Gods). Euphrates Villa, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman mosaics - The Euphrates ( River Gods). Euphrates Villa, Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.
  • Roman geometric mosaics from Zeugma. 2nd-3rd century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against an art background.
  • Roman Mosaic - close up of  Tethys wife of river god Oceanos. The Oceanos & Tethys Mosaic, fom The House of Oceanos, Zeugma.  2nd - 3rd century AD. Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The Oceanos and Tethys Mosaic is the floor mosaic of the shallow pool of the House of Oceanos. In this mosaic, which belongs to the Early Roman Empire Period, Oceanos, the river god who is the origin of life, and his wife Tethys are represented. At the middle of the mosaic which is surrounded by a geometric triple tress borders there are Oceanos and his wife Tethys. Around them there are Eros figures riding various species of fish and dolphins symbolising the abundance of the sea. The most represented attributes of Oceanos are snake and fish.<br />
<br />
 in the mosaic, Oceanos is seen with chelas. Those chelas are among his most characteristic attributes. Though the tail of an eel is represented as his feet in the figures on ceramics, within the scope of the art of mosaic he is represented as a bust and only with the chelas on his head such as this one. His wife Tethys is right by his side and represented with wings upon her forehead. Between them, there is the dragon called Cetos which is a mythological sea creature. As is seen in the coins of Zeugma, the Euphrates River is expressed as a dragon. Besides these two figures, on the top-right of the mosaic, there is a young male figure which is thought to be Pan, the patron of fishermen and shepherds. The fact that Eros figures and Pan which are the side figures are located outward implies that the pool is built to allow walking around. <br />
<br />
The expression of the Oceanos as not an ocean but a river surrounding the world: By that the water, which vapours with the heat of the sun and then gives life to the nature by becoming rain, and which after being used by the nature reaches again the sea via the rivers is expressed. The water becomes aware of itself and its function by that cycle. This phenomenon is represented in the mosaic panel as the div
  • Hunters hunting. Roman mosaic floor of the Room of The Small Hunt, no 25 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale ,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hunters hunting. Roman mosaic floor of the Room of The Small Hunt, no 25 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale ,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hunters hunting a boar. Roman mosaic floor of the Room of The Small Hunt, no 25 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale ,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hunter with dogs. Roman mosaic floor of the Room of The Small Hunt, no 25 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale ,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hunter with dogs. Roman mosaic floor of the Room of The Small Hunt, no 25 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale ,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hunters with a wild boar. Roman mosaic floor of the Room of The Small Hunt, no 25 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale ,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hunters hunting. Roman mosaic floor of the Room of The Small Hunt, no 25 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale ,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Roman mosaic floor of the Room of The Small Hunt, no 25 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale ,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hunters hunting. Roman mosaic floor of the Room of The Small Hunt, no 25 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale ,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hunters hunting. Roman mosaic floor of the Room of The Small Hunt, no 25 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale ,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hunters Hunting. Roman mosaic floor of the Room of The Small Hunt, no 25 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale ,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hunters hunting. Roman mosaic floor of the Room of The Small Hunt, no 25 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale ,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hunters Hunting. Roman mosaic floor of the Room of The Small Hunt, no 25 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale ,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hunters making an offering at an altar. Roman mosaic floor of the Room of The Small Hunt, no 25 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale ,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Wild Boar being hunted. Roman mosaic floor of the Room of The Small Hunt, no 25 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale ,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Wild Boar being hunted. Roman mosaic floor of the Room of The Small Hunt, no 25 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale ,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hunter Roman mosaic floor of the Room of The Small Hunt, no 25 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale ,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hunters looking for birds. Roman mosaic floor of the Room of The Small Hunt, no 25 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale ,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hunter with a hare. Roman mosaic floor of the Room of The Small Hunt, no 25 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale ,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hunters looking for birds. Roman mosaic floor of the Room of The Small Hunt, no 25 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale ,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hunter with a hare. Roman mosaic floor of the Room of The Small Hunt, no 25 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale ,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hunters carrying a dead wild boar. Roman mosaic floor of the Room of The Small Hunt, no 25 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale ,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hunters carrying a dead wild boar. Roman mosaic floor of the Room of The Small Hunt, no 25 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale ,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hunters hunting a boar. Roman mosaic floor of the Room of The Small Hunt, no 25 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale ,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Deer being hunted. Roman mosaic floor of the Room of The Small Hunt, no 25 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale ,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Close up of a chariot racing at the Circus Maximus Chariot racing at the Circus Maximus from the Palaestra room no 15.. Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Close up of a chariot racing at the Circus Maximus Chariot racing at the Circus Maximus from the Palaestra room no 15.. Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hunters hunting. Roman mosaic floor of the Room of The Small Hunt, no 25 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale ,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hunters making an offering at an altar. Roman mosaic floor of the Room of The Small Hunt, no 25 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale ,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hunter Roman mosaic floor of the Room of The Small Hunt, no 25 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale ,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic detail fron the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic detail fron the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic detail fron the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic detail fron the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic detail fron the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Detail of a Roman Mosaic from the Room of The Fishing Cupids, room 24, at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Detail of a Roman Mosaic from the Room of The Fishing Cupids, room 24, at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic detail fron the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic detail fron the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic detail fron the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic detail fron the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic detail fron the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Detail of a Roman Mosaic from the Room of The Fishing Cupids, room 24, at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic detail fron the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic detail fron the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic detail fron the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic detail fron the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic detail fron the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Roman Mosaic from the Cubilcle with Erotic Scene, room 24, at the Villa Romana del Casale,  4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Roman Mosaic from the Cubilcle with Erotic Scene, room 24, at the Villa Romana del Casale,  first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Cupids & dolphin Roman mosaic, room 24, at the Villa Romana del Casale, Sicily ,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hunter with dogs chasing a fox from the Room of The Small Hunt, no 25 - Roman mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Fishermen Roman mosaic, room 24, at the Villa Romana del Casale, Sicily ,  circa the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic detail fron the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic detail fron the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic detail fron the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic detail fron the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic detail fron the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic detail fron the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic detail fron the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic detail fron the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mosaic detail fron the Room of the Ten Bikini Girls, room no 30, from the Ambulatory of The Great Hunt, room no 28,  at the Villa Romana del Casale which containis the richest, largest and most complex collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Constructed in the first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.

FunkyStock Picture Library Resource

Picture The Past

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FunkyStock Picture Library free resource for professional editorial picture editors, picture researchers, historical scholars and students and enthusiasts who want to browse some of the best pictures and images of historic countries, historical places, archaeological sites and the very best museum antiquities and artefacts exhibits in Europe and the Middle East.

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Browse travel pictures and images of historic places and archaeological sites of countries in Europe and the Middle East.

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Explore the past through pictures and images of its historic places. See the great palaces, castles and cities of antiquity as well as the great archaeological sites where our ancestors made history.

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Browse pictures & images the treasured artefacts and antiquities exhibits from the great Museum of Europe and the Middle East. See the art and objects made by our ancestors.

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