• Pantheon. the 2nd century Roman temple to all Roman Gods built by the Emperor Trajan. Now the Roman Catholic  church of St. Mary and the Martyrs. Rome
  • The Baroque Jesuit church and museum with the border bridge to Slovakia, Esztergom, Hungary (127mb)
  • Capsicum annuum or chili peppers drying  to make Hungarian paprika - Kalocsa Hungary
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel from Water Gate Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 BC.  Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The figure sitting on a stool to the left of the table holds a goblet in his right hand which he raised upwards. Behind, there is a servant with a fan in his hand. On the other side of the table is another servant waits with a vessel in the hands. The rightmost figure plays a Saz (a stringed musical instrument) with the tassel on the handle. <br />
<br />
On a white background.
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Long Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Goddess Kubaba. Goddess is depicted from the profile. The part below the chest of the relief is broken. She holds a pomegranate in her hands on her chest. She carries a one-horned headdress on her head. Her braided hair hangs down to her shoulder. The text in the hieroglyphics is not understood. The lower part of the relief has been restored. <br />
<br />
On a White Background.
  • Picture & image of Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Herald's Wall Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Two sphinxes standing on their hind legs on both sides attack to the winged horse standing on its hind legs in the middle.  <br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • The Canopus, an elongated canal imitating the famous sanctuary of Serapis near Alexandria. The semi-circular exedra of the Serapeum is located at its southern end, dedicated to the gods Isis and Serpis which was probably used as a banqueting hall. Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Kiosk built in 17th century to protect the organ pipes. The Organ fountain, 1566, housing organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • Roman sculptural decorations  on  The Arch Of Constantine built to celebrate victory over Maxentius . Rome. Rome
  • Roman sculptural decorations  on  The Arch Of Constantine built to celebrate victory over Maxentius . Rome. Rome
  • Fountain of the Four Rivers by Bellinio, designed to carry the Egyptian obalisque brough from the Circus Maximus. The 4 figures represent the Nile,  Ganges, Danube amd Rio de la plata. Plazza Novona,  Rome
  • Capsicum annuum or chili peppers being grown to make Hungarian paprika - Kalocsa Hungary
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of a Procession. Limestone, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900 - 700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
It is a depiction of three marching female figures in long dress with a high headdress (photos) at their head. These women are considered to be the nuns of the Goddess Kubaba. The figure in the front has a small animal in her right hand while the figure in the middle has a glass in his right hand. The object which the figures carry in their left is not understood.  <br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 BC. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The figure playing a musical instrument similar to a guitar is followed by another figure carrying an animal. The stem of the musical instrument is fringed. The left side of the Orthostat is uncompleted.<br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Three figures moving towards the altar behind the sacrifices. The figures wearing a long-tailed cloak hold objects in their left hand, which resembles to a sceptre with a twisted end.  <br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Pictures & images of the North Gate ancient Hittite stele stone slabs with carvings of the Phoenician language  known as the Karatepe bilingual, which allowed academics to translate Hittite hieroglyphs. 8th century BC discovered in 1946. Karatepe Aslantas Open-Air Museum (Karatepe-Aslantaş Açık Hava Müzesi), Osmaniye Province, Turkey.
  • Pictures & images of the South Gate ancient Hittite stele stone slabs with carvings of the Luwian language hieroglyphics known as the Karatepe bilingual, which allowed academics to translate Hittite hieroglyphs. 8th century BC discovered in 1946. Karatepe Aslantas Open-Air Museum (Karatepe-Aslantaş Açık Hava Müzesi), Osmaniye Province, Turkey.
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Statues and columns that surround a rectangular basin that ends at The Serapaeum, dedicated to the gods Isis and Serpis which was probably used as a banqueting hall. Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Room of The Nobility (Stanza della Nobilta). The Renaissance paintings by Federico Zuccari can be dated to 1566-67. Decorated with Trompe-l'?il Ionian Pillars & busts the figures in the panels depict "Virtue" and "Thee Liberal Arts". Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Medieval mosaics of the ceiling of The Baptistry of Florence Duomo ( Battistero di San Giovanni ) showing Joseph,  Mary and the baby Jesus on a donkey travelling to Egypt,  started in 1225 by Venetian craftsmen in a Byzantine style and completed in the 14th century. Florence Italy
  • Modern sculpture by Jmenez Deredia next to The Arch Of Constantine . Rome
  • Baroque church nect to Trajan's Market ( Mercati Trajanei) . Rome
  • Fountain of the Four Rivers by Bellinio, designed to carry the Egyptian obalisque brough from the Circus Maximus. The 4 figures represent the Nile,  Ganges, Danube amd Rio de la plata. Plazza Novona,  Rome
  • Pantheon. the 2nd century Roman temple to all Roman Gods built by the Emperor Trajan. Now the Roman Catholic  church of St. Mary and the Martyrs. Rome
  • Hittite relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Long Wall Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Goddess Kubaba. Goddess is depicted from the profile. The part below the chest of the relief is broken. She holds a pomegranate in her hands on her chest. She carries a one-horned headdress on her head. Her braided hair hangs down to her shoulder. The text in the hieroglyphics is not understood. The lower part of the relief has been restored. <br />
<br />
On a White Background.
  • Alaca Hoyuk Sphinx Gate Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Figure with a sharp and horned headdress (probably a god) sitting on a stool with a short backrest, with a figure (probably the figure of a king) worshipping to it. Both figures wear a large and ring-shaped earring. Among them is a hieroglyph, the symbol of divinity.<br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Pictures & images of the North Gate ancient Hittite stele stone slabs with carvings of the Phoenician language  known as the Karatepe bilingual, which allowed academics to translate Hittite hieroglyphs. 8th century BC discovered in 1946. Karatepe Aslantas Open-Air Museum (Karatepe-Aslantaş Açık Hava Müzesi), Osmaniye Province, Turkey. Against white background
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict a mythical Bird. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict a mythical Bull. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Baroque church nect to Trajan's Market ( Mercati Trajanei) . Rome
  • Pantheon. the 2nd century Roman temple to all Roman Gods built by the Emperor Trajan. Now the Roman Catholic  church of St. Mary and the Martyrs. Rome
  • Romanesque interior with 14th century Frescoes of the Last Judgement attributed to Gregory and Donato D'Arezzo , Basilica Church of Santa Maria Maggiore, Tuscania
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin . Museum Inv No: VA  8856
  • 9th century BC Basalt Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict soldiers fighting. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict a mythical lion. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • . internal frescoes & decorations by Livio Agresti from Forlì (1550 to 1572)
  • Room of The Nobility (Stanza della Nobilta). The Renaissance paintings by Federico Zuccari can be dated to 1566-67. Decorated with Trompe-l'?il Ionian Pillars & busts the figures in the panels depict "Virtue" and "Thee Liberal Arts". Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Medieval mosaics of the ceiling of The Baptistry of Florence Duomo ( Battistero di San Giovanni ) showing the profits,  Mary and the baby Jesus on a donkey travelling to Egypt,  started in 1225 by Venetian craftsmen in a Byzantine style and completed in the 14th century. Florence Italy
  • Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel of Royal Buttress. Basalt, Karkamıs, (Kargamıs), Carchemish (Karkemish), 900-700 B.C. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Hieroglyph panel1 (left) - Discourse of Yariris. Yariris presents his predecessor, the eldest son Kamanis, to his people. <br />
Second From left panel 2  -  King Araras holds his son Kamanis from the wrist. King carries a sceptre in his hand and a sword at his waist while the prince leans on a stick and carries a sword on his shoulder. <br />
Hieroglyphs reads; "This is Kamanis and his siblings.) held his hand and despite the fact that he is a child, I located him on the temple. This is Yariris' image".  <br />
<br />
Panel 3 - This panels scene showing 8 out of 10 children of the King, the hieroglyphs reads as follows: "Malitispas, Astitarhunzas, Tamitispas,Isikaritispas, Sikaras, Halpawaris, Ya hilatispas". Above, there are three figures holding knucklebones (astragalus) and one figure walking by leaning on a stick; below are two each figures playing the knucklebones and turning whirligigs.<br />
 <br />
Panel 4 - The queen carries her youngest son. The hieroglyphs located above read; "and this is Tuwarsais; the prince desired by the ruler, whose exclusiveness has been exposed". While the queen carries her son in her lap, she holds the rope of the colt coming behind with her other hand. The muscles of the colt are schematic. <br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Alaca Hoyuk Hittite monumental relief sculpted orthostat stone panel. Andesite, Alaca, Corum, 1399 - 1301 B.C. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey<br />
<br />
The rightmost figure wears a long coat and tailed dress. With both hands, he holds a sceptre with a ring in the middle. This item is thought to be a cult object in Assyria reliefs. The pointed and twisted tips of his shoes also show that he is in a high rank.  <br />
<br />
Against a white background.
  • Fountain of the Four Rivers by Bellinio, designed to carry the Egyptian obalisque brough from the Circus Maximus. The 4 figures represent the Nile,  Ganges, Danube amd Rio de la plata. Plazza Novona,  Rome
  • Capsicum annuum or chili peppers drying  to make Hungarian paprika - Kalocsa Hungary
  • close up of Eflatun Pınar ( Eflatunpınar) Ancient Hittite relief sculpture monument and sacred pool, and its Hittite relief scultures of Hittite gods.  Between 15th to 13th centuries BC. Lake Beysehir National Park, Konya, Turkey.
  • Romanesque interior with 14th century Frescoes of the Last Judgement attributed to Gregory and Donato D'Arezzo , Basilica Church of Santa Maria Maggiore, Tuscania
  • The Etruscan bench with the inscription "you who have travelled the world wishing to see great stupendous marvels, come here, where there are horrendous faces, elephants, lions, bears, orcs and dragons", commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Relief panels depicting a lion hunt found in the palace district in the ruins of Coba Höyük, also known as Sakçe Gözü or Sakçagözü, archaeological site in southeastern Anatolia, Turkey.  Warriors are fighting with the lion from a chariot and on foot wearing armour . Basalt to 750 BC, The Pergamon Museum, Berlin inv no VA 971
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin Museum Inv No: OP 19,
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin OP VAS 8854,
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • The Canopus, an elongated canal imitating the famous sanctuary of Serapis near Alexandria. The semi-circular exedra of the Serapeum is located at its southern end, dedicated to the gods Isis and Serpis which was probably used as a banqueting hall. Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Serapaeum, dedicated to the gods Isis and Serpis which was probably used as a banqueting hall. Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Canopus, an elongated canal imitating the famous sanctuary of Serapis near Alexandria. The semi-circular exedra of the Serapeum is located at its southern end, dedicated to the gods Isis and Serpis which was probably used as a banqueting hall. Hadrian’s Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Canopus, an elongated canal imitating the famous sanctuary of Serapis near Alexandria. The semi-circular exedra of the Serapeum is located at its southern end, dedicated to the gods Isis and Serpis which was probably used as a banqueting hall. Hadrian’s Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • . internal frescoes & decorations by Livio Agresti from Forlì (1550 to 1572)
  • Room of The Nobility (Stanza della Nobilta). The Renaissance paintings by Federico Zuccari can be dated to 1566-67. Decorated with Trompe-l'?il Ionian Pillars & busts the figures in the panels depict "Virtue" and "Thee Liberal Arts". Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Medieval mosaics of the ceiling of The Baptistry of Florence Duomo ( Battistero di San Giovanni ) showing probably showing the arch angel Gabriel Gabriel revealing the coming of the Messaiah to Jon the Baptist ,  started in 1225 by Venetian craftsmen in a Byzantine style and completed in the 14th century. Florence Italy
  • Close up of Hittite relief scultures of Hittite godsEflatun Pınar ( Eflatunpınar) Ancient Hittite relief sculpture monument and sacred pool.  Between 15th to 13th centuries BC. Lake Beysehir National Park, Konya, Turkey.
  • Close up of Hittite relief scultures of Hittite godsEflatun Pınar ( Eflatunpınar) Ancient Hittite relief sculpture monument and sacred pool.  Between 15th to 13th centuries BC. Lake Beysehir National Park, Konya, Turkey.
  • Romanesque interior with 14th century Frescoes of the Last Judgement attributed to Gregory and Donato D'Arezzo , Basilica Church of Santa Maria Maggiore, Tuscania
  • Lunette of the main portal with Romanesque sculptures of Abraham about to sleigh Isaac , Basilica Church of Santa Maria Maggiore, Tuscania
  • Lunette of the main portal with Romanesque sculptures of the Modona and child, centre, Abraham about to sleigh Isaac, left, and The lamb of God, right , Basilica Church of Santa Maria Maggiore, Tuscania
  • Furia Alta, Winged Fury, a greek and Etruscan deity that was important to the Romans as a guardian of national glory and fertility of the soil, hence the basket on her head, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Temple built to the memory of Giulia Farnese by her husband Pier Francesco Orsini, Duke of Babarzo c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist style Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Temple built to the memory of Giulia Farnese by her husband Pier Francesco Orsini, Duke of Babarzo c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist style Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Photo of the Hittite releif sculpture on the Lion gate to the Hittite capital Hattusa
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf, ancient Guzana, in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats from the Palace of King Kapara are in a Neo Hittite style and depict an Archer. Louvre Museum, Paris, inv AO11072
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin Museum Inv No: OP 14,
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin Museum Inv No: OP 15
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin . Museum Inv No VAS 8841,
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin . Museum Inv No: VA  8840,
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin . Museum Inv No: VA 8850
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin . Museum Inv No: VA  8856
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC Basalt Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict soldiers fighting. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • The Serapaeum, dedicated to the gods Isis and Serpis which was probably used as a banqueting hall. Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Statues and columns that surround a rectangular basin that ends at The Serapaeum, dedicated to the gods Isis and Serpis which was probably used as a banqueting hall. Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Salon of the Fountain( Sala della Fontana ), the banquet hall of Cardinal Ipollito d"Este. The trompe-l'?il frescoes were carried out by 6 assistants of Girolamo Muziano (1532-1592) were inspired by the "Solomonic" winding columns of the Vatican Basilica to create a loggia decorated by festoons of fruit, flowers & vegetables with a landscape beyond. The rustic fountain at the end of the salon was built by fountain maker Curzio Maccarone and was completed in 1568. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Room of Glory (Stanza della Gloria ). The Renaissance paintings by Federico Zuccari can be dated to 1566-68. . Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Room of The Nobility (Stanza della Nobilta). The Renaissance paintings by Federico Zuccari can be dated to 1566-67. Decorated with Trompe-l'?il Ionian Pillars & busts the figures in the panels depict "Virtue" and "Thee Liberal Arts". Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval Sculptures of The Madonna & Child above the door to the The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Medieval mosaics of the ceiling of The Baptistry of Florence Duomo ( Battistero di San Giovanni ) showing Mary having given birth to Jesus who is lying in a manger which shows the influence of the Franciscan Friar who oversaw the mosic work,  Jacopo da Torrita, who was following the tradition of Christ being born in a stable invented by St. Francis,  started in 1225 by Venetian craftsmen in a Byzantine style and completed in the 14th century. Florence Italy
  • Romanesque interior with 14th century Frescoes of the Last Judgement attributed to Gregory and Donato D'Arezzo , Basilica Church of Santa Maria Maggiore, Tuscania
  • Lunette of the main portal with Romanesque sculptures of the Modona and child, centre, Abraham about to sleigh Isaac, left, and The lamb of God, right , Basilica Church of Santa Maria Maggiore, Tuscania
  • The sword of God from the Sancutary of Yazilikaza, Hattusha, Turkey. Probably the weirdest representation of the rock sanctuary Yazilikaza, shows a sword God. He is waering a high pointed cap, whose ornamented with horns showing he is a divine character. The lower part of his body is formed of two hanging lions that merge into a sword blade . The body of God seems to form the sword handle and the sword being stuck into the ground could indicate that there is a god of the underworld. Cast from the original. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin.  Museum Inv No: OP 18, 22, 19, 14, 15, VAS 8854, 8841, 8852
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin. Museum Inv No: VA 8843
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin . Museum Inv No: VA 8845,
  • The Canopus, an elongated canal imitating the famous sanctuary of Serapis near Alexandria. The semi-circular exedra of the Serapeum is located at its southern end, dedicated to the gods Isis and Serpis which was probably used as a banqueting hall. Hadrian’s Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Canopus, an elongated canal imitating the famous sanctuary of Serapis near Alexandria. The semi-circular exedra of the Serapeum is located at its southern end, dedicated to the gods Isis and Serpis which was probably used as a banqueting hall. Hadrian’s Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Salon of the Fountain( Sala della Fontana ), the banquet hall of Cardinal Ipollito d"Este. The trompe-l'?il frescoes were carried out by 6 assistants of Girolamo Muziano (1532-1592) were inspired by the "Solomonic" winding columns of the Vatican Basilica to create a loggia decorated by festoons of fruit, flowers & vegetables with a landscape beyond. The rustic fountain at the end of the salon was built by fountain maker Curzio Maccarone and was completed in 1568. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval Sculptures of The Madonna & Child above the door to the The Leaning Tower Of Pisa, Italy
  • The Medieval mosaics of the ceiling of The Baptistry of Florence Duomo ( Battistero di San Giovanni ) showing the three wise men on their way to visit the baby Jesus,  started in 1225 by Venetian craftsmen in a Byzantine style and completed in the 14th century. Florence Italy
  • Eflatun Pınar ( Eflatunpınar) Ancient Hittite relief sculpture monument and sacred pool, and its Hittite relief scultures of Hittite gods.  Between 15th to 13th centuries BC. Lake Beysehir National Park, Konya, Turkey.
  • Statues of bulls and Eflatun Pınar ( Eflatunpınar) Ancient Hittite relief sculpture monument and sacred pool, and its Hittite relief scultures of Hittite gods.  Between 15th to 13th centuries BC. Lake Beysehir National Park, Konya, Turkey.
  • Romanesque interior with 14th century Frescoes of the Last Judgement attributed to Gregory and Donato D'Arezzo , Basilica Church of Santa Maria Maggiore, Tuscania
  • Lunette of the main portal with Romanesque sculptures of the Modona and child, centre, Abraham about to sleigh Isaac, left, and The lamb of God, right , Basilica Church of Santa Maria Maggiore, Tuscania
  • The Etruscan bench with the inscription "you who have travelled the world wishing to see great stupendous marvels, come here, where there are horrendous faces, elephants, lions, bears, orcs and dragons", commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Furia Alta, Winged Fury, a greek and Etruscan deity that was important to the Romans as a guardian of national glory and fertility of the soil, hence the basket on her head, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin. Museum Inv No: VA 8859, 8843, 8845, 8840, 8850, 8844, 8856
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin Museum Inv No: OP 18,
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin . Museum Inv No: VA 8844,
  • Statues and columns that surround a rectangular basin that ends at The Serapaeum, dedicated to the gods Isis and Serpis which was probably used as a banqueting hall. Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Canopus, an elongated canal imitating the famous sanctuary of Serapis near Alexandria. The semi-circular exedra of the Serapeum is located at its southern end, dedicated to the gods Isis and Serpis which was probably used as a banqueting hall. Hadrian’s Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Room of The Nobility (Stanza della Nobilta). The Renaissance paintings by Federico Zuccari can be dated to 1566-67. Decorated with Trompe-l'?il Ionian Pillars & busts the figures in the panels depict "Virtue" and "Thee Liberal Arts". Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Rape of the Sabine Women by the Flemish artist Jean de Boulogne ( Giambologna). Made from one imperfect block of white marble, the largest block ever transported to Florence. The Loggia dei Lanzi, also called the Loggia della Signoria, Piazza della Signoria in Florence, Italy,
  • The Medieval mosaics of the ceiling of The Baptistry of Florence Duomo ( Battistero di San Giovanni ) showing the Three Wise Men giving gifts to the Baby Jesus ,  started in 1225 by Venetian craftsmen in a Byzantine style and completed in the 14th century. Florence Italy
  • The Medieval mosaics of the ceiling of The Baptistry of Florence Duomo ( Battistero di San Giovanni ) showing an Anel telling the sleeping three wise men to travel and find the baby Jesus ,  started in 1225 by Venetian craftsmen in a Byzantine style and completed in the 14th century. Florence Italy
  • Romanesque interior with 14th century Frescoes of the Last Judgement attributed to Gregory and Donato D'Arezzo , Basilica Church of Santa Maria Maggiore, Tuscania
  • Romanesque interior with 14th century Frescoes of the Last Judgement attributed to Gregory and Donato D'Arezzo , Basilica Church of Santa Maria Maggiore, Tuscania
  • Lunette of the main portal with Romanesque sculptures of the Modona and child, centre, Abraham about to sleigh Isaac, left, and The lamb of God, right , Basilica Church of Santa Maria Maggiore, Tuscania
  • Pegasus fountain, a tribute to the Farnese family, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • Pegasus fountain, a tribute to the Farnese family, commissioned by Piaer Francesco Orsini c. 1513-84, The Renaissance Mannerist statues of the Park of Monsters or The Sacred Wood of Bamarzo, Italy
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf, ancient Guzana, in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict a mythical God. Louvre Museum, Paris, inv AO11073
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin , Museum Inv No VAS 8852
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • A Colossal Statue of the Weather God Hadad found near Gerdshin near Sam'al / Zincirli , Turkey. The lower part of the body of the statue has Aramaic text which starts " I am Panamuwa, the son of QRL, the king of Ja'udi, I have erected this statue of Hadad, at my eternal grave.  Originally the statue would have held lightening rods and an axe. On his round cap are bull horns known as the symbols of divinity. The weather God brought the rains which in the dry areas of Mesopotamia was all important. The inscription goes on to read " May the soul of Panamuwa eat with Hadad, May the soul of Panamuwa drink with Hadad". Basalt 775 BC, Pergamon Museum Berlin, inv no VA 2882.
  • 9th century BC Basalt Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict soldiers fighting. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • The Canopus, an elongated canal imitating the famous sanctuary of Serapis near Alexandria. The semi-circular exedra of the Serapeum is located at its southern end, dedicated to the gods Isis and Serpis which was probably used as a banqueting hall. Hadrian’s Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Room of Glory (Stanza della Gloria ). The Renaissance paintings by Federico Zuccari can be dated to 1566-68. The frescoes in the vaulted ceiling depict the virtues which consent the fulfilment of "Glory" with allegorical panels depicting Magnanimity, Fortune, Time and Religion. Trompe-l'?il alcoves reveal the Cardinals hat of Ippolito d'Este  . Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Rape of the Sabine Women by the Flemish artist Jean de Boulogne ( Giambologna). Made from one imperfect block of white marble, the largest block ever transported to Florence. The Loggia dei Lanzi, also called the Loggia della Signoria, Piazza della Signoria in Florence, Italy,
  • The Medieval mosaics of the ceiling of The Baptistry of Florence Duomo ( Battistero di San Giovanni ) showing Adam & Eve being tempted by Satin in the form of a snake and being expelled from the Garden of Eden by the Archangel Gabriel ( top panel from left to right),  Started in 1225 by Venetian craftsmen in a Byzantine style and completed in the 14th century. Florence Italy
  • The Medieval mosaics of the ceiling of The Baptistry of Florence Duomo ( Battistero di San Giovanni ) showing the Adan & Eve being expelled from the Garden of Eden by the Archangel Gabriel (left) and starting to work on barren rocky land ,  started in 1225 by Venetian craftsmen in a Byzantine style and completed in the 14th century. Florence Italy
  • Father teaching his  child to Ski- Insbruck - Austrian Tyrol
  • Stock photos of heart shaped chocolates for Valentines or Love message. The perfect stock image to say I love you. Funky stock photos library
  • Grindelwald to Kleiner Scheidegg Train - Swiss Alps
  • Close up of lower relief sculptures of Hittite gods at Eflatun Pınar ( Eflatunpınar) Ancient Hittite relief sculpture monument and sacred pool.  Between 15th to 13th centuries BC. Lake Beysehir National Park, Konya, Turkey.
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict mythical animals and figures that have magical properties. Pergamon Museum, Berlin Museum Inv No: OP  22,
  • 9th century BC stone Neo-Hittite/ Aramaean Orthostats from Palace Temple of the Aramaean city of Tell Halaf in northeastern Syria close to the Turkish border. The Orthostats are in a Neo Hittite style and depict a mythical Bird. Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • The Canopus, an elongated canal imitating the famous sanctuary of Serapis near Alexandria. The semi-circular exedra of the Serapeum is located at its southern end, dedicated to the gods Isis and Serpis which was probably used as a banqueting hall. Hadrian’s Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • wheat field ready to be harvested
  • 14th century Frescoes of the Descent into Hell attributed to Gregory and Donato D'Arezzo , Basilica Church of Santa Maria Maggiore, Tuscania
  • Room of Glory (Stanza della Gloria ). The Renaissance paintings by Federico Zuccari can be dated to 1566-68. The frescoes in the vaulted ceiling depict the virtues which consent the fulfilment of "Glory" with allegorical panels depicting Magnanimity, Fortune, Time and Religion. Trompe-l'?il alcoves reveal the Cardinals hat of Ippolito d'Este  . Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Canopus, an elongated canal imitating the famous sanctuary of Serapis near Alexandria. The semi-circular exedra of the Serapeum is located at its southern end, dedicated to the gods Isis and Serpis which was probably used as a banqueting hall. Hadrian’s Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Canopus, an elongated canal imitating the famous sanctuary of Serapis near Alexandria. The semi-circular exedra of the Serapeum is located at its southern end, dedicated to the gods Isis and Serpis which was probably used as a banqueting hall. Hadrian’s Villa ( Villa Adriana ) built during the second and third decades of the 2nd century AD, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Egyptian Roman mummy portrait or Fayum mummy portrait painted panel of a man, Roman Period, 1st to 3rd cent AD, Egypt. Egyptian Museum, Turin. <br />
<br />
Mummy portraits or Fayum mummy portraits (also Faiyum mummy portraits) are a type of naturalistic painted portrait on wooden boards attached to Upper class mummies from Roman Egypt. They belong to the tradition of panel painting, one of the most highly regarded forms of art in the Classical world. he portraits covered the faces of bodies that were mummified for burial. Extant examples indicate that they were mounted into the bands of cloth that were used to wrap the bodies.
  • Egyptian Roman mummy portrait or Fayum mummy portrait painted panel of a man, Roman Period, 1st to 3rd cent AD, Egypt. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Black background,<br />
<br />
Mummy portraits or Fayum mummy portraits (also Faiyum mummy portraits) are a type of naturalistic painted portrait on wooden boards attached to Upper class mummies from Roman Egypt. They belong to the tradition of panel painting, one of the most highly regarded forms of art in the Classical world. he portraits covered the faces of bodies that were mummified for burial. Extant examples indicate that they were mounted into the bands of cloth that were used to wrap the bodies.
  • Ancient Egyptian shabti box, wood, Intermediate Period, 21st-22nd Dynasty (1076-746 BC), Thebes, Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background.<br />
<br />
Floor 1 room 10 of Museum - Essential items of funerary equipment from the New Kingdom on, shabti figures, of which there could be from 1 to over 400 examples in a single tomb, were meant to substitute for the deceased whenever he or she was called upon to perform manual labor in the afterlife. the shabti box is a decorated wooden box to hold the figures<br />
<br />
Essential items of funerary equipment from the New Kingdom on, shabti figures, of which there could be from 1 to over 400 examples in a single tomb, were meant to substitute for the deceased whenever he or she was called upon to perform manual labor in the afterlife. the shabti box is a decorated wooden box to hold the figures
  • Ancient Egyptian shabtis doll, lwood, New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, (1538-1040 BC), Deir el Medina. Egyptian Museum, Turin.Grey background. <br />
<br />
shabti figures began to occur in Middle Kingdom tombs with a twofold nature: on <br />
the one hand, they were meant to be images of their owners, representatives of the deceased in the realm of the Lord of Eternity. <br />
On the other hand, they were also considered to be servants of the deceased, taking the role of the servant statues. The complex <br />
nature of the shabti figure as a substitute of both the owner and his or her servants remains unaltered during the New Kingdom
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Herakles or Hercules, Nessos and Deianira Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The centaur Nessos agreed to carry Herakles’ (Hercules) wife Deianira across the river Euenos in Aitolia but tried to rape her in mid-stream. I the struggle that followed we see Herakles about to deliver a crushing blow with his club. Nessos has been beaten to her knees but is still fighting. Behind the centaur is the partly disrobed figure of Deianira
  • Detail of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Zeus and Prometheus, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Prometheus is screaming in pain. Zeus had given him a terrible punishment for giving fire to man: he was tied to the Caucasus mountains and had his liver picked out daily by an eagle. Herakles shot the eagle and is undoing the first manacle. He wears his trade mark lion-skin and thrown his club to one side. A small mountain nymph, holding a throwing stick appears amongst the rocks.
  • Wide picture of the Roman mosaics of the small hunt, room no 24 at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Small Hunt room was used as a living room for guests of the Villa Romana del Casale. The Small hunt mosaic design has 4 registers running across the mosaic depicting hunting scenes. In the first register two servants are handling hunting dogs. In the second register figures are depicted burning incense at an altar to Diana, the goddess of hunting, before the hunt starts. The offering is being made by Constantius Clorus , the Caesar of Emperor Maximianus who owned the Villa Romana del Casale. Behind him is his son the future Emperor Constantine. To the right of the altar is a figure holding the reins of a horse dressed in a clavi decorated with ivy leaves indicating that he belongs to the family of Maximianus.
  • Close up detail picture of the Roman mosaics of the small hunt depicting deer being caught in a net trap, room no 24 at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Small Hunt room was used as a living room for guests of the Villa Romana del Casale. The Small hunt mosaic design has 4 registers running across the mosaic depicting hunting scenes. In the first register two servants are handling hunting dogs. In the second register figures are depicted burning incense at an altar to Diana, the goddess of hunting, before the hunt starts. The offering is being made by Constantius Clorus , the Caesar of Emperor Maximianus who owned the Villa Romana del Casale. Behind him is his son the future Emperor Constantine. To the right of the altar is a figure holding the reins of a horse dressed in a clavi decorated with ivy leaves indicating that he belongs to the family of Maximianus.
  • Close up detail picture of the Roman mosaics of the small hunt depicting a hare about to be speared,  room no 24 at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Small Hunt room was used as a living room for guests of the Villa Romana del Casale. The Small hunt mosaic design has 4 registers running across the mosaic depicting hunting scenes. In the first register two servants are handling hunting dogs. In the second register figures are depicted burning incense at an altar to Diana, the goddess of hunting, before the hunt starts. The offering is being made by Constantius Clorus , the Caesar of Emperor Maximianus who owned the Villa Romana del Casale. Behind him is his son the future Emperor Constantine. To the right of the altar is a figure holding the reins of a horse dressed in a clavi decorated with ivy leaves indicating that he belongs to the family of Maximianus.
  • Roman mosaics - The Gypsy Girls. The House of Menad. Ancient Zeugama, 2nd - 3rd century AD . Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
It was discovered in the building called the House of Menad during the excavations conducted by the Gaziantep Museum. As the excavations continued, it was understood that almost all the mosaics inside the building had been stolen by historical _artifact; traffickers. The figure, called the Gypsy. Girl, was fortunately under the soil extracted from the illegal diggings and unseen by the traffickers; then it was brought to our Museum. She was liken to a Gypsy Girl as a joke during the excavations when she was unearthed with her uncombed hair, salient cheekbones, round face and earrings, and then has kept to be called with that name. <br />
<br />
There is no illuminating data regarding her identity but some scholrs claim that she is one of the -mnads present in  Dionysus festivals because of the tendrils near her 1.71eado, and others suggest that this is a portrait of Alexander the Great The most interesting feature of the mosaic is that it follows the beholder in every direction. A special technique was used in the mosaic in order to make her eyes more realistic. On the other hand, the fact that both joy and sorrow are reflected in her face indicates the stage reached in the art of portx4it. <br />
<br />
The piece was made, via the technique -called "three look" in the art of painting during the Hellenistic period. This technique was used by great painters as well. Da vincrs'Mona Lisa is an example for such paintings. With those characteristics, the piece has become the symbol of Zeugma and Gaziantep
  • A plastered bull skull and frescoes of a reconstruction of one of four Catalhoyuk houses to help archaeologists understand the finished structure of excavated ruins. 7500 BC to 5700 BC, Catalyhoyuk Archaeological Site, Çumra, Konya, Turkey
  • Painted colour verion of 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Pan teaching Daphnis to play the pipes, a Roman copy late 2nd century BC Hellenistic Geek original attributed to Rodes sculptor Heliodoros. Pan's and Daphnis' heads and Daphnis' right arm are restorations.  The Farnese collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • 6th-7th Century v Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Corridor F-G  of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
The corridor was a covered passageway that connected the two wings of the villa, partly straight and partly curved, following the shape of the central esedra. The elements that remain are from the inner walkway. The wall is divided by slender columns. Their capitals support female figures whose architectural function is in turn to support the columns of the superstructure. The female figures hold floral garlands that link them to one another. They may be meant to represent Caryatids, the women of Caria sold into slavery, who gave the name to female figures used as supports instead of columns. The most important part of the decoration is the small pictures in the upper zone: still lifes with masks from the theater alternate with imaginary landscapes, shrines, statues of divinities, little aedicula, and altars, the whole populated by figures of peasants, fishermen, and shepherds. The scene depicting a naval battle on the curved part may well refer to the battle of Actium that led to Rome's conquest of Egypt.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of  Room E10 0f La Domus, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano, 130-140AD ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
 The white-ground central panel had a figured decoration, already obliterated by repairs carried out in antiquity. In the squares to the sides of the upper area, swathes of white fabric bordered by green leaves and berries are depicted against a purplish red background. The side walls are decorated in a similar symmetrical way; in the squares there are various decorative elements, a stag in flight with a quiver nearby (perhaps an allusion to the myth of Actaeon who was transformed into a stag by Artemis, or, more simply, to hunting), a small head (gorgoneion) contained between volutes.
  • Roman Fresco with a boat decorated for a festival and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .   <br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with a boat decorated for a festival and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .    Against a grey background.<br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  <br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Roman Fresco with boats and marine life from the second quarter of the first century AD. (mosaico fauna marina da porto fluviale di san paolo), museo nazionale romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy. inv. 121462 .  <br />
The frescoes depict boats decorated as boats which went along the Tiber on festival days; their shape appears to be the caudicariae boats, used to transport merchandise. In the fresco fragment exhibited here (Ambiente E) the boat on the left depicts probably the group of 'side Serapide and Demetra on the stern, whereas the one on the right presents a crowned character on the bow and, on the stern, a feminine figure fluctuating in the air. Between the two boats, a young boy (a cupid or Palaimon-Portunus) rides a dolphin. All around are depicted several fish incredibly casting their shadows on the sea. The ichthyic fauna, lifeless as in still life decoration, is detailed as in a scientific catalogue. For the most part the represented species live next to the coast or were bred by the Romans in the piscinae salsac or in ponds. It is possible to recognize the rock mullet (mullus sunnuletus) and the mud one (mullus barbatu4 the scorpion fish (scorpoena) the dentex (dentex dentex), the aguglia (belone agus) the dolphin (delphinus delphis) and the golden mullet (lire curate).
  • Gothic altarpiece dedicated to St Vincent by Bernat Martorell circa 1483-1440 in Barcelona, tempera and gold lef on wood from the Parish church of St Vincent of menarguens, Noguera, Spain. At the top of the central panels of the altar tryptic, replacing the traditional Calvery scene, can be seen in the centre the Virgin of Mercy and kneeling to the left is Sant Benet de Bages, in black, and to the right St. Bernard of Clairvaux, patron saint of thr Benedictine and Cistercian orders . Below this is a depiction of St Vincent and either side are scenes of the Mardom of Vincent. Along the bottom are scenes from the Passion of Christ, with Judas in a yellow tunic kissing Christ and a furious Peter cutting off the ear of Malcus. National Museum of Catalan Art (MNAC), Barcelona, Spain, inv 15797. Against a black background.
  • Gothic altarpiece dedicated to St Vincent by Bernat Martorell circa 1483-1440 in Barcelona, tempera and gold leaf on wood from the Parish church of St Vincent of menarguens, Noguera, Spain. At the top of the central panels of the altar tryptic, replacing the traditional Calvary scene, can be seen in the centre the Virgin of Mercy and kneeling to the left is Sant Benet de Bages, in black, and to the right St. Bernard of Clairvaux, patron saint of thr Benedictine and Cistercian orders . Below this is a depiction of St Vincent and either side are scenes of the Mardom of Vincent. Along the bottom are scenes from the Passion of Christ, with Judas in a yellow tunic kissing Christ and a furious Peter cutting off the ear of Malcus. National Museum of Catalan Art (MNAC), Barcelona, Spain, inv 15797
  • Close up of an end of 7th to start of 6th century B.C Etruscan lid in the shape of a head of a Canopo style vase, used to hold funereal ashes from Chiusi, inv 94610, National Archaeological Museum Florence, Italy , black background
  • Detail of the Roman fresco wall painting of all the characters in the story of Admetus who, aided by Apollo made the Fates agree not to take Admetus on his 'death day' if he could find someone else to replace him, his wife, Alcestis, dies instead of Admetus but as she decends into the Underworld he discovers that he no longer wants to live without her, Pompeii House of the Tragic Poet, inv 9026, Naples National Archaeological Museum, grey background
  • Roman bust of Socrates, 1st cent AD from the construction site of the monument to Vitorio Emanuel II,  Rome, Italy. This portrait of Socrates is similar to the Herm of Socrates from the Naples National Museum. In xenophon’s Symposium socrates is described as ‘Short body with wide shoulders, prominent belly, aquiline nose, thick wide mouth and head almost completely bold. In 399 BC the famous Athenian philosopher was condemned to death for impiety and corruption. Inv 1236, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman bust of Socrates, 1st cent AD from the construction site of the monument to Vitorio Emanuel II,  Rome, Italy. This portrait of Socrates is similar to the Herm of Socrates from the Naples National Museum. In xenophon’s Symposium socrates is described as ‘Short body with wide shoulders, prominent belly, aquiline nose, thick wide mouth and head almost completely bold. In 399 BC the famous Athenian philosopher was condemned to death for impiety and corruption. Inv 1236, National Roman Museum, Rome.
  • Roman decoration panels that covered the end of the beams from a Roman ship, from the age of Calligula, 37-41 AD, made from bronze. The forearms were used to ward off evil the extended gesture was meant to keep danger away.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Roman Portrait bust of Roman Emperor Nerva, circa  96 to 98 AD excavated from Tivoli. Marcus Cocceius Nerva Caesar Augustus was Roman Emperor from 96 to 98 AD. On 18 September 96 AD Domitian was assassinated and Nerva became Emperor  at the age of sixty-five after a lifetime of imperial service under Nero and the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Emperor Claudius About to vanquish Britanica from Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Naked warrior Claudius id about to deliver the death blow to Britanica.   From The South Building, Rooms 1-3, Mythological Releifs.
  • Roman Sarcophagus with detailed relief sculptured panels with battle scenes. This large sarcophagus which was found in 1931 near the Tiburtina, in the eastern suburbs of the ancient city, shows on its front a symbolic battle, staged on two levels. This composition focuses on the progress of the Roman horseman, depicted in the guise of a universal victor, in a melee of soldiers, spears and horses; the Romans are delivering savage blows, devastating their enemies. The bloody scenes are framed by two pairs of enslaved barbarians, whose afflicted demeanour expresses the suffering which comes to those who rebel against the dominion of Rome. The dramatic animation of the combat emphasised by the deep chiaroscuro obtained by a skilful feat of carving. The low relief on the sides of the sarcophagus shows events subsequent to the encounter; on one side barbarian prisoners cross the river on the other chiefs submit to the Roman officials. The freeze on the lid, between two corner masks, celebrates the dead man and his wife, presented in the centre is the act of ‘dextarum iunctio’; on the left, the women exercises her ‘virtue’ in the house, educating her children; on the right, the, after his warlike activities, receives his 'clementia'. The faces of the principle characters remain incomplete, awaiting the carving of the features of the dead people. The decoration of the sarcophagus, inspired by many scenes on the Antonine Column, can be dated to around 180AD. The military insignia represented on the upper edge of the casket - the eagle of the Legio III Flavia and the boar of the Legio I Itlaica - enable us perhaps to identify the dead man as Aurelius Iulius Pompilius, an official of Marcus Aurelius in command of two cavalry squadron on detachment to those two legions during the war against Marcomanni (1720-175AD). National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • 2nd century AD Roman marble sculpture of Pan teaching Daphnis to play the pipes, a Roman copy late 2nd century BC Hellenistic Geek original attributed to Rodes sculptor Heliodoros. Pan's and Daphnis' heads and Daphnis' right arm are restorations.  The Farnese collection, Naples Museum of Archaeology, Italy
  • Apse of Saint Peter de la Seu d'Urgell<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the twelfth century<br />
Fresco transferred to canvas<br />
From the church of St. Peter currently dedicated to St. Michael and St. Peter Cathedral group of Seu d'Urgell (Alt Urgell)<br />
<br />
Acquisition of the Museum Board Campaign 1919-1923<br />
MNAC 15867<br />
<br />
<br />
The apse is the most important part of the church as it was where the altar was located. The apse of La Seu d'Urgell like most Romanesque apses was decorated with frescoes of a Theophany (referring to images of the Incarnation of Jesus).High up in the semi circular cupola of the apse is a large image of Christ in Majesty, or Christ Pantocrator, in a mandorla, a pointed verticle oval shaped aureola which surrounds the figures of Christ and the Virgin Mary in traditional Christian art.  This is flanked by Tetramorph showing the four evangelical symbols - St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle. In the middle register is are a series of  frescoes of the Apostles and the figure of Mary. The lower register, which has not been preserved, must have been painted curtains that imitated luxury fabrics.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 372
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 371 
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. The sculpture here changes the pattern by raising the right arm to the neck, rather than making her arm cross her chest, this flattens the composition.
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century Imperial Roman Marble Statue from Italy. Louvre Museum, Paris. Cat No MR 371 
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts. The sculpture here changes the pattern by raising the right arm to the neck, rather than making her arm cross her chest, this flattens the composition.
  • Aphrodite of Fréjus in the style known as "Venus Genetrix". A 1.64m high Roman statue, dating from the end of the 1st century BC to the start of the 1st century AD, in Parian marble, was discovered at Fréjus (Forum Julii) in 1650. It is considered as the best Roman copy of the lost Greek work. Louvre Museum, Paris<br />
<br />
The Venus Genetrix style of statue depicts Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) as Genetrix ( Latin for Mother). This sculptural type was adopted by the Julia-Claudian dynasty after Julius Caesar claimed that he was defended from Venus herself.  The original lost Greek statue is attributed to Greek sculpture Callimachus who created a Bronze Aphrodite in 420-410. According to Pliny's Natural History showing her dressed in a light but clinging chiton or peplos, which was lowered on the left shoulder to reveal her left breast and hung down in a sheer face and decoratively carved so as not to hide the outlines of the woman's body. Venus was depicted holding the apple won in the Judgement of Paris in her left hand, whilst her right hand moved to cover her head. From the lost bronze original are derived all surviving copies. The composition was frontal, the body's form monumental, and in the surviving Roman replicas its proportions are close to the Polyclitean, an ancient Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth century BC.
  • The Venus of Arles (  Greek Goddess Aphrodite) is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) marble sculpture of Venus probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The style of the Venus of Arles, like the Venus de Milo, is not a fully nude figure both having draped clothes from the waist down. The first known example of a totally nude Venus is the 4th century BC  Aphrodite of Cnidus by.Praxiteles  The Venus of Arles was probably an earlier statue by Praxiteles known as the Aphrodite of Thespiae . <br />
The venus of Arles was found in 1651 by workmen digging a well in Arles. In 1681 it was given to Louis XIV to decorate the Galerie des Glaces of Versailles. The statue was moved to the Musée du Louvre after the French Revolution.
  • Statue of Puzur-Ishtar Shakkanakku  (military governor or prince c. 2050 BC)) of Mari appointed by the Akkad Kings. According to the inscription below the right hand above the hem of the garment , the sculpture was originally made as a votive gift. The name Puzar-Eshtar, Prince of Mari, is mentioned twice, but the figures headgear is the horned cap of a deity, the statue cannot depict the mortal prince. The clasped hands of the figure and the text make it certain that the statue once belonged to the inventory of a temple, but where the temple stood is not known, despite the mention of Mari in the title of the prince. Like many other monuments, the statue was looted from its original site in Mari and the body was was discovered in the museum of Nebuchadrezzar’s palace at Babylon (604-562 BC). This oversized statue is one of the few large preserved sculptures of the Near East. The head was broken from the body in antiquity and both pieces survived separately. The excavated body was taken to the Istanbul Museum and an exchange of casts with the Pergamon Mus The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the head from the Pergamon Museum meant that the statue could be reassembled. The Vorderasiatisches Museum, part of the Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Roman statue in the nude hero style of Emperor Antoninus Pius, 138-161 AD. Titus Fulvius Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, also known as Antoninus, was Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii.[3]<br />
He acquired the name Pius after his accession to the throne, either because he compelled the Senate to deify his adoptive father Hadrian, or because he had saved senators sentenced to death by Hadrian in his later years. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare Greek bronze statue known as the Hellenistic Prince, a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze, one of the few in existence.  The figure is leaning with its left arm on a long shaft, a modern replica of the original bronze spear. The head clearly shows that the artist intended it as a portrait as it is proportionally smaller than the rest of the body. The letter L. VI.P.L.XXIIX, later incised on the abdomen are inventory numbers that included the statue in the catalogue of works of art present in Rome during the Republican period. Records of the catalogue (Tabulae) ere kept in the Tabulatium archives on the Capitoline Hill. The figure is represented in heroic nudity and is a copy of a famous statue by Lysippus (371-305 BC) of Alexander the Great. The statue is considered to depict a Hellenistic Prince, possibly an early portrait of Attalus II, King of Pergamon. More recent interpretations take into account the realistic facial features and consider the work to be a portrait of a Roman who had ties to the Greek world and wished to be represented as a Hellenistic Prince. This is a rare example of a 2nd cent BC Hellenistic bronze statue  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman head sculpture in the ‘Italic cubism ‘ style, 2nd - 3rd century BC, found in the foundations of the Ministery of Finance on the via XX Septembre, Rome. The head, the back of which was not completed, shows markedly realistic, clear features. The style, a blend of Greek art and Italic traditions, is traceable to Etruscan portraiture of the so called ‘Italic cubism’ of the 3rd century BC, and local stone used was well suited to this genre. It is believed to be the only known example of this style and has been roughly dated to between the 3rd and 2nd century BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman head sculpture in the ‘Italic cubism ‘ style, 2nd - 3rd century BC, found in the foundations of the Ministery of Finance on the via XX Septembre, Rome. The head, the back of which was not completed, shows markedly realistic, clear features. The style, a blend of Greek art and Italic traditions, is traceable to Etruscan portraiture of the so called ‘Italic cubism’ of the 3rd century BC, and local stone used was well suited to this genre. It is believed to be the only known example of this style and has been roughly dated to between the 3rd and 2nd century BC. The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Bust of Greek Philosopher Plato. A  2nd century AD Roman sculpture in marble. In  423-348 BC Greek sculptor Silanion created a bronze bust of Plato to adorn the gardens of the Acadamy in Athens, at the request of Persia Mithridite, according to Diogenes Laertius (De Vitis Philosophorum III, 25 citing Memorabilia Favorinus ). This Roman copy of the Greek original can be identified by the la two letters of “Plato” inscribed on it.  Inv MR 415   (or Ma 2654), The Louvre Mueum, Paris.
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Sleeping Hermaphroditus, The Borghese Hermaphrodite.  A Life size ancient 2nd century AD Roman statue sculpted in Greek Marble and found in the grounds of Santa Maria della Vittoria, near the Baths of Diocletian, Rome. It was added to the Borghese Collection by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, in the 17th century and was named the "Borghese Hermaphroditus”. It was later sold to the occupying French and was removed it to The Louvre. Hermaphrodite, son of Hermes and Aphrodite had repels the advances of the nymph Salmacis. However, she got Zeus as their two bodies are united in a bisexual being. The Sleeping Hermaphroditus has been described as a good early Imperial Roman copy of a bronze original by the later of the two Hellenistic sculptors named Polycles (150 BC) the original bronze was mentioned in Pliny's Natural History. In 1619  Bernini sculpted the mattress on which the ancient marble of Hermaphrodite lies. Louvre Museum, Paris
  • Ariadne sleeping a 2nd century AD Marble Roman statue from Italy. The girl is lying asleep on a rock and is a variation of the famous Sleeping Ariadne of the Vatican museum whose composition is reversed. in Greek mythology Ariadne was the daughter of Minos, King of Crete  and his queen Pasiphaë, daughter of Helios . When Thesius was sent to Crete to be sacrificed to the Minateur Ariadne fell in love at first sight, and helped him by giving him a sword and a ball of thread, so that he could find his way out of the Minotaur's labyrinth. She eloped with Theseus after he achieved his goal, and in most accounts of the myth, Theseus abandoned Ariadne sleeping on Naxos, and Dionysus rediscovered and wedded her. This Roman  Sculpture was inspired  by a Greek original of the 2nd century AD. inv MR 311 ( or Ma 340 ), Louvre Museum Paris
  • Crouching Aphrodite (Venus). 2nd Century  Roman Marble Statue from Marmol. Cordoba Archaeological Museum, Spain.
<br />
This sculpture  is a variation on the Classic Hellanistic 3rd to Ist century BC style of Aphrodite crouching to bathe. Aphrodite crouches with her right knee close to the ground, turns her head to the right as if looking at somebody and, in most versions, reaches her right arm over to her left shoulder to cover her breasts.
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • The Venus of Arles (  Greek Goddess Aphrodite) is a 1.94-metre-high (6.4 ft) marble sculpture of Venus probably a copy of the Aphrodite of Thespiae by 4th century BC Greek Athenian sculpture Praxiteles . Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The style of the Venus of Arles, like the Venus de Milo, is not a fully nude figure both having draped clothes from the waist down. The first known example of a totally nude Venus is the 4th century BC  Aphrodite of Cnidus by.Praxiteles  The Venus of Arles was probably an earlier statue by Praxiteles known as the Aphrodite of Thespiae . <br />
The venus of Arles was found in 1651 by workmen digging a well in Arles. In 1681 it was given to Louis XIV to decorate the Galerie des Glaces of Versailles. The statue was moved to the Musée du Louvre after the French Revolution.
  • Apse of Saint Peter de la Seu d'Urgell<br />
<br />
Second quarter of the twelfth century<br />
Fresco transferred to canvas<br />
From the church of St. Peter currently dedicated to St. Michael and St. Peter Cathedral group of Seu d'Urgell (Alt Urgell)<br />
<br />
Acquisition of the Museum Board Campaign 1919-1923<br />
MNAC 15867<br />
<br />
<br />
The apse is the most important part of the church as it was where the altar was located. The apse of La Seu d'Urgell like most Romanesque apses was decorated with frescoes of a Theophany (referring to images of the Incarnation of Jesus).High up in the semi circular cupola of the apse is a large image of Christ in Majesty, or Christ Pantocrator, in a mandorla, a pointed verticle oval shaped aureola which surrounds the figures of Christ and the Virgin Mary in traditional Christian art.  This is flanked by Tetramorph showing the four evangelical symbols - St Matthew the man, St Mark the lion, St Luke the ox, and John the eagle. In the middle register is are a series of  frescoes of the Apostles and the figure of Mary. The lower register, which has not been preserved, must have been painted curtains that imitated luxury fabrics.
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the Life of St Lubin . Central panel shows A barrel of wine being transported to the Cathedral, below left - The young Lubin working as a shepherd, below right - A monk gives Lubin a belt with the alphabet written on it, above left - Lubin receiving instruction from a cleric, above right - Lubin spends his spare time learning to read, while his companion idles.  Cental bottom semi circle - wine cryers, above left -a procession, above right - a procession of laymen and clerics.  A UNESCO World Heritage Site..
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the life of Eustace . Central panel shows act 2 ?the Tragedy and Exile? , central diamond - After various disasters, Eustace and his family abandon their home. Top Right - possibly Eustace negotiating passage to Egypt , top right - Eustace and his family board a boat to Egypt.  Bottom left from act one ?the Conversion:?- Placidus hears the words of Christ coming from the mouth of a stag, right - Placidus is baptised and given the name 'Eustace'. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval Windows  of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France, dedicated to the life an miracles of St Nicholas. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. Bottom corner shows During a famine, Nicholas persuades sailors to give the town some grain, bottom left shows The sailors bringing grain ashore . Centre panel bottom, The young St Nicholas does well at school, left Nicholas secretly gives gold to an old man to save his daughters , right The old man tries to thank Nicholas, who humbly flees from him, top .Nicholas is chosen to be the new Bishop of Myra.  .
  • Marble Releif Sculptures from the frieze around the Parthenon Block XXXVII to XLI  100 to 114 . From the Parthenon of the Acropolis Athens. A British Museum Exhibit known as The Elgin Marbles
  • The 1st cent B.C Terrace Temple dedicated to Zeus Soteros  and round sanctuary dating back to the 5th cent B.C and dedicated to the god King Basileus Kaunios, the son of Apollo’s son Miletos and the water nymph Kyanee, . Archaeological site of  Kaunos (Caunos), Dalyan Turkey
  • Greek Classical Period Bronze Statue of Zeus or Poseidon found in the sea of Cape Artemision of the north Eastern Euboea Island, Greece.  The God is shown in a great stride about to throw either a trident of a thunderbolt that is now missing from his right hand. The statue is one of the only preserved statues of the preserved style with exquisite rendering of motion & anatomy. The identity of the statue is controversial and is probably more likely to be Zeus rather than Poseidon. 460 BC Ref No X15161 Athens Archaeological Museum
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • Lanyon Quoit is a megalithic burial dolmen from the Neolithic period, circa 4000 to 3000 BC, near Morvah on the Penwith peninsula, Cornwall, England
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • Ancient Egyptian head rest for sleeping on, type 1 . Egyptian Museum, Turin. White background.<br />
<br />
Ancient egyptian headrests were used to raise the head whist sleeping. Padding was laid over the wooden headrest to make it more comfortable.
  • Ancient Egyptian head rest for sleeping on, type 1 . Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background<br />
<br />
Ancient egyptian headrests were used to raise the head whist sleeping. Padding was laid over the wooden headrest to make it more comfortable.
  • Ancient Egyptian bed delonging to Kha , tomb of Kha, Theban Tomb 8 , mid-18th dynasty (1550 to 1292 BC), Turin Egyptian Museum. <br />
<br />
According to excavator Shciaparelli " the beds were found in Kcha's tomb also. The larger one, his own, was found in the antechamber." Egyptians believed that in the Afterlife they would require the same comforts as they enjoyed in life so beds and many other worldly requirements were put into their tombs.
  • Ancient Egyptian bed delonging to Kha , tomb of Kha, Theban Tomb 8 , mid-18th dynasty (1550 to 1292 BC), Turin Egyptian Museum. <br />
<br />
According to excavator Shciaparelli " the beds were found in Kcha's tomb also. The larger one, his own, was found in the antechamber." Egyptians believed that in the Afterlife they would require the same comforts as they enjoyed in life so beds and many other worldly requirements were put into their tombs.
  • Ancient Egyptian bed delonging to Kha , tomb of Kha, Theban Tomb 8 , mid-18th dynasty (1550 to 1292 BC), Turin Egyptian Museum. <br />
<br />
According to excavator Shciaparelli " the beds were found in Kcha's tomb also. The larger one, his own, was found in the antechamber." Egyptians believed that in the Afterlife they would require the same comforts as they enjoyed in life so beds and many other worldly requirements were put into their tombs.
  • Egyptian Roman mummy portrait or Fayum mummy portrait painted panel of a man, Roman Period, 1st to 3rd cent AD, Egypt. Egyptian Museum, Turin. White background.<br />
<br />
Mummy portraits or Fayum mummy portraits (also Faiyum mummy portraits) are a type of naturalistic painted portrait on wooden boards attached to Upper class mummies from Roman Egypt. They belong to the tradition of panel painting, one of the most highly regarded forms of art in the Classical world. he portraits covered the faces of bodies that were mummified for burial. Extant examples indicate that they were mounted into the bands of cloth that were used to wrap the bodies.
  • Egyptian Roman mummy portrait or Fayum mummy portrait painted panel of a man, Roman Period, 1st to 3rd cent AD, Egypt. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background;<br />
<br />
Mummy portraits or Fayum mummy portraits (also Faiyum mummy portraits) are a type of naturalistic painted portrait on wooden boards attached to Upper class mummies from Roman Egypt. They belong to the tradition of panel painting, one of the most highly regarded forms of art in the Classical world. he portraits covered the faces of bodies that were mummified for burial. Extant examples indicate that they were mounted into the bands of cloth that were used to wrap the bodies.
  • Egyptian Roman mummy portrait or Fayum mummy portrait painted panel of a man, Roman Period, 1st to 3rd cent AD, Egypt. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Black background,<br />
<br />
Mummy portraits or Fayum mummy portraits (also Faiyum mummy portraits) are a type of naturalistic painted portrait on wooden boards attached to Upper class mummies from Roman Egypt. They belong to the tradition of panel painting, one of the most highly regarded forms of art in the Classical world. he portraits covered the faces of bodies that were mummified for burial. Extant examples indicate that they were mounted into the bands of cloth that were used to wrap the bodies.
  • Egyptian Roman mummy portrait or Fayum mummy portrait painted panel of a man, Roman Period, 1st to 3rd cent AD, Egypt. Egyptian Museum, Turin. Grey background;<br />
<br />
Mummy portraits or Fayum mummy portraits (also Faiyum mummy portraits) are a type of naturalistic painted portrait on wooden boards attached to Upper class mummies from Roman Egypt. They belong to the tradition of panel painting, one of the most highly regarded forms of art in the Classical world. he portraits covered the faces of bodies that were mummified for burial. Extant examples indicate that they were mounted into the bands of cloth that were used to wrap the bodies.
  • Ancient Egyptian decorated mari ware, class D, baked clay, Predynastic Period, Naqada II Protodynastic Period (3700-300 BC). Egyptian Museum, Turin. White background.<br />
<br />
Mari was a new raw material used to make vases from Naqada II onwards. The material was a marl of rich clay found in some ancient Egyptian desert site which was pulverised and mixed with water. Typically the pottery had a rosy sinish when fired making a good background for painted motifs.
  • Ancient Egyptian decorated mari ware, class D, baked clay, Predynastic Period, Naqada II Protodynastic Period (3700-300 BC). Egyptian Museum, Turin. Black background,<br />
<br />
Mari was a new raw material used to make vases from Naqada II onwards. The material was a marl of rich clay found in some ancient Egyptian desert site which was pulverised and mixed with water. Typically the pottery had a rosy sinish when fired making a good background for painted motifs.
  • Ancient Egyptian  decorated jar sealed with linen , tomb of Kha, Theban Tomb 8 , mid-18th dynasty (1550 to 1292 BC), Turin Egyptian Museum. White background<br />
<br />
TT8 or Theban Tomb 8 was the tomb of Kha, the overseer of works from Deir el-Medina in the mid-18th dynasty[2] and his wife, Merit. TT8 was one of the greatest archaeological discoveries of ancient Egypt, one of few tombs of nobility to survive intact.
  • Ancient Egyptian  decorated jar sealed with linen , tomb of Kha, Theban Tomb 8 , mid-18th dynasty (1550 to 1292 BC), Turin Egyptian Museum. <br />
<br />
TT8 or Theban Tomb 8 was the tomb of Kha, the overseer of works from Deir el-Medina in the mid-18th dynasty[2] and his wife, Merit. TT8 was one of the greatest archaeological discoveries of ancient Egypt, one of few tombs of nobility to survive intact.

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